Courses

In addition to the program’s four core courses, starred (*) courses in the list below represent possible choices for the six archaeology-specific elective courses required by the archaeology major.

The other (unstarred) courses could count toward the three additional courses required by the major, which are pertinent to an individual student’s particular archaeological concentration.

Other courses not included on this list could potentially be counted toward the latter category (e.g., ancient language classes, graduate courses, courses concerning other regions). All course selections should be made in consultation with an adviser from the archaeology program.

Anthropology

070.103 (H,S,W) Africa and the Museum
Guyer 3 credits

* 070.132 (H,S,W) Invitation to Anthropology
Staff 3 credits

070.319 (H,S) The Logic of Anthropological Inquiry
Guyer 3 credits

070.378 (H,S) Cultural Property and Politics in Latin America
Poole 3 credits

Biology

020.365 (N) Introduction to the Human Skeleton
Ruff 3 credits

020.379 01 (N) Evolution
Norris 3 credits

Behavioral Biology

* 290.101 Human Origins
P. Holland

Classics

040.102 (H) Jews, Greeks and Others in Ancient Israel: Historical and Archaeological Aspects
Staff 3 credits

* 040.140 (H) Gender and Sexuality in Early Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean
Anderson 3 credits

040.111 (H) Greek Civilization
Staff 3 credits

040.112 (H) Roman Civilization
Staff 3 credits

* 040.137 (H W) Archaeology at the Crossroads: The Ancient Eastern Mediterranean through Objects in the JHU Archaeological Museum
Anderson 3 credits

* 040.218 (H) Celebration and Performance in the Early Aegean
Anderson 3 credits

* 040.221 (H) The Archaeology of Early Greece
Anderson 3 credits

* 040.359 (H) Making Identities: How Archaeology Constructs People in the Past and Present
Anderson 3 credits

* 010.430 (H) History of Roman Art and Architecture
Tucci 3 credits 

Graduate courses that may be taken with permission of the instructor

040.609 (H) Sexuality in Egyptian and Roman Art
Bryan 3 credits

040.648 (H) Homeric Archaeology
Anderson 3 credits

040.680 (H) Roman Sculpture in the Walters Art Museum
Staff 3 credits

010.718 (H) Art and Architecture in the Augustan Age
Tucci 3 credits

010.719 (H) Art and Architecture under the Flavian Dynasty
Tucci 3 credits

Geography and Environmental Engineering

570.317 (N) Paleoecology
Brush 3 credits

570.406 (H,S,W) Environmental History
Schoenberger 3 credits

570.423 (N) Principles of Geomorphology
Wilcock 4 credits

150.107 (S) Introduction to Geography
Schoenberger 3 credits

570.205 (N) Ecology
Brush 3 credits

570.328 (N) Geography and Ecology of Plants
Brush 3 credits

570.404 (H, S) Political Ecology
Schoenberger 3 credits

History

100.470 (H,S) Monuments and Memory in Asian History
Meyer-Fong 3 credits

100.101 (H,S,W) History of Occidental Civilization: The Ancient World
Staff 3 credits

100.121-122 (H,S) History of Africa
Berry, Larson 3 credits

100.208 (H,S) China: Neolithic to Song
Meyer-Fong 3 credits

History of Art

* 010.105 (H) Ancient Art of the Americas
DeLeonardis 3 credits

* 010.317 (H) Space & Experience in Rome’s Provinces During the 2nd Century CE
Miranda 3 credits

* 010.334 (H) Problems in Ancient American Art
DeLeonardis 3 credits

* 010.336 (H) Hellenistic Art
Tucci 3 credits

* 010.355 (H) Art and Religion in the Roman World
Tucci 3 credits

* 010.365 (H) Ancient Andean Art
DeLeonardis 3 credits

* 010.370 (H) Art of Ancient Peru
DeLeonardis 3 credits

*010.378 (H) Roman Historical Art
3 credits

*010.398 (H) Tombs for the Living
DeLeonardis 3 credits

* 010.407 (H) Ancient Americas Metallurgy
DeLeonardis 3 credits

* 010.423 (H) Roman Sculpture
Tucci 3 credits

* 010.430 (H) History of Roman Art and Architecture
Tucci 3 credits

* 010.315 Art of the Assyrian Empire, 1000-600 BCE
Feldman 3 credits

* 010.364 Babylon: Myth and Reality
Feldman 3 credits

* 010.421 Creating Sacred Space in the Ancient and Medieval World
Feldman 3 credits

