Spring Courses

View the individual course descriptions of all sections of Expository Writing on our course descriptions page.

Spring 2018 Courses

060.100 (H) (W) Introduction to Expository Writing

(3) Limit 10 per section.

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

Section Day/Time Instructor Title
01 MW 1:30-2:45 Evans Introduction to Expository Writing
02 MW 3:00-4:15 Evans Introduction to Expository Writing
03 TTH 9:00-10:15 Brodsky Introduction to Expository Writing
05 TTH 10:30-11:45 Brodsky Introduction to Expository Writing
060.114 (H) (W) Expository Writing

(3) Limit 15 per section.

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

Section Day/Time Instructor Title
01 MWF 10:00-10:50 Webber Balancing Freedom and Security
02 MWF 11:00-11:50 Flowers Medicine, East and West
03 MW 12:00-1:15 Lee Defying the Limits of Knowledge
04 MW 12:00-1:15 Oppel Law and Revenge
05 MW 1:30-2:45 Oppel Law and Revenge
06 MW 1:30-2:45 Giardini Science Fiction, Gender, and Sexuality
07 TTH 9:00-10:15 Guralp Understanding Scientific Explanation
08 TTH 9:00-10:15 Loker The Olympics and Politics
09 TTH 9:00-10:15 Lewis Revenge and Morality
10 TTH 10:30-11:45 Berger Contemporary American Short Stories
11 TTH 10:30-11:45 Sampson The Ethics of Spying & Surveillance in Film
12 TTH 10:30-11:45 O’Connor Violence and Macbeth
13 TTH 12:00-1:15 O’Connor Violence and Macbeth
14 TTH 12:00-1:15 Westcott The Challenge of Climate Change
15 TTH 12:00-1:15 Watters Family Matters
16 TTH 1:30-2:45 Watters Family Matters
17 TTH 1:30-2:45 Westcott The Challenge of Climate Change
18 TTH 1:30-2:45 Zecca American Gothic

View the individual course descriptions of all the sections of Expository Writing on our course descriptions page.

060.139 (H) (W) The Narrative Essay

(3) Limit 12 per section.

Telling stories is one of the first and most important ways that human beings try to make sense of the world and their experience of it. The narrative art informs fiction and nonfiction alike, is central to the writing of history, anthropology, crime reports and laboratory reports, sports stories and political documentaries. What happened? The answer may be imagined or factual, but it will almost certainly be narrative. This course focuses on the narrative essay, a nonfiction prose form that answers the question of “what happened” in a variety of contexts and aims to make sense not only of what happened but how and why. We will begin by summarizing narrative essays, will move to analyzing them, and in the second half of the course you will write two narrative essays of your own, the first based on a choice of topics and sources, the second of your own design. Authors may include James Baldwin, Frederick Douglass, Chang Rae Lee, Danielle Ofri, George Orwell, Richard Selzer, John Updike, and Abraham Verghese. You will learn the power of narrative to inform and persuade as you test that power in your own writing.

Section Day/Time Instructor Title
01 MW 1:30-2:45 Kain The Narrative Essay