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Keywords: bma, exhibits, mellon, students

M&S students produced 4 multimedia features for the BMA show Print by Print: The Apocalypses of Dürer and Redon (link); The Prints of Hogarth and Raftery: A Comparison (link); Contemporary Printmaking (link); and Printmaking Techniques (link)

Jennifer Kingsley


This month's exhibits: M&S minor and Wilson fellow Laura Somenzi (class of 2013) has curated the show Zelda Fitzgerald: Choreography in Color at the Evergreen Museum and Library. Laura and her show are featured in JHU's Rising blog. Don't miss Zelda's fascinating work; open October 19, 2011 through January 29, 2012. At the BMA opens Print by Print: Series from Dürer to Lichtenstein. Students from M&S Spring 2011 course "Paper Museums: Exhibiting Prints at the Baltimore Museum of Art" worked with curator Rena Hoisington to research the objects, select the prints and themes, and prepare exhibit materials; open October 30, 2011 through March 25, 2012. See the review in the Washington Post and Baltimore Sun. JHU Faculty are invited to a special curator's tour on December 1 at 2pm. Keep an eye out for the detailed announcement, coming soon.

Jennifer Kingsley


Keywords: bma

Please join Museums and Society, the Career Center, and the Baltimore Museum of Art this Wednesday, March 9th from 4:30-6:00 PM for our annual "Breaking into Museum Careers" discussion panel. The talk will be held in the Baltimore Museum of Art Hess Boardroom and will include four speakers who have each had diverse careers in the arts. The panelists will include: Michelle Boardman, Director of Creative Services, BMA,  Scott Perich, Senior Director of Exhibits and Design, The National Aquarium,  Jobi Zink, Senior Collections Manager, The Jewish Museum of Maryland, and Schroeder Cherry, Museum Education Consultant. The panelists will speak about their career trajectories and answer questions from the audience. Should be a great event, we look forward to seeing you there!

Katie Johnson


Keywords: bma, internship, walters

Students on the hunt for summer museum internship opportunities should consider looking close to home: both the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Museum offer internships specifically catered towards Johns Hopkins graduate and undergraduate students. (more)

The Robert and Nancy Hall Fellowship Program at the Walters Art Museum offers two paid summer internships. Both undergraduate and graduate students are eligible for the fellowship. The summer fellows are employed full-time, 35 hours a week for 10 weeks and will receive a stipend of $4,900, or $14 an hour. The program provides students with an opportunity to gain an understanding of the museum profession and to contribute to the work of the Walters Art Museum. The application deadline is February 24th, 2011.

The Michael and Nancy Lytell Internship at the Baltimore Museum of Art offers one paid summer internship to a Johns Hopkins undergraduate. Interns can expect to work 30 hours a week, and receive a $4600 stipend. The application deadline is March 4th, 2011. For more information on the Lytell Internship and other summer opportunities at the BMA click here.

For students interested in other summer museum internships, the Program in Museums and Society has compiled a database of job opportunities. The database can be found here.

Katie Johnson


Keywords: bma

Each semester, the Program in Museums and Society offers unique opportunities for undergraduates to study in and around local museums and with museum professionals. In the spring of 2010, for example, 12 students had the chance to turn their classroom work into a real-life exercise, developing public programming for the Baltimore Museum of Art’s exhibition Andy Warhol: The Last Decade. Some of their final projects were implemented by the BMA during the run of the exhibition, which is on view through January 9, 2011. (more)

In the spring of 2010, Dr. Preston Bautista led a course at the Baltimore Museum of Art in which Johns Hopkins students were introduced to art history through the lens of museum education. The course, entitled Interpreting Warhol: An Introduction to Museum Education and Interpretation, focused on the traveling exhibition Andy Warhol: The Last Decade. Dr. Bautista, an art historian who directs public programming at the BMA, invited students to consider the exhibition from the perspective of museum educators, focusing on how meaning is created in museums and how museum experiences are informed by personal and technological encounters. Combined with a close art historical study of Andy Warhol’s late works, the course concluded by inviting students to propose public programs that would accompany the fall 2010 exhibition.

This exciting, hands-on collaboration led to the realization of several student proposals, both in part and in full. Student Laura Somenzi suggested the development of a play based on two important interviews with Warhol. Laura wanted to engage a community organization external to the BMA, in order to open doors for visitors beyond the more familiar, art historical points of entry onto Warhol’s work. The play, written by local playwright Rich Espy and produced by the Single Carrot Theater, was entitled Three Andys. Approximately 300 people attended the debut production, held during the BMA’s “Late Night Warhol Party.”

Students also proposed art making activities that took place during the “Late Night” event. Visitors were introduced to Warhol’s screenprinting techniques, and were able to create their own Last Supper, Yarn, and Rorschach¬-inspired works. Through this activity, visitors gained a stronger understanding of Warhol’s techniques, and of how his studios—known as The Factory—contributed to the fabrication process.

Students also suggested tours intended to tie other parts of the BMA’s collection into the exhibition—for example, comparing sacred paintings from the Renaissance to Warhol’s Last Supper, Matisse cut-outs to his camouflage paintings, and Pollock’s drip works to the Yarn series. These tours—although never realized—were useful exercises in helping students integrate the study of historic and contemporary art, and to think about how permanent collections and special exhibitions can act in dialogue.

Hopkins students interested in hands-on, museum based courses will have a number of opportunities for study in the spring of 2011, including Paper Museums: Exhibiting Prints at the Baltimore Museum of Art, taught by BMA curator Rena Hoisington, and Artists, Museums, and Social Purpose: Contemporary Models, with artist and educator Peter Bruun.

Katie Johnson


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