Society of Fellows in the Humanities

The Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University has created a new and distinctive form of intellectual community with its Society of Fellows in the Humanities. The Society of Fellows will assemble a select group of PhD and MFA recipients to pursue a range of meaningful careers available to scholars in the Humanities and Humanistic Social Sciences. In a fellowship year that combines research with hands-on experience, fellows will build on their doctoral training even as they explore new applications for their academic expertise. 

This initiative has three major goals:

  • Provide recent graduates with an opportunity to expand their areas of interest and expertise.
  • Increase the hiring potential of Krieger School graduates.
  • Give PhD candidates incentive to finish their degree in a timely manner.
  • Display the value of the humanities both within Johns Hopkins and outside of the university.

Krieger School students who complete their PhD in the humanities or related disciplines no more than 12 months before the start date are eligible for this award.

The Path Forward

Through an annual competition, the Society of Fellows will aim to award 12-month Postdoctoral Fellowships, which are renewable for one year. The first cohort (AY 2022-23) was announced in spring 2022. Each fellow will receive a salary of $55,000, plus a $1,500 research budget and health insurance.  

This first cohort will include eight to nine fellows. The Krieger School aims to increase the cohort size to by three to four, providing postdoctoral fellowships to at least 12 candidates each year.

The KSAS Society of Fellows promises to be a transformative experience for the fellows and the organizations with whom they partner. It taps the truly dynamic potential of a graduate degree in the Humanities, offering a model for the future of graduate studies. 

Virginia Jewiss, Associate Director, Alexander Grass Humanities Institute

2022-2023 Fellows

Marc Alsina

Marc Alsina

During his tenure with the Society of Fellows Marc is working in partnership with the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum to develop skills in curation and public history. He previously earned his PhD in the History of Science and Technology at Johns Hopkins University with his dissertation research focusing on the technical and cultural history of aviation in Argentina. At the Smithsonian, Marc is assisting on a curatorial project, crafting articles on Latin American aviation for the museum’s publications and blog, and transforming his dissertation into a book manuscript. 

Cara Cummings

Cara Cummings

Dr. Cara Rei Cummings is pleased to be working at the Office of Undergraduate Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity. At URSCA she is a co-instructor of the Summer Humanities Collaboratory, a program bringing visiting students from HBCUs and community colleges to Hopkins to do and present research in the humanities. Dr. Cummings is also editor of the Macksey Journal and coordinator of the Annual Macksey Symposium. These are both platforms for undergraduate research that many of our Collaboratory Students will be taking advantage of. Finally, Dr. Cummings is a mentor for all undergraduate researchers at Hopkins, humanities and STEM.   

Gabriella Fee

Gabriella Fee 

Gabriella Fee will complete a public-facing fellowship at the nonprofit Writers in Baltimore Schools, where they will design and adapt curricula, compile data on student and instructor experience, and teach creative writing pedagogy to Johns Hopkins undergraduate students. 

Jo Giardini

Jo Giardini

Jo Giardini will be working between the Winston Tabb Special Collections Research Center in the Sheridan Libraries, and the Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality in order to develop university collections and programing related to queer and trans studies, and to teach courses grounded in queer and trans material histories. They will also be initiating work on a public facing research project on Johns Hopkins’ Gender Identity Clinic, and its closure in the 1970s. 

Spencer Hupp

Spencer Hupp

Spencer acts as an assistant liaison between the Writing Seminars and Sheridan Libraries, adjunct to specialist librarian Heidi Herr. Together they tailor a collection of manuscripts, literary artifacts, and reference items to the needs of Writing Seminars undergraduates and MFA candidates, working to further integrate the libraries into Writing Seminars curricula.

Spencer earned his MFA from the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars in 2022. His poetry and criticism appears with the Times Literary Supplement, the Sewanee Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, Commonweal, and Literary Matters, among others. His adjacent research interests include German literature and translation.   

Jacob Kripp

Jacob Kripp

Jacob is teaching courses on Frantz Fanon, Global White Supremacy, and Fascism in the Political Science Department. In addition to teaching, Jacob will help coordinate the racial politics working group, which aims to center the study of race, racism, and empire across the subfields of Political Science. 

Sarah Ross

Sarah Ross

Sarah Ross (English) will complete a university administrative fellowship at the Alexander Grass Humanities Institute with a focus on expanding Blast Courses in the Humanities and other public humanities initiatives. 

Elisa Santucci

Elisa Santucci

Elisa Santucci (Modern Languages and Literatures) is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, with a parallel research project on the anecdote. Elisa will be working on several projects focusing on trans lives and studies. While developing a project on the collection of narratives of trans students, staff and faculty regarding their JHU experience, he will also be organizing a panel on Johns Hopkins’ historical relationship to transphobia and gender discrimination, and a conference on the developments in trans studies, with the goal of integrating researchers from a variety of subject areas and disciplines.  

Rachel Waxman

Rachel Waxman

Rachel Waxman will be working with the Vice Dean for Graduate Education to analyze job placement data for doctoral students across the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. As the academic job market has become increasingly precarious, the need to understand career outcomes for doctoral students has become more important than ever. Rachel will be working with career outcomes data that has been collected by departments over the past several years as well as speaking with PhD-holders who have pursued careers beyond the academy.

This research will help individual departments and the university as a whole better understand career outcomes at the doctoral level. However, the ultimate aim of this project is to use career outcomes findings to articulate the wider social value of the PhD beyond the academy.