Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. Students can register for courses on the Student Information Services (SIS) website.

Note that courses other than those listed below may be approved by the Islamic Studies DUS for credit toward the minor in Islamic Studies.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Themes in Medieval Islamic Thought
AS.194.401 (01)

This seminar examines medieval Muslim thinkers who addressed themes at the intersection of theology, philosophy, science, and ethics: the definition of the nature of God’s attributes, His uniqueness, transcendence and omnipotence; human freewill and the limits of human knowledge; the nature of the world; and the relationship among reason, religion, and science. The course will look at how these and other crucial themes were addressed by major medieval philosophers and philosophical schools not only in Islam, but also in Judaism and Christianity, and highlight similarities and differences among the three major monotheistic faiths.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
  • Room: Gilman 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

First Year Arabic II
AS.375.116 (02)

Continuation of AS.375.115. Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. May not be taken Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory

  • Credits: 4.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Alsayed Suliman, Anas
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic Empires
AS.010.338 (01)

Long characterized in the Western imagination as exotic realms of fantasy, harems in Islamic tradition served as private domestic quarters for the women of elite households. This course explores the harem—as an institution, a physical space, and a community of women—from various art-historical perspectives, considering such topics as the harem’s architecture, the agency of its inhabitants as patrons and collectors, the mediating role of eunuchs in the harem’s visual and material culture, and the ability of harem women to make their mark through public artistic commissions. Our case studies will address a range of Islamic geographical and chronological contexts, though we will focus on the empires of the early modern period and, above all, the famous harem of the Ottoman sultans at the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul. In challenging popular misconceptions, the course will also look at the wealth of exoticizing imagery that the harem inspired in Western art, which we will consider through Orientalist paintings at the Walters Art Museum and illustrated rare books at Hopkins itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-NW, ISLM-ISLMST

Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in America
AS.194.210 (01)

This course explores how American Muslims navigate and contest complex notions of belonging in the context of national conversations on race, gender, citizenship, and national security. With a focus on specific case studies that range from Black Muslim movements of the early twentieth century to the ongoing War on Terror, the course adds complexity to the public conversation on what it means to be Muslim - and what it means to be American. We will draw on history, ethnography, first-person narratives, films, blogs, documentaries and fiction. As a Community Engaged course, the class will include site visits and learning with and from Muslim communities in Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/26
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP, CSC-CE

The Qur'an: Text and Context
AS.194.220 (01)

For 1400 years, the Qur’an has played a central role in Muslim intellectual, spiritual, artistic and ritual life. This course will explore the sacred scripture of Islam through its foundational ideas, history of the text and thematic development, literary style, history and methods of interpretation, and role in Muslim spiritual and ritual life. We will also explore how the Qur’an weaves through literature, music and the visual arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic Texts
AS.070.465 (01)

What is the nature of anthropological concepts and what relations do they bear to concepts internal to a society? We invite students to think with key ideas from Hindu and Islamic traditions, asking if anthropological concepts are best seen as abstractions from the particular or as intertwined with ongoing lines of inquiry, say into the nature of the real and continual efforts to test it? Topics in ritual theory, grammar, aesthetics, translation, revelation, luminosity, figuration and the mythological among those to be considered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 2:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena, Khan, Naveeda
  • Room: Mergenthaler 439
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST

Islamic Finance
AS.230.367 (01)

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $2 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on riba in the Quran and hadith, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST

Power Dressing: The Politics of Costume between the Ottoman Empire and the West
AS.010.440 (01)

In the Ottoman Empire—a vast multiethnic state straddling Africa, Asia, and Europe—how one dressed was a deeply political affair. Ottoman rulers and subjects alike used clothing to express (and sometimes transgress) the hierarchical, religious, and communal distinctions defining their society, much to the fascination of foreigners who visited the empire or sought knowledge of its sartorial traditions in texts and images. This seminar will explore Ottoman dress and dress codes in the context of the empire’s long and complicated relationship with Western powers, focusing on the role that costume played as a charged site of cross-cultural interaction, posturing, and self-assertion from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. Our case studies will include costume albums—books showing people high and low in their characteristic garb—painted by Ottoman artists for Western buyers; diplomatic robes of honor and their attendant ceremonies; and cultural cross-dressing as manifested in European turquerie portraiture and masquerades. Moving into the modern period, we will consider how nineteenth-century dress reforms bridged the gap between Ottoman and Western costume while engendering new modes of Ottoman sartorial self-representation that challenged hardening Orientalist discourses in such venues as mannequin museums and world’s fairs. The seminar will make considerable use of artworks in local collections, including rare books and prints at Hopkins itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): HART-NW, ISLM-ISLMST

Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval World
AS.194.201 (01)

The three most widespread monotheisms have much more in common than is generally portrayed: a common founding figure, a partly shared succession of prophets, closely comparable ethical concerns and religious practices, a history of coexistence and of cultural, religious, social and economic interaction. This course will focus on a number of key texts and historical events that have shaped the relationships between Jews, Muslims, and Christians during the Middle Ages and contributed to their reciprocal construction of the image of the “other.” The geographical center of the course will be the Mediterranean and the Near and Middle East, a true cradle of civilizations, religions, and exchange.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/30
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

First Year Arabic II
AS.375.116 (01)

Continuation of AS.375.115. Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. May not be taken Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory

  • Credits: 4.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Alsayed Suliman, Anas
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Second Year Arabic II
AS.375.216 (01)

Continuation of AS.375.215. Designed to bring students up to competency level required for third/fourth year Arabic. Students will consolidate and expand their mastery of the four basic skills acquired in AS.375.115-116. More authentic material--written, audio, and visual--will be used, and culture will be further expanded on as a fifth skill. Accelerated students should register for Section 01. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.215 or permission required.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Jafire, Sana
  • Room: Krieger 517
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/16
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Fourth Year Arabic II
AS.375.402 (01)

This is an introductory course to different periods of the Arabic literature. Selections of famous Arabic poetry and short prose works are the substance of the course. Continuation of AS.375.401. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.302 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Jafire, Sana
  • Room: Krieger 517
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Arabic II
AS.375.216 (02)

Continuation of AS.375.215. Designed to bring students up to competency level required for third/fourth year Arabic. Students will consolidate and expand their mastery of the four basic skills acquired in AS.375.115-116. More authentic material--written, audio, and visual--will be used, and culture will be further expanded on as a fifth skill. Accelerated students should register for Section 01. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.215 or permission required.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Jafire, Sana
  • Room: Krieger 504
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.194.401 (01)Themes in Medieval Islamic ThoughtW 3:00PM - 5:30PMFerrario, GabrieleGilman 300ISLM-ISLMST
AS.375.116 (02)First Year Arabic IIMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 1:30PM - 2:20PMAlsayed Suliman, AnasKrieger 300ISLM-ISLMST
AS.010.338 (01)Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic EmpiresTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRustem, UnverGilman 119HART-NW, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.194.210 (01)Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in AmericaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, HomayraKrieger 302ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP, CSC-CE
AS.194.220 (01)The Qur'an: Text and ContextTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMZiad, HomayraGilman 377ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.465 (01)Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic TextsF 2:00PM - 4:30PMDas, Veena, Khan, NaveedaMergenthaler 439INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.230.367 (01)Islamic FinanceM 3:00PM - 5:30PMCalder, RyanGilman 400INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.010.440 (01)Power Dressing: The Politics of Costume between the Ottoman Empire and the WestM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverGilman 119HART-NW, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.194.201 (01)Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval WorldMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMFerrario, GabrieleHodson 216ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.375.116 (01)First Year Arabic IIMTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AMAlsayed Suliman, AnasGilman 77ISLM-ISLMST
AS.375.216 (01)Second Year Arabic IIMTWTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMJafire, SanaKrieger 517ISLM-ISLMST
AS.375.402 (01)Fourth Year Arabic IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMJafire, SanaKrieger 517
AS.375.216 (02)Second Year Arabic IIMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMJafire, SanaKrieger 504ISLM-ISLMST