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Workshop–Global Groundings: Evaluating Walter Rodney’s Legacies

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Global Groundings: Evaluating Walter Rodney’s Legacies
Download PDF of Rodney Workshop program here
Friday January 31, 2020
Workshop sponsored by the Arrighi Center for Global Studies
9.00 – 9.30 Coffee (JHU Homewood Campus, Clipper Room, Shriver Hall)
9.30 – 10.00 Introductions (Clipper Room, Shriver Hall)
Introducing the Arrighi Center (Beverly Silver), the Walter Rodney Foundation (Patricia Rodney and Jesse Benjamin), and the format for today’s workshop (Robbie Shilliam)
10.00 – 11.15 How Europe Underdeveloped Africa (Clipper Room, Shriver Hall)
Introduced by: Michael West (Penn State); Charisse Burden-Stelly (Carleton College); Vesla Weaver (JHU)
11.15 – 11.30 Break
11.30 – 12.45 History of the Guyanese Working People (Clipper Room, Shriver Hall)
Introduced by: Zophia Edwards (Providence College); Randolph B. Persaud (American University); Ricardo Jacobs (JHU)
12.45 – 14.00 Lunch in Clipper Room/ Walk to afternoon location
14.00 – 15.00 “Bro Wally” and Rastafari (301 Shaffer Hall, JHU Homewood Campus)
Discussion led by Ras Wayne Rose – Iniversal Development of Rastafari (IDOR) Inc.
15.00 – 15.15 Break
15.15 – 16.30 Groundings with my Brothers (301 Shaffer Hall, JHU)
Introduced by: David Austin (John Abbot College); Clarence Lusane (Howard University); Jessica Marie Johnson (JHU)
16.30 – 18.00 Break/ Travel to Red Emma’s (1225 Cathedral St. Baltimore)
18.00 – 19.00 Buffet at Red Emma’s for all symposium participants
19.00 – 20.30 Public Discussion: The Legacies of Walter Rodney in Baltimore and Beyond (Red Emma’s 1225 Cathedral St. Baltimore)
Patricia Rodney & Jesse Benjamin (Walter Rodney Foundation) Larry Jackson and Kali-Ahset Amen (Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts), and Lester Spence (JHU)

Follow-up Discussion on “Global Groundings: Evaluating the Legacies of Walter Rodney”

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The Arrighi Center organized a lively and stimulating workshop on January 31, entitled “Global Groundings: Evaluating Walter Rodney’s Legacies“.  As a prequel to the workshop, a group of faculty and graduate students met as a reading group during the fall semester to discuss the three main works of Walter Rodney that the workshop took up.  On February 14 we will take a moment to reflect again, taking into account the discussions at the January 31 workshop.  Faculty and graduate students who participated in the fall reading group and/or the January 31 workshop are especially encouraged to attend this follow-up discussion.
Here is a background reading for the Feb 14 meeting:   Wallerstein review of Rodney books

Book manuscript workshop: “Revolution in Development: Mexico and the Governance of the Global Economy” by Christy Thornton (JHU Sociology)

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We will discuss Christy Thornton’s book manuscript, Revolution in Development: Mexico and the Governance of the Global Economy (forthcoming  University of California Press).  Christy is in the process of making the final revisions, so it is a good time for giving feedback before the book goes into press. See the book chapter outline below.
This workshop is part of the Arrighi Center’s ongoing series on one of our four thematic priority areas: “Changing Structures and Norms of Global Governance”. This series of seminars/workshops (beginning in 2018-2019) is also working toward identifying common areas of interest among faculty and students, leading to the possible establishment of  a “Global Governance Research Affinity Group” and/or “Global Governance Research Working Group”
RSVP to Beverly Silver (silver@jhu.edu) if you would like to participate in the workshop on Christy Thornton’s book manuscript. Participants will receive the book manuscript and be asked to read/comment on the Introduction and at least one empirical chapter.  A full schedule for the workshop will be sent out a week before the seminar, once we have received the RSVP’s.
Revolution in Development: Mexico and the Governance of the Global Economy by Christy Thornton (forthcoming with University of California Press)
Chapter Outline:
*Introduction: How Could Mexico Matter?
*Chapter 1: Recognition and Representation: The Mexican Revolution and Multilateral Governance
*Chapter 2: “A New Legal and Philosophic Conception of Credit”: Redefining Debt in the 1930s
*Chapter 3: A Solidarity of Interests: Mexico and the Inter-American Bank
*Chapter 4: Voice and Vote: Mexico’s Post-War Vision at Bretton Woods
*Chapter 5: Within Limits of Justice: The Economic Charter for the Americas and its Critics
*Chapter 6: Organizing the Terms of Trade: Mexico and the International Trade Organization
*Chapter 7: The Price of Success: Navigating the New Development Order During the Mexican Miracle
*Chapter 8: A Mexican International Economic Order?
*Conclusion

Arrighi General Seminar – Fall 2020 Introductory Meeting

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Arrighi General Seminar introductory meeting and informal discussion of Fall 2020 activities. Please email arrighi@jhu.edu to receive Zoom meeting information.

