Krieger School of Arts & Sciences > Undergraduate

Engineering

Engineering
Students can: Major Minor
Degrees Offered: BA, BS, MA, MS, PhD
The Whiting School of Engineering provides academic instruction in a wide range of disciplines in nine undergraduate departments, 10 graduate departments, its Engineering for Professionals programs (part-time), and the Center for Leadership Education.

Bioethics

Bioethics
Students can: Minor

Bioethics is dedicated to the identification and exploration of the moral problems which arise in medicine, health care, and the life sciences. The undergraduate minor in bioethics is designed to provide students with the conceptual and analytical tools necessary to address ethical issues in clinical practice, public health, and scientific research, all in both local and global contexts.

The Department of Philosophy collaborates with the Berman Institute of Bioethics to offer this minor.

Environmental Science and Studies

Environmental Science and Studies
Students can: Major Minor
Degrees Offered: BS, BA

The Environmental Science and Studies (ENVS) program provides a supportive yet challenging academic home for students who are passionate about the environment and who want to make a positive difference in the world.

The interdisciplinary ENVS majors and minor introduce students to the Earth’s living and nonliving systems and how humans interact with and affect those systems. The ENVS curriculum is solution-focused, providing students with the tools they need to become the next generation of problem-solvers. Courses examine how the powerful tools of science and policy can be brought to bear on environmental problems and the challenge of developing a more sustainable and equitable society.

Islamic Studies

Islamic Studies
Students can: Minor

The Program in Islamic Studies' minor provides the intellectual and linguistic training to approach Islam — and the world — in a historically and culturally informed way, challenging stereotypes and misconceptions while exploring the diversity and complexity of the world’s second-largest religion.

The combined cross-disciplinary perspectives across history, anthropology, philosophy, history of science, history of art, Near Eastern studies, and others will be generative of a new approach to the scholarship and teaching of Islamic studies. Our aim is to educate our students about Muslims and Islam in historical and comparative perspectives, and in the context of their co-existence with followers of many other faiths.

Medicine, Science, and the Humanities

Medicine, Science, and the Humanities
Students can: Major

Medicine, Science, and the Humanities is an interdisciplinary, humanities-based major using a cultural and historical context to explore scientific inquiry and the roots of medicine. This major is ideal for students who plan to pursue careers in the health professions as well as those interested in issues of importance to science and medicine, and students who plan to pursue graduate work in a range of humanities, social science, or professional disciplines.

Related Programs and Centers

Social Policy

Social Policy
Students can: Minor

The social policy minor brings an interdisciplinary focus to the many social problems facing a city such as Baltimore and the nation as a whole and encourages the search for policy solutions to those problems.

Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond (360.247) is cross-listed in the departments of economics, political science, and sociology. The course is open to all undergraduates and is a required course for the social policy minor.

In addition to the introductory course, students are offered a range of 300-level elective courses across the three disciplines of economics, political science, and sociology. Students wishing to complete the minor then apply for an intensive semester experience in either Baltimore or Washington, D.C., in the spring of their junior year. The intensive semester combines small, interdisciplinary classes with an internship experience in the social policy field. Fifteen students are accepted at each location, with priority given to students majoring in economics, political science, or sociology. Finally, all students participate in a senior capstone seminar.

Global Studies

Global Studies

The Arrighi Center for Global Studies is an interdisciplinary research center based in the social sciences, focusing on the study of urgent contemporary problems arising from processes of globalization. As the successor to Hopkins’ Institute for Global Studies in Culture Power and History (IGS)—which Arrighi directed from 1999–2002—it serves as a hub for international collaboration between Hopkins faculty, graduate students, advanced undergraduate students, and counterparts from around the world, especially from Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

It provides the the Global Social Change and Development major for undergraduate students. It also encourages the active participation of graduate students in all its activities including seminars and research working groups.

The center carries out its mission through various activities including:

  • Sponsoring research working groups
  • Organizing seminar series, workshops, and mini-conferences
  • Hosting post-doc fellows and visiting scholars from around the world
  • Organizing an annual distinguished lecture
  • Establishing partnerships with local civil society organizations working in the center’s main areas of concern
  • Promoting graduate and undergraduate training through research practices and curriculum development

Archaeology

Archaeology
Students can: Major
Degrees Offered: BA

The Johns Hopkins Undergraduate Program in Archaeology is an interdepartmental program that introduces students to archaeological theory, the analysis of archaeological materials, and the results of archaeological research in prehistoric and early historic periods in the Old and New Worlds.

