Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. Students can register for courses on the Student Information Services (SIS) website.

Note that courses other than those listed below may be approved by the Islamic Studies DUS for credit toward the minor in Islamic Studies.

AS.194.210 - Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in America

This course explores how American Muslims navigate and contest complex notions of belonging in the context of national conversations on race, gender, citizenship, and national security. With a focus on specific case studies that range from Black Muslim movements of the early twentieth century to the ongoing War on Terror, the course will add complexity to the public conversation on what it means to be Muslim - and what it means to be American. The course will draw on history, ethnography, first-person narratives, films, blogs, documentaries and fiction.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.100.421 - Sex, Law and Islam

ISIS, “virgins” in paradise, the sexual slavery of Yazidi women…. This course will use anthropological and historical studies to examine the long history of how rules and understandings about sex, sexuality, and gender have mattered in how people think about Islam.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Khan, Naveeda, Shepard, Todd
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.070.214 - Politics and Poetics of Mobility in Africa

This course considers a broad survey of contemporary themes in African mobility, displacement, and re-settlement. Drawing on historical, anthropological, and literary texts and film, the course uses mobility as a window into a range of topics that are of scholarly interest in contemporary African studies: from urbanization and labor, to violence, political subjectivity and the changing nature of the state, formal and informal economy, gender and domesticity, and religious movements.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: McGlennen, Emma Elizabeth
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.070.465 - Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic Texts

What is the nature of anthropological concepts and what relations do they bear to concepts internal to a society? We invite students to think with key ideas from Hindu and Islamic traditions, asking if anthropological concepts are best seen as abstractions from the particular or as intertwined with ongoing lines of inquiry, say into the nature of the real and continual efforts to test it? Topics in ritual theory, grammar, aesthetics, translation, revelation, luminosity, figuration and the mythological among those to be considered.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena, Khan, Naveeda
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: F 2:00PM - 4:30PM
Status: Open

AS.010.423 - Modern and Contemporary Art in South Asia

How does modernism operate in the colonial context, work with and against the nationalisms of new countries (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh), challenge existing norms of the art world and the art market, engage with the difficult and violent upheavals of Partition and sectarian conflict, and allow for experimentations and new forms all the while? This course will explore the history of the art of the subcontinent from c. 1880 to the present by critical engagement with the art, artists, and theories at play in the South Asian region.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
Status: Open

AS.194.401 - Themes in Medieval Islamic Thought

This seminar examines medieval Muslim thinkers who addressed themes at the intersection of theology, philosophy, science, and ethics: the definition of the nature of God’s attributes, His uniqueness, transcendence and omnipotence; human freewill and the limits of human knowledge; the nature of the world; and the relationship among reason, religion, and science. The course will look at how these and other crucial themes were addressed by major medieval philosophers and philosophical schools not only in Islam, but also in Judaism and Christianity, and highlight similarities and differences among the three major monotheistic faiths.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.194.201 - Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval World

The three most widespread monotheisms have much more in common than is generally portrayed: a common founding figure, a partly shared succession of prophets, closely comparable ethical concerns and religious practices, a history of coexistence and of cultural, religious, social and economic interaction. This course will focus on a number of key texts and historical events that have shaped the relationships between Jews, Muslims, and Christians during the Middle Ages and contributed to their reciprocal construction of the image of the “other.” The geographical center of the course will be the Mediterranean and the Near and Middle East, a true cradle of civilizations, religions, and exchange.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.375.116 - First Year Arabic II

Continuation of AS.375.115. Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. Accelerated students should register for Section 01. May not be taken Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Hassan, Inas, Jafire, Sana
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.070.374 - What Does it Mean to be Religious?

What do we mean when we say that something or someone is “religious?” We unpack this question in a comparative approach, and pay special attention to the ways in which this term has been applied to the study of Islamic cultures and Muslim experience. Through an exploration of the categories of experience, creativity and the individual, we offer a more capacious way of imagining what it means to be religious.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar, Ziad, Homayra
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.375.116 - First Year Arabic II

Continuation of AS.375.115. Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. Accelerated students should register for Section 01. May not be taken Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Hassan, Inas, Jafire, Sana
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.375.216 - Second Year Arabic II

Continuation of AS.375.215. Designed to bring students up to competency level required for third/fourth year Arabic. Students will consolidate and expand their mastery of the four basic skills acquired in AS.375.115-116. More authentic material--written, audio, and visual--will be used, and culture will be further expanded on as a fifth skill. Accelerated students should register for Section 01. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.215 or permission required.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Hassan, Inas, Jafire, Sana
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.010.103 - Introduction to the Art of Asia

A survey of the art and architecture of Asia, from the ancient world to the present and including the Indian subcontinent, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.375.216 - Second Year Arabic II

Continuation of AS.375.215. Designed to bring students up to competency level required for third/fourth year Arabic. Students will consolidate and expand their mastery of the four basic skills acquired in AS.375.115-116. More authentic material--written, audio, and visual--will be used, and culture will be further expanded on as a fifth skill. Accelerated students should register for Section 01. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.215 or permission required.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Hassan, Inas, Jafire, Sana
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.375.402 - Fourth Year Arabic II

This is an introductory course to different periods of the Arabic literature. Selections of famous Arabic poetry and short prose works are the substance of the course. Continuation of AS.375.401. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.302 or equivalent.

