Johns Hopkins Unversity
Great Books at Johns Hopkins
An introduction to the humanities at Johns Hopkins and an exploration of some of the Western world’s most important literary works of art.

Of Books, Bass Lines, and Bees

What do they have to do with Henry Purcell's
Dido and Aeneas
? Watch now and find out.
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What Students Are Saying:

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"Writing assignments allow strengthening and improvement of focus; discussion sections are open and dynamic; panels give various perspectives; online discussion boards if you are uncomfortable participating in class; exposure to a wide range of literary works; opera performances!"

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"In this class, students learn not only how to write an explication de texte (similar to close reading of a passage in a novel) at a college level but also get a taste of several different disciplines taught at Hopkins, including philosophy, music, and classical studies."

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"Heavy reading; interesting cross examination of very different texts with reference to each other.  This, in combination with professors from very different fields provides new insight into the readings."

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"Great Books offers a mix of different media to really immerse the students in the subject (i.e., scripts, operas, films, selected readings, discussions).  I really enjoyed this course and would recommend it."

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"Be prepared to read about 1 work a week.  If you enjoy the classics you will love this class."

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"Read many books, mostly from antiquity (Homer, Ovid, Virgil) and philosophy.  Get to hear operas and music theory (very interesting and different!).  Four different professors = four different perspectives, all very knowledgeable."

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"Reading intensive course with “Explication” style writing.  Exposure to different ideas and points of view from faculty from several different departments."

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"In this class, students learn not only how to write an explication de texte (similar to close reading of a passage in a novel) at a college level but also get a taste of several different disciplines taught at Hopkins, including philosophy, music, and classical studies."

 

 

 

 

 

 

Registration

This course is for first-year undergraduates.
Others wishing to enroll should contact
Prof. Elizabeth Patton (epatton1@jhu.edu)
to obtain a waiver.

To register, go to: www.jhu.edu/registrar

Description from course catalog:
360.133 | GREAT BOOKS: WESTERN TRADITION OR THE HUMANITIES: A TRADITION OF CLASSICS
(3 credits)

Instructors: Egginton/Patton/Giarusso
Great Books explores some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical tradition in Europe and the Americas. In lectures and panel sessions, professors from several academic disciplines introduce texts and then lead further discussion in small group sessions. Where appropriate, as in the Faust legend, Peabody resources allow comparison of the literary text and its operatic counterparts. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of Great Books at Hopkins, along with a reading list that begins with Homer’s Odyssey and continues to the modern period, varying each term based on faculty expertise.

Cross-listed with the Classics, Humanities Center, Music, Philosophy, and German and Romance Languages & Literatures.