Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Introduction to Modern Jewish History
AS.100.129 (02)

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST

History: Ancient Syria-Palestine II
AS.130.302 (01)

A survey of the history of Ancient Syria and Cannan, including ancient Israel. Taught with AS.134.661. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Prophets and Prophecy in the Bible
AS.130.373 (01)

From thundering voices of social justice to apocalyptic visionaries, biblical prophets have been revered by Jews, Christians and Muslims for thousands of years. They have inspired civic leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr. yet also provided fodder for modern charlatans promising a utopian future. Yet who were these individuals (orators? politicians? diviners? poets?) and what was the full range of their message as set against the Realpolitik world of ancient Israel, Iraq, Egypt, Syria and Jordan?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

From Hebrews to Jews: The Development of Jewish Identity in the Ancient World
AS.130.133 (01)

What happened to the ten lost tribes of Israel? Was Abraham Jewish? How far back can Jewish ethnicity be traced using genetic research? These questions and more will be topics of discussion as we explore the development of Jewish identity, beginning with the first evidence of a people called “Israel” in the 13th century BCE and ending with the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE. The class will start with a discussion of different types of identity, including ethnic, religious, and cultural identities, as well as how identity can vary between members of the same community. We will also consider how ancient peoples can be studied using textual and archaeological sources. Then we will take a loosely diachronic approach to the development of Jewish identity, from the elusive origins of the Israelites to their existence as a monarchic state under rulers such as King David; from their forced displacement under the Assyrian empire to the Diaspora caused by the Romans. Using primary and secondary source materials, we will assess the key developments in group identity that took place at these times and the factors which influenced them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Themes and Concepts in Jewish History
AS.100.180 (01)

The course will introduce the student to the main themes and debates in Jewish historiography.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST

Elementary Biblical Hebrew
AS.130.441 (01)

Survey of grammar and reading of simple texts. (Credit given only on completion of AS.130.440 and AS.130.441). May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reading Of Hebrew Prose
AS.130.443 (01)

Reading of Biblical Hebrew prose, especially from the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Modern Jewish History
AS.100.129 (01)

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST

Introduction to the History of Rabbinic Literature
AS.130.346 (01)

Broadly surveying classic rabbinic literature, including the Talmud and its commentaries, the legal codes and the response, this seminar explores the immanent as well as the external factors that shaped the development of this literature, the seminal role of this literature in Jewish self-definition and self-perception, and the role of this literature in pre-modern and modern Jewish culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Does Israel Have a Future?
AS.190.434 (01)

Israel is one of the only countries whose existence is openly challenged. This class will examine the future of Israel focusing on international and domestic threats to its continued existence as a Jewish democracy. Outside threats to be considered include nuclear attack and the growing international movement to delegitimize Israel. domestic challenges include demographic changes, the role of religion in governance, and doubts as to whether one can be a Jewish state and still be a democracy. Lessons from the destruction of the ancient Israelite kingdoms and from contemporary state deaths will be included. The course will conclude by considering efforts that Israel can undertake to meet the threats it faces.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

First Year Hebrew II
AS.384.116 (01)

Designed to provide reading and writing mastery, to provide a foundation in Hebrew grammar and to provide basic conversational skills. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Holocaust in Israeli Society and Culture
AS.216.342 (02)

This course examines the role of the Holocaust in Israeli society and culture. We will study the emergence of the discourse of the Holocaust in Israel and its development throughout the years. Through focusing on literary, artistic and cinematic responses to the Holocaust, we will analyze the impact of its memory on the nation, its politics and its self-perception.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Intermediate Yiddish II
AS.210.264 (01)

Continuation of Intermediate Yiddish I: this course will focus on the Yiddish language as a key to understanding the culture of Yiddish-speaking Jews. Topics in Yiddish literature, cultural history and contemporary culture will be explored through written and aural texts, and these primary sources will be used as a springboard for work on all the language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Yiddish II
AS.210.164 (01)

Year-long course that includes the four language skills--reading, writing, listening, and speaking--and introduces students to Yiddish culture through text, song, and film. Emphasis is placed both on the acquisition of Yiddish as a tool for the study of Yiddish literature and Ashkenazic history and culture, and on the active use of the language in oral and written communication. Both semesters must be taken with a passing grade to receive credit. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.163 or instructor permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Museums and Identity
AS.211.329 (01)

The museum boom of the last half-century has centered largely around museums dedicated to the culture and history of identity groups, including national, ethnic, religious, and minority groups. In this course we will examine such museums and consider their long history through a comparison of the theory and practice of Jewish museums with other identity museums. We will study the various museological traditions that engage identity, including the collection of art and antiquities, ethnographic exhibitions, history museums, heritage museums, art museums, and other museums of culture. Some of the questions we will ask include: what are museums for and who are they for? how do museums shape identity? and how do the various types of museums relate to one another? Our primary work will be to examine a variety of contemporary examples around the world with visits to local museums including the Jewish Museum of Maryland, the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of the American Indian.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval World
AS.194.201 (01)

The three most widespread monotheisms have much more in common than is generally portrayed: a common founding figure, a partly shared succession of prophets, closely comparable ethical concerns and religious practices, a history of coexistence and of cultural, religious, social and economic interaction. This course will focus on a number of key texts and historical events that have shaped the relationships between Jews, Muslims, and Christians during the Middle Ages and contributed to their reciprocal construction of the image of the “other.” The geographical center of the course will be the Mediterranean and the Near and Middle East, a true cradle of civilizations, religions, and exchange.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/30
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

