Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt
AS.130.126 (01)

A basic introduction to Egyptian Religion, with a special focus on the nature of the gods and how humans interact with them. We will devote particular time to the Book of the Dead and to the "magical" aspects of religion designed for protective purposes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jasnow, Richard
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/100
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (01)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (02)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of Civilizations
AS.130.203 (01)

This course examines Africa’s ancient past from the emergence of biologically modern humans, ancient hunter-gatherers, the earliest animal herding and farming populations, to cities and civilizations. While Egypt plays an undeniably central role in world history, this course concentrates in particular on ancient geographies other than Egypt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC

Disposable People: Race, Immigration and Biopolitics
AS.190.311 (01)

This course will explore theories and practices of race and immigration in order to illuminate the proliferation of populations regarded as disposable in contemporary politics. We will pay special attention to the contestable criteria used to determine eligibility for membership in the human race. We shall also examine how political power influences the relays between citizenship status and those whose lives are worthy of protection, and those who should be allowed to die.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

The American Welfare State
AS.190.380 (01)

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Trump. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP

The Idea of Power
AS.150.404 (01)

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Krieger 308
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing Whiteness
AS.100.354 (01)

This course will turn to known and not-so-known black writers during the early to mid-twentieth century who defied literary expectation and wrote stories that featured or focused on whiteness. We will consider what whiteness offered black writers and the political work that their literary experimentations did for a white American publishing industry.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in America
AS.194.210 (01)

This course explores how American Muslims navigate and contest complex notions of belonging in the context of national conversations on race, gender, citizenship, and national security. With a focus on specific case studies that range from Black Muslim movements of the early twentieth century to the ongoing War on Terror, the course adds complexity to the public conversation on what it means to be Muslim - and what it means to be American. We will draw on history, ethnography, first-person narratives, films, blogs, documentaries and fiction. As a Community Engaged course, the class will include site visits and learning with and from Muslim communities in Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/26
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP, CSC-CE

Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore Area
AS.190.410 (01)

This course uses a community based learning approach to inquire into the presence of the Rastafari community in the Baltimore area. Most people will have heard of Rastafari through the music of Bob Marley. People might not know, however, that Rastafari emerges out of and has been part of a global history of liberation struggles. This course is co-taught with a local Rastafari organization. You will be intellectually and practically equipped to take part in a project of original research on the Rastafari presence in the Baltimore region, starting with the demonization of the movement in the 1980s “war on drugs” and including the movement’s response.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, CSC-CE

Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal Justice
AS.191.303 (01)

In this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of critical race theory, including its genesis in legal theory. The course will examine its relationship and importance to social movements, including through key concepts like intersectionality. The course will also use critical race theory to grapple with law, racial segregation, and the criminal justice system in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (04)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Leaf, Philip
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Qualitative Research Practicum
AS.230.323 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. This course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for the Sociology major.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Amen Strayhorn, Kali-ahset
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Hip Hop Culture: From the Boogie Down to Black Lives Matter
AS.362.271 (01)

Hip hop has become one of the most influential youth cultural movements of the past 40 years. It has moved from being a geographically-isolated African American and Puerto Rican musical scene to influencing every aspect of American and international youth culture, including music, visual culture, language, and politics. How did hip hop develop? Where did it come from, who made it, and why? What do the images and messages of hip hop culture mean, how has it changed our world, and who cares? We will approach these questions by delving into the historical, aesthetic, socioeconomic, and political dimensions of hip hop culture. Classes will historically explore specific themes, either examining issues that hip hop has dealt with (e.g., police brutality) or employing theoretical frameworks that we can use to help us think more critically about hip hop (e.g., subcultural theory).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 5:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Devos, Andrew David
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

WGS Internship/Practicum: Feminist Animals: Sex, Nature, and Nonhumans
AS.363.416 (01)