World-Systems Analysis in a Critical Juncture 1: The Legacies of Dependency Theory

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The Arrighi Center is co-sponsoring the 44th Annual Conference on the Political Economy of the World-System, “World-Systems Analysis in a Critical Juncture.” The conference takes place during a critical juncture for both the field of world-systems analysis and for the world-system itself. The first four sessions of the conference bring together papers that reconstruct the theoretical and methodological lineages of world-systems analysis by recuperating neglected foundational texts and by putting the world-systems perspective into dialogue with other critical approaches in the social sciences. The next four sessions deploy tools provided by a world-systems perspective to analyze the multiple intertwined social, political, and economic challenges of the current juncture, illuminating the global crisis and unfolding systemic chaos.

Please click here to pre-register.

Session #1: The Legacies of Dependency Theory

Friday, September 25th, 1:00pm to 3:00pm EST

Discussant: Patricio Korzeniewicz (UMD College Park)

Antonio Brussi (University of Brasilia) – “On Reconstructing the Lineages of World-Systems Analysis”

Kristin Plys (University of Toronto) – “For a Rodneyan World-Systems Analysis”

Matías Vernengo (Bucknell University) – “Unequal Exchange and Dependency in South-South Relations: Marini’s contribution in a classical-Keynesian perspective”

Isis Campos Camarinha (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro) – “The ‘Dialectics of Time’: Alienation on a World Scale Dimension”

World-Systems Analysis in a Critical Juncture 2: Beyond Eurocentrism and European Hegemony

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The Arrighi Center is co-sponsoring the 44th Annual Conference on the Political Economy of the World-System, “World-Systems Analysis in a Critical Juncture.” The conference takes place during a critical juncture for both the field of world-systems analysis and for the world-system itself. The first four sessions of the conference bring together papers that reconstruct the theoretical and methodological lineages of world-systems analysis by recuperating neglected foundational texts and by putting the world-systems perspective into dialogue with other critical approaches in the social sciences. The next four sessions deploy tools provided by a world-systems perspective to analyze the multiple intertwined social, political, and economic challenges of the current juncture, illuminating the global crisis and unfolding systemic chaos.

Please click here to pre-register.

Session #2: Beyond Eurocentrism & European Hegemony

Friday, October 2nd, 10:00am to 12:00pm EST

Discussant: Ravi Palat (SUNY Binghamton)

Elson Boles (Saginaw Valley State University) – “Abu-Lughod, Arrighi, Wallerstein: The transition, the Waves, and the Spiral Evolution of Rights”

Huei-Ying Kuo (Johns Hopkins University) – “From Straits to Straits: Links and Breaks of ‘Overseas Chinese’ Tea Business Networks after the Capitalist Incorporation of Chinese Tea Industry”

Daniele Benzi (Federal University of Bahia) – “Coloniality of Power and non-Eurocentric Global History: Remembering and Debating with Aníbal Quijano (1930-2018)”

Manuela Boatcă (University of Freiburg) – “Global and Regional Transformations: Teaching Walter Rodney and Janet Abu-Lughod in the 21st century”

Policing the Global Crisis, Session I – United Kingdom

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The Arrighi Center is sponsoring a seminar series entitled Policing the Global Crisis.  The first session will focus on the UK with presentations by and discussion with:

  • Stafford Scott (Tottenham Rights, Justice for Mark Duggan, Broadwater Farm Defence Campaign)
  • Adam Elliott-Cooper (Research Associate in Sociology, University of Greenwich)

For the zoom link, please click here to register If you have difficulties registering (e.g., if you don’t have a google account), please send an email request to arrighi@jhu.edu with “Policing the Global Crisis” in subject heading..

Series Theme: The past decade has been characterized by an intertwined explosion of social protest worldwide, a deepening crisis of global capitalism, and increasingly authoritarian and militarized forms of rule—in universities, workplaces, communities, and on the street. The seminar series takes a comparative and global perspective in order to unravel the dynamics of these intertwined processes and to address the urgent question of ‘what is to be done’.