The Holocaust in Israeli Society and Culture
AS.216.342 (01)

This course examines the role of the Holocaust in Israeli society and culture. We will study the emergence of the discourse of the Holocaust in Israel and its development throughout the years. Through focusing on literary, artistic and cinematic responses to the Holocaust, we will analyze the impact of its memory on the nation, its politics and its self-perception.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

ANGELS IN AMERICA (The Play) The Millennium Shift in American Culture and Politics
AS.225.218 (01)

Tony Kushner’s epoch-making play weaves together astonishingly diverse sides of America in a broad tapestry; a modern work that emerged at the end of the 20th Century, now being revived world wide: it provides keys to understanding the American zeitgeist and the coming transformations of the culture. In one pivotal work we find the emergence of LGBT rights, the Mormon Church, the AIDS epidemic, the new “spirituality,” the Reagan-era transformation of both government and business, and the looming figure of Roy Cohn whose influence in American politics “behind the scenes” ranged from the Rosenberg trial to his work as counsel for the McCarthy Committee in the 1950s: and even his legacy in the 2016 as primary political and business mentor of the current President of the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Monsters, Ghosts, and Golems
AS.211.347 (01)

Modern Jewish literature and film is full of monsters, ghosts, golems, dybbuks, and other occult creatures. We will study the rich religious and folkloric traditions that these works draw on in order to better understand why Yiddish, German, Hebrew, and English literature from the 19th century to the present and why film from its beginnings are so full of the occult and the supernatural. We will pay special attention to the ways that monsters, spirits, and the like were deployed in modernist literature and film, in order to ask and answer major questions about modernity: what are the social and aesthetic consequences of technology and automation? what aspects of human nature are revealed by new insights into the psyche? All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Themes in Medieval Islamic Thought
AS.194.401 (01)

This seminar examines medieval Muslim thinkers who addressed themes at the intersection of theology, philosophy, science, and ethics: the definition of the nature of God’s attributes, His uniqueness, transcendence and omnipotence; human freewill and the limits of human knowledge; the nature of the world; and the relationship among reason, religion, and science. The course will look at how these and other crucial themes were addressed by major medieval philosophers and philosophical schools not only in Islam, but also in Judaism and Christianity, and highlight similarities and differences among the three major monotheistic faiths.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Second Year Hebrew II
AS.384.216 (01)

Designed to enrich vocabulary and provide intensive grammatical review, and enhance fluency in reading, writing and comprehension. Recommended Course Background: AS.384.215 or permission required.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Hebrew II
AS.384.316 (01)

Designed to: maximize comprehension and the spoken language through literary and newspaper excerpts providing the student with the language of an educated Israeli. Recommended Course Background: AS.384.315 or permission required. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKatz, DavidSmokler Center LibraryNEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.129 (02)Introduction to Modern Jewish HistoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMoss, KennethGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST
AS.130.302 (01)History: Ancient Syria-Palestine IITh 2:00PM - 4:30PMMandell, Alice HGilman 130G
AS.130.373 (01)Prophets and Prophecy in the BibleMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLewis, TheodoreHodson 216
AS.130.133 (01)From Hebrews to Jews: The Development of Jewish Identity in the Ancient WorldTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMLiebermann, Rosanne RuthGilman 400NEAS-HISCUL
AS.100.180 (01)Themes and Concepts in Jewish HistoryWF 3:00PM - 4:00PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST
AS.130.441 (01)Elementary Biblical HebrewTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMEstrada, Justin EugeneMSE Library D1
AS.130.443 (01)Reading Of Hebrew ProseF 1:30PM - 4:00PMEstrada, Justin EugeneMSE Library D1
AS.100.129 (01)Introduction to Modern Jewish HistoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMoss, KennethGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST
AS.130.346 (01)Introduction to the History of Rabbinic LiteratureMW 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center Library
AS.190.434 (01)Does Israel Have a Future?W 3:00PM - 5:30PMDavid, Steven RShriver Hall 001INST-CP
AS.384.116 (01)First Year Hebrew IITTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCohen, ZviSmokler Center 213
AS.216.342 (02)The Holocaust in Israeli Society and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCohen, Zvi, Stahl, NetaMaryland 104INST-CP
AS.210.264 (01)Intermediate Yiddish IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLang, BeatriceGilman 443
AS.210.164 (01)Elementary Yiddish IITTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLang, BeatriceGilman 443
AS.211.329 (01)Museums and IdentityTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMSpinner, Samuel JacobGilman 443GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.201 (01)Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFerrario, GabrieleShriver Hall 104ISLM-ISLMST
AS.216.342 (01)The Holocaust in Israeli Society and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaMaryland 104INST-CP
AS.225.218 (01)ANGELS IN AMERICA (The Play) The Millennium Shift in American Culture and PoliticsTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMMartin, Joseph HMerrick 105
AS.211.347 (01)Monsters, Ghosts, and GolemsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpinner, Samuel JacobHodson 311GRLL-ENGL
AS.194.401 (01)Themes in Medieval Islamic ThoughtT 1:30PM - 3:50PMFerrario, GabrieleKrieger LavertyISLM-ISLMST
AS.384.216 (01)Second Year Hebrew IIMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 1:40PMCohen, ZviSmokler Center 213
AS.384.316 (01)Third Year Hebrew IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMCohen, ZviSmokler Center 214