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Keywords: courses, research, students

In September Professor Rebecca Brown will present the paper “Pushing the Boundaries (But Not Too Much): Indian Contemporary Art in the US" at the 2011 American Council for Southern Asian Art symposium. Her talk presents parts of her ongoing research on the Festival of India, a group of over 40 exhibitions that took place across the USA in 1985-86. From a major show of historical Indian sculpture at the National Gallery in Washington D.C. to a blockbuster India! show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and from a small photography exhibition in Berkeley to a show on colonial American exchanges with eighteenth-century India in Salem Massachusetts, the Festival is a key case for investigating how exhibits of art and culture serve cultural diplomacy, national identity, commerce and tourism. (more)

In the Fall of 2010, Professor Brown taught a course related to this research, The Politics of Display in South Asia, in which students examined the Festival alongside nineteenth-century international exhibitions and regional collections of South Asian art.

Jennifer Kingsley


In a Spring 2011 research seminar entitled the Archaeology of Daily Life, Professor Hérica Valladares and eight undergraduate students worked regularly in the newly renovated Johns Hopkins University Archaeological Museum. They had the opportunity to study little known and mostly unpublished artifacts from the Greco-Roman world, as well as modern objects produced in Hellenistic and Classical styles.  Under the direction of Professor Valladares, students wrote essays about these works of art that culminated in the recently launched on-line exhibition and catalog The Archaeology of Daily Life. The site focuses on private aspects of Greek and Roman culture, an expanding and complex field of study that faces particular challenges because the small, portable objects that serve as core evidence for scholars are often decontextualized, poorly documented, and frequently copied. To learn more about other exhibitions and collection-based projects developed by Hopkins students in conjunction with courses in the Program in Museums and Society, click here.

Jennifer Kingsley


Keywords: courses

Spring semester is quickly coming to an end and it is time to begin thinking about fall 2011 courses. Be sure to check out the many exciting offerings through Museums and Society. In addition to core courses and various practicum offerings, numerous cross-listed opportunities, and several advanced undergraduate seminars, we are especially looking forward to two courses offered by visitors to Hopkins: Walters’ Curator Alicia Weisberg-Roberts, and Baltimore lawyer Walt Lehmann. Students in these courses will have two opportunities to learn about very different aspects of the art world. (more)

In Dr. Weisberg-Roberts course, History and Theory of the Decorative Arts, students will study various approaches to defining, displaying, and interpreting objects hands-on at the Walters Art Museum 17th and 18th century galleries. The decorative arts will be explored as a cultural and museological category. The semester will culminate with the planning of a permanent installation for the museum.

Walt Lehmann’s course Art and the Law will examine the ways in which art and the law intersect from a variety of perspectives including intellectual property, cultural appropriation, and freedom of expression. Mr. Lehmann is a managing partner of the entertainment law firm LEHMANN STROBEL PLC. Over the years he has advised independent producers, artists, writers, and nonprofit arts and cultural organizations on a wide range of legal and business matters. His course will be a welcome addition to the diverse range of offerings of Museums and Society.

Hopkins students should also remember that the Baltimore Student Exchange Program (BSEP) allows them to enroll in courses at MICA, Goucher, Morgan State, Loyola, and other area institutions. Logistical information can be obtained through the Office of the Registrar, and students interested in pursuing such opportunities should be sure to consult with the appropriate departmental and program advisors before registering.

Katie Johnson


Keywords: courses

Spring semester is just around the corner, and it's time to plan your course schedules. Be sure to check out the many exciting offerings through Museums and Society. In addition to core courses and various practicum offerings, numerous cross-listed opportunities, and several advanced undergraduate seminars, we are especially looking forward to two courses offered by visitors to Hopkins: BMA Curator Rena Hoisington, and Baltimore artist/art educator/art activist Peter Bruun. Students in these courses will have real hands-on opportunities, curating a BMA exhibition and proposing an art installation for the 2012 Hopkins Arts Festival. (more)

Rena Hoisington’s course Paper Museums: Exhibiting Prints at the Baltimore Museum of Art offers students an exciting opportunity to work behind the scenes at the museum. Students will help to organize an exhibition on series, portfolios and sets of prints. The exhibition Thinking in Series is not intended to be a survey of the history of printmaking, but rather a thematically organized exhibition that examines a sampling of the diverse styles, ideas and techniques that have been explored in serial images over the past several centuries. In addition to landscape, other themes of interest include narrative, war, homage, and imagination. Students will have a chance to assist the curator with research, installation, and programming. This will be a great course for students interested in learning more about the development, promotion, and execution of exhibitions at large-scale institutions.

Baltimore’s very own Peter Bruun will teach a course entitled Artists, Museums, and Social Purpose: Contemporary Models. A long time resident of Baltimore, Bruun is the director and founder of Art on Purpose, a non-profit arts organization that aims to reach diverse communities in Baltimore through exhibitions and events that engage a variety of partners including professional artists, students, teachers, after-school programs, senior citizens, and other cultural and community organizations invested in themes addressed by exhibition projects. Artists, Museums, and Social Purpose: Contemporary Models will explore the relationship between artists and museums with a particular emphasis on this relationship as it is playing out in Baltimore today. For the final project, students will develop a proposal for an installation on campus, which will be considered for the Johns Hopkins Arts Festival of spring 2012. This course will be intensely hands-on and will introduce students to a variety of social issues and concerns. It will also allow students to forge relationships with local arts professionals. It is a truly unique opportunity for anyone interested in arts and the community!

Hopkins students should also remember that the Baltimore Student Exchange Program (BSEP) allows them to enroll in courses at MICA, Goucher, Morgan State, Loyola, and other area institutions. Logistical information can be obtained through the Office of the Registrar, and students interested in pursuing such opportunities should be sure to consult with the appropriate departmental and program advisors before registering.

Katie Johnson


Keywords: courses

Registration for Spring 2011 is right around the corner—October 28th! Museums and Society is offering six courses, along with seven cross-listed courses in other departments. There are opportunities to work with the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art and the JHU Archeological Museum. There are classes that will explore the concept of cultural property, museum controversies and challenges, and museum practices. See the full list of courses on our newly updated page!

Katie Johnson


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