Undergraduate Courses

All current offerings are below. This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found on the SIS website. To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

German Elements I

Four skills introduction to German language and culture. Develops proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills through the use of basic texts, multi-media, and communicative language activities.Online tools required. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Tuesday section is a mandatory hour; choose your section based on the MWF time. Conflicts with Tuesday hour can be resolved after start of semester. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin. Students wishing to retain credits for German Elements I must complete German Elements II with a passing grade.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate German I

Taught in German. This course continues the same four-skills approach (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) from the first-year sequence, introducing and practicing more advanced topics and structures. Expansion and extension through topical readings and discussion and multi-media materials. Online tools required. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced German I: Cultural Topics of the Modern German-speaking World

Taught in German. Required for Major & Minor. Topically, this course focuses on defining moments in cultural history in German speaking countries in the 2nd half of the 20th century. Films, texts and other media provide a basis for discussing events in post-war Germany from 1945 to 1989. A review and expansion of advanced grammatical concepts and vocabulary underlie the course. Focus on improving expression in writing and speaking. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Elements I

Four skills introduction to German language and culture. Develops proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills through the use of basic texts, multi-media, and communicative language activities.Online tools required. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Tuesday section is a mandatory hour; choose your section based on the MWF time. Conflicts with Tuesday hour can be resolved after start of semester. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin. Students wishing to retain credits for German Elements I must complete German Elements II with a passing grade.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Elements I

Four skills introduction to German language and culture. Develops proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills through the use of basic texts, multi-media, and communicative language activities.Online tools required. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Tuesday section is a mandatory hour; choose your section based on the MWF time. Conflicts with Tuesday hour can be resolved after start of semester. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin. Students wishing to retain credits for German Elements I must complete German Elements II with a passing grade.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate German I

Taught in German. This course continues the same four-skills approach (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) from the first-year sequence, introducing and practicing more advanced topics and structures. Expansion and extension through topical readings and discussion and multi-media materials. Online tools required. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate German I

Taught in German. This course continues the same four-skills approach (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) from the first-year sequence, introducing and practicing more advanced topics and structures. Expansion and extension through topical readings and discussion and multi-media materials. Online tools required. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate German II

Taught in German. This course is designed to continue the four skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) approach to learning German. Readings and discussions are topically based and include fairy tales, poems, art and film, as well as readings on contemporary themes such as Germany’s green movement. Students will also review and deepen their understanding of the grammatical concepts of German. May not be taken for S/U.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Trust: Literature and Philosophy

Fake news, policing crises, political polarization, and the like challenge us to reevaluate the notion of trust. The course takes up this challenge with the help of both literary and philosophical texts that shall assist us in posing, and trying to answer, questions such as the following: What or whom should we trust (ourselves, others, neither)? Is it possible and sometimes even preferable not to trust? Or should we cultivate trust in society? If so, how? Authors may include ETA Hoffmann, Hegel, Nietzsche, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Elements II

Continuation to the introduction to the German language and a development of reading, speaking, writing & listening through the use of basic texts and communicative activities. The culture of the German-language countries is also incorporated into the curriculum. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Tuesday hour is mandatory. May not be taken for S/U.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced German I: Cultural Topics of the Modern German-speaking World

Taught in German. Required for Major & Minor. Topically, this course focuses on defining moments in cultural history in German speaking countries in the 2nd half of the 20th century. Films, texts and other media provide a basis for discussing events in post-war Germany from 1945 to 1989. A review and expansion of advanced grammatical concepts and vocabulary underlie the course. Focus on improving expression in writing and speaking. Language Program Director: Deborah Mifflin

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, Postcolonial, Queer and Other

Is it clear what “knowledge” means? Does it have the same meaning historically, across different academic disciplines and in daily life? Rather than posing questions about the nature of knowledge explored in the branch of philosophy known as epistemology, this course will propose a minoritized critical inquiry into the matter of knowledge/s. Through works by Black, feminist, queer, and postcolonial theorists such as Patricia Hill Collins, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Donna Haraway, we will address alternative epistemologies that operate with “partial” or “unfinished” models. Understanding knowledge as unfinished rather than universal enables consequential dialogue to take place: no longer focused on judgments, thought remains open to the ideas of others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Panorama of German Thought

This course introduces students to major figures and trends in German literature and thought from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. We will pay particular attention to the evolution of German political thought from the Protestant Reformation to the foundation of the German Federal Republic after WWII. How did the Protestant Reformation affect the understanding of the state, rights, civic institutions, and temporal authority in Germany? How did German Enlightenment thinkers conceive of ethics and politics or morality and rights? How do German writers define the nation, community, and the people or das Volk? What is the link between romanticism and nationalism? To what degree is political economy, as developed by Marx, a critical response to romanticism? How did German thinkers conceive of power and force in the wake of World Wars I and II? What are the ties that bind and rend a community in this tradition? We will consider these and related questions in this course through careful readings of selected works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT

Existentialism in Literature and Philosophy

This course explores the themes of existentialism, including the meaning of existence, the nature of the self, authenticity and inauthenticity, the inescapability of death, the experience of time, anxiety, freedom and responsibility to others, in literary and philosophical works. It will be examined why these philosophical ideas often seem to demand literary expression, or bear a close relation to literary works. Readings may include writings by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Heidegger, Rilke, Kafka, Simmel, Jaspers, Buber, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Camus.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Flucht und Migration: Literarische Erkundungen

We will study how contemporary German literature reflects the experiences of migrants and refugees. Jenny Erpenbeck’s novel Gehen, ging, gegangen (2017) and Sasha Marianna Salzmann’s novel Außer sich (2018) will serve as our main examples, complemented with shorter texts and other material on the historical and political contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-GERM

Ghost Stories, Haunted House and Other Occult Phenomena

From the eighteenth century to the modern period, German authors have been obsessed with uncanny phenomena that blur the line between the natural world and the supernatural world of ghosts, spirits, and magic. We will explore the encounter with otherworldly phenomena in this course with a special emphasis on the status of literature as a play of semblance or collection of shadows. Why have ghost stories been so persistent in the modern era when science and reason are said to dominate our understanding of the world? Is the occult the dark side of science? What kind of knowledge does literature yield? What can literature tell us about what is random, obscure, or inexplicable?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.210.161 (03)German Elements IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMMifflin, Deborah McGeeMaryland 309
AS.210.261 (01)Intermediate German IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMWheeler, Heidi LGilman 75
AS.210.361 (02)Advanced German I: Cultural Topics of the Modern German-speaking WorldMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMifflin, Deborah McGeeGilman 134
AS.210.161 (01)German Elements IMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMMifflin, Deborah McGeeGilman 134
AS.210.161 (02)German Elements IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMMifflin, Deborah McGeeBloomberg 178
AS.210.261 (03)Intermediate German IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMWheeler, Heidi LBloomberg 276
AS.210.261 (02)Intermediate German IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMWheeler, Heidi LGilman 186
AS.210.262 (01)Intermediate German IIMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMWheeler, Heidi LGilman 186
AS.213.271 (01)Trust: Literature and PhilosophyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMYonover, Jason MauriceMaryland 309
AS.210.162 (01)German Elements IIMTWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMMifflin, Deborah McGeeKrieger 304
AS.210.361 (01)Advanced German I: Cultural Topics of the Modern German-speaking WorldMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMMifflin, Deborah McGeeBloomberg 178
AS.211.362 (01)Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, Postcolonial, Queer and OtherM 1:30PM - 4:00PMNitis, MayaMaryland 217GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMTobias, RochelleLatrobe 107GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT
AS.213.374 (01)Existentialism in Literature and PhilosophyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaShaffer 100GRLL-ENGL
AS.213.340 (01)Flucht und Migration: Literarische ErkundungenTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMPahl, KatrinSmokler Center LibraryGRLL-GERM
AS.213.380 (01)Ghost Stories, Haunted House and Other Occult PhenomenaWF 3:00PM - 4:15PMTobias, RochelleKrieger 205GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL