Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

AS.100.356 - W.E.B. Du Bois and the Problem of the Color-Line

This seminar will introduce students to the ideas and legacy of the renowned American scholar, journalist, and activist, W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963), asking students to locate Du Bois in his historical context and in our own. Through readings and discussions of his key works in various forms, we will assess Du Bois’s impact on major debates in American politics, African-American affairs, and academic disciplines like sociology and history. We will track changes in Du Bois thinking over time, including in his views of racism, class, gender, liberalism, radicalism, imperialism, and war. Finally, we will consider the ways in which Du Bois's work continues to shape our understanding of these issues and debates in contemporary American society.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Brann, Allon Y
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 12:00PM
Status: Canceled

AS.362.590 - Independent Study for Africana Studies

Credits: 3.00
Instructor:
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.362.595 - Summer Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor:
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.362.590 - Independent Study for Africana Studies

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.100.356 - W.E.B. Du Bois and the Problem of the Color-Line

This seminar will introduce students to the ideas and legacy of the renowned American scholar, journalist, and activist, W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963), asking students to locate Du Bois in his historical context and in our own. Through readings and discussions of his key works in various forms, we will assess Du Bois’s impact on major debates in American politics, African-American affairs, and academic disciplines like sociology and history. We will track changes in Du Bois's thinking over time, including in his views of racism, class, gender, liberalism, radicalism, imperialism, and war. Finally, we will consider the ways in which Du Bois's work continues to shape our understanding of these issues and debates in contemporary American society.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Brann, Allon Y
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.180.252 - Economics of Discrimination

This course examines labor market discrimination by gender, race and ethnicity in the United States. What does the empirical evidence show, and how can we explain it? How much of the difference in observed outcomes is driven by differences in productivity characteristics and how much is due to discrimination? How have economists theorized about discrimination and what methodologies can be employed to test those theories? What has been the impact of public policy in this area; how do large corporations and educational institutions respond; and what can we learn from landmark lawsuits? The course will reinforce skills relevant to all fields of applied economics, including critical evaluation of the theoretical and empirical literature, the reasoned application of statistical techniques, and analysis of current policy issues. Seniors by Permission Only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Barbara Anne
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.100.376 - The Haitian Revolution in Global Perspective

This course situates the events of the Haitian Revolution in a global context, from its origins to its lasting effects and historical memory.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Gaffield, Meredith Michelle
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Canceled

AS.130.400 - Introduction to Middle Egyptian

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read. Course meets with AS.133.600.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jasnow, Richard
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Approval Required

AS.180.355 - Economics of Poverty/Inequality

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Moffitt, Robert A
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Canceled

AS.190.339 - American Racial Politics

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.214

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spence, Lester
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 3:30PM
Status: Open

AS.211.394 - Brazilian Culture & Civilization

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.100.323 - America in the 1960s

The years between 1959, when the course begins, and 1971, when it ends, were tumultuous and divisive. This course explores the political, racial, and cultural struggles of a half century ago.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Walters, Ronald
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.100.123 - Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Larson, Pier M
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.210.391 - Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature I

This third-year course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will read two complete works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers each semester, followed by intense writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Prereq: 210.278 or placement test. Permission required

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Rosa, Elis Piera, Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.211.394 - Brazilian Culture & Civilization

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Approval Required

AS.230.205 - Introduction to Social Statistics

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Grigg, Jeffrey Alexander
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Closed

AS.362.112 - Introduction to Africana Studies

Introduction to the core concepts, theories, cultural and intellectual production across the black diaspora. Antiracist, queer, and insurgent black thought welcome here.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Johnson, Jessica Marie
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.230.385 - Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.313 - Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing

Is a neighborhood just a grouping of individuals living in the same place, or do neighborhoods have collective meanings and impacts on children and families? We will capitalize on research methodologies used to define and describe neighborhoods and their effects on economic and educational outcomes. These include case studies, census data, surveys, quasi/experimental data. Focus is on how research measures neighborhood effects and incorporates community level processes into models of social causation (e.g., social capital/control, community efficacy, civic engagement). Also examined: patterns in residential mobility, segregation, and preferences within black and white populations; development of housing policy in the U.S.; programs to determine how neighborhoods affect issues of social importance. Statistics and public policy background is helpful but not required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.362.510 - Senior Honors in Africana Studies I