Credits: 2.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.070.267 - Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.363.329 - Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Art in North Africa and the Middle East

This course aims to explore how gender and sexuality is situated in contemporary artistic practices in the geographical Middle East, through concepts of religion, war, revolution, resistance, nation-state, post-colonialism, and neoliberalism, especially as written and observed first-hand by artists, curators and scholars from the Middle East and North Africa region and their diasporas. Every week, under an overarching topic, notions of gender and sexuality will be questioned through works of selected artists across the region, as well as texts that provide the historical, theoretical, sociological and political background.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ince, Ezgi
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 2:00PM - 4:30PM
Status: Open

AS.194.205 - Introduction to Islamic Spirituality: The Sufi tradition

For over a thousand years, the Sufi tradition has been a dynamic force in Islamic social, political and spiritual life. The tradition offers a treasure trove of devotional literature and music, philosophical treatises, contemplative practices, and institutions of social and political organization. Often known by its key practices, (“cleansing the heart” and “purifying the ego-self”), the goal of Islamic spirituality is ihsan: manifesting divine beauty through a path of self-knowledge. Historically, the tradition provided moral and spiritual direction through the presence of spiritual teachers and supported infrastructure that could be likened to privatized social welfare (serving the impoverished, sick, and homeless). After unpacking the politics of the term “Sufi,” we will explore foundational concepts in the Qur’an, in the literature on Muhammad, and in ancient Greek traditions of virtue ethics. We will trace the historical development of the tradition from the early ascetics to the age of trans-national Sufi orders. We will then move into some of the key constructs of the tradition of spiritual growth and character formation: the divine-human relationship, the anthropology and stages of the spiritual path, contemplative and practical disciplines, ideas of sainthood, discipleship and ethical perfection, and the psychology of love. Throughout the class, we will explore the nature of experiential language and interrogate the tradition through the lens of gender. We will also experience Sufism through ritual and music and explore the tradition in some of its uniquely American forms.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.140.461 - Scripta Manent: Manuscript Cultures East and West

This seminar looks at manuscripts both as physical objects and as cultural products, through an analysis of their ways of production, material features, and uses in different cultures and contexts. Meetings will be devoted to the codicology, paleography, and philology of manuscripts with a particular focus on the Greek, Latin, Arabic, Hebrew and Judaeo-Arabic traditions. Indian, Chinese and Japanese contexts will complement the focus of the seminar and provide elements of comparison and wider framing. The seminar will also address recently developed digital tools for the study of manuscripts and provide students with a set of skills and tools for approaching and using manuscript material effectively. The seminar will include hands-on sessions, with viewing of original manuscripts from the rich collections of the Sheridan Libraries and the Walters Art Museum.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 5:20PM
Status: Open

AS.191.335 - Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Freedman, Robert
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
Status: Open

AS.070.465 - Concepts and the Real in Hindu & Islamic Studies

We will examine historical uses of photographs, critiques of them and more recent creative uptakes of photography in anthropology. We will learn from the use of photographs by anthropologists in the Hopkins department. We will also undertake independent projects. Students will learn to critically engage and mobilize images through the history of its use in anthropology.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Das, Veena, Khan, Naveeda
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Canceled

AS.070.372 - Religion and Media

This course examines the ways in which conventional and non-conventional media recreate or transform religious experience in modern life. Increasingly, religion is experienced not only in sacred spaces and as ritual prescriptions, but also through the information that is disseminated through radio, TV, and the Internet, as well as in consumer culture and political speeches. Beginning with this proposition that our ideas about religion are shaped not only by historical and scriptural legacies, but as well as by material practices and other sundry conditions of mediation, of which our present times supply many, we will reexamines how questions of revelation, belief, spirituality, ethereality, and ritual practice are constituted by these irreducible ways, thus complicating the neat separation of religion and secularism, or, for that matter, religion and culture.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Bagaria, Swayam
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.194.101 - Introduction to Islam

Study of Islam, its beliefs and practices in their historical development, from the preaching of Muhammad to the end of the Middle Ages, providing a historically-grounded understanding of Islam

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
Status: Open

AS.375.115 - First Year Arabic

Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Jafire, Sana
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
Status: Open

AS.375.115 - First Year Arabic

Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Jafire, Sana
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.375.215 - Second Year Arabic

Designed to bring students up to competency level required for third/fourth year Arabic. Students will consolidate and expand their mastery of the four basic skills acquired in AS.375.115-116. More authentic material--written, audio, and visual--will be used, and culture will be further expanded on as a fifth skill. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.115-116 or equivalent.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Jendi, Sahar
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
Status: Open

AS.375.301 - Third Year Arabic

Designed to enhance students' ability to read, discuss, and write about various topics covered in traditional and contemporary Arabic texts. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.216 or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jafire, Sana
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Open

AS.375.215 - Second Year Arabic

Designed to bring students up to competency level required for third/fourth year Arabic. Students will consolidate and expand their mastery of the four basic skills acquired in AS.375.115-116. More authentic material--written, audio, and visual--will be used, and culture will be further expanded on as a fifth skill. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.115-116 or equivalent.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Jendi, Sahar
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.375.401 - Fourth Year Arabic

This is an introductory course to different periods of the Arabic literature. Selections of famous Arabic poetry and short prose works are the substance of the course.

Credits: 2.00
Instructor: Jendi, Sahar
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 1:00PM - 1:50PM
Status: Open