Events

If you would like to submit an event to be AGHI-sponsored, please use our event request form.

Mar
28
Tue
Critical Climate Thinking: The Passing of Paradise: Corals and The(ir) End in West Papua
Mar 28 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Mergenthaler 426

Speaker: Nils Bubandt, Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Aarhus University

Commentator: Erica Schoenberger (JHU)

Critical Climate Thinking is an interdisciplinary lecture series that aims to generate a conversation concerning climate change not merely as a scientific phenomenon but as a persistent dimension of lived experience. It approaches the cosmos not only as an object outside us, but as something in us.

Lecture series co-organized by Rochelle Tobias (GRLL), Naveeda Khan (Anthropology), and Deborah Poole (Anthropology) and co-sponsored by E2SHI, Anthropology, GRLL, CAMS, and Africana Studies.

Mar
29
Wed
Literary Readings by Gwenaëlle Aubry
Mar 29 @ 5:15 pm – 7:00 pm Gilman 479

The Humanities Center, in collaboration with the Centre Louis Marin and the Alexander Grass Humanities Institute, is pleased to announce a literary reading by Gwenaëlle Aubry (CNRS, Paris; Prix Fémina 2009). The reading will consist of fragments from 2 novels, Personne and Perséphone 2014.

The Richard A. Macksey Lecture: Dan-el Padilla Peralta Presents ‘Undocumented’
Mar 29 @ 7:00 pm – 8:45 pm Shriver Hall
The Richard A. Macksey Lecture: Dan-el Padilla Peralta Presents 'Undocumented' @ Shriver Hall | Baltimore | Maryland | United States

The Alexander Grass Humanities Institute, in Conjunction with Classics, The Forums on Race in America, the Foreign Affairs Symposium, and The Racism, Immigration & Citizenship Program is proud to present the Richard A. Macksey lecture:

“Undocumented”: A presentation by Dan-el Padilla Peralta

Dan-el Padilla Peralta arrived legally in New York as a young boy with his family, but when their visas lapsed when Dan-el was in grade school, the family joined the ranks of the city’s homeless. Dan-el, his mother, and brother lived in a downtown shelter where his only refuge was the meager library. With the help of a young volunteer, Dan-el was accepted on scholarship to Collegiate, the oldest private school in the country. From Collegiate, Dan-el went on to Princeton, where he made the momentous decision to come out as an undocumented student in a Wall Street Journal profile a few months before he gave the salutatorian’s traditional address in Latin at his commencement. After attaining his doctoral degree in classics at Stanford University, Dan-el went on to become a Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University and has since returned to Princeton as assistant professor. Dan-el Padilla’s memoir, Undocumented, is essential reading for the debate on immigration, but it is also an unforgettable tale of a passionate young scholar coming of age in two very different worlds.

Apr
3
Mon
Queering Zoos: Unsettling Performance of Humanity and Animality
Apr 3 @ 5:30 pm To Be Announced

The Program in Museums and Society presents speaker Jean Estebanez of Université Paris-Est Creteil, who will discuss “Queering Zoos: Unsettling Performance of Humanity and Animality”.

Co-sponsored by the Alexander Grass Humanities Institute.

Apr
11
Tue
Critical Climate Thinking: Disciplining the Life Sciences: The Hunterian Legacy 1813 – 1861
Apr 11 @ 5:15 pm – 7:15 pm Gilman 479

Speaker: Tilottama Rajan (Western University, Canada)

Commentator: Katie Hindmarch-Watson (JHU)

Critical Climate Thinking is an interdisciplinary lecture series that aims to generate a conversation concerning climate change not merely as a scientific phenomenon but as a persistent dimension of lived experience. It approaches the cosmos not only as an object outside us, but as something in us.

Lecture series co-organized by Rochelle Tobias (GRLL), Naveeda Khan (Anthropology), and Deborah Poole (Anthropology) and co-sponsored by E2SHI, Anthropology, GRLL, CAMS, and Africana Studies.

Apr
21
Fri
Populism, Multi-Cultural Identity, and the Future of Europe: The 2nd Annual Aronson International Studies Conference
Apr 21 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm To Be Announced

A one-day symposium featuring world-renowned scholars, authors, and policy makers from both the US and Europe, the event is aimed at addressing questions on the future of European identity and political organization. In the context of a rise in global populist movements, the symposium will focus particularly on recent and upcoming elections, trends toward illiberalism, the rise of far-right and far-left populist parties, and treatment of minority groups, including xenophobia, Islamophobia and anti-Semitism. The symposium will feature presentations by, among others, Boris Dittrich, former member of the Dutch parliament and current director of LGBT Advocacy at Human Rights Watch, and Peter Schechter, Senior Vice President of the Atlantic Council. JHU undergraduates currently engaged in relevant research will also present. Students, alumni, and interested members of the public are welcome to attend.

Apr
27
Thu
Sheridan Libraries “Forgery Fellow” Lecture: Elly Truitt (Bryn Mawr)
Apr 27 @ 5:00 pm Gilman Hall, Room 50

Third Annual Bibliotheca Fictiva Collection “Forgery Fellow” Lecture, Sheridan Libraries,

Co-Sponsored by the Alexander Grass Humanities Institute, JHU

Elly Truitt (Bryn Mawr), “Inventions of the Past: Medieval Histories of the Trojan War”

Thursday, April 27, 5:00 pm

Homewood Campus, Gilman Hall, Room 50

Apr
28
Fri
JHU Humanities Ph.D. Speakers Series: Humanities at Work
Apr 28 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Mergenthaler 431 (AGHI conference room)

Join us to talk about and hear from humanities scholars who have translated their training into rewarding careers outside of academia.

Elizabeth Waraksa is Program Director for Research and Strategic Initiatives. Elizabeth joined the Association of Research Libraries in October 2015. As program director for research and strategic initiatives, she works closely with the Association’s Coordinating Committee to foster the development of project activities brought forward by member directors, staff, or partners in response to the Association’s System of Action.

Prior to joining ARL in October 2015, Elizabeth Waraksa held numerous positions in academic libraries and universities on the West Coast, including librarian for Middle Eastern studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and lecturer in Near Eastern languages and cultures and the study of religion at UCLA. She has also conducted research and managed projects as an independent consultant for a variety of initiatives, including the Association’s Strategic Thinking and Design process and the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. She holds a doctorate in Near Eastern studies with a specialization in Egyptian art and archaeology from the Johns Hopkins University and has taught extensively in this field.

Wine and cheese included.

RSVP information will come in due course.