The first semester of Senior Honors in Africana Studies, conducted as an Independent Study. Interested students should submit an application to the CAS Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.362.219 - Freshman Seminar: Black Narratives and the Archive

This course will explore the various ways black people have narrated stories. From the slave narrative to fiction, biography to oral history, we will consider the relationship between historical events and the stories that people tell about those events. Where does history and imagination meet in the telling? How does one weave together story material to give it shape? While we will spend the first half of the semester engaging published and more popular narratives about black life, the second half of the course will focus on interviewing and archiving the stories of black workers and staff at JHU. What kinds of stories do they tell? How do they tell them? What do their stories help us understand about the past? Ultimately, this course will concern itself with what it means to be black and the various ways everyday people and artists alike have attempted to narrate their experiences in both writing and oral forms.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mott, Shani
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.362.413 - African American Representations in the Western

The course will investigate American cinematic representations of African Americans, slavery (and more specifically its absence), the Civil War, and racial formation along the United States’ southwestern frontier in films produced from the 1950s through the contemporary period. The course closely examines American cinematic fantasies of the western frontier, frontier violence and the desire to escape or erase the tensions of race and slavery that have deeply permeated the American cultural consciousness, strongly shaping the production of American masculine ideals. The course will also take decided note of the national shift from liberal “Great Society Programs” of the 1960s to the conservative “neoliberal” social and cultural ideals in the 1980s and 1990s. Our purpose is to consider the organization and reformation of hegemonic power by way of the complex morality play the western film evokes, typically considering the interstitial geographies between blackness and whiteness, civilization and savagery, belonging and alienation, and metropolis and colonial outpost. We will privilege in our discussions the contested frontiers of racial dominion. Films include “Buck and the Preacher,” “The Battle of Algiers,” “Sgt. Rutledge,” and “Django Unchained.”

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.362.305 - Black Periodical Studies

This course explores the ways in which nineteenth- and twentieth-century black periodical culture fostered (and, at times, hampered) the literary and cultural production of the African diaspora. Authors will likely include Frederick Douglass, “Ethiop (William J. Wilson),” Frances E.W. Harper, Pauline Hopkins, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Richard Bruce Nugent, and others.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.362.160 - " Land, Labour and Environmental Rights and Struggles in Contemporary Africa".

‘Africa rising’ has become an influential, albeit contested, narrative used by institutions like the International Monetary Fund and World Economic Forum to describe the rapid economic growth in 21st century Africa. This rapid ‘economic growth has been accompanied by another type of ‘Africa Rising’ – a mushrooming of social protest and popular uprisings across the continent. The course will introduce important theoretical perspectives, debates, and examples to equip students to critically examine contemporary social dynamics through the interconnected themes of land, labor and environmental rights and struggles that have gripped the African continent. What has given rise to these awakenings? Who are the actors involved in these actions? What are their demands and strategies? What lessons does it hold for social movement theory and development more broadly? The first section focuses on land reclamation movements, the new wave of ‘land grabs’ and responses from below. The second section presents the role of labour movements and its intersection with popular uprisings. The third section considers responses from communities and movements to the ecological destruction and climate change.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jacobs, Ricado Eduard
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.362.314 - Police and Prisons in Comparative Perspective

This course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of two parts. First, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Second, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.316 - African American Family

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: McDonald, Katrina Bell
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.230.205 - Introduction to Social Statistics

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Grigg, Jeffrey Alexander
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.362.203 - Passing in American Culture

This course will examine film and literary narratives of “passing” in 20th century America. We will study texts that feature people who cross social boundaries of race, class, sexuality, and gender, and consider what “passing” reveals about American social mobility.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Mott, Shani
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.230.244 - Race and Ethnicity in American Society

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Greif, Meredith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only