Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896
AS.100.108 (02)

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Freshman Seminar: American Slavery
AS.100.211 (01)

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives. Freshman only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Freshman Seminar: Health, Healing, and Medicine in Africa
AS.100.205 (01)

A freshman seminar introducing students to the history of health, healing, and forms of medical practice in Africa over the last two centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896
AS.100.108 (04)

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

"All Art is Propaganda"
AS.060.327 (01)

This course will explore black literature written as protest. We will examine how, in the face of threats to black life, Frances E.W. Harper, Richard Wright, Amiri Baraka, and others have realized versions of W.E.B. Du Bois’s objective: “all art is propaganda and ever must be, despite the wailing of the purists.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Gender and Sexuality in African History
AS.100.430 (01)

An upper-level history reading seminar with a focus on histories of gender and sexuality in colonial and postcolonial Africa.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896
AS.100.108 (03)

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896
AS.100.108 (01)

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Writing Africa Now
AS.060.129 (01)

This course surveys post-2000 literary and cultural production from sub-Saharan Africa. Topics will include debates over genre and fiction’s relevance to African experience, legacies of canonical writing about independence, urban Africa as violent or “tragic” landscape, and problems of scale and geographical context. Readings by authors such as Adichie, Wainaina, Duiker, and Vladislavic, and students will be introduced to the main print and online arteries of African intellectual discussion. This class is for non-majors and does not count towards the English major or minor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Science and Technology in Slave Regimes
AS.140.328 (01)

What does science and technology look like in slave regimes? This seminar explores this question from a trans-national perspective by comparing cases in the Antebellum US, Cuba, Brazil and other countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM

Jim Crow in America
AS.100.486 (01)

This course explores the history, politics, and culture of legalized racial segregation in the United State between the mid-nineteenth and twentieth centuries – a regime commonly known as “Jim Crow.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Black Women Writers
AS.362.301 (01)

This course will introduce students to a variety of works written by black women of the Diaspora with a focus on the U.S. We will consider how women have theorized power, engaged history, and creatively imagined both the past and the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The politics of contemporary black film
AS.362.216 (01)

Over the past few years films such as Black Panther, Get Out, and Black KKKlansman have been both critical and economic successes, significantly changing how we think of “black films” as a genre. What do these films tell us about what it means to be black at this specific moment in time? How is what these films tell us shaped by how they are produced? How do the circulation of concepts like “Wakanda Forever!” shape political imaginations? When we watch these films how are our own ideas change? As a particularly powerful form of popular culture, film not only entertains, but it educates, and in some instances propagandizes. This is no less true of black films than it is of non-black ones. In this class we will examine a range of recent popular black films with an eye to examining the politics of their production, circulation, and consumption.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom
AS.190.284 (02)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to African American Literature (Part 1)
AS.362.123 (01)

This course will survey African American Literature from the 19th century to the late 20th century. We will turn to prose, poetry, and drama to explore the various ways black writes have engaged U.S. culture, history, and politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Rastafari: Race and Resistance on a Global Scale
AS.190.410 (01)

The study of race has in recent years taken a global turn, such that nationally-inscribed struggles over racism have been increasingly re-narrated as part of struggles over global order. In this class we will use the Rastafari faith to examine the challenges that this global turn presents to the study of race. Gestated in the 1930s Caribbean, drawing upon a long tradition of North American Ethiopianism, and rising to global prominence by the 1980s, the Rastafrai faith connects all corners of the Black world and far beyond. As such, an examination of Rastafari can tell us much about the prospects of - and difficulties in – overturning racism as a global ordering principle. Open to Seniors Only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom
AS.190.284 (03)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

The American Welfare State
AS.190.380 (01)

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Obama. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/17
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP

Race and Segregated Time
AS.190.419 (01)

This course explores how time, and not just space, is segregated along racial lines. We shall examine how racial injustices are experienced as impositions on human time, how resistance to racial inequality has often been figured in temporal terms, and what it means to think in untimely ways that challenge how the extended lifespans of racially dominant groups is contingent upon the foreshortened lifetimes of racial others. Readings will bring political theory into contact with contemporary experiences of race, such as: criminal (in)justice, environmental racism and the proliferation of human disposability. Recommended Course Background: One Political Theory course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, SPOL-UL

Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom
AS.190.284 (04)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom
AS.190.284 (01)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in America
AS.194.210 (01)