Introducing feminist approaches to ecology and nonhumans, this course considers the interconnections between heteropatriarchal domination and the domination of nonhuman animals and ecologies. What different sensibilities and ways of seeing sex and gender open up when attention shifts to nonhumans? What tensions within and between feminism, animal liberation, and ecological concern come to the fore when each approach is alongside the others? How does the study of nonhumans extend the promise of feminism, and vice versa? In responding to these questions, we will see the real breadth of issues that the theory and practice of feminism can address.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Guha-Majumdar, Jishnu
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Accelerated Portuguese
AS.210.290 (03)

No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is an accelerated Portuguese introductory course. Encourages rapid acquisition by intensive exposure to the language through immersion activities, videos and culture. The course will cover the basics of Portuguese grammar. Students will be encouraged to use the language through communicative activities, listening and writing activities. Students will develop an intermediate level of proficiency in Portuguese. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiker, Magali T
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (02)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Leaf, Philip
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Africana Studies
AS.362.112 (01)

This course introduces students to the field of Africana Studies. It focuses on the historical experience, intellectual ideas, theories, and cultural production of African-descended people. We will consider how people of the black diaspora remember and encounter Africa. We will explore, too, how such people have lived, spoken, written, and produced art about colonialism and enslavement, gender and mobility, violence and pleasure. This course will be thematically organized and invite you to center your own stories about black people within your understanding of the modern world and its making.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Black Against Empire
AS.362.315 (01)

This course will examine the confrontation of Black social movements with imperialism in the twentieth century. How, we will ask, have key Black internationalist thinkers conceptualized and defined diaspora, capitalism, imperialism, war, and the global? What have been the effects of war and repression, as well as economic growth and globalization, on Black internationalism? Readings may include texts by W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Y. Davis, Frantz Fanon, Ashley Farmer, Claudia Jones, Robin D.G. Kelley, Claude McKay, Huey P. Newton, Walter Rodney, Malcolm X, etc. Students will complete a research paper on a topic of their own choosing related to Black internationalism in the twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP

Baltimore and Beyond
AS.230.357 (01)

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (01)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Leaf, Philip
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore
AS.280.120 (03)

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Leaf, Philip
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.130.126 (01)Gods and Monsters in Ancient EgyptMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJasnow, RichardOlin 305ARCH-RELATE
AS.100.282 (01)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.282 (02)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.130.203 (01)Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of CivilizationsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 10ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC
AS.190.311 (01)Disposable People: Race, Immigration and BiopoliticsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Mattin Center 162INST-PT
AS.190.380 (01)The American Welfare StateTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, DanielAbel Wolman House 100POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP
AS.150.404 (01)The Idea of PowerTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLebron, Christopher JosephKrieger 308INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 413HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.354 (01)Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing WhitenessTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani THodson 316HIST-US
AS.194.210 (01)Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in AmericaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, HomayraKrieger 302ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP, CSC-CE
AS.190.410 (01)Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore AreaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMShilliam, RobertKrieger 300POLI-IR, CSC-CE
AS.191.303 (01)Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal JusticeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceMaryland 114POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL
AS.280.120 (04)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipHodson 210
AS.230.323 (01)Qualitative Research PracticumTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAmen Strayhorn, Kali-ahsetMattin Center 162CSC-CE
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.362.271 (01)Hip Hop Culture: From the Boogie Down to Black Lives MatterT 5:00PM - 7:30PMDevos, Andrew DavidKrieger 304
AS.363.416 (01)WGS Internship/Practicum: Feminist Animals: Sex, Nature, and NonhumansW 1:30PM - 4:30PMGuha-Majumdar, Jishnu 
AS.210.290 (03)Accelerated PortugueseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiker, Magali TGilman 77
AS.280.120 (02)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipHodson 210
AS.362.112 (01)Introduction to Africana StudiesWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMMott, Shani TShaffer 300
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 413INST-AP
AS.362.315 (01)Black Against EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger LavertyINST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.230.357 (01)Baltimore and BeyondT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieAbel Wolman House 100SPOL-UL
AS.280.120 (01)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipHodson 210
AS.280.120 (03)Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in BaltimoreT 4:30PM - 5:45PMLeaf, PhilipHodson 210