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Museums and Society minor Chloe Pelletier's show "Herbert Hasseltine: Sculptor of the Modern Age" opens tomorrow at Evergreen Museum and Library! The exhibit runs until May 26. For more about the Annual Student Curatorship at Evergreen and how to apply, please click here.

Jennifer Kingsley


In a Spring 2011 research seminar entitled the Archaeology of Daily Life, Professor Hérica Valladares and eight undergraduate students worked regularly in the newly renovated Johns Hopkins University Archaeological Museum. They had the opportunity to study little known and mostly unpublished artifacts from the Greco-Roman world, as well as modern objects produced in Hellenistic and Classical styles.  Under the direction of Professor Valladares, students wrote essays about these works of art that culminated in the recently launched on-line exhibition and catalog The Archaeology of Daily Life. The site focuses on private aspects of Greek and Roman culture, an expanding and complex field of study that faces particular challenges because the small, portable objects that serve as core evidence for scholars are often decontextualized, poorly documented, and frequently copied. To learn more about other exhibitions and collection-based projects developed by Hopkins students in conjunction with courses in the Program in Museums and Society, click here.

Jennifer Kingsley


In a spring, 2010 seminar called The Authority of Ruins: Antiquarianism in Italy, 1500s - 1800s, Professor Hérica Valladares and seven undergraduate students worked regularly in the Rare Books “cage” of the Milton S. Eisenhower Library at Johns Hopkins University.  Under the guidance of Prof. Valladares and Dr. Earle Havens, Curator of Rare Books at Hopkins' Sheridan Libraries, they had the opportunity to peruse, read, and handle antiquarian publications dating between the sixteenth and the nineteenth centuries.  The resulting on-line exhibition focuses on the visual nature of the study of antiquity, and investigates important changes in the methods for analyzing and depicting ruins during this period.  To learn more about other exhibitions and collection-based projects developed by Hopkins students in conjunction with courses in the Program in Museums and Society, click here.

Elizabeth Rodini


Don't miss Baltimore's Billy Baldwin, opening at JHU's Evergreen Museum & Library on Thursday, May 20, 6-8 p.m (rsvp 410-516-0341 or evergreenmuseum@jhu.edu).  Organized by Evergreen director and curator James Abbott, along with students in his spring 2010 seminar on modernism at Johns Hopkins, this exhibition looks at the work of Baltimore-born William "Billy" Baldwin (1903–1983), one of the most ingenious of 20th-century interior designers.   (more)

Furniture, textiles, fine art, and photographs illustrate the professional evolution of Baldwin, the so-called dean of American decorators, whose long career introduced a more relaxed and practical interior design sensibility.  The exhibition focuses attention on Baldwin's life-long pride in his Monument City origins, and includes vignettes representing three of his Maryland-based commissions that show the development of his now-iconic design vocabulary.  Baltimore's Billy Baldwin and  its accompanying publication are made possible by The Richard C. Von Hess Foundation.  The exhibition will remain on view through October 24, 2010.
 

Elizabeth Rodini


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