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Blood, paper and Spit:The Korean War through the Prism of the Interrogation Room

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JHU th Annual Public Health in Asia Symposium

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The Public Health in Asia Symposium is hosting its annual event this Saturday, March 2nd from 9-2PM in Hodson 311. The theme of this year’s symposium is “Advancing Equity, Driving Innovation” and will display a wide variety of undergraduate and graduate research from the Bloomberg School of Public Health as well as keynote speakers Colonel Randy Bagwell, Director of International Humanitarian Law (IHL) at the American Red Cross and Dr. Bruce Lee, an executive Director of the Global Obesity Prevention Center (GOPC). The symposium plans to explore public health issues and innovative approaches in Asia and bring forth a holistic view of Asia’s public health status through a representation of many different nations. This year’s symposium will be held in collaboration with the American Mock World Health Organization to bring forth a further insights on public health innovation. The symposium will be divided into two sessions: Session 1- Student presenters (9AM – 11AM); Session 2-Keynote speakers (11AM – 1PM) and catered lunch and networking event afterward. 
 
Free breakfast and lunch will be catered from THB and Panera in addition to networking opportunities with the speakers and attendees. Please attend this event to learn about relevant public health research, network with renowned faculty and speakers, and receive breakfast and lunch!
Please visit our website and Facebook page for more information:
Website: https://jhuphasxamwho.wixsite.com/phasxamwho
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/556919304818845/?active_tab=discussion

Studying Strategies And Joys Of Lifelong Mandarin

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Mandarin skills have been the common thread in Robert Daly’s varied/checkered
33-year career as a diplomat, teacher, actor/producer (A Native of Beijing in New
York, Chinese Sesame Street), government and corporate consultant, interpreter
for Chinese and American leaders, American Director of the Hopkins-Nanjing
Center, and think tank analyst. Mr. Daly will share his advice on strategies for
Chinese-language study and the challenges of maintaining Mandarin skills outside the classroom.

The U.S.- China Trade War: What Have We Learned So Far?

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was never just about the trade deficit. Donald Trump correctly insists that
America didn’t start the latest round of trade frictions; it was belatedly
responding to Chinese practices that previous U.S. presidents had complained of
for years. Xi Jinping, reasonably, sees American insistence on Chinese
“structural reform” as an assault on his Party’s governance that is tantamount to
a call for regime change. Chinese soybean purchases and American sanctions
relief won’t mend the matter. Domestic politics in both nations, irreconcilable
strategic goals, and competing values and historical illusions will prevent the
21st Century’s two great powers from satisfying each other—or even managing their differences well—for several decades.

Now, Later, Never: Candlelight Protests and Queer Futurity

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It has become commonplace to argue that the so-called Candlelight Revolution in South Korea in 2016-17
succeeded in achieving what had seemed impossible: impeaching and ousting the right-wing President for
corruption and abuse of power and installing a new, liberal government. In such jubilant view, the
candlelight protests drew from the legacies of pro-democracy movements of the 1980s and reinvigorated
forms of decentralized collective action since then, spectacularly demonstrating the will of the people and
the power of peaceful mass mobilization. But there is a critical aspect that profoundly troubles this
dominant narrative of political transformation—queer and feminist dissenting voices that were silenced
and told to wait until later. Engaging with the idea of sigisangjo, an idiom that denotes being premature or
being out of order, I discuss in this talk the time and place for queer politics and radical social change.
Ju Hui Judy Han is a cultural geographer and assistant professor in Gender Studies at UCLA. Her comics
and writings about (im)mobilities, faith-based movements, and queer politics have been published in
journals including Geoforum, Critical Asian Studies, positions: asia critique, and Journal of Korean Studies
as well as in several edited books including Q&A: Queer in Asian America (1998), Territories of Poverty:
Rethinking North and South (2015) and Ethnographies of U.S. Empire (2018). She is currently working on
two book manuscripts—one on evangelical geopolitics and missionary aspirations, and another on queer
activism and minority formations.

Dealing with Poisons: The Production and Circulation of Medical Knowledge in Tang China (7th and 8th centuries)

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Poisons figured saliently as therapeutic agents in classical Chinese pharmacy. How was the knowledge of its usage produced, controlled, and circulated? Focusing on the 7th and 8th centuries, when for the first time in Chinese history the state actively engaged in the making of pharmacological knowledge, this talk examines how the Tang court collected information about poisons from all corners of the empire, and regulated their usage for effective governance. Furthermore, this state-produced knowledge changed as it travelled from the center to the peripheries of the empire when it was adapted by local actors to fit the resources at hand. The talk demonstrates that the central government’s efforts to standardize knowledge of poisons through its patronage of authoritative texts went hand in hand with its fluid transformations upon transmission in society, contingent upon local conditions and practical needs.

Tiananmen 1989-30 years later: “the Gate of Heavenly Peace” Documentary Screening & A Conversation with the director

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Punitive Containment through Welfare Provision? Protests and the Implementation of the Dibao Program in Contemporary China

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The East Asian Studies Speaker Series Proudly Presents Returning Sociology Alumni Burak Gurel and Erdem Yoruk
Speakers:  Burak Gurel and Erdem Yoruk
Punitive Containment through Welfare Provision? Protests and the Implementation of the Dibao Program in Contemporary China
Abstract: By providing cash assistance to about 50 million poor people, the Minimum Livelihood Guarantee Scheme (Dibao) of the People’s Republic of China is one of the largest social assistance programs in the contemporary world. Based on two panel datasets on protest events and Dibao provision, we address the question whether contentious politics plays a role in the expansion or contraction of Dibao provision. Our analysis shows that higher protests lead to less social assistance between 2013 and 2016, suggesting that during the Xi Jinping era the Chinese government punishes the protesting citizens by limiting their access to social welfare.
Erdem Yörük (PhD JHU, 2012) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Koç University, Istanbul and an associate member in the Department of Social Policy and Intervention at the University of Oxford. His work focuses on social welfare and social policy, social movements, political sociology, and comparative and historical sociology. He has publications in the New Left Review, Governance, Politics & Society, South Atlantic Quarterly, Current Sociology, Social Indicators Research and International Journal of Communication and a forthcoming book The Politics of the Welfare State in Turkey from the University of Michigan Press. His research has been funded by the ERC, European Commission, NSF and the Ford Foundation.
Burak Gürel is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at Koç University in Istanbul, Turkey. He earned his PhD in sociology from Johns Hopkins University in 2015. His research interests include political economy, historical sociology, rural development, social movements and welfare politics, with a focus on China, India and Turkey. He has published in the Journal of Peasant Studies, Journal of Agrarian Change, Rural China, and in several edited volumes.

Tiananmen 1989-30 years later: “the Gate of Heavenly Peace” Documentary Screening & A Conversation with the director

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Tiananmen 1989-30 years later:“the Gate of Heavenly Peace”A Conversation with the Director

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