This course explores how American Muslims navigate and contest complex notions of belonging in the context of national conversations on race, gender, citizenship, and national security. With a focus on specific case studies that range from Black Muslim movements of the early twentieth century to the ongoing War on Terror, the course will add complexity to the public conversation on what it means to be Muslim - and what it means to be American. The course will draw on history, ethnography, first-person narratives, films, blogs, documentaries and fiction.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP

The Idea of Power
AS.150.404 (01)

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

African American Family
AS.230.316 (01)

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development
AS.230.265 (01)

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students. Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences"

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (01)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Baltimore and Beyond
AS.230.357 (01)

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (02)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (04)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (03)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Curatorial Seminar
AS.389.420 (01)

In collaboration with a local museum, conceptualize and develop an exhibition, potentially including but not limited to: checklists, exhibition texts, interpretive strategies, and programming. Exhibition theme varies year to year. Concepts, ethics and practicalities of curation are key concerns. Research visits to regional museums and private collections as relevant.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Police and Prisons in Comparative Perspective
AS.362.113 (01)

Course description: (modified slightly) This introductory course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of three parts. First, we will define key concepts in police and prison studies. Then, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Third, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-AP

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This is the gateway class to the study of African American life, culture, politics and history in the United States and the Caribbean. African American Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study that includes history, social sciences, literature and the arts. This academic discipline is often taught under parallel terms emphasizing related geographies and identifying concepts: Black Studies, Afro-American Studies, Africana Studies, Pan-African Studies and African Diaspora Studies. Unlike every other modern academic discipline in the college, African American Studies was founded because of a social and political revolution. The class has two purposes, operating in tandem: (1) provide students with a generous historical, political and cultural overview of the lives of African descendants in the western hemisphere, but principally in North America; (2) explicitly address the problem of regularized systemic inequality in American society as a response to and an attempt to dominate a core nugget of identity difference that is the operative mechanism in black protest, resistance and revolt. This is a difference that includes, but is not limited by or reducible to morphology, culture, history, and ontology. We accept as an operating principle that an inquiry into an enslaved group of nonwestern human beings marked by difference cannot rely solely on the western episteme for its excavation. Thus, we will examine a body of diverse evidence during the semester, works of literature, history, sociology, political science, music and film. The course requirements include essays, examinations, and presentations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Black Utopias
AS.362.311 (01)

In this course, we will read literary and historical texts that present visions of black utopia. Authors include “Ethiop” (William J. Wilson), Marcus Garvey, Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Collections Remix
AS.389.378 (01)

The course invites students to mine the archival, literary and cultural collections of the university for materials that reflect African-American experiences and stage campus interventions based on their findings. Participates in the Housing Our Story: Archival Justice for Black Baltimore project. M&S Practicum..

