News & Events Archive


How Humanities Can Help Fix the World

As academe’s hoped-for recovery from the 2008 financial crisis recedes before it like the shimmer of water on a hot roadway, the problems of its humanities component are up close and all too real. Read the Chronicle of Higher Education’s article entitled  How Humanities Can Help Fix the World.


Italian Graduate Student Conference

VERSUS: Antagonism, Self-Criticism, and Hostility in Literature and Art: Italian Graduate Conference Sept. 16-17: Join the Italian Graduate Students for their annual conference featuring keynote speakers Natalie Hester and Stanley Fish.


The Fourth Singleton Distinguished Lecture Series

Charles S. Singleton Center for the Study of Premodern Europe presents the Fourth Singleton Distinguished Lecture Series, "Papal Bull: Politics, Propaganda, and Print in Renaissance Rome," by Margaret Meserve, University of Notre Dame. Three lectures held at Homewood, Johns Hopkins University, Sept. 19-22, 2016. At the close of the Middle Ages, the papacy controlled the largest, most sophisticated communication apparatus of any state in Europe. Yet the late medieval papacy was also an institution in crisis, facing doctrinal and political challenges from all sides. The fifteenth-century popes deployed various strategies to reinforce their claims to authority – diplomatic, doctrinal, ritual, architectural, and artistic. These lectures will explore how the Renaissance papacy added the new technology of printing to its political armamentarium in the first fifty years after the invention of movable type.


Critical Climate Thinking Lecture Series: September 22

Critical Climate Thinking is an interdisciplinary lecture series that aims to generate a conversation concerning climate change not merely as a scientific phenomenon but as a persistent dimension of lived experience. It approaches the cosmos not only as an object outside us, but as something in us. On Thursday, Sept. 22, Peter K. Haff, Professor Emeritus of Geology and Civil and Environmental Engineering at Duke University, will discuss, "Do Humans Cause Climate Change? The Earth’s Perspective."


How did a classics major end up working for the United States Navy?

How did a classics major end up working for the United States Navy?
From the Spring 2016 issue of Arts & Sciences Magazine: What to do with a PhD in classical studies when you realize you don’t want to enter academia? As it turns out, you have more options than you might think. Such was the discovery of Kristina Giannotta ’03 (PhD), now branch head of histories for the […]


Students from the Program for Museums and Society help plan a unique exhibition

Students from the Program for Museums and Society help plan a unique exhibition
From the Spring 2016 issue of Arts & Sciences Magazine: Sometimes, as 11 undergraduates learned during the spring semester, the most interesting thing about a book is not the words it contains, but the actual book itself. When, exactly, is an object a book, and when is it not? How does the physical book relate to […]


A conversation with Professor Bill Egginton about the complexities of Don Quixote

A conversation with Professor Bill Egginton about the complexities of <em>Don Quixote</em>
From the Spring 2016 issue of Arts & Sciences Magazine: William Egginton says he isn’t tilting at windmills when contending that the conventional wisdom about Don Quixote doesn’t even scrape the surface of Miguel de Cervantes’ 17th-century masterpiece. “People think it’s about idealism or windmills, or it’s a work of satire,” says Egginton, the Andrew W. […]


The Hopkins Review quietly becomes a force among university literary magazines

<em>The Hopkins Review</em> quietly becomes a force among university literary magazines
From the Spring 2016 issue of Arts & Sciences Magazine: It takes a certain amount of courage to publish a serious, print-based literary magazine these days. Readers have too many claims on their increasingly fragmented attention, and anyone with access to a computer or a smartphone can publish his or her work online as soon as […]


Johns Hopkins establishes Humanities Institute

Philanthropist Elizabeth Grass Weese and her brother, Roger Grass, have committed $10 million to advance humanities scholarship and teaching at the Johns Hopkins University and to promote literature, art, philosophy, history, and other cultural studies in Baltimore and the wider community. Their gift, through the Alexander Grass Foundation, is the largest ever to Johns Hopkins exclusively for the support of the humanities.