Events

If you would like to submit an event to be AGHI-sponsored, please use our event request form.

Mar
24
Fri
JHU Humanities Ph.D. Speakers Series: Humanities at Work (featuring Phoebe Stein Davis)
Mar 24 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Mergenthaler 431 (AGHI conference room)

Join us to talk about and hear from humanities scholars who have translated their training into rewarding careers outside of academia.

Phoebe Stein Davis is the Executive Director of the Maryland Humanities Council. Before taking this position a year ago, Davis was with the Illinois Humanities Council (IHC) in Chicago for nearly ten years, where she was responsible for several major initiatives, including a highly successful effort to increase the national visibility of IHC and assisting in the creation and execution of IHC’s series of year-long public programs on race, advances in genetics, and environmental issues.

Wine and cheese included.

See more details and RSVP here https://jhu.joinhandshake.com/events/47988.

Mar
27
Mon
Portuguese and PLAS Pizza Lunch
Mar 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Levering Great Hall

Join us for a delicious lunch and learn about all the Portuguese Program has to offer . . . along with Brazilian dessert and board games!

Schouler Lecture Series, George Chauncey, Yale University
Mar 27 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm Gilman 50

The James S. Schouler Lecture Series with George Chauncey, Samuel Knight Professor of History, Yale University

“Rethinking the Postwar American Urban Crisis: Race, Sexuality, and Anti-Gay Politics”

Monday, March 27th: “The Great Puerto Rican Migration and the Queering of Postwar New York City,” 4:30pm, Gilman 50, reception to follow in the Gilman Atrium

Tuesday, March 28th: “Racial Crisis, Press Power, and the Assault on the Postwar Gay World,” 4:00pm, Gilman 308

Thursday, March 30th: “Death and Vice in a Great American City: Anti-Gay Politics and Urban Degeneration,” 4:00pm, Gilman 308

[Co-sponsored by WGS and English]

Research in Focus Lecture: Johan Oosterman
Mar 27 @ 5:15 pm – 7:15 pm

Johan Oosterman, professor at Radboud University in Nijmegen, Netherlands, will presents “The French princes of the North: Crowdsourcing, scholarship and the illuminated prayer book of Mary Guelders (c. 1415).”

Mar
28
Tue
Critical Climate Thinking: The Passing of Paradise: Corals and The(ir) End in West Papua
Mar 28 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Mergenthaler 426

Speaker: Nils Bubandt, Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Aarhus University

Commentator: Erica Schoenberger (JHU)

Critical Climate Thinking is an interdisciplinary lecture series that aims to generate a conversation concerning climate change not merely as a scientific phenomenon but as a persistent dimension of lived experience. It approaches the cosmos not only as an object outside us, but as something in us.

Lecture series co-organized by Rochelle Tobias (GRLL), Naveeda Khan (Anthropology), and Deborah Poole (Anthropology) and co-sponsored by E2SHI, Anthropology, GRLL, CAMS, and Africana Studies.

Schouler Lecture Series, George Chauncey, Yale University
Mar 28 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Gilman 308

The James S. Schouler Lecture Series with George Chauncey, Samuel Knight Professor of History, Yale University

“Rethinking the Postwar American Urban Crisis: Race, Sexuality, and Anti-Gay Politics”

Monday, March 27th: “The Great Puerto Rican Migration and the Queering of Postwar New York City,” 4:30pm, Gilman 50, reception to follow in the Gilman Atrium

Tuesday, March 28th: “Racial Crisis, Press Power, and the Assault on the Postwar Gay World,” 4:00pm, Gilman 308

Thursday, March 30th: “Death and Vice in a Great American City: Anti-Gay Politics and Urban Degeneration,” 4:00pm, Gilman 308

[Co-sponsored by WGS and English]

The 2017 James W. Poultney Memorial Lecture: Gregory Crane (Tufts)
Mar 28 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Greek, Latin, and Classics in an Age of Global Philology

A lecture by Gregory Crane, Tufts University

Gregory R. Crane is Editor-in-Chief of the Perseus Project, Professor of Classics and Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship at Tufts University, and the Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities at Universität Leipzig.

A reception will be held in Gilman Hall, Room 108 (Classics seminar room), following the lecture.

Writing Seminars Poetry Alumni Reading: Elizabeth Hazen, Richie Hofmann, and Laura Bylenok
Mar 28 @ 6:00 pm

Elizabeth Hazen is a poet and essayist whose work has appeared in Best American Poetry 2013, Southwest Review, The Threepenny Review, The Normal School, and other journals. She teaches English at Calvert School in Baltimore, Maryland. Chaos Theories is her first book.

Richie Hofmann is the author of a collection of poems, Second Empire (Alice James Books, 2015), winner of the 2014 Beatrice Hawley Award. He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and a Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, and his poems appear in the New Yorker, Kenyon Review, the New Republic, Ploughshares, New England Review, the New Criterion, Yale Review, and Poetry. A graduate of the University Professors Program at Boston University and the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars MFA program, he is a doctoral candidate at Emory University, where he has held the Creative Writing Fellowship in Poetry. He lives in Chicago.

Laura Bylenok is the author of Warp, winner of the 2015 T.S. Eliot Prize, and a/0 (DIAGRAM/New Michigan Press, 2014). Her poetry has appeared in Best New Poets, Ninth Letter, Pleiades, North American Review, Guernica, and West Branch, among other journals. She holds an M.F.A. from the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Utah, where she was awarded the Vice-Presidential Fellowship and served as poetry editor for Quarterly West. She is Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Mar
29
Wed
Literary Readings by Gwenaëlle Aubry
Mar 29 @ 5:15 pm – 7:00 pm Gilman 479

The Humanities Center, in collaboration with the Centre Louis Marin and the Alexander Grass Humanities Institute, is pleased to announce a literary reading by Gwenaëlle Aubry (CNRS, Paris; Prix Fémina 2009). The reading will consist of fragments from 2 novels, Personne and Perséphone 2014.

The Richard A. Macksey Lecture: Dan-el Padilla Peralta Presents ‘Undocumented’
Mar 29 @ 7:00 pm – 8:45 pm Shriver Hall
The Richard A. Macksey Lecture: Dan-el Padilla Peralta Presents 'Undocumented' @ Shriver Hall | Baltimore | Maryland | United States

The Alexander Grass Humanities Institute, in Conjunction with Classics, The Forums on Race in America, the Foreign Affairs Symposium, and The Racism, Immigration & Citizenship Program is proud to present the Richard A. Macksey lecture:

“Undocumented”: A presentation by Dan-el Padilla Peralta

Dan-el Padilla Peralta arrived legally in New York as a young boy with his family, but when their visas lapsed when Dan-el was in grade school, the family joined the ranks of the city’s homeless. Dan-el, his mother, and brother lived in a downtown shelter where his only refuge was the meager library. With the help of a young volunteer, Dan-el was accepted on scholarship to Collegiate, the oldest private school in the country. From Collegiate, Dan-el went on to Princeton, where he made the momentous decision to come out as an undocumented student in a Wall Street Journal profile a few months before he gave the salutatorian’s traditional address in Latin at his commencement. After attaining his doctoral degree in classics at Stanford University, Dan-el went on to become a Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University and has since returned to Princeton as assistant professor. Dan-el Padilla’s memoir, Undocumented, is essential reading for the debate on immigration, but it is also an unforgettable tale of a passionate young scholar coming of age in two very different worlds.