Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Malcolm and Martin: An Introduction to the Lives and Thought of Two Icons of the Black Freedom Struggle
AS.060.328 (01)

Using their recorded speeches, written lectures and published writings and drawing from their biographies, this course will explore the important life work of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. We intend to upend traditional conversations about political radicalism and ethnic politics by analyzing these spokesmen associated most indelibly with black nationalism and racial integration, respectively.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation
AS.100.123 (01)

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Larson, Pier M
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA

The Haitian Revolution in Global Perspective
AS.100.376 (01)

An advanced undergraduate seminar tracing the history of the Haitian Revolution from its origins in the early modern Atlantic world to its global impact and continuing legacies in the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Gaffield, Meredith Michelle
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Land, Labor and Environmental Movements in Contemporary Africa
AS.230.219 (01)

The course examines the new wave of social protest and popular uprisings in contemporary Africa through the interconnected themes of land, labor, and environmental movements. Attention will be placed on the early 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jacobs, Ricado Eduard
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Economics of Poverty/Inequality
AS.180.355 (01)

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Moffitt, Robert A
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/32
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Gangster Films
AS.061.328 (01)

The bad guy as hero from Little Caesar to Goodfellas. Film screenings Th 7:30-10:00 PM, Sun 7:00-9:30 PM. Lab fee: $40.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:20PM, S 7:00PM - 9:30PM Screenings, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Bucknell, Lucy
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern France
AS.212.413 (01)

Across the 20th century, mainstream and avant-garde French culture was deeply impacted by the presence of African American musicians and performing artists hailing from the jazz tradition. From the Josephine Baker craze of the 1920s to the second post-war which welcomed the innovations of bebop and sixties-era free improvisation, metropolitan France proved a space where expatriate and exiled African Americans could both perpetuate the tradition and innovate by turns. At the same time, French taste-makers, critics, and musicians eager to adopt new forms and styles debated the extent to which American jazz music in its various strains could be made French. This course in transcultural French studies will feature readings in music criticism, history, and literature, as well as frequent close listening. It will culminate in an international symposium (to be held Nov. 15 and 16; attendance mandatory) uniting noted scholars and legendary jazz musicians. Although some background in French language and basic musical notation is desirable (students are encouraged to engage in original-source research), all core course readings will be provided in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Schilling, Derek
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL

Migrants and Refugees in Africa
AS.100.444 (01)

A history of forced and voluntary migration and displacement in Africa, its causes and consequences, with a focus on refugees and labor migrants since 1960.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Larson, Pier M
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/33
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development
AS.230.265 (01)

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students. Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences"

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kang, Minhyoung
  • Room: Krieger 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy Perspectives
AS.230.320 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/25
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Passing in American Culture
AS.362.203 (01)

This course will examine film and literary narratives of “passing” in 20th century America. We will study texts that feature people who cross social boundaries of race, class, sexuality, and gender, and consider what “passing” reveals about American social mobility.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Police and Prisons in Comparative Perspective
AS.362.314 (01)

This course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of two parts. First, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Second, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-AFAMER, INST-CP, INST-AP

Introduction to African American Literature (Part 1)
AS.362.123 (01)

This course will survey African American Literature from the 19th century to the late 20th century. We will turn to prose, poetry, and drama to explore the various ways black writes have engaged U.S. culture, history, and politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of African American Studies, with attention to the literature, film, culture, history, and politics of black life in the United States. Our reading list will likely include texts by David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E.W. Harper, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America
AS.230.385 (01)

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.060.328 (01)Malcolm and Martin: An Introduction to the Lives and Thought of Two Icons of the Black Freedom StruggleTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Lawrence PMaryland 217ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.100.123 (01)Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, InnovationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLarson, Pier MGilman 17HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.376 (01)The Haitian Revolution in Global PerspectiveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGaffield, Meredith MichelleGilman 186HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 313INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.219 (01)Land, Labor and Environmental Movements in Contemporary AfricaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJacobs, Ricado EduardMaryland 104INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.180.355 (01)Economics of Poverty/InequalityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMoffitt, Robert AHodson 203SPOL-UL
AS.061.328 (01)Gangster FilmsM 3:00PM - 5:20PM, S 7:00PM - 9:30PM Screenings, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucyGilman 186FILM-CRITST
AS.212.413 (01)For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern FranceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSchilling, DerekGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.444 (01)Migrants and Refugees in AfricaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMLarson, Pier MGilman 400HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 305INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.230.265 (01)Research Tools for Global Sociology and DevelopmentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKang, MinhyoungKrieger 108
AS.230.320 (01)Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy PerspectivesT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieHodson 311SPOL-UL
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyHodson 211INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.362.203 (01)Passing in American CultureTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani TMergenthaler 266
AS.362.314 (01)Police and Prisons in Comparative PerspectiveMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceRemsen Hall 1AFRS-AFAMER, INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.362.123 (01)Introduction to African American Literature (Part 1)WF 1:30PM - 2:45PMMott, Shani TMergenthaler 252
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMJackson, Lawrence PGilman 55
AS.230.385 (01)Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LHodson 301INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Disposable People: Race, Immigration and Biopolitics
AS.190.311 (01)

This course will explore theories and practices of race and immigration in order to illuminate the proliferation of populations regarded as disposable in contemporary politics. We will pay special attention to the contestable criteria used to determine eligibility for membership in the human race. We shall also examine how political power influences the relays between citizenship status and those whose lives are worthy of protection, and those who should be allowed to die.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt
AS.130.126 (01)

A basic introduction to Egyptian Religion, with a special focus on the nature of the gods and how humans interact with them. We will devote particular time to the Book of the Dead and to the "magical" aspects of religion designed for protective purposes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jasnow, Richard
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 3/100
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (01)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (02)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing Whiteness
AS.100.354 (01)

This course will turn to known and not-so-known black writers during the early to mid-twentieth century who defied literary expectation and wrote stories that featured or focused on whiteness. We will consider what whiteness offered black writers and the political work that their literary experimentations did for a white American publishing industry.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of Civilizations
AS.130.203 (01)

This course examines Africa’s ancient past from the emergence of biologically modern humans, ancient hunter-gatherers, the earliest animal herding and farming populations, to cities and civilizations. While Egypt plays an undeniably central role in world history, this course concentrates in particular on ancient geographies other than Egypt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC

The Idea of Power
AS.150.404 (01)

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

The American Welfare State
AS.190.380 (01)

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Trump. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP

Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore Area
AS.190.410 (01)

This course uses a community based learning approach to inquire into the presence of the Rastafari community in the Baltimore area. Most people will have heard of Rastafari through the music of Bob Marley. People might not know, however, that Rastafari emerges out of and has been part of a global history of liberation struggles. This course is co-taught with a local Rastafari organization. You will be intellectually and practically equipped to take part in a project of original research on the Rastafari presence in the Baltimore region, starting with the demonization of the movement in the 1980s “war on drugs” and including the movement’s response.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, CSC-CE

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal Justice
AS.191.303 (01)

In this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of critical race theory, including its genesis in legal theory. The course will examine its relationship and importance to social movements, including through key concepts like intersectionality. The course will also use critical race theory to grapple with law, racial segregation, and the criminal justice system in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL

Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in America
AS.194.210 (01)

This course explores how American Muslims navigate and contest complex notions of belonging in the context of national conversations on race, gender, citizenship, and national security. With a focus on specific case studies that range from Black Muslim movements of the early twentieth century to the ongoing War on Terror, the course adds complexity to the public conversation on what it means to be Muslim - and what it means to be American. We will draw on history, ethnography, first-person narratives, films, blogs, documentaries and fiction. As a Community Engaged course, the class will include site visits and learning with and from Muslim communities in Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP, CSC-CE

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (01)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Leaf, Philip
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Accelerated Portuguese
AS.210.290 (03)

No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is an accelerated Portuguese introductory course. Encourages rapid acquisition by intensive exposure to the language through immersion activities, video[F1] s and culture. The course will cover the basics of Portuguese grammar. Students will be encouraged to use the language through communicative activities, listening and writing activities. Students will develop an intermediate level of proficiency in Portuguese. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiker, Magali T
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Qualitative Research Practicum
AS.230.323 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. This course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for the Sociology major.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Amen Strayhorn, Kali-ahset
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

Baltimore and Beyond
AS.230.357 (01)

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Accelerated Portuguese
AS.210.290 (02)

No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is an accelerated Portuguese introductory course. Encourages rapid acquisition by intensive exposure to the language through immersion activities, video[F1] s and culture. The course will cover the basics of Portuguese grammar. Students will be encouraged to use the language through communicative activities, listening and writing activities. Students will develop an intermediate level of proficiency in Portuguese. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Maryland 109
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Accelerated Portuguese
AS.210.290 (01)

No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is an accelerated Portuguese introductory course. Encourages rapid acquisition by intensive exposure to the language through immersion activities, video[F1] s and culture. The course will cover the basics of Portuguese grammar. Students will be encouraged to use the language through communicative activities, listening and writing activities. Students will develop an intermediate level of proficiency in Portuguese. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiker, Magali T
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (04)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Leaf, Philip
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Africana Studies
AS.362.112 (01)

This course introduces students to the field of Africana Studies. It focuses on the historical experience, intellectual ideas, theories, and cultural production of African-descended people. We will consider how people of the black diaspora remember and encounter Africa. We will explore, too, how such people have lived, spoken, written, and produced art about colonialism and enslavement, gender and mobility, violence and pleasure. This course will be thematically organized and invite you to center your own stories about black people within your understanding of the modern world and its making.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (03)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Leaf, Philip
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Black Against Empire
AS.362.315 (01)

This course will examine the confrontation of Black social movements with imperialism in the twentieth century. How, we will ask, have key Black internationalist thinkers conceptualized and defined diaspora, capitalism, imperialism, war, and the global? What have been the effects of war and repression, as well as economic growth and globalization, on Black internationalism? Readings may include texts by W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Y. Davis, Frantz Fanon, Ashley Farmer, Claudia Jones, Robin D.G. Kelley, Claude McKay, Huey P. Newton, Walter Rodney, Malcolm X, etc. Students will complete a research paper on a topic of their own choosing related to Black internationalism in the twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP

Portuguese Conversation
AS.210.222 (01)

Portuguese Conversation is a course designed for students who finished one semester in Portuguese and above students who are eager to improve their conversational language skills. In this course, students will be motivated to speak from a range of resources and materials such as the Internet, short stories, films, and current news. Students will practice Portuguese to build confidence, develop fluency, and improve pronunciation and accuracy. Grammar will be reviewed as needed in class, but most of it will be done outside of class with tutors or a TA, freeing class time for more communicative activities. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.177 or equivalent. May be taken concurrently with other courses in Portuguese. May be taken Pass/Fail.

  • Credits: 1.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Spiker, Magali T
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (02)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Leaf, Philip
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.190.311 (01)Disposable People: Race, Immigration and BiopoliticsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Mattin Center 162INST-PT
AS.130.126 (01)Gods and Monsters in Ancient EgyptMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJasnow, RichardGilman 50ARCH-RELATE
AS.100.282 (01)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.282 (02)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.354 (01)Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing WhitenessTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani TRemsen Hall 1HIST-US
AS.130.203 (01)Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of CivilizationsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 17ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC
AS.150.404 (01)The Idea of PowerTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLebron, Christopher JosephMaryland 202INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.190.380 (01)The American Welfare StateTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, DanielAbel Wolman House 100POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP
AS.190.410 (01)Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore AreaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMShilliam, RobertKrieger 300POLI-IR, CSC-CE
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisSmokler Center LibraryHIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.191.303 (01)Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal JusticeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger LavertyPOLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL
AS.194.210 (01)Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in AmericaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, HomayraKrieger 302ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP, CSC-CE
AS.280.120 (01)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipHodson 210
AS.210.290 (03)Accelerated PortugueseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiker, Magali TGilman 77
AS.230.323 (01)Qualitative Research PracticumTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAmen Strayhorn, Kali-ahsetMattin Center 162CSC-CE
AS.230.357 (01)Baltimore and BeyondT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieAbel Wolman House 100SPOL-UL
AS.210.290 (02)Accelerated PortugueseMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaMaryland 109
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 4:30PM - 5:20PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 413INST-AP
AS.210.290 (01)Accelerated PortugueseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMSpiker, Magali THodson 315
AS.280.120 (04)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipHodson 210
AS.362.112 (01)Introduction to Africana StudiesWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMMott, Shani TShaffer 300
AS.280.120 (03)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipHodson 210
AS.362.315 (01)Black Against EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger LavertyINST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.210.222 (01)Portuguese ConversationW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSpiker, Magali TMaryland 114
AS.280.120 (02)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipHodson 210