Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Art of the Ancient Andes
AS.010.365 (01)

The visual arts of Andean South America and their respective cultural contexts form the basis of our study. Collections study in local and regional museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Ancient Americas Metallurgy
AS.010.407 (01)

This course addresses the technology, iconography and social significance of metals and draws on case studies from the Americas. Collections study in museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Visualizing Travel, Movement, and Interaction in the Ancient Americas
AS.010.458 (01)

In photographs and museum displays, the visual culture of the ancient Americas is made static. Pyramids stand vacant, sculptures appear frozen, and once portable objects remain stationary. But ancient American small-scale objects were designed to be set in motion for ritual and pilgrimage, free-standing stelae and altars were meant to be circumambulated and engaged with directly, and architecture (and spaces bound by architecture) influenced the shape of bodily movement. Notably absent from a twenty-first century vantage point are the ways that these spaces, and the spaces around art, were interacted with and how objects such as polychromed ceramics and carved pieces of precious stone were moved from place to place by the region’s ancient Indigenous residents. Exploring a rich visual and material record and considering the movement of both people and objects, this course asks how works of art influenced the ways ancient peoples physically interacted with and moved throughout the three-dimensional world. By considering a series of case studies from the ancient Americas, this course seeks to better understand the full aesthetic dimensions of this visual culture in the context of its rich social use. Additionally, we will also engage with issues related to contemporary travel, tourism, and migration that crosses through these places and materials. No prior knowledge of the field is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Popovici, Catherine H
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture (literature, cinema).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-LATAM

The Gender Binary and American Empire
AS.100.396 (01)

This seminar explores how the sex and gender binary was produced through US colonialism since the nineteenth century. Topics include domestic settler colonialism, as well as Hawaii, the Caribbean, and Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gill Peterson, Jules
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Intermediate Portuguese I
AS.210.277 (01)

Intermediate Portuguese I is designed for students who have attained an advanced elementary level in the language. The course offers training in the skills of the language with emphasis on expanding grammatical knowledge and vocabulary, while developing ease and fluency in the language through the use of a multifaceted approach. Course materials immerse students in the cultures of Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese-speaking Africa, and reflect the mix of cultures at work in the contemporary Lusophone world. Upon the successful completion of Intermediate Portuguese I, students may enroll in the next level, Intermediate Portuguese II – AS.210.278. May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: AS.210.275 or placement test. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Portuguese: Conversation through Film & Music
AS.210.288 (01)

Improve your Portuguese conversational and speaking skills through colorful Brazilian media. This course is designed for highly motivated undergraduate and graduate students who want to SPEAK Portuguese. Conversation sessions provide intensive work on communication skills through discussion on issues raised in films, news media & music. Grammar will be reviewed as needed outside of class with tutors or TA, freeing class time for more communicative activities. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: one semester of Portuguese, two semesters of Spanish or Placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the fourth class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Ramos, Rosario
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the fourth class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ramos, Rosario
  • Room: Croft Hall B32
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Advanced Spanish Conversation
AS.210.316 (01)

Conversational Spanish surveys high-interest themes, discusses short films by contemporary Hispanic filmmakers and offers a thorough review of grammar. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as personality traits, social media, political power, art and lifestyles on completion of this course. Conversational skills mastered during the course apply to all careers interconnected by Spanish. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ramos, Rosario
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Adv Spanish Composition
AS.210.317 (01)

This third-year course is a hands-on and process-oriented introduction to discussion and compositional analysis. On completion of this course, students will have improved their Spanish writing skills in various types of compositions they might be expected to write in academic settings and in real-life formats such as film reviews, letters to the editor, cover letters, etc. The course also focuses on refinement of grammar and vocabulary use. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after September 13th.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hubbard, Arancha
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Portuguese I
AS.210.391 (01)

Designed to sharpen students’ abilities in contemporary spoken and written Portuguese. This third-year course fosters the development of complex language skills that enhance fluency, accuracy and general proficiency in Portuguese and its appropriate use in professional and informal contexts. Students will briefly review previous grammar structures and concentrate on new complex grammar concepts. Using a variety of cultural items such as current news, short stories, plays, films, videos, newspaper articles, and popular music, students discuss diverse topics followed by intense writing and oral discussion with the aim of developing critical thinking and solid communication skills. Successful completion of Advanced Portuguese I will prepare students for the next level, Advanced Portuguese II, AS.210.392. May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: AS.210.278 or placement test. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH. Did you know that one of the first Latin American actresses to conquer Hollywood was Brazilian? Did you know that cinema has existed in Brazil since 1895, just six months after the first screening in Paris? This course is an introduction to both the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focus on the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production. Film aesthetics are analyzed through a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films, and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2022. Students wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. No Prereq.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH. Did you know that one of the first Latin American actresses to