News & Events Archive


Perspectives on Slavery in Baltimore: April 19

Perspectives on Slavery in Baltimore: April 19
Come to a panel discussion about the early 19th century enslaved community that lived and worked at Homewood before the farm would become a university campus in the 20th century. Consider challenges and best practices for public historians in reading the African presence back into the landscape of the historic sites and museums of the United States. RSVP to homewoodmuseum@jhu.edu. Related video: From […]


April 6: Does Conservation Challenge Art History?

April 6: Does Conservation Challenge Art History?
Monday, April 6, 2015, 5:00 p.m. 132 Gilman Hall Conservation challenges art history as a discipline. As part of the material turn in the human sciences, restoration history requires not only a theoretical or historical approach of artworks, but also a closer look at the material objects themselves, along with the people, actions and displays […]


Trending on Instagram…

Trending on Instagram…
Footlocker, Thomas Teurlai's solo American debut, was curated by M&S senior Joseph Shaikewitz as a Capstone project in Museums and Society and supported by an Arts Innovation Grant funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Popular art blog Hyperallergic featured the exhibition on Instagram. Click to learn more.


March 9: The Life and Death of Metadata

March 9: The Life and Death of Metadata
Join us March 9 at 5:15 p.m. for a talk by Yanni Alexander Loukissas. What does data visualization offer the humanities? How do we evaluate it as a method and analytical tool for research? What are the politics of metadata? Professor Loukissas' work explores digital futures for scholarship in the arts and humanities. His talk will offer a scientific and cultural history of metadata from Boston's vast and venerable Arnold Arboretum as part of a broader inquiry focused on explaining how data organize knowledge at collecting institutions. Click to learn more.


A Sense of Place: Hidden Stories of the Homewood Campus

A Sense of Place: Hidden Stories of the Homewood Campus
In 2014, students from the Program in Museums and Society explored the history of the Homewood campus alongside experts in heritage studies. In a hands-on, exploratory course, they developed "A Sense of Place," a series of 10 interpretive signs that highlight locations around campus. Read more on the Hopkins Retrospective site.


Nov. 18: “A Tea Jar Named Chigusa and the Art of Tea in Japan”

Nov. 18: “A Tea Jar Named Chigusa and the Art of Tea in Japan”
Louise Cort, Curator of Ceramics at the Freer and Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., speaks about the fascinating life history of this seemingly ordinary clay jar that found celebrity in Japan. Co-sponsored by the Walters Art Museum, this lecture continues the program’s investigations into matters of materiality.