Archaeology studies human societies through examination of their material culture (physical remains), considering such issues as human subsistence, interaction with climate and physical environment, patterns of settlement, political and economic organization, and religious activity and thought. The field allows for the study of the entirety of human experience from its beginnings to the present day, in every region of the world and across all social strata.

Students in the major will have the opportunity to study and conduct research on materials stored in the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Collection, which consists of a diverse and extensive assemblage of artifacts from ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Palestine, and Mesoamerica. Opportunities may also be available to study materials in the Classical, Egyptian, and Near Eastern collections in the Walters Art Museum, as well as to conduct fieldwork at faculty-sponsored archaeological digs in Egypt.

Related Programs and Centers

Visual Arts

Visual Arts

For the minor in visual arts, students may focus on either traditional studio courses or a digital
 curriculum. They have the option to combine the two tracks for a more
diverse, if more general, experience.

The core requirements include either Studio Drawing I (studio track) or Introduction to Digital Photography (digital track) and a History of Art course pertinent to the student’s field of interest. Students may count as many as two visual arts courses taken at MICA,
 but not offered at Hopkins, toward the minor.


The Homewood Art Workshops provide a studio environment in which undergraduates can pursue their creative interests. Through classes offered by the Homewood Art Workshops, students can enrich their lives while diversifying and broadening their educational experience.

Music

Music
Students can: Minor

There are many options for Krieger School students wanting a formal or informal music component included in their programs. For less formal options, such as taking classes, arranging lessons, participating in chamber music, establishing a music minor, or simply attending concerts, visit the Peabody Conservatory website.

If you are enrolled in the Krieger School of the Arts and Sciences or the School of Engineering, you can pursue two degrees simultaneously—the one you have selected in your school and a bachelor of music degree at Peabody Conservatory. Due to the performance requirement for admissions, you must (in addition to being accepted at the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences) apply, audition, and be accepted to Peabody. Admission to the double degree program is competitive. Auditions are held in February and May for entrance the following fall. Your individual course of study will be determined by discussions between advisers at Peabody Conservatory and the Krieger School. You can expect to take five or six years to finish both degrees.

Music as a Major

A Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree majoring in music is not offered at the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences or at Peabody. Bachelor's degrees at Peabody are all Bachelor of Music (BM) degrees based on a high-level performance curriculum.

Music as a Minor

The Krieger School of Arts and Sciences offers a music minor for students who have some training and background in music and wish to pursue their interest in a systematic way without getting their degree in the field. It consists of a selection of music courses, including music history, theory, ensembles and/or lessons.

Cross-Registration

If you have a musical goal that can be reached through specific classes or private lessons at Peabody, you may cross-register. With the approval of the appropriate dean of your division at Johns Hopkins, you may take advantage of the resources of both the Preparatory (pre-college) and Conservatory (college) branches of Peabody.

Lessons and ensemble studies at Peabody are on a space-available basis. There is an advantage to signing up early. For details, an information sheet entitled "How to Cross-Register to Peabody" is available from your academic adviser's office.

Pre-Law

Pre-Law

Johns Hopkins does not offer an undergraduate major in law, but does offer a pre-law program. This program is not a major but part of a pre-professional advising track program. Additional information about all pre-professional programs can be found on the The Office of Pre-Professional Advising website.

Any Johns Hopkins undergraduate student, pursuing any of our arts and sciences or engineering majors, may also pursue the pre-law advising track. The pre-professional advisers work with the students, providing them with academic advising, assistance in selecting the proper courses, and helping with the graduate school application process. Therefore, during the application process, students interested in law can choose whichever major they want.

Women, Gender, and Sexuality

Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Students can: Minor

The Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality (WGS) promotes interdisciplinary scholarship on women, gender, sexuality, and related issues. The program coordinates a wide array of course offerings for both undergraduate and graduate students. It incorporates non-Western intellectual traditions where gender and sexuality are discussed in relation to class, ethnicity, and race in everyday life, political organization, and situations of violent conflict.

The program also provides opportunities for intellectual exchange across disciplines by sponsoring lectures, symposia, seminars, and workshops for faculty and students alike. Through both interdisciplinary and specialized courses, students are encouraged to develop critical and comparative approaches to the study of gender and associated topics; race, class, and violence being among them.