Near Eastern Studies

* 130.101 (H) Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations
Schwartz 3 credits

* 130.102 (H,S) From Neanderthals to the Neolithic
S. McCarter 3 credits

130.106 (H W) Freshman Seminar: Ancient Empires
Lauinger 3 credits

* 130.115 (H,S) Introduction to Near Eastern Archaeology
Schwartz 3 credits

* 130.126 (H) Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt
Jasnow 3 credits

* 130.135 (H) Ancient Egyptian Civilization
Bryan 3 credits

* 130.177 (H,S) World Prehistory
Harrower 3 credits

* 130.316 (H) Ancient City of the Future
Schwartz 3 credits

130.304 (H) Ancient Cities
Delnero 3 credits

* 130.328 (H) Ancient Egypt within Africa
Bryan 3 credits

* 130.329 (H) Ancient Egyptian Art
Bryan 3 credits

* 130.334 (H) Museum Study of Objects from the Eton College Myers Collection
Bryan 3 credits

* 130.350 (H) Issues in the Archaeology of the Near East
Schwartz 3 credits

* 130.351 (H,S) The Emergence of Civilization: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
Schwartz 3 credits

* 130.353 (H,N) Space Archaeology: An Introduction to Satellite Remote Sensing, GIS, and GPS
Harrower 3 credits

* 130.354 (H,S) Archaeological Method and Theory
Harrower 3 credits

* 130.355 (H,N) Geographic Information Systems in Archaeology
Harrower 3 credits

130.510 (H) Senior Thesis I (Fall or Spring Semester)
Schwartz  3 credits

130.511 (H) Senior Thesis II (Fall or Spring Semester)
Prerequisite: 130.510
Schwartz 3 credits

131.800 Independent Readings and Research
(Laboratory seminar on zooarchaeology may be offered by Melinda Zeder, adjunct professor of Near Eastern Studies and curator in the American Museum of Natural
History, Smithsonian Institution) 

* 136.101 (H,S) Introduction to Archaeology
Schwartz 3 credits

Graduate courses that may be taken with permission of the instructor

131.634-635 (H,S) Seminars in Near Eastern Archaeology
Schwartz 3 credits

131.653 (H, N) Space Archaeology: An Introduction to Satellite Remote Sensing, GIS, and GPS.
Harrower 3 credits

131.654 (H,S) Archaeological Method and Theory
Harrower 3 credits

131.655 (H,N) Geographic Information Systems in Archaeology
Harrower 3 credits

133.700-701 (H) Survey of Egyptian Archaeological Sites
Bryan 3 credits

133.720-721 (H) Egyptian Art of the Old through Middle Kingdoms
Bryan 3 credits

133.724-725 (H) Egyptian Art of the Second Intermediate Period and the New Kingdom
Bryan 3 credits

133.730 (H) Egyptian Art of the Third Intermediate and Late Periods
Bryan 3 credits

133.735 (H) Egyptian Art of the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods
Bryan 3 credits

133.750-751 (H) Seminar in Egyptian Art and Archaeology
Bryan 3 credits

Museums and Society

* 389.205 (H) Examining Archaeological Objects
Balachandran 3 credits

* 389.315 (H) Ancient Colors: The Technologies and Meanings of Color in Antiquity
Balachandran 3 credits

389.336 (H) Heritage at Work
Comer 3 credits

389.340 (H) Critical Issues in Art Conservation
Balachandran 3 credits

* 389.342 (H) Objects in Focus: Materials, Techniques, History
Balachandran 3 credits

389.345 (H) Introduction to Museum Practice
Balachandran 3 credits

389.361 (H) Introduction to Material Culture: Farming, Food, and Festivity
Arthur 3 credits

389.440 (H,S) Who Owns Culture?
Rodini 3 credits

History of Science and Technology

140.105 (HS) History of Medicine: Antiquity through the Scientific Revolution
Fissell 3 credits

Earth and Planetary Sciences

270.104 (N) History of the Earth and Its Biota
Hinnov 3 credits

270.205 (EN) Intro to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
Staff

270.318 (N) Remote Sensing of the Environment
Del Castillo, Zaitchik 3 credits

270.220 (N) The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology
Ferry 3 credits

270.222 (N) Earth Materials
Veblen, Ferry  4 credits 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab

270.311 (N) Geobiology
Levin 3 credits

270.313 (N) Isotope Geochemistry
Passey 3 credits

270.377 (N) Climates of the Past
Hinnov, Levin, Passey 3 credits

270.405 (N) Modeling the Hydrological Cycle
Zaitchik 3 credits

Program in Latin American Studies

361.130 (H,S,W) Introduction to Latin American Studies
Castro-Klaren 3 credits

Africana Studies

362.103 (H,S) Introduction to the Arts of Africa
Bridges 3 credits

362.220 (H,S,W) Discourses in the African Diaspora
Vinson 2 credits

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Art of the Ancient Andes
AS.010.365 (01)

The ancient visual arts of Andean South America and their respective cultural contexts form the basis of this course. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum students will have access to collections for study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, HART-ANC

Ancient Greek Civilization
AS.040.111 (01)

The course will introduce students to major aspects of the ancient Greek civilization, with special emphasis placed upon culture, society, archaeology, literature, and philosophy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Smith, Joshua M
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (01)

The question what it means to be human requires continual investigation. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding humanity in its diverse manifestations. This course familiarizes students with anthropological concepts and methods, and engages in critical analysis of a broad range of subjects including language, exchange, class, race, gender, kinship, sexuality, religion, and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Shaffer 301 Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/27
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (02)

The question what it means to be human requires continual investigation. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding humanity in its diverse manifestations. This course familiarizes students with anthropological concepts and methods, and engages in critical analysis of a broad range of subjects including language, exchange, class, race, gender, kinship, sexuality, religion, and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Shaffer 301 Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/26
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (03)

The question what it means to be human requires continual investigation. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding humanity in its diverse manifestations. This course familiarizes students with anthropological concepts and methods, and engages in critical analysis of a broad range of subjects including language, exchange, class, race, gender, kinship, sexuality, religion, and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Shaffer 301 Shaffer 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations
AS.130.101 (01)

Review of important issues in ancient Near Eastern history and culture from the Neolithic era to the Persian period. Included will be an examination of the Neolithic agricultural revolution, the emergence of cities, states and writing, and formation of empires. Cultures such as Sumer and Akkad, Egypt, the Hittites, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians will be discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schwartz, Glenn M
  • Room: Shaffer 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 32/45
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Freshman Seminar: The Art of War and Peace in Ancient Mesopotamia
AS.130.129 (01)

Ancient Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq, Syria, and Iran, is the “cradle of civilization.” It witnessed new inventions previously unknown to the ancient world: urban cities, writing systems, kingship, and empires. This course examines the close relationship between war and peace and art in ancient Mesopotamia (ancient Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria) from 3500 to 539 BCE. During the semester students will be introduced to the art, architecture, and archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia. This course is aimed at students without a previous background in art historical or archaeological approaches to Mesopotamia, but more advanced students are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Avary Rhys
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

"Egyptomania": A Consumer's Guide to Ancient Egypt
AS.130.149 (01)

Chances are you’ve heard of Cleopatra and the curse of King Tut’s tomb. You may have even met a mummy or two, whether in the flesh or on the silver screen. Even today, 5,000 years after the dawn of Egyptian civilization—and half-way around the globe—the land of the pharaohs continues to fascinate the Western world. But, how is it that ancient Egypt came to be so deeply entrenched in Western culture? This course considers the history of Western interaction with ancient Egypt and examines the consequences of laying claim to a culture that is not one’s own. We will approach our study through the lens of consumption, both material and cultural, situating these phenomena within their historical and contemporary contexts. By engaging with both primary and secondary sources, we will consider the power relations embedded in Egyptian archaeology and the writing of history as well as the ethics of collecting and displaying ancient Egyptian material culture. We will also investigate the popularization of ancient Egypt known as “Egyptomania,” focusing on the commoditization of ancient Egyptian culture in Western media and merchandise. By the end of the class, students will be able to engage with the complex, yet fundamental, question of who owns culture and what is at stake when we uncritically consume an image of the past.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Swaney, Margaret Mary (Meg)
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, ARCH-ARCH

