Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

AS.200.240 - Psychology of Women

The social construction of gender and its impact on the lives of women are examined in this course. This survey course is designed to cover a wide array of psychological topics as they relate to the female experience in American culture. The influence of historical, developmental, and social contexts on psychological experiences is also examined. The goals will be achieved through the following objectives: reading course materials, attending course lectures, engaging in discussion of controversial issues, taking quizzes and exams, doing homework assignments, and writing a reflection paper.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schug, Mariah
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings: TTh 4:00PM - 8:30PM
Status: Open

AS.100.323 - America in the 1960s

The years between 1959, when the course begins, and 1971, when it ends, were tumultuous and divisive. This course explores the political, racial, and cultural struggles of a half century ago.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Walters, Ronald
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.100.426 - Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Marshall, John W
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.070.436 - Vulnerability

Many in the contemporary world live in states of acute vulnerability. In this course, we will look closely at situations like forced displacement, experience of poverty and injury, environmental devastation, and the politics of social protest. Thinking with ethnography, feminist philosophy, fiction, and film, we will explore whether vulnerability may be taken as a condition to live with rather than one to overcome at any cost.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Pandian, Anand
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.200.204 - Human Sexuality

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 4:00PM - 6:20PM
Status: Open

AS.230.316 - African American Family

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: McDonald, Katrina Bell
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.040.218 - Celebration and Performance in Early Greece

Surviving imagery suggests that persons in Minoan and Mycenaean societies engaged in various celebratory performances, including processions, feasts, and ecstatic dance. This course explores archaeological evidence of such celebrations, focusing on sociocultural roles, bodily experience, and interpretive challenges.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Anderson, Emily S.K.
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.100.359 - Gender, Patriarchy, and the English Revolution

This course explores the varied experiences of gender and gender roles in seventeenth-century Britain and analyzes how these roles were challenged, changed, and sometimes upended during the English Revolution (1642-1660).

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hinchliff, Catherine M
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.180.252 - Economics of Discrimination

This course examines labor market discrimination by gender, race and ethnicity in the United States. What does the empirical evidence show, and how can we explain it? How much of the difference in observed outcomes is driven by differences in productivity characteristics and how much is due to discrimination? How have economists theorized about discrimination and what methodologies can be employed to test those theories? What has been the impact of public policy in this area; how do large corporations and educational institutions respond; and what can we learn from landmark lawsuits? The course will reinforce skills relevant to all fields of applied economics, including critical evaluation of the theoretical and empirical literature, the reasoned application of statistical techniques, and analysis of current policy issues. Seniors by Permission Only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Barbara Anne
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.213.373 - Sex und Macht

We will discuss postwar and contemporary literature and films that grapple with the effect of unequal power structures on sexual relations. Taught in German.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Pahl, Katrin
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Open

AS.200.204 - Human Sexuality

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.250.351 - Reproductive Physiology

Focuses on reproductive physiology and biochemical and molecular regulation of the female and male reproductive tracts. Topics include the hypothalamus and pituitary, peptide and steroid hormone action, epididymis and male accessory sex organs, female reproductive tract, menstrual cycle, ovulation and gamete transport, fertilization and fertility enhancement, sexually transmitted diseases, and male and female contraceptive methods. Introductory lectures on each topic followed by research-oriented lectures and readings from current literature.

Credits: 2.00
Instructor: Zirkin, Barry R
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.370 - Housing and Homelessness in the United States

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Greif, Meredith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.363.445 - Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan England

If Shakespeare had a sister who went to London to be a writer, what would she write? Virginia Woolf’s account of the thwarted career of Shakespeare’s hypothetical sister, Judith, in A Room of One’s Own frames our reading of plays and poetry by Shakespeare and contemporary women writers, including Isabella Whitney, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Sidney, Aemelia Lanyer, and Mary Wroth. Working within a selected historical context, students will create fictional biographies of “Judith Shakespeare,” including her perspective on our identified authors and a sample or description of Judith’s own literary accomplishments. Secondary course readings will reflect contemporary economic, political, and religious contexts.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.363.502 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.300.312 - Imagining Revolution and Utopia

What form should revolution take, and what should society look like after the revolution? What would happen to the state, family, home, status of women, human interrelations, and everyday life? These questions consumed radicals in 19th century Russia and Europe, and their answers helped to shape the political culture of the 20th century. This course examines theories of revolution and utopia and responses to them in literature, art and film. Primary case study is Russia and the Soviet Union, with a comparative look at influential European works.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.280.225 - Population, Health and Development

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, contraceptive methods as well as family planning and child survival programs, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS. This course is restricted to Public Health Studies majors. Students minoring in Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality can register with instructor approval.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Becker, Stanley
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.363.337 - The Poetics & Politics of Sex: Struck From the Record: Reclaiming Women’s Contribution to the Global March Towards Modernity

The course examines claims that present women’s historic role as limited to confinement in the home, and bearing children. Students will gain an understanding of the complexity the world’s path to modernity and the important, and⎯until recently, silent⎯roles that women have played.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Stewart, Simone Gamali
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.363.329 - Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Art in North Africa and the Middle East

This course aims to explore how gender and sexuality is situated in contemporary artistic practices in the geographical Middle East, through concepts of religion, war, revolution, resistance, nation-state, post-colonialism, and neoliberalism, especially as written and observed first-hand by artists, curators and scholars from the Middle East and North Africa region and their diasporas. Every week, under an overarching topic, notions of gender and sexuality will be questioned through works of selected artists across the region, as well as texts that provide the historical, theoretical, sociological and political background.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ince, Ezgi
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 2:00PM - 4:30PM
Status: Open

AS.290.420 - Human Sexual Orientation

This course will examine the historical and current theories of sexual orientation and sexual variation development by examining the biological, psychological and social contributing factors that influence the development of sexual orientations and variations along with treatment and modification of problematic sexual behaviors. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester. Enrollment is limited to Senior Majors & Minors in Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychology; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 6:30PM - 8:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.363.201 - Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Pahl, Katrin
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open