Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. Students can register for courses on the Student Information Services (SIS) website.

Note that courses other than those listed below may be approved by the Islamic Studies DUS for credit toward the minor in Islamic Studies.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Building an Empire: Architecture of the Ottoman Capitals, c. 1300–1600
AS.010.329 (01)

Centered on modern-day Turkey and encompassing vast territories in Asia, Africa, and Europe, the Ottoman Empire (1299 – 1923) was the longest lived and among the most powerful Islamic states in history, with an artistic tradition to match. This course explores the functional and symbolic role that architecture played during the empire’s formative centuries, when three successive capital — Bursa, Edirne, and Istanbul — served to visualize the sultans’ growing claims to universal authority. With reference to mosques, palaces, tombs, and other categories of architecture, the course will examine the buildings in their artistic, social, and political contexts. Themes to be addressed include patronage and audience, architectural practice and the building trade, ceremonial and ritual, topography and urban planning, and the relationship of Ottoman architecture to other traditions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic Empires
AS.010.338 (01)

Long characterized in the Western imagination as exotic realms of fantasy, harems in Islamic tradition served as private domestic quarters for the women of elite households. This course explores the harem—as an institution, a physical space, and a community of women—from various art-historical perspectives, considering such topics as the harem’s architecture, the agency of its inhabitants as patrons and collectors, the mediating role of eunuchs in the harem’s visual and material culture, and the ability of harem women to make their mark through public artistic commissions. Our case studies will address a range of Islamic geographical and chronological contexts, though we will focus on the empires of the early modern period and, above all, the famous harem of the Ottoman sultans at the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul. In challenging popular misconceptions, the course will also look at the wealth of exoticizing imagery that the harem inspired in Western art, which we will consider through Orientalist paintings at the Walters Art Museum and illustrated rare books at Hopkins itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South Asia
AS.010.352 (01)

This course will explore modern and contemporary art in colonial and postcolonial contexts from Bangladesh to northern Africa. How do artists negotiate demands to support their national and local identities while participating in modernism across borders? What role do secularism and spirituality have in modern art? How do anticolonial, Marxist, and feminist politics shape art in these regions? How do global economic forces and the rise of powerful collectors, private museums, and international art fairs shape art and artists working across this geographic area? We will foreground the role of women as artists, collectors, patrons, and scholars throughout.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran
AS.070.267 (01)

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar (Niloofar)
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

Freshman Seminar: Jerusalem: The Holy City
AS.130.138 (01)

This course will survey the cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia, primarily as the symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course content will focus on the transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence by examining the artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. The creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience will be examined. Course requirements will focus on the development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mandell, Alice H
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Islamic Pasts in the Contemporary World
AS.194.102 (01)

This course will focus on the intellectual and cultural legacies of “Islamic pasts.” It has been argued by scholars that Islam is not only a religion but a “civilization” with identifiable sensibilities, overlapping histories, and temporalities. This civilization once spread from the Atlantic coast of Africa to the Indian subcontinent and beyond, but regimes and dynasties have changed hands in many of these places, while remaining in place in others. What remains of Islamic pasts in places where Islam once reigned supreme but has either vanished, been reduced to minority status, or repressed in ongoing political projects? This course examines lost Islamic pasts in the contemporary world, using readings from anthropology, history, literature, and poetry. As the basis of this course, we will read four texts in their entirety focusing on four different geographic points of interest—Spain, India, the Balkans, and Palestine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Roy, Arpan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Never Forget: Muslims, Islamophobia, and Dissent after 9/11
AS.194.202 (01)

In partnership with the social justice organization Justice for Muslims Collective, this community-engaged course and oral history project will explore how diverse Muslim communities navigated and contested belonging and political and cultural agency amidst state-sponsored violence and national debates on race, gender, citizenship and national security after 9/11 and during the ongoing War on Terror. Through history, ethnography, first-person narratives, film, fiction, and online resources, students will learn about the impact of 9/11 on American Muslim communities. This includes cultural and political resistance to imperialism, racism, and Islamophobia as well as to intersectional inequities within Muslim communities that were intensified in the context of Islamophobia. Students will learn about community activism and organizing from JMC, and complete a participatory action research project with the organization. This project is an oral history archive that will address gaps in the documentation of movement histories when it comes to early organizing against War on Terror policies by Muslim communities and communities racialized or perceived as Muslim. Students will be trained to record stories of resistance among leaders who organized and responded at the local and national-level in the Greater Washington region, to support the building of an archive that will shape a wide variety of future organizing and advocacy efforts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra (Homayra)
  • Room: 3003 N. Charles OMA Lounge  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

First Year Arabic
AS.375.115 (01)

Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Jafire, Sana
  • Room: Krieger 504  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

First Year Arabic
AS.375.115 (02)

Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Jafire, Sana
  • Room: Krieger 504 Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/16
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Second Year Arabic
AS.375.215 (01)

Designed to bring students up to competency level required for third/fourth year Arabic. Students will consolidate and expand their mastery of the four basic skills acquired in AS.375.115-116. More authentic material--written, audio, and visual--will be used, and culture will be further expanded on as a fifth skill. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.115-116 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jafire, Sana
  • Room: Krieger 517 Krieger 517
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Third Year Arabic
AS.375.301 (01)

Designed to enhance students' ability to read, discuss, and write about various topics covered in traditional and contemporary Arabic texts. Recommended Course Background: AS.375.216 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Galal Darwish Suliman, Rania
  • Room: Greenhouse 113  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/8
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.329 (01)Building an Empire: Architecture of the Ottoman Capitals, c. 1300–1600TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRustem, UnverGilman 177
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.338 (01)Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic EmpiresW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverGilman 177
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.352 (01)Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South AsiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.267 (01)Culture, Religion and Politics in IranW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHaeri, Niloofar (Niloofar)Hodson 301
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.130.138 (01)Freshman Seminar: Jerusalem: The Holy CityTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMandell, Alice HGilman 130G
 
NEAS-HISCUL
AS.194.102 (01)Islamic Pasts in the Contemporary WorldTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMRoy, ArpanMergenthaler 252
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.194.202 (01)Never Forget: Muslims, Islamophobia, and Dissent after 9/11T 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, Homayra (Homayra)3003 N. Charles OMA Lounge
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.375.115 (01)First Year ArabicMTWTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMJafire, SanaKrieger 504
 
ISLM-ISLMST
AS.375.115 (02)First Year ArabicMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMJafire, SanaKrieger 504
Gilman 381
ISLM-ISLMST
AS.375.215 (01)Second Year ArabicMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMJafire, SanaKrieger 517
Krieger 517
ISLM-ISLMST
AS.375.301 (01)Third Year ArabicMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMGalal Darwish Suliman, RaniaGreenhouse 113
 
ISLM-ISLMST