World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective
AS.130.177 (01)

How and why did our nomadic hunting and gathering ancestors become farmers? What led agricultural societies to build cities, develop writing, religious institutions, wage war, and trade for exotic goods? This course surveys prehistory and ancient history from the origins of human culture to the emergence civilization. Although prehistory and ancient history yield evidence of tremendous cultural diversity this course emphasizes common elements of past human experience, culture, and culture change. These include the origins of modern humans and their adjustment to a variety of post-ice age environments, shifts from hunting and gathering to agricultural lifeways, and the initial development of the world’s earliest cities and civilizations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Distilling the Ancients: An Anthropological Approach to Alcohol in the Ancient World
AS.130.206 (01)

The consumption of alcohol is one of the oldest known human practices. Almost every culture has some type of mind-altering beverage that influences and shapes many facets of society. This course is a cross-cultural examination of the power and significance of alcohol in the ancient world. From the Neolithic to the Classical symposium to the Egyptian festival, the importance of communal drinking—alcohol or otherwise—is a uniting factor across the ancient world. This class will unpack the impact and significance of alcohol across a wide-range of ancient cultures, and examine what the study of alcohol might reveal about ancient societies. This includes alcohol as medicine, its religious and ritual functions, alcohol as a community unifier (and divider) and identity builder, and its practical and economic uses. Students will apply anthropological and archaeological theories to understand why, how, and to what effect humans drink.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Moroney, Morgan E
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/17
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH, MSCH-HUM

From Papyrus to Pixels: The Materiality of Writing from Past to Present
AS.130.222 (01)

For over 5,200 years humans have used writing as a record for political, administrative, social, religious, and scholarly pursuits. Over millennia diverse scripts have been written, inscribed, carved, impressed, and painted on a variety of objects such as papyrus, stone, ivory, clay, leather, wax, rope, paper, metal, bone, wood, and other mediums. Today, the practice of writing has primarily shifted to the digital world. Computers are often the preferred way for people to “write.” In this course students will be invited to critically examine relationships between scribes, craftsmen, writing, and materials. The goal of the course is for students to recognize how writing has shaped religious and political movements, and aided bureaucratic endeavors from the invention of writing around 3200 B.C. to the present day. In the first part of the semester we will explore the emergence of writing in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, and Mesoamerica. In the second half of the course students will explore how the act of writing transitioned from hand written manuscripts, to printed books, and now digitized texts. We will explore the way that computers and social media have changed the way that people interact with writing. The seminar will include lecture, discussion, museum fieldtrips, and experimental archaeology labs to investigate and engage with the materiality of clay cuneiform tablets, Egyptian papyrus, Roman wax writing boards, and more!

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Shippelhoute, Karlene Dee Ann
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

The Archaeology of Animals: An Introduction to Zooarchaeology
AS.130.244 (01)

This course is intended to introduce students to the discipline of zooarchaeology, the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Humans have long depended on their animal counterparts not only for nutritional value, but for their economic, symbolic, and social value, making the study of animals in the human past deeply revealing of the entangled worlds that humans and animals lived in together. In service of this investigation, zooarchaeology, or the study of animal remains from archaeological sites, has developed interdisciplinary techniques in order to address archaeological questions. Zooarchaeology has the ability to provide insight into ancient human behavior around the world including economic strategies, dietary practices, religious observances, ecological interactions, and more. The course will introduce students to the basics of archaeological investigation and the identification of faunal osteological remains on archaeological sites, as well as some of the basic tools and techniques used to derive meaningful conclusions from primary data. Students will be introduced to the principles of comparative anatomy and the major elements of mammalian, avian, and fish skeletons. Students will also be taught to recognize significant markers for taphonomy, sex, butchery, age, and pathology and how this information is used to generate archaeological knowledge. Supplementary readings that help illustrate the application of these techniques to archaeological interpretation will be provided and discussed in class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Poolman, Laurel Ames
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-BIOBEH, BEHB-SOCSCI, ARCH-ARCH

