Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

African American Art of the Twentieth Century
AS.010.207 (01)

This course offers an introduction to African American art of the twentieth century, with a particular emphasis on artists represented in nearby collections, including the Baltimore Museum of Art and the National Gallery of Art. The class will focus on selected case studies central to the history of African American art, addressing individual practitioners, exhibitions, key artworks, and the critical debates that shaped the discourse and reception of Black art in various locations throughout the United States, including Washington, D.C., New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, among others. Visits to the museum will provide students with opportunities to engage with artworks outside of the classroom and consider questions of institutional and curatorial responsibility alongside art historical analysis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Grotte-Jacobs, Miriam Sara
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Double: Identity and Difference in Art Since 1900
AS.010.461 (01)

"Doubling" is a grammar of resemblance and difference: in works of doubling a presentation of two shapes, images or bodies, often in a symmetrical format, forces us to compare them--to perceive how they are alike and unalike. The art of doubling causes us to “see double” and to see ourselves in the act of seeing; it forces us to perceive the differences between things and bodies, catalyzing a reflection on identity. Doubling is a recurring theme of modern and contemporary art, apparent in painting, sculpture, photography, video, film, and performance. While few artists are strictly “doublers,” many practitioners have embraced tactics of repetition and reversal, staged perceptual contradictions, or explored doubled and divided selves (Doppelgängers, shadows, twins, and pairs); the course will aim to understand why. The class is organized in anticipation of an exhibition opening at the National Gallery of Art in May 2022.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Meyer, James
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation
AS.100.123 (01)

Introduction to three major themes in African history, from the precolonial era to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/38
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, MSCH-HUM

Slavery in the Americas and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, 1450-1890
AS.100.224 (01)

This course explores the origins, organization and abolition of the institution of Slavery in the Americas, the Transatlantic slave trade and their impacts on the formation of the Early Modern World c. 1450-1890.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Krichtal, Alexey
  • Room: Maryland 201  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Middle Egyptian
AS.130.400 (01)

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read. Course meets with AS.133.600.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Praet, Maarten
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-DIASPO

Science and Technology in Slave Regimes
AS.140.328 (01)

This course explores the questions that arise when we juxtapose slave regimes with scientific and technological change. We’ll consider very broad questions, such as, was slavery compatible with modernity? As well as study specific cases where slavery and technology intersected, such as the cotton gin or sugar cane plantations, but also the existence of “modern” scientific societies within slave regimes. We’ll explore these questions from a trans-national perspective by comparing cases in the Antebellum US, Cuba, Brazil, Haiti and other countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kargon, Robert H, Portuondo, Maria M
  • Room: Gilman 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Race and Racism in International Relations
AS.190.255 (01)

This course introduces students to the foundational importance of race and racism to the construction of our contemporary global order. Topics include the Crusades, European imperialism, eugenics, Apartheid, freedom struggles, decolonization, and global development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Black Politics I
AS.190.340 (01)

This course is a survey of the bases and substance of politics among black Americans and the relation of black politics to the American political system up to the end of Jim Crow. The intention is both to provide a general sense of pertinent issues and relations over this period as a way of helping to make sense of the present and to develop criteria for evaluating political scientists' and others' claims regarding the status and characteristics of black American political activity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature I
AS.210.391 (01)

This third-year course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Students will read two complete works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers each semester, followed by intense writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Prereq: 210.278, placement test or instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, Spiker, Magali T
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, Staff
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Black Italy
AS.211.423 (01)

Over the last three decades Italy, historically a country of emigrants—many of whom suffered from discrimination in the societies they joined—became a destination for hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees from various countries, and particularly from Africa. Significant numbers of these immigrants came to Italy as a result of the country’s limited, though violent colonial history; others arrive because Italy is the closest entry-point to Europe. How have these migratory flows challenged Italian society’s sense of itself? How have they transformed the notion of Italian national identity? In recent years, growing numbers of Afro- and Afro-descendant writers, filmmakers, artists and Black activists are responding through their work to pervasive xenophobia and racism while challenging Italy’s self-representation as a ‘White’ country. How are they forcing it to broaden the idea of ‘Italianess’? How do their counternarratives compel Italy to confront its ignored colonial past? And, in what way have Black youth in Italy embraced the #Blacklivesmatter movement? This multimedia course examines representation of blackness and racialized otherness, whiteness, and national identity through literary, film, and visual archival material in an intersectional framework. Examining Italy’s internal, ‘Southern question,’ retracing Italy’s colonial history, and recognizing the experiences of Italians of immigrant origins and those of immigrants themselves, we’ll explore compelling works by writers and filmmakers such as Igiaba Scego, Gagriella Ghermandi, Maza Megniste, Dagmawi Yimer, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room: Krieger 170  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (01)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: Hodson 316 Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (02)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: Hodson 316 Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Freshman Seminar: Anti-Racism 101
AS.362.102 (01)

