Events

If you would like your event to be posted on this calendar, please use our event request form. If you would like AGHI to co-sponsor your event, please use the co-sponsorship request form.

Sep
21
Thu
Bibliomania: 150 Years of Collecting Rare Books at the George Peabody Library
Sep 21 2017 – Jan 31 2018 all-day
Bibliomania: 150 Years of Collecting Rare Books at the George Peabody Library

Over the past 150 years the Peabody Library has captured, through its rare book and manuscript collections, America’s deepest desires and vaulting ambitions to bring the history of the world and ideas to the City of Baltimore. This exhibition presents many of the richest and rarest fruits of George Peabody’s early intellectual and bibliophilic aspirations, from the collection the library opened with in 1866 to the massive cast-iron expansion in 1878, which transformed the library into the glorious “Cathedral of Books” that it continues as today.

The Exhibit Gallery is open 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Friday, and 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Saturday.

For more information, please visit the Sheridan Libraries website.

Feb
1
Thu
Colloquium – Lori Marso
Feb 1 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm Gilman Hall

Colloquium with Lori Marso (Union College)

Title: TBA

Sponsored by Political and Moral Thought

Feb
6
Tue
Spring Study Abroad Fair
Feb 6 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Meet with representatives from the various study abroad programs to learn about opportunities for summer and fall 2018.

Feb
8
Thu
Classics Lecture: Eleanor Dickey (University of Reading)
Feb 8 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm Gilman 108 (Classics Seminar Room)

Futures of the Ancient Past

How did the Ancient Greeks learn Latin?

A lecture by Eleanor Dickey, University of Reading

During the Roman empire many Greek speakers learned Latin, at levels ranging from limited oral proficiency for trading purposes to written fluency for entering the legal profession. Many of the materials they used survive, both intact textbooks passed down via the medieval manuscript tradition and original papyrus fragments from Egypt, and therefore we can know quite a lot about how ancient language learning was actually achieved. Some of the things ancient students did, such as learning tables of noun declensions, are strikingly similar to work undertaken by today’s Latin students; other things, such as the way they handled syntax and their struggles with the Roman alphabet, are very different. In this session we shall look at the ancient evidence for different kinds of learning techniques and their effectiveness.

Futures of the Ancient Past looks in two directions: forward, to new and emerging trends in Classics, and backward, across centuries of other efforts to promote, contest, or redirect antiquity’s continuing influence. It thus aims to illuminate an unfamiliar history of what Classics has been, as well as to generate a new vision of what it might become.

Feb
20
Tue
The President’s Reading Series: Literature of Social Import: Yiyun Li
Feb 20 @ 6:00 pm TBD

Yiyun Li grew up in Beijing and came to the United States in 1996. Her debut collection, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, won the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, PEN/Hemingway Award, Guardian First Book Award, and California Book Award for first fiction. Her novel The Vagrants won the gold medal of California Book Award for fiction, and was shortlisted for the Dublin IMPAC Award. Gold Boy, Emerald Girl, her second collection, was a finalist of Story Prize and shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Kinder Than Solitude, her latest novel, was published to critical acclaim. Her books have been translated into more than 20 languages.

For more information, click here.

Yiyun Li: The President’s Reading Series: Literature of Social Import
Feb 20 @ 6:00 pm

This event is free and open to the public.

Mar
1
Thu
Colloquium – Meredith Williams
Mar 1 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm Gilman Hall

Colloquium with Meredith Williams (Johns Hopkins University)

Title: “On Certainty‘s Ladder”

Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy

Classics Lecture: Gareth Williams (Columbia University)
Mar 1 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm Gilman 108 (Classics Seminar Room)

Futures of the Ancient Past

Lecture title TBA.

A lecture by Gareth Williams, Columbia University

Abstract to follow.

Futures of the Ancient Past looks in two directions: forward, to new and emerging trends in Classics, and backward, across centuries of other efforts to promote, contest, or redirect antiquity’s continuing influence. It thus aims to illuminate an unfamiliar history of what Classics has been, as well as to generate a new vision of what it might become.

Mar
13
Tue
A Reading By Jessica Anya Blau, Jane Delury, and Rahul Kanakia
Mar 13 @ 6:00 pm

This event is free and open to the public.

Rahul Kankia, Jessica Anaya Blau, Jane Deluty MFA Reading
Mar 13 @ 6:00 pm TBD