Ancient Magic and Ritual
AS.130.376 (01)

This course will introduce students to the vast body of rituals that were practiced and performed in antiquity, with a particular emphasis on rituals from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Hebrew Bible. In addition to examining rituals from a comparative perspective, anthropological and sociological studies of ritual will be read and discussed to shed light on the social, cultural, and political significance of ritual in the ancient world and beyond.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Delnero, Paul
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, MSCH-HUM

Creating an Egyptian Temple
AS.130.377 (01)

This class will challenge every participant to plan a temple environment for a particular deity. The readings, lectures, and discussions will cover the mythology around specific gods and how it influenced temple architecture, location, ritual, and festivals. It will survey the history of temple building in Egypt, the role of architecture and art -- particularly wall reliefs -- in communicating the functions of particular parts of temples. The aim is to help students understand what requirements an Egyptian temple needed to fulfill. Then each student will plan a temple for a chosen deity and explain to peers how it meets the ancient requirements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bryan, Betsy Morrell
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/8
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to Archaeology
AS.130.378 (01)

Geoarchaeology is a multidisciplinary subfield that applies the tools and techniques of earth science to understand ancient humans and their interactions with environments. This course examines basic topics and concepts, including archaeological site formation, paleo-environmental reconstruction, raw materials and resources, soil science, deposition and erosion of wind and water-borne sediments in different environments such as along rivers, lakes and coastlines, radiocarbon and other chronometric dating methods, and ground-based remote sensing, including ground penetrating radar.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Xin
  • Room: Krieger 108  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/24
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MINOR, ARCH-RELATE

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL

Curatorial Seminar: Ancient Art
AS.389.420 (01)

Course focuses on the theory, ethics, issues, and practice of curatorial work. This semester we will curate a new, more global, installation of ancient art at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Applied work will include finalizing the list of artworks to include, working with lead curator Kevin Tervala on the installation plan and design; developing new interpretations for the Antioch mosaics and for artworks drawn from collections that span Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas; and writing and workshopping labels.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P, Tervala, Kevin Dixon
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.365 (01)Art of the Ancient AndesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaGilman 119
 
ARCH-ARCH, HART-ANC
AS.040.111 (01)Ancient Greek CivilizationTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSmith, Joshua MGilman 377
 
AS.070.132 (01)Invitation to AnthropologyW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroShaffer 301
Gilman 55
ARCH-RELATE
AS.070.132 (02)Invitation to AnthropologyW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroShaffer 301
Gilman 400
ARCH-RELATE
AS.070.132 (03)Invitation to AnthropologyW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroShaffer 301
Shaffer 100
ARCH-RELATE
AS.130.101 (01)Ancient Near Eastern CivilizationsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn MShaffer 301
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.129 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Art of War and Peace in Ancient MesopotamiaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMTaylor, Avary RhysGilman 130G
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.149 (01)"Egyptomania": A Consumer's Guide to Ancient EgyptTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMSwaney, Margaret Mary (Meg)Bloomberg 172
 
NEAS-HISCUL, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.177 (01)World Prehistory: An Anthropological PerspectiveTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHarrower, Michael JamesHodson 301
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.206 (01)Distilling the Ancients: An Anthropological Approach to Alcohol in the Ancient WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMoroney, Morgan EGilman 313
 
NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH, MSCH-HUM
AS.130.222 (01)From Papyrus to Pixels: The Materiality of Writing from Past to PresentMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMShippelhoute, Karlene Dee AnnGilman 119
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.244 (01)The Archaeology of Animals: An Introduction to ZooarchaeologyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMPoolman, Laurel AmesMaryland 114
 
BEHB-BIOBEH, BEHB-SOCSCI, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.376 (01)Ancient Magic and RitualTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMDelnero, PaulAmes 234
 
ARCH-RELATE, MSCH-HUM
AS.130.377 (01)Creating an Egyptian TempleMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMBryan, Betsy MorrellGilman 130G
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.378 (01)Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to ArchaeologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 130G
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisM 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, XinKrieger 108
 
ENVS-MINOR, ARCH-RELATE
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer PHodson 303
 
HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.389.420 (01)Curatorial Seminar: Ancient ArtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsley, Jennifer P, Tervala, Kevin DixonHodson 301
 
PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE