Floyd W. Hayes, III

Senior Lecturer, Center for Africana Studies

410-516-7659
fwhayes3@jhu.edu

Biography
Publications
Books

Dr. Floyd W. Hayes III is a senior lecturer and coordinator of programs and undergraduate studies in the Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University. During the fall 2008 semester, he was scholar-in-residence in African and African American studies and the African American Cultural Center at Towson University. He earned his PhD degree in government and politics at the University of Maryland with the dissertation entitled “Division and Conflict in Postindustrial Politics: The Politics of Educational Policymaking in Montgomery County, Maryland.” Dr. Hayes received an MA degree in African area studies from the University of California at Los Angeles and a BA degree in French and political science from North Carolina Central University. He received the Certificat d’Etudes in French from the University of Paris. He has taught at a number of universities, including North Carolina State University, Purdue University, San Diego State University, Cornell University, Morgan State University, the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Princeton University, Swarthmore College, and the University of California at Los Angeles.

Dr. Hayes’s teaching and research interests include Africana politics and political philosophy, urban politics and public policy, educational policymaking and politics, jazz and politics, and politics and black popular culture.

Dr. Hayes is an amateur power lifter, and he holds Maryland State and national records.

He is the editor of A Turbulent Voyage: Readings in African American Studies, which is in its third edition. He has contributed numerous chapters to books and anthologies, including the following: “Hope and Disappointment in Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Political Theology: Eclipse of the Liberal Spirit,” in The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King, edited by Robert Birt; “Programmed Retardation,” in International Encyclopedia of Social Sciences, 2nd Edition, edited by William A. Darity, Jr.; “A Way of Remembering the Black Panther Party in the Post-Black Power Era: Resentment, Disaster, and Disillusionment, in Comrades: A Local History of The Black Panther Party, edited by Judson L. Jeffries; “US Does Not Mean United Slaves,” in Black Power in the Belly of the Beast, edited by Judson L. Jeffries; “Politics of Knowledge: Black Policy Professionals in the Managerial Age,” in A Companion to African American Studies, edited by Lewis and Jane Gordon; “African Americans: An Overview,” in Encyclopedia of American Studies, edited by George T. Kurian, Miles Orvell, Johnnella E. Butler, and Jay Mechling; “Cornel West and Afro-Nihilism: A Reconsideration,” in Cornel West: A Critical Reader, edited by George Yancy; “All Power to the People: The Political Thought of Huey P. Newton and the Black Panther Party,” in The Black Panther Party Reconsidered, edited by Charles E. Jones; “The Concept of Double Vision in Richard Wright’s The Outsider: Fragmented Blackness in the Age of Nihilism,” in Existence in Black: An Anthology of Black Existential Philosophy, edited by Lewis R. Gordon; “Fanon, Oppression, and Resentment: The Black Experience in the United States,” in Fanon: A Critical Reader, edited by Lewis R. Gordon, T. Denean Sharpely-Whiting, and Renee T. White; and “Government Retreat, the Dispossessed, and the Politics of African American Self-Reliant Development,” in African Americans and the New Policy Consensus: Retreat of the Liberal State?, edited by Marilyn E. Lashely and Melanie Njeri Jackson.

Professor Hayes wrote the Foreword to Judson L. Jeffries’ book, Virginia’s Native Son: The Election and Administration of Governor L. Douglas Wilder. Articles by Professor Hayes appear in Black Renaissance Noire; Valley Voices: A Literary Review; Spectrum: A Journal on Black Men; The Journal of African American History; The American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and the Black Experience; The Griot; The Negro Educational Review; The Black Scholar; Urban Education; The Western Journal of Black Studies; The Journal of Black Studies; The Journal of Ethnic Studies; Explorations in Ethnic Studies; Explorations in Sights and Sounds; and Black World. Currently, Dr. Hayes is working on a book, entitled Domination and Ressentiment: the Desperate Vision of Richard Wright, which examines Wright’s social and political thought.