*Our series title is a riff off and homage to Stuart Hall et al’s (1978) Policing the Crisis: Mugging, the State, and Law and Order.

World-Systems Analysis in a Critical Juncture 3: Synergizing World-Systems Analysis

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The Arrighi Center is co-sponsoring the 44th Annual Conference on the Political Economy of the World-System, “World-Systems Analysis in a Critical Juncture.” The conference takes place during a critical juncture for both the field of world-systems analysis and for the world-system itself. The first four sessions of the conference bring together papers that reconstruct the theoretical and methodological lineages of world-systems analysis by recuperating neglected foundational texts and by putting the world-systems perspective into dialogue with other critical approaches in the social sciences. The next four sessions deploy tools provided by a world-systems perspective to analyze the multiple intertwined social, political, and economic challenges of the current juncture, illuminating the global crisis and unfolding systemic chaos.

Please click here to pre-register.

Session #3: Synergizing World-Systems Analysis

Friday, October 9th, 1:00pm to 3:00pm EST

Discussant: Amy Quark (William & Mary)

Volkan Aytar (Virginia Commonwealth University) – “‘Two Cultures,’ Alternative Knowledge Movements and Synergies with World-System Analysis”

Kelvin Santiago (SUNY Binghamton) – “’Primitive’ Accumulation under Historical Capitalism and the Unequal Social Regulation of the Global Labor Force”

Yasemin Bavbek (Brown University) & Juho Korhonen (Boğaziçi University) – “Symbolic Power in World-Systems Ordering: Classification Struggles of the Ottoman and Russian Empires”

David Smith (UC Irvine), Paul Ciccantell (University of Western Michigan), & Elizabeth Sowers (CSU Channel Islands) – “Reconstructing Commodity Chain Analysis as World-Systems Analysis”

World-Systems Analysis in a Critical Juncture 4: Theory & Methodology of Terence K. Hopkins

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The Arrighi Center is co-sponsoring the 44th Annual Conference on the Political Economy of the World-System, “World-Systems Analysis in a Critical Juncture.” The conference takes place during a critical juncture for both the field of world-systems analysis and for the world-system itself. The first four sessions of the conference bring together papers that reconstruct the theoretical and methodological lineages of world-systems analysis by recuperating neglected foundational texts and by putting the world-systems perspective into dialogue with other critical approaches in the social sciences. The next four sessions deploy tools provided by a world-systems perspective to analyze the multiple intertwined social, political, and economic challenges of the current juncture, illuminating the global crisis and unfolding systemic chaos.

Please click here to pre-register.

Session #4: Theory & Methodology of Terence K. Hopkins

Friday, October 16th, 10:00am to 12:00pm EST

Discussant: Beverly Silver (Johns Hopkins University)

Gamze Evcimen (SUNY Binghamton) – “Hopkins & Concepts as Relational Categories: Different Manifestations of the Relationship between Religion & Neoliberalism in the Global South”

Brendan McQuade (University of Southern Maine) & Stuart Schrader (Johns Hopkins University) – “Amorphous Powers and Ill-disciplined Comparisons: Police Power, and Patterns of Imperium, and State-formation”

Fathun K. Satrio (SUNY Binghamton) – “Cycles of Primitive Accumulation: Revisiting Terence Hopkins’ Contributions to Primitive Accumulation”

Mauro Di Meglio (University of Naples “L’Orientale”) – “World-Systems Analysis as Relational      Thinking: Indisciplinarity and the Geopolitics of Epistemological Inclusions/Exclusions”

Policing the Global Crisis, Session II — Brazil

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The Arrighi Center is sponsoring a seminar series entitled Policing the Global Crisis.  The second session will focus on Brazil with presentations by and discussion with:

  • Isabela Souza (Observatório de Favelas)
  • Patricia Sonia Silveira Rivero (Professor, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro)

For the zoom link, please click here to register If you have difficulties registering (e.g., if you don’t have a google account), please send an email request to arrighi@jhu.edu with “Policing the Global Crisis” in subject heading.

Series Theme: The past decade has been characterized by an intertwined explosion of social protest worldwide, a deepening crisis of global capitalism, and increasingly authoritarian and militarized forms of rule—in universities, workplaces, communities, and on the street. The seminar series takes a comparative and global perspective in order to unravel the dynamics of these intertwined processes and to address the urgent question of ‘what is to be done’.

*Our series title is a riff off and homage to Stuart Hall et al’s (1978) Policing the Crisis: Mugging, the State, and Law and Order.