what is Anti-Racism? How do we identify racism's presence and effects, and how do we direct socical and civic resources to end it? In this Freshmen Seminar, students will learn from a series of faculty experts and invited guests about the history, workings, and legacies of racism. They'll also study present-day and past approaches attempted and theorized- to abolish racism in the modern world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger 180  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This is the gateway class to the study of African American life, culture, politics and history in the United States and the Caribbean. African American Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study that includes history, social sciences, literature and the arts. This academic discipline is often taught under parallel terms emphasizing related geographies and identifying concepts: Black Studies, Afro-American Studies, Africana Studies, Pan-African Studies and African Diaspora Studies. Unlike every other modern academic discipline in the college, African American Studies was founded because of a social and political revolution. The class has two purposes, operating in tandem: (1) provide students with a generous historical, political and cultural overview of the lives of African descendants in the western hemisphere, but principally in North America; (2) explicitly address the problem of regularized systemic inequality in American society as a response to and an attempt to dominate a core nugget of identity difference that is the operative mechanism in black protest, resistance and revolt. This is a difference that includes, but is not limited by or reducible to morphology, culture, history, and ontology. We accept as an operating principle that an inquiry into an enslaved group of nonwestern human beings marked by difference cannot rely solely on the western episteme for its excavation. Thus, we will examine a body of diverse evidence during the semester, works of literature, history, sociology, political science, music and film. The course requirements include essays, examinations, and presentations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Hackerman 320  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

African American Poetry and Poetics
AS.362.201 (01)

In this course, we will follow the development of black poetry primarily as it has evolved in the United States. Beginning with the first published African American writers of the eighteenth century and ending with several important poets writing and performing today, we will consider the shape of the African American poetic tradition as commonly anthologized and as defined by our own theoretically-informed readings of the assigned literature. Attention will be given to both canonical and neglected literary movements and groups. Readings will include poetry and essays by Frances E.W. Harper, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Harryette Mullen, Tracie Morris, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room: Maryland 201  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Black Women Writers
AS.362.301 (01)

This course will introduce students to a variety of works written by black women of the Diaspora with a focus on the U.S. We will consider how women have theorized power, engaged history, and creatively imagined both the past and the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Curatorial Seminar: Ancient Art
AS.389.420 (01)

Course focuses on the theory, ethics, issues, and practice of curatorial work. This semester we will curate a new, more global, installation of ancient art at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Applied work will include finalizing the list of artworks to include, working with lead curator Kevin Tervala on the installation plan and design; developing new interpretations for the Antioch mosaics and for artworks drawn from collections that span Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas; and writing and workshopping labels.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P, Tervala, Kevin Dixon
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.207 (01)African American Art of the Twentieth CenturyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMGrotte-Jacobs, Miriam SaraGilman 177
 
AS.010.461 (01)The Double: Identity and Difference in Art Since 1900Th 4:30PM - 7:00PMMeyer, JamesGilman 177
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.123 (01)Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, InnovationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 132
 
HIST-AFRICA, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.224 (01)Slavery in the Americas and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, 1450-1890MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKrichtal, AlexeyMaryland 201
 
HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.400 (01)Introduction to Middle EgyptianMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMPraet, MaartenGilman 130G
 
AFRS-DIASPO
AS.140.328 (01)Science and Technology in Slave RegimesM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKargon, Robert H, Portuondo, Maria MGilman 300
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.255 (01)Race and Racism in International RelationsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMShilliam, RobertKrieger 308
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.340 (01)Black Politics IM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, LesterHodson 216
 
INST-AP
AS.210.391 (01)Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, Spiker, Magali THodson 216
 
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 219
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, StaffGilman 219
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.423 (01)Black ItalyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDi Bianco, LauraKrieger 170
 
MLL-ENGL, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.205 (01)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.Hodson 316
Gilman 377
AS.230.205 (02)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.Hodson 316
Gilman 377
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyKrieger Laverty
 
INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.362.102 (01)Freshman Seminar: Anti-Racism 101W 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger 180
 
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMJackson, Lawrence PHackerman 320
 
AS.362.201 (01)African American Poetry and PoeticsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNurhussein, NadiaMaryland 201
 
AS.362.301 (01)Black Women WritersTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani TMergenthaler 111
 
AS.389.420 (01)Curatorial Seminar: Ancient ArtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsley, Jennifer P, Tervala, Kevin DixonHodson 301
 
PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE