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All Italian Courses

All current offerings are below. This listing provides a snapshot of courses within this program and may not be complete. All course registration information can be found on the SIS website.

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Italian Elements I
AS.210.151 (02)

This course sequence (AS.210.151 and AS.210.152) is an introduction to Italian for students with no previous exposure to the language. By the end of the academic year, you will be able to meet basic needs in an Italian-only environment. Examples include introducing yourself, asking for and giving directions, ordering a meal at a restaurant, describing and asking information about places and people, and engaging in a simple phone conversation. Advanced speakers of other Romance languages (e.g. French, Spanish, Portuguese) are encouraged to enroll in AS.210.175 (Accelerated Italian for Speakers of Other Romance Languages I)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Cerreti, Marta, Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Wyman Park N105
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Elements I
AS.210.151 (03)

This course sequence (AS.210.151 and AS.210.152) is an introduction to Italian for students with no previous exposure to the language. By the end of the academic year, you will be able to meet basic needs in an Italian-only environment. Examples include introducing yourself, asking for and giving directions, ordering a meal at a restaurant, describing and asking information about places and people, and engaging in a simple phone conversation. Advanced speakers of other Romance languages (e.g. French, Spanish, Portuguese) are encouraged to enroll in AS.210.175 (Accelerated Italian for Speakers of Other Romance Languages I)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo, Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Elements I
AS.210.151 (04)

This course sequence (AS.210.151 and AS.210.152) is an introduction to Italian for students with no previous exposure to the language. By the end of the academic year, you will be able to meet basic needs in an Italian-only environment. Examples include introducing yourself, asking for and giving directions, ordering a meal at a restaurant, describing and asking information about places and people, and engaging in a simple phone conversation. Advanced speakers of other Romance languages (e.g. French, Spanish, Portuguese) are encouraged to enroll in AS.210.175 (Accelerated Italian for Speakers of Other Romance Languages I)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo, Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Accelerated Italian for Advanced Speakers of other Romance Languages
AS.210.175 (01)

This course sequence (AS210.175 and AS210.176) is designed for advanced speakers of other Romance languages (e.g. French, Spanish, Portuguese), and will cover the same material as the regular-track Italian Elements I and II (AS.210.151 and AS.210.152) and Intermediate Italian I and II (AS.210.251 and AS.210.252) courses. Upon successful completion of both semesters, students will be allowed to register for AS.210.351 (Advanced Italian I).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Italian I
AS.210.251 (02)

This course sequence (AS.210.251 and AS.210.252) will reinforce your ability to engage in complex daily tasks in Italian, and will introduce you to more formal academic and real-world topics. By the end of the academic year, you will be able to write a strong résumé and cover letter in the European format, sit a job interview in Italian, and participate in debates on simple topics. You will also read five engaging short stories, watch several Italian films, and discuss topics such as emigration and immigration from/to Italy, the protection of the environment, and the history of the Italian South.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo, Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Wyman Park N105
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Italian I
AS.210.351 (01)

This highly interactive course focuses on complex historical and contemporary themes, and is ideal, among others, for students who are specializing in international studies, medicine, psychology, and cognitive science. Students will analyze authentic texts and audiovisual materials on topics including the history of the Sicilian mafia, mental health and the deinstitutionalization movement in Italy, Europe and Italy in the 1960s-1980s, the role of curiosity and amazement in scientific discovery and art, and intercultural differences around hilarity. Taught in Italian.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Cipriani, Giulia M., Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.
AS.211.222 (01)

This course traces the history of Italian cinema from the silent era to the new millennium, highlighting its main trends and genres, and reflecting on the major transformations modern and contemporary Italian society experienced over the twentieth and twentieth-first centuries. We shall examine iconic films such as Vittorio De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves, Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura, and Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Mamma Roma, that received international recognition and influenced other national, cinematic productions. We shall also look at the work of less famous, or independent filmmakers who received less critical attention. While this class takes an historical approach, it also includes a theoretical component and introduces students to the specificity of the cinematic language, examining films in relation to the mise-en-scène, frame composition, camera movements, editing, and sound. This class is taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Wegenstein, Bernadette
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Italian Journeys: An Other Story
AS.214.363 (01)