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.108 (02)Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Jessica MarieHodson 210HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.211 (01)Freshman Seminar: American SlaveryTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMorgan, PhilipGilman 75HIST-US
AS.100.205 (01)Freshman Seminar: Health, Healing, and Medicine in AfricaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMLarson, Pier MGilman 413HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 277HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.108 (04)Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJohnson, Jessica MarieHodson 210HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.060.327 (01)"All Art is Propaganda"TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNurhussein, NadiaGilman 134
AS.100.430 (01)Gender and Sexuality in African HistoryT 4:00PM - 6:30PMLarson, Pier MGilman 308HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.108 (03)Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJohnson, Jessica MarieHodson 210HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.108 (01)Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Jessica MarieHodson 210HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.060.129 (01)Writing Africa NowTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Jeanne-MarieMaryland 217
AS.140.328 (01)Science and Technology in Slave RegimesW 1:30PM - 3:50PMKargon, Robert H, Portuondo, Maria MGilman 300INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.486 (01)Jim Crow in AmericaT 3:00PM - 5:30PMConnolly, Nathan DGilman 75HIST-US
AS.362.301 (01)Black Women WritersM 9:00AM - 11:30AMMott, ShaniMergenthaler 266
AS.362.216 (01)The politics of contemporary black filmM 1:30PM - 3:50PMSpence, LesterParkway Theater 2
AS.190.284 (02)Classics of Political Theory: Political FreedomMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Gilman 50INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.362.123 (01)Introduction to African American Literature (Part 1)MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMott, ShaniGilman 217
AS.190.410 (01)Rastafari: Race and Resistance on a Global ScaleTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMShilliam, RobertLatrobe 107POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.284 (03)Classics of Political Theory: Political FreedomMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Gilman 50INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.380 (01)The American Welfare StateTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, DanielAbel Wolman House 100POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP
AS.190.419 (01)Race and Segregated TimeT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Greenhouse 113POLI-PT, INST-PT, SPOL-UL
AS.190.284 (04)Classics of Political Theory: Political FreedomMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Gilman 50INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.284 (01)Classics of Political Theory: Political FreedomMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Gilman 50INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.194.210 (01)Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in AmericaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, HomayraMergenthaler 426ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP
AS.150.404 (01)The Idea of PowerTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLebron, Christopher JosephGilman 288INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.230.316 (01)African American FamilyTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAmen Strayhorn, Kali-ahsetGilman 413INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.265 (01)Research Tools for Global Sociology and DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKang, MinhyoungKrieger 108
AS.280.120 (01)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipMergenthaler 111
AS.230.357 (01)Baltimore and BeyondT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieAbel Wolman House 100SPOL-UL
AS.280.120 (02)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipMergenthaler 111
AS.280.120 (04)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipMergenthaler 111
AS.280.120 (03)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipMergenthaler 111
AS.389.420 (01)Curatorial SeminarTh 4:15PM - 6:45PMKingsley, Jennifer PGilman 277
AS.362.113 (01)Police and Prisons in Comparative PerspectiveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceShaffer 100INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Lawrence PMergenthaler 266
AS.362.311 (01)Black UtopiasTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNurhussein, NadiaKrieger 306
AS.389.378 (01)Collections RemixF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsley, Jennifer PGilman 413PMUS-PRAC

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

African-American Political Thought
AS.191.110 (11)

This course surveys key writings within African-American political thought, a rich tradition that transforms the way one understands essential aspects of political science, like citizenship, nationalism, social movement strategy, democracy, state violence, and political economy. It begins with abolitionism and extends to the present day Black Lives Matter movement. The focus will be on primary texts, and classes will offer historical context. No prior knowledge in political theory needed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.191.110 (11)African-American Political ThoughtMWF 1:00PM - 4:15PMGuha-Majumdar, JishnuKrieger 309INST-PT

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature I
AS.210.391 (01)

This third-year course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will read two complete works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers each semester, followed by intense writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Prereq: 210.278 or placement test. Permission required

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economics of Discrimination
AS.180.252 (01)

This course examines labor market discrimination by gender, race and ethnicity in the United States. What does the empirical evidence show, and how can we explain it? How much of the difference in observed outcomes is driven by differences in productivity characteristics and how much is due to discrimination? How have economists theorized about discrimination and what methodologies can be employed to test those theories? What has been the impact of public policy in this area; how do large corporations and educational institutions respond; and what can we learn from landmark lawsuits? The course will reinforce skills relevant to all fields of applied economics, including critical evaluation of the theoretical and empirical literature, the reasoned application of statistical techniques, and analysis of current policy issues. Seniors by Permission Only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Malcolm and Martin: An Introduction to the Lives and Thought of Two Icons of the Black Freedom Struggle
AS.060.328 (01)

Using their recorded speeches, written lectures and published writings and drawing from their biographies, this course will explore the important life work of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. We intend to upend traditional conversations about political radicalism and ethnic politics by analyzing these spokesmen associated most indelibly with black nationalism and racial integration, respectively.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Migrants and Refugees in Africa
AS.100.444 (01)

A history of forced and voluntary migration and displacement in Africa, its causes and consequences, with a focus on refugees and labor migrants since 1960.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation
AS.100.123 (01)

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 33/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA

Introduction to Middle Egyptian
AS.130.400 (01)

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read. Course meets with AS.133.600.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-DIASPO

The Haitian Revolution in Global Perspective
AS.100.376 (01)

An advanced undergraduate seminar tracing the history of the Haitian Revolution from its origins in the early modern Atlantic world to its global impact and continuing legacies in the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Gangster Films
AS.061.328 (01)

The bad guy as hero from Little Caesar to Goodfellas. Film screenings Th 7:30-10:00 PM, Sun 7:00-9:30 PM. Lab fee: $40.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Economics of Poverty/Inequality
AS.180.355 (01)

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/32
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Biography, Black history and the Recreation of Early 20th Century Baltimore Neighborhoods: The Case of Billie Holiday
AS.100.440 (01)

This is an archival, original research course using the tools of microhistory and biography to etch a 1920s social history of the city centered on two corridors, East Baltimore’s Dallas Street and West Baltimore’s Pennsylvania Avenue. Our evidence consists primarily of block-level maps, the census, newspaper articles, property records and city directories. Permission of instructor strongly recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 11/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/2
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/33
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of African American Studies, with attention to the literature, film, culture, history, and politics of black life in the United States. Our reading list will likely include texts by David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E.W. Harper, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America
AS.230.385 (01)

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development
AS.230.265 (01)

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students. Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences"

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (02)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy Perspectives
AS.230.320 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern France
AS.212.413 (01)

Across the 20th century, mainstream and avant-garde French culture was deeply impacted by the presence of African American musicians and performing artists hailing from the jazz tradition. From the Josephine Baker craze of the 1920s to the second post-war which welcomed the innovations of bebop and sixties-era free improvisation, metropolitan France proved a space where expatriate and exiled African Americans could both perpetuate the tradition and innovate by turns. At the same time, French taste-makers, critics, and musicians eager to adopt new forms and styles debated the extent to which American jazz music in its various strains could be made French. This course in transcultural French studies will feature readings in music criticism, history, and literature, as well as frequent close listening. It will culminate in an international symposium (to be held Nov. 15 and 16; attendance mandatory) uniting noted scholars and legendary jazz musicians. Although some background in French language and basic musical notation is desirable (students are encouraged to engage in original-source research), all core course readings will be provided in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (01)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Police and Prisons in Comparative Perspective
AS.362.314 (01)

This course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of two parts. First, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Second, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-AFAMER, INST-CP, INST-AP

Introduction to African American Literature (Part 1)
AS.362.123 (01)

This course will survey African American Literature from the 19th century to the late 20th century. We will turn to prose, poetry, and drama to explore the various ways black writes have engaged U.S. culture, history, and politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Passing in American Culture
AS.362.203 (01)

This course will examine film and literary narratives of “passing” in 20th century America. We will study texts that feature people who cross social boundaries of race, class, sexuality, and gender, and consider what “passing” reveals about American social mobility.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.210.391 (01)Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature IMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMStaffGilman 313
AS.180.252 (01)Economics of DiscriminationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMorgan, Barbara AnneShriver Hall 104SPOL-UL
AS.060.328 (01)Malcolm and Martin: An Introduction to the Lives and Thought of Two Icons of the Black Freedom StruggleTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Lawrence PMaryland 217ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.100.444 (01)Migrants and Refugees in AfricaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMLarson, Pier MGilman 400HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.100.123 (01)Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, InnovationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLarson, Pier MGilman 17HIST-AFRICA
AS.130.400 (01)Introduction to Middle EgyptianMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMJasnow, RichardMSE Library EisenbergAFRS-DIASPO
AS.100.376 (01)The Haitian Revolution in Global PerspectiveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGaffield, Meredith MichelleGilman 186HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.061.328 (01)Gangster FilmsM 3:00PM - 5:20PM, S 7:00PM - 9:30PM Screenings, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucyGilman 186FILM-CRITST
AS.180.355 (01)Economics of Poverty/InequalityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMoffitt, Robert AHodson 203SPOL-UL
AS.100.440 (01)Biography, Black history and the Recreation of Early 20th Century Baltimore Neighborhoods: The Case of Billie HolidayW 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Lawrence PGilman 413HIST-US
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, StaffHodson 305INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 305INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMNurhussein, NadiaGilman 55
AS.230.385 (01)Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LHodson 301INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.265 (01)Research Tools for Global Sociology and DevelopmentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKang, MinhyoungKrieger 108
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 313INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.205 (02)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMGrigg, Jeffrey AlexanderHodson 203
AS.230.320 (01)Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy PerspectivesT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieKrieger LavertySPOL-UL
AS.212.413 (01)For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern FranceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSchilling, DerekGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.205 (01)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMGrigg, Jeffrey AlexanderHodson 203
AS.362.314 (01)Police and Prisons in Comparative PerspectiveMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceRemsen Hall 1AFRS-AFAMER, INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.362.123 (01)Introduction to African American Literature (Part 1)MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMMott, ShaniGilman 217
AS.362.203 (01)Passing in American CultureTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMott, ShaniGilman 381