East Asian Studies Speakers Series

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Spring 2014

  
Friday
Feburary 7
12:00-1:30pm

Mergenthaler 266

JHU-Homewood

Ryan Sayre

"Externalizing Vigilance: The Political Aesthetics of Coastal Fortifications in Post-Tsunami Japan"


Instructor
East Asian Studies Program
Johns Hopkins University

Cosponsor: The Department of Anthropology

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Thursday
Feburary 20
12:00-1:30pm

Mergenthaler 266

JHU-Homewood

Emily Hannum
"
Can the Early Educational Experience be Pro-mobility? Early School Transition and Pro-Mobility Outcomes in Young Adulthood in China's Poor Rural Communities"

Associate Professor of Sociology
Education Chair, Graduate Group in Sociology
University of Pennsylvania

Cosponsored by the Department of Sociology

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Monday
Feburary 24
12:00-1:30pm

Mergenthaler 366

JHU-Homewood

Jae-Jung Suh
"Nationalist Identities at Clash? Historical Disputes in Northeast Asia "

Associate Professor
Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced Intl. Studies (SAIS)
Johns Hopkins University

Sponsored by the Department of Political Science

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Friday
Feburary 28
10:00am-5:30pm

Shriver Clipper Room

JHU-Homewood

Symposium on Public Health in Asia


Co-sponsored by Public Health Studies & The Environment, Energy, Sustainability & Health Institute

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Tuesday
March 11
4:30-6:00pm

Mergenthaler 266

JHU-Homewood

Workshop on US - Japan Relations with Weston Konishi

Chief Operating Officer
Peace Winds America
(A Disaster Preparedness and Response Organization)

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Thursday
March 13
4:15pm-6:00pm

Mergenthaler 366

JHU-Homewood

Kenneth McElwain

"Do Decentralized/Democratized Parties Redistribute Differently? Evidence from Japan and Western Europe"

Department of Political Science
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Sponsored by The Department of Political Science, Co-Sponsored by the East Asian Studies Program

 
  
   
 
   
Wednesday
March 26
12-1:30pm


Mergenthaler 266
JHU-Homewood

Yulia Frumer

"Hypothetical Navigation and Globalization of Time in Japan"

Assistant Professor
History of Science and Technology
Johns Hopkins University

Co-Sponsored by The Department of History and Technology

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Yulia Frumer is an Assistant Professor in the History of Science and Technology Department at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Frumer graduated from Princeton University in 2012 with Ph.Ds in History of Science and Japanese History, and held a post-doctoral fellowship at Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin in 2013. Previously, she held fellowships from the Japanese Government and the Japan Foundation, and was affiliated with International Center for Japanese Studies in Kyoto (Nichibunken), and the Tokyo University. Her research focuses on the cross-cultural exchange of scientific and technological ideas in nineteenth century Japan, and she is currently working on a book manuscript that deals with the transformation of Japanese timekeeping technology and the notions of time associated with it.   

   

Monday
March 31
12-1:30pm

Levering Great Hall
JHU-Homewood

Gail Hershatter

"The Gender of Memory: Travels in Disappearing Terrain"

Distinguished Professor
Department of History
University of California Santa Cruz

Co-sponsored by The Department of History and the Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality

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Gail Hershatter is an award-winning historian and Distinguished Professor of Honor at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research includes on the modern social and cultural history of China, and focuses particularly on the role of women during the revolutionary period of China. Dr. Hershatter was awarded the Guggenheim Fellowship in 2007 for "demonstrating exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts", and served as president of the Association for Asian Studies, the largest organization for Asia-focused research in the world, in 2011.

 
  
   

  
Tuesday
March 11
4:30-6:00pm

Mergenthaler 266

JHU-Homewood

Workshop on US - Japan Relations with Weston Konishi

Chief Operating Officer

Peace Winds America (Disaster Preparedness and Response)

   
Wednesday
March 26
12-1:30pm


Mergenthaler 266
JHU-Homewood

Yulia Frumer

"Hypothetical Navigation and Globalization of Time in Japan"

Assistant Professor

History of Science and Technology

Johns Hopkins University

 

Co-Sponsored by The Department of History and Technology

 
   

Monday
March 31
12-1:30pm

Levering Great Hall
JHU-Homewood

 

Gail Hershatter

"The Gender of Memory: Travels in Disappearing Terrain"

Distinguished Professor

Department of History

University of California Santa Cruz

Co-sponsored by The Department of History and the Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality

 
 
  
   
 
   

Thursday
April 22
4:00-6:00pm


Mergenthaler 266
JHU-Homewood

 

Atsushi Kondo

"Migrant Immigration Policy in Japan: MIPEX 2010 and 2013"

Faculty of Law, Mejio University
Visiting Scholar, Harvard Law School

Sponsored by RIC
Co-Sponsored by the East Asian Studies Program

   

Thursday
April 24
12:00-1:30pm


Mergenthaler 266
JHU-Homewood

Viren Murthy

"Rethinking Modern China as Resistance: From Zhang Taiyan to Japanese Sinology"

Assistant Professor
Department of History
University of Wisconsin - Madison

Co-Sponsored by The Department of History

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My work probes the historical conditions for the possibility of philosophy and politics in the modern world and in East Asia in particular.  I am generally interested in the attempts of East Asian intellectuals to resist modernity through reviving premodern philosophies and religions, such as Buddhism.  My first book, The Political Philosophy of Zhang Taiyan:  The Resistance of Consciousness, shows how in early 20th century China, Zhang Taiyan, drew on Consciousness-Only (Yogācāra) Buddhism to formulate a theory of revolution.  In particular, the book explains how this seemingly ancient body of knowledge is reformulated as China was incorporated into the global capitalist system of nation-states.  My more recent project, tentatively entitled, “Imagining Asia: Takeuchi Yoshimi and the Conundrums of Asian Modernity,” examines how philosophies of resistance intersect with visions of transnational identity and hopes for an alternative future.  The historical context for this second work continues to be the fundamental transformations in conceptions of space and time associated with spread of global capitalism and how such changes affect the way intellectuals in East Asia conceive of political alliances, strategies and futures.  In this context, the project not only concerns the manner in which Takeuchi re-imagines the politics of Asian identity, but also how such imaginaries relate to attempts to imagine a different world by Marxists in Japan and elsewhere in East Asia.  The project about Asianism also has an important contemporary dimension and in this context I interrogate the work of various proponents of Asianism, such as Baik Yong-soe,  Kuan-hsing Chen, Sun Ge and Wang Hui.