What does it mean to be “other,” and how can reading about experiences of otherness affect our understanding of historical moments? In this interdisciplinary survey of contemporary Italian literature, students will read through the lens of “the other” in order to highlight both the milieu of lived experiences (often lived by the authors themselves) outside of sociocultural ideals, and the role they play within modern Italian canon. Combining gender studies, animal studies, posthumanism, and other theoretical frameworks, students will examine works from authors such as Sibilla Aleramo, Carlo Levi, Elena Ferrante, Igiaba Scego, and directors Vittorio De Sica, and Alice Rohrwacher. Taught in English—students wishing to do coursework in Italian should register for AS.214.363 (02).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 11:00AM - 12:45PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura, Zawacki, Samuel James
  • Room: Gilman 492
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Dante Visits the Afterlife
AS.214.479 (01)

One of the greatest works of literature of all times, the Divine Comedy leads us down into the torture-pits of Hell, up the steep mountain terrain of Purgatory, through the “virtual” space of Paradise, and then back to where we began: our own earthly lives. We accompany Dante on his journey, building along the way knowledge of medieval Italian history, literature, philosophy, politics, and religion. The course also focuses on the arts of reading deeply, asking questions of a text, and interpreting literary and scholarly works through discussion and critical writing. Conducted in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Teoria e Prassi della Glottodidattica dell’Italiano
AS.214.607 (01)

The goal of this course is to familiarize Graduate Student Instructors in Italian with foundational elements of Second Language Acquisition and foreign language teaching. The course will (1) acquaint students with historical and current theories of foreign language pedagogy; (2) demonstrate strategies to integrate theoretical knowledge into everyday practice, both in terms of instructional delivery, and materials development; (3) introduce participants to basic evaluation tools to critically assess teaching practices and tools in terms of quality, relevance, validity, reliability and other theory-based criteria; (4) help participants to articulate their own pedagogical training and philosophy of teaching in preparation for the academic job market. Taught in Italian.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:30PM - 5:30PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Nonhumans of Renaissance Humanism
AS.214.610 (01)

This course is an exploration of the notions of the human that emerge when interrogating pre-modern Italian literary constructions of nonhuman entities (water, earth, flora, fauna, objects, buildings, cities, automata, demons, angels, gods, and God). We will read work by authors such as Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Pico, Alberti, Leonardo, Sannazaro, Baldi, and Della Porta, as well as parts of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, and selections from bestiaries, herbaria, and books of emblems. Accompanying these readings are recent studies in critical theory on posthumanism and transhumanism, animal studies, ecocriticism, and phenomenology.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:30PM - 5:30PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Independent Study
AS.214.861 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Independent Study
AS.214.861 (02)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Independent Study
AS.214.861 (03)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Dissertation Research
AS.214.862 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Dissertation Research
AS.214.862 (02)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Dissertation Research
AS.214.862 (03)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Proposal Preparation
AS.214.863 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Proposal Preparation
AS.214.863 (02)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Proposal Preparation
AS.214.863 (03)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Elements II
AS.210.152 (02)

Course helps students develop basic listening, reading, writing, speaking, and interactional skills in Italian. The content of the course is highly communicative, and students are constantly presented with real-life, task-based activities. Course adopts a continuous assessment system (no mid-term and no final).

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Elements II
AS.210.152 (03)

Course helps students develop basic listening, reading, writing, speaking, and interactional skills in Italian. The content of the course is highly communicative, and students are constantly presented with real-life, task-based activities. Course adopts a continuous assessment system (no mid-term and no final).

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Accelerated Italian for Advanced Speakers of other Romance Languages II
AS.210.176 (01)

This is the second part of an elementary Italian language course sequence designed for advanced speakers of other romance languages (e.g. French, Spanish, Portuguese). This course will cover the same material as the regular-track Intermediate Italian I and II courses. Students completing this course with a grade of B or higher will be allowed to register for AS210.351 (Advanced Italian I) in the Fall term. Pre-requisite: Completion of AS.210.175 with a grade of B or higher, or Italian Language Program Director permission.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Zannirato, Alessandro
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Italian II
AS.210.252 (01)

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Intermediate Italian I (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Italian II
AS.210.352 (01)

Course presents a systematic introduction to a variety of complex cultural and historical topics related to present-day Italy, emphasizing intercultural comparisons, interdisciplinarity, and encouraging a personal exploration of such topics. Course adopts a continuous assessment system (no mid-term and no final).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Cipriani, Giulia M.
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Made in Italy: Italian style in context
AS.211.224 (01)

Italy and the “Italian style” have become synonym of exquisite taste, class, and elegance thanks to the quality of Italian craftsmanship. This course will explore some of the major factors that contributed to the rise of Italian fashion and Italian industrial design as iconic all around the world. The classes will focus on the main protagonists and art movements that influenced the development of Italian style. We will analyze trends, clothing, and style not only in a historical context, but also through a critical apparatus that will include themes related to gender, culture, power, and politics. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required, but those who can read in Italian will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL, MLL-ITAL

Dante Translating / Translating Dante
AS.211.435 (01)

This course begins with a close reading of Dante’s Vita nuova. Simultaneously a profound exploration of the power of love and an elaborate experimentation with poetic form, this enigmatic work is also a meditation on translation: of life to text; of prose to verse; of the divine to human, and vice versa. Key passages in the Divine Comedy, in which the poet rewrites Homer, Virgil, the Bible, and himself, will highlight the centrality of translation to the creative process. Questions of originality, appropriation, and revision will be further explored through works by Charles Baudelaire, Robert Penn Warren, Jorge Luis Borges, Louise Gluck, Elizabeth Alexander, Allegra Goodman, and Christine and the Queens, all of whom translate Dante’s new life into something uniquely their own.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Jewiss, Virginia C
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, MLL-ITAL

World Science Fiction
AS.214.225 (01)

This course explores the local, global, and universal natures of the speculative genre of science fiction (SF) from the early twentieth century through the present. It highlights works from the Golden Age (late 1930s-’50s), the New Wave of the 1960s and ’70s, cyberpunk in the 1980s, and today’s various sub-genres and cross-over incarnations. We will approach the genre as a mode of thought-experimentation and world-building that problematizes actual and possible political, cultural, natural, cosmic, and techno-scientific realities. Among the themes included are the human-machine interface, environmental apocalypse, the alien, utopia-dystopia. Readings/viewings/listenings include short stories from nearly every continent, short films and tv episodes, visual art, music, journalism, and literary criticism. All materials and lectures in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/50
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, MSCH-HUM

Collecting and its Discontents
AS.214.307 (01)

This seminar will be concerned with resonances between collectors, artists, poets, and other hallowed figures of modernity, and their less celebrated doubles: hoarders, bibliomaniacs, ragpickers, and gleaners. We will examine the material practices and psychic mechanisms that define these identities and authorize distinctions between them, as well as the historical contexts from which they emerge. More broadly, we will grapple with the relationships between objects and narrative. We will ask how the human-object practices of collecting, hoarding, gleaning, scavenge, misuse, and fetishism change when performed in the immaterial realm of language, and what these practices look like as rhetorical and narrative strategies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (01)

What does it mean to traverse a name? What’s in a name? What if that name is Orpheus, one of antiquity’s most renowned poets? In this class we will try to answer these three questions. We will follow the myth of Orpheus from its origins in antiquity to the Italian Renaissance. Our aim will be to look at the ways a name and, in this case, a story is able to take on different forms as it travels through time and as it is being narrated. Through the texts of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio and Poliziano, we will compare their delivery of the myth against those of the Roman poets Virgil and Ovid. Via a close reading of each text, we will use elements inherent to the story such as love, loss, pain, dismemberment, identity, gender and sexuality to explore the concept of multiplicity within a single unity. Historical contextualization, literary theory, textual criticism and reception will serve as further tools to help us in our questioning. Ultimately, we will follow the journey of transformation of the myth to ask ourselves two final questions: is it the same story? Are we the same readers? No prior knowledge of any of the texts is necessary. The course will be taught in English with section 02 available in Italian for Italian Majors and Minors to fulfill their requirements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 2:00PM - 4:30PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Avesani, Tatiana Ioanna
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (02)

What does it mean to traverse a name? What’s in a name? What if that name is Orpheus, one of antiquity’s most renowned poets? In this class we will try to answer these three questions. We will follow the myth of Orpheus from its origins in antiquity to the Italian Renaissance. Our aim will be to look at the ways a name and, in this case, a story is able to take on different forms as it travels through time and as it is being narrated. Through the texts of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio and Poliziano, we will compare their delivery of the myth against those of the Roman poets Virgil and Ovid. Via a close reading of each text, we will use elements inherent to the story such as love, loss, pain, dismemberment, identity, gender and sexuality to explore the concept of multiplicity within a single unity. Historical contextualization, literary theory, textual criticism and reception will serve as further tools to help us in our questioning. Ultimately, we will follow the journey of transformation of the myth to ask ourselves two final questions: is it the same story? Are we the same readers? No prior knowledge of any of the texts is necessary. The course will be taught in English with section 02 available in Italian for Italian Majors and Minors to fulfill their requirements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Avesani, Tatiana Ioanna
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Carlo Emilio Gadda and the Neo-Avant-Garde
AS.214.609 (01)

This course is dedicated to the work of Carlo Emilio Gadda, the great neurotic polymath sometimes referred to as “the Italian James Joyce,” and his outsize influence on neo-avant-garde and experimentalist literary movements of the 1960s and 1970s. We will read selections from Gadda’s two major novels, La cognizione del dolore and Quer pasticciaccio brutto de’ via Merulana, divulgative science writings and other fascist-era journalism, as well as the vitriolic antifascist treatise, Eros e Priapo. Our study of Gadda will include discussions of the critical approaches that ground Gadda studies, from rigorous philology to affect theory, science studies, and new materialism. We will then turn to the “Nipotini dell’Ingegnere”— those named by Alberto Arbasino in his influential essay of that title (himself, Giovanni Testori, and Pier Paolo Pasolini); as well as writers of the neo-avant-garde who sought to continue Gadda’s legacy by emulating his famously “baroque” style marked by wild digressions and the extensive use of regional dialects and neologisms. We conclude the semester with a reading of Carla Lonzi’s 1969 Autoritratto and a study of the circulation of ideas and praxes between literary and visual neo-avant-garde movements in Italy and beyond. Throughout the semester, we will attend to ongoing debates about illegibility, engagement, realism, and the aesthetics of obscenity. Class conducted in English. All Italian texts will also be available in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:30PM - 5:30PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL

Purgatorio and Purgatories
AS.214.614 (01)

While the concept of purgatory for the departed has long been part of many cultures' beliefs, it was Dante who offered Western thought one of the most detailed architectures of this transitional space to date. The second book in the Divine Comedy trilogy, the Purgatorio is Dante's most relatable of the three otherworldly realms. For one, purgatory is not eternal. It is also a highly organized system, explores a kind of justice that seems more fair than eternal punishment, and it offers something the two other realms do not: hope. In reading the Purgatorio closely, students will explore medieval theories of divine justice, human justice, penance, piety, and morality—many of which still inform our thinking today about right action and the common good. Much attention will be given to literary analysis of the poem. Students will also read commentaries and critical studies on Dante’s Purgatorio, as well as on “purgatories” from other cultures and traditions. Offered in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:30PM - 5:30PM 01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room: Gilman 478
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL

Professional Training - Italian
AS.214.850 (01)

Training for professional academic purposes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Independent Stdy
AS.214.861 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00 - 9.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Independent Stdy
AS.214.861 (02)

  • Credits: 3.00 - 9.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Dissertation Res
AS.214.862 (01)

  • Credits: 10.00 - 20.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Dissertation Res
AS.214.862 (02)

  • Credits: 10.00 - 20.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Dissertation Res
AS.214.862 (03)

  • Credits: 10.00 - 20.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Proposal Prep
AS.214.863 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00 - 9.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Proposal Prep
AS.214.863 (02)

  • Credits: 3.00 - 9.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Proposal Prep
AS.214.863 (03)

  • Credits: 3.00 - 9.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-23-2023 to 04-28-2023
  • Instructor: Saiber, Arielle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Location Term Course Details
AS.210.151 (02)Italian Elements IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMCerreti, Marta, Zannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.151 (03)Italian Elements IMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMProietti, Leonardo, Zannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.151 (04)Italian Elements ITTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMProietti, Leonardo, Zannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.175 (01)Accelerated Italian for Advanced Speakers of other Romance LanguagesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMZannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.251 (02)Intermediate Italian IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMProietti, Leonardo, Zannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.351 (01)Advanced Italian IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCipriani, Giulia M., Zannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.211.222 (01)Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMWegenstein, BernadetteHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.363 (01)Italian Journeys: An Other StoryTTh 11:00AM - 12:45PMDi Bianco, Laura, Zawacki, Samuel JamesHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.479 (01)Dante Visits the AfterlifeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.607 (01)Teoria e Prassi della Glottodidattica dell’ItalianoT 3:30PM - 5:30PMZannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.610 (01)The Nonhumans of Renaissance HumanismW 3:30PM - 5:30PMSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.861 (01)Italian Independent StudyDi Bianco, LauraHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.861 (02)Italian Independent StudyStephens, Walter EHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.861 (03)Italian Independent StudyStaffHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.862 (01)Italian Dissertation ResearchDi Bianco, LauraHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.862 (02)Italian Dissertation ResearchStephens, Walter EHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.862 (03)Italian Dissertation ResearchStaffHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.863 (01)Italian Proposal PreparationDi Bianco, LauraHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.863 (02)Italian Proposal PreparationStephens, Walter EHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.214.863 (03)Italian Proposal PreparationStaffHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.152 (02)Italian Elements IIMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMZannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.210.152 (03)Italian Elements IIMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMZannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.210.176 (01)Accelerated Italian for Advanced Speakers of other Romance Languages IITTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMZannirato, AlessandroHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.210.252 (01)Intermediate Italian IIMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMProietti, LeonardoHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.210.352 (01)Advanced Italian IIMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCipriani, Giulia M.Homewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.211.224 (01)Made in Italy: Italian style in contextMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMProietti, LeonardoHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.211.435 (01)Dante Translating / Translating DanteT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJewiss, Virginia CHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.225 (01)World Science FictionMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.307 (01)Collecting and its DiscontentsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.362 (01)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernF 2:00PM - 4:30PMAvesani, Tatiana IoannaHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.362 (02)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMAvesani, Tatiana IoannaHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.609 (01)Carlo Emilio Gadda and the Neo-Avant-GardeTh 3:30PM - 5:30PMSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.614 (01)Purgatorio and PurgatoriesM 3:30PM - 5:30PMSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.850 (01)Professional Training - ItalianSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.861 (01)Italian Independent StdyDi Bianco, LauraHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.861 (02)Italian Independent StdySaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.862 (01)Italian Dissertation ResDi Bianco, LauraHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.862 (02)Italian Dissertation ResStephens, Walter EHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.862 (03)Italian Dissertation ResSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.863 (01)Italian Proposal PrepDi Bianco, LauraHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.863 (02)Italian Proposal PrepStephens, Walter EHomewood CampusSpring 2023
AS.214.863 (03)Italian Proposal PrepSaiber, ArielleHomewood CampusSpring 2023