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Museums & Society Newsfeed

Keywords: activities, jobs, students

Our students and recent alumns have been writing about their research both in and on museums. Check out a piece by Emily Sneff, class 2011, for AAM's emerging museum professionals blog about her thesis on the British Museum. Molly Martell, class of 2015, is in the Museums and Society's "Staging Suburbia" practicum, in which students are working with the Jewish Museum of Maryland on a travel show about Baltimore's suburbs. She writes about her research experience on the Jewish Museum blog, here.

Jennifer Kingsley


Keywords: courses, exhibits, students

Federal Foodies: From Farm to Table in Early Baltimore opens this week at Homewood Museum (February 3-April 29, 2012). The exhibit explores issues from farming and gardening practices to how foods were preserved, prepared and presented in the nineteenth-century, and showcases cookbooks, implements, and images, among other artefacts from the period. The show is curated by students from the Museums and Society course Introduction to Material Culture, taught every Fall by Catherine Arthur, Director of Homewood Museum. Come see what they discovered, including evidence of an early type of community supported agriculture, right here in Baltimore!

Jennifer Kingsley


Keywords: internships, jobs, students

A guest post by M&S minor Lydia Alcock '12: "Whenever I tell people I’m studying psychology and museums their response is usually, what are you going to do with that? At first, back in freshman year, I wasn’t so sure. As I continued taking classes in the Museums and Society department and learned more about the museum world, I realized there was a niche for me where I could combine psych and museums: museum education. When I started applying for internships, I discovered a place so perfect for me I couldn’t believe it was real. I began interning at the Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies in September of 2011, and after working on heritage programming for 3 and a half months I realized I might never find another place so suited to my interests. Luckily, a part-time job opened up, and guess what? Now I’m employed!" To read more, click here.

Jennifer Kingsley


Keywords: museums, news, students

In a recent blog post Scottish writer Allan Massie suggests it may not really matter whether artworks (read also: artifacts, historic documents and other significant material culture) leave their originating contexts because digital media can make these accessible to everyone, forever and from anywhere. The Brontë Society in Yorkshire may dispute Massie's notion, having just lost the "most significant manuscript by Charlotte Brontë to be discovered for decades" to the Musée des Lettres et Manuscrits in Paris (read about it here). A few years ago, critics challenged Wal-Mart heiress Alice Walton's acquisitions on similar grounds, arguing that she was removing masterpieces from their rightful homes, although more recently these same critics have been praising her Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (some do continue to note the ethical questions raised by Wal-Mart funding such a museum however: see Jeffrey Goldberg's article on bloomberg.com). What is at stake here? And are digital surrogates adequate substitutes for originals? or perhaps even better than originals because they allow us to build an infinite variety of imaginary museums - ones that  make interpretative choices not limited by bricks and mortar? Could this simply be the latest iteration of museums "freeing works of art from their expected performance" (A. Malraux, "Imaginary Museum," in The Voices of Silence, trans. S. Gilbert (London, 1954), 12)? Tell us what your imaginary museum would hold and how it improves on the works' current homes. Post your response on our facebook page (link here).

Jennifer Kingsley


Take a break and go check out an Ever Green Evening! Thursday (Dec 8) 6-8pm. Inspired by book collections in Baltimore, JHU students from the Fall 2011 course the Artist in the Museum have made artists' books that explore everything from illuminated manuscripts to zombies. They look great! Congratulations to the artists.

Jennifer Kingsley


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