Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses beginning with AS.145 are specifically for the MSH major.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Discover Hopkins: Medical Narratives
AS.145.120 (51)

As Hippocrates said, It is more important to know what sort of person has a disease than to know what sort of disease a person has. People relate their health issues to others through personal narratives and stories. These stories are the common language of medicine. The experience of human health, suffering, and death as told in these stories are used by people to convey their observations and emotions to others. This course will explore narratives and storytelling in medicine in many forms including patient narratives, fiction written by physicians, medical case reports, and oral traditions as well as themes discovery, mystery, adventure, confession, joy, grief, and loss. Students will also work outside the classroom, gathering a range of experiences from traditional medical rounds and case presentations to media and visual representations such as art and film.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Discover Hopkins: Exploring Medical Careers
AS.145.110 (51)

Many people are unaware of the diversity of medical and health careers. This program introduces scientific knowledge and promotes awareness of a variety of medical and health careers, for example, multiple specialties of physicians, physician assistant, nurse careers, professional therapists (physical, occupational, respiratory, radiation), clinical nutritionist, pharmacist, genetic counselor, medical laboratory scientist, veterinarian, clinical trial professionals, clinical social worker, and public health related careers. Taught by diverse healthcare professionals currently working at Johns Hopkins Hospital System, students will gain meaningful scientific knowledge and practical career knowledge by participating in lectures, labs, hands-on/simulation activities, interviews, and workshops.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Discover Hopkins: Exploring Medical Careers
AS.145.110 (61)

Many people are unaware of the diversity of medical and health careers. This program introduces scientific knowledge and promotes awareness of a variety of medical and health careers, for example, multiple specialties of physicians, physician assistant, nurse careers, professional therapists (physical, occupational, respiratory, radiation), clinical nutritionist, pharmacist, genetic counselor, medical laboratory scientist, veterinarian, clinical trial professionals, clinical social worker, and public health related careers. Taught by diverse healthcare professionals currently working at Johns Hopkins Hospital System, students will gain meaningful scientific knowledge and practical career knowledge by participating in lectures, labs, hands-on/simulation activities, interviews, and workshops.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Discover Hopkins: Medical Narratives
AS.145.120 (41)

As Hippocrates said, It is more important to know what sort of person has a disease than to know what sort of disease a person has. People relate their health issues to others through personal narratives and stories. These stories are the common language of medicine. The experience of human health, suffering, and death as told in these stories are used by people to convey their observations and emotions to others. This course will explore narratives and storytelling in medicine in many forms including patient narratives, fiction written by physicians, medical case reports, and oral traditions as well as themes discovery, mystery, adventure, confession, joy, grief, and loss. Students will also work outside the classroom, gathering a range of experiences from traditional medical rounds and case presentations to media and visual representations such as art and film.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 35/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.145.120 (51)Discover Hopkins: Medical NarrativesMTWThF 9:30AM - 4:00PMKrishnan, LakshmiBloomberg 172
AS.145.110 (51)Discover Hopkins: Exploring Medical CareersMTWThF 9:30AM - 4:00PMStaffGilman 177
AS.145.110 (61)Discover Hopkins: Exploring Medical CareersMTWThF 9:30AM - 4:00PMStaffGilman 277
AS.145.120 (41)Discover Hopkins: Medical NarrativesMTWThF 9:30AM - 4:00PMKrishnan, LakshmiHodson 210

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Medicine in an Age of Empires, 1500-1800
AS.100.291 (01)

How did medicine emerge as a distinctive body of knowledge and a profession in the early modern period? The answers lie in the histories of disease, empire, and global commerce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (03)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Time Travel
AS.060.108 (01)

Why is time travel such a consistent and perplexing theme in literature and film over the last 150 years? Why is modernity so concerned with peeking backwards or forwards? This course will examine the history of time-travel fiction, from its beginning in utopian fiction through its box-office dominance in the 1980s, and into today. Writers will likely include Mark Twain, Edward Bellamy, Harold Steele Mackay, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein, and Philip K. Dick. Movies will include *The Terminator*, *Back to the Future*, and *Primer*.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Greeks and Their Emotions
AS.040.241 (01)

This seminar is meant as an introduction to the study of ancient emotions, with a particular emphasis on how the Greeks of the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods conceptualized, portrayed and lived their emotions through linguistic, literary and artistic expression. After an analysis of how the ancient Greek terminology for the emotions differs from our own, we shall focus on the phenomenon of emotion as deeply rooted in the physical body, and in light of this we will contemplate (and question) its universality. Texts will be read in translation. No knowledge of ancient Greek required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (06)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (07)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (01)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (02)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (04)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (05)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Medicine
AS.140.105 (08)

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

History of Public Health in East Asia
AS.140.146 (01)

This course examines the history of disease, epidemics, and public health responses in East Asia from the 17th-20th centuries. This public health history emphasizes the interactions, connections, and comparisons among China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level:
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (06)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy and Cognitive Science
AS.150.476 (01)

This term's topic will be "cognitive penetration". Can what you believe change how things look and sound? For example, do paintings look different to someone who knows a lot about art history and aesthetics? Can racial prejudice cause someone to see a cellphone as a gun? If your beliefs can alter your perceptions, how can perceptions provide neutral justification for beliefs? And how does one draw a distinction between perception and thought in the first place? Readings will be drawn both from philosophy (e.g., Fodor, Block, Siegel) and psychology (e.g., Pylyshyn, Firestone, Lupyan). Recommended Course Background: Some previous exposure to philosophy, the mind-brain sciences, or other relevant background.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Justice and Health
AS.150.474 (01)

Course will consider the bearing of theories of justice on health care. Topics will include national health insurance, rationing and cost containment, and what justice requires of researchers in developing countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical Humanities
AS.145.101 (02)

This team-taught course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the university's new concentration in "Medicine, Science, and Humanities." The themes of death, dying, and the treatment of the dead are explored in their changing historical, anthropological, philosophical, literary, art historical and medical dimensions. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and upperclass Medicine, Science, and Humanities majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Research Seminar
AS.140.411 (01)

For majors pursuing independent research.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Experimental Bodies: Histories of Human Subjects Research in the 19th and 20th Centuries
AS.140.314 (01)

This course traces the history of human subjects research as a medical and scientific practice. It will focus on the human subjects themselves, and how their experiences intersect with the histories of race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical Humanities
AS.145.101 (01)

This team-taught course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the university's new concentration in "Medicine, Science, and Humanities." The themes of death, dying, and the treatment of the dead are explored in their changing historical, anthropological, philosophical, literary, art historical and medical dimensions. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and upperclass Medicine, Science, and Humanities majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Scientific Revolution
AS.140.321 (02)

Explore how the Western understanding of nature changed between 1500 and 1720 through the works of astronomers and astrologers, naturalists and magi, natural philosophers and experimentalists, doctors and alchemists & others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Scientific Revolution
AS.140.321 (01)

Explore how the Western understanding of nature changed between 1500 and 1720 through the works of astronomers and astrologers, naturalists and magi, natural philosophers and experimentalists, doctors and alchemists & others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Psychopolitics: Science, Mind, and Society
AS.140.313 (01)

This course explores the history of psychiatry and the mind sciences as social and political institutions in the United States, from the country's founding to the present. Each class meeting will explore a set of "alternative facts" emerging in the setting of a landmark political dispute in US history. Students will read, discuss, and research claims made by competing scientific experts about who should participate in American society and to what extent. Overall, the course is geared toward students interested in making sense of the exchange between scientific knowledge and social politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (02)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (01)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 7/21
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (04)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (02)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. This course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (03)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical Humanities
AS.145.101 (03)

This team-taught course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the university's new concentration in "Medicine, Science, and Humanities." The themes of death, dying, and the treatment of the dead are explored in their changing historical, anthropological, philosophical, literary, art historical and medical dimensions. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and upperclass Medicine, Science, and Humanities majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (04)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. This course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND

The Value of Humanity
AS.150.454 (01)

Are human beings distinctively valuable? What makes us valuable? And how should we respond to the value of human beings? The course is divided into four parts. The first part takes up questions about the basis of human value. We consider various proposals, including Kant's, about the valuable feature or capacity of human beings. Are we valuable in virtue of having a good will, in virtue of being agents, in virtue of being valuers, or something further? The second part takes up questions about the explanation of the value of human beings. Does the proposed feature make us valuable because it instantiates a simple value property, making us valuable in ourselves, or simpliciter? We consider whether the notion of value simpliciter is a notion we fully understand, or need. Does the proposed feature make us valuable because it makes us good-for something or someone? Who or what does it make us good-for? Or again, does the proposed feature make us such that we are objects of an appropriate attitude or practical stance? If so, what is the attitude or stance? The third part of the course takes up normative questions about the appropriate mode of responding to human beings. We consider whether it makes sense to say that human beings are "ends-in-themselves," and what it would mean to treat a person as an end-in-itself. We also consider various accounts of respect. A guiding question is whether human beings are the only appropriate objects of respect, or whether we can respect other beings, and even artifacts. The fourth part of the class applies what we have learned so far to related topics: to the question of whether human life or existence is valuable, and conversely, whether death is disvaluable. We consider, albeit briefly, the value of human beings in relation to the value of animals. And we ask about the role of Kantian notions like dignity in applied contexts, so that highly philosophical considerations about value are shown to have real-world bearing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (03)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. This course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (12)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (09)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (13)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (11)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (07)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Public Health in East Asia Through Films & Documentaries
AS.140.176 (01)

This course uses contemporary films and documentaries to address issues in public health in East Asia, past & present. Topics covered include medicine in turn-of-the-twentieth century Japan and China, revolutionary medicine, STDS, mental illness, HIV/AIDs in China, industrial pollution, the politics of universal health care insurance, and pandemics in East Asia.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to Both
AS.150.136 (01)

Philosophers and scientists raise important questions about the nature of the physical world, the mental world, the relationship between them, and the right methods to use in their investigations of these worlds. The answers they present are very different. Scientists are usually empiricists, and want to answer questions by experiment and observation. Philosophers don’t want to do this, but defend their views a priori. Why? Can both be right? Readings will present philosophical and scientific views about the world and our knowledge of it. They will include selections from major historical and contemporary figures in philosophy and science. This course has no prerequisites in philosophy or science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-PHLMND

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (10)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (08)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Writing about Science I: Daily News Journalism
AS.220.206 (01)

This course is designed to teach students the skills of daily news reporting, with a focus on covering science news. Students will learn how turn scientific discoveries into lively and engaging prose for the general public, interview sources, and pitch stories to news organizations. The skills taught are applicable to all areas of journalism, not just science journalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (05)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Non-Fiction: Science as a Social Activity
AS.220.210 (01)

Using the political and economic milieu of science and technology as a context for our writing, we will study how social factors such as government, money, secrecy, and ethics affect the conduct and public presentation of scientific and medical research. Controversies from 20th century history as well as current events will be discussed. Writing assignments to satisfy the W requirement will consist of short papers derived from classroom topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (03)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Cross-listed with History and History of Art.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Intro to Bioethics
AS.150.219 (14)

Introduction to a wide range of moral issues arising in the biomedical fields, e.g. physician-assisted suicide, human cloning, abortion, surrogacy, and human subjects research. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.291 (01)Medicine in an Age of Empires, 1500-1800TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaffGilman 400HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US
AS.140.105 (03)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPomata, GiannaGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.060.108 (01)Time TravelTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRosenthal, Jesse KarlSmokler Center Library
AS.040.241 (01)The Greeks and Their EmotionsMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMAsuni, MicheleGilman 134
AS.140.105 (06)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPomata, GiannaGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (07)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPomata, Gianna MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (01)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPomata, GiannaGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (02)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPomata, GiannaGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (04)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPomata, GiannaGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (05)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPomata, GiannaGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.105 (08)History of MedicineMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPomata, GiannaGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.140.146 (01)History of Public Health in East AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHanson, MartaSmokler Center 301INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.150.219 (06)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.476 (01)Philosophy and Cognitive ScienceMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMGross, StevenGilman 217COGS-PHLMND
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLópez Raja, Julio, StaffHodson 305MSCH-HUM
AS.150.474 (01)Justice and HealthF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBok, HilaryMaryland 309
AS.145.101 (02)Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical HumanitiesT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMEnder, Evelyne, Merback, Mitchell, Stephens, Walter EGilman 50
AS.140.411 (01)Senior Research SeminarMercelis, Joris Hans Angele 
AS.140.314 (01)Experimental Bodies: Histories of Human Subjects Research in the 19th and 20th CenturiesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMNuriddin, AyahGilman 277
AS.145.101 (01)Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical HumanitiesT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMEnder, Evelyne, Merback, Mitchell, Stephens, Walter EGilman 50
AS.140.321 (02)Scientific RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPortuondo, Maria MMaryland 109MSCH-HUM
AS.140.321 (01)Scientific RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPortuondo, Maria MMaryland 109MSCH-HUM
AS.140.313 (01)Psychopolitics: Science, Mind, and SocietyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMScharff, Samuel LouisGilman 134BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (02)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (01)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (04)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.136 (02)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.219 (03)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.145.101 (03)Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical HumanitiesT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMEnder, Evelyne, Merback, Mitchell, Stephens, Walter EGilman 50
AS.150.136 (04)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.454 (01)The Value of HumanityTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMTheunissen, L Nandi 
AS.150.136 (03)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.219 (12)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (09)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (13)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (11)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (07)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.140.176 (01)Public Health in East Asia Through Films & DocumentariesTh 6:30PM - 9:00PM ScreeningsHanson, MartaGilman 132
AS.150.136 (01)Philosophy & Science: An Introduction to BothMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMAchinstein, PeterGilman 50COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.219 (10)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.219 (08)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.220.206 (01)Writing about Science I: Daily News JournalismF 4:00PM - 6:20PMGrimm, DavidGilman 277MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.150.219 (05)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.220.210 (01)Introduction to Non-Fiction: Science as a Social ActivityTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMBiddle, Wayne MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaffGilman 134MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (03)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaffGilman 134MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKingsley, Jennifer PGilman 119HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.150.219 (14)Intro to BioethicsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBok, HilaryBloomberg 272PHIL-BIOETH, PHIL-ETHICS, BEHB-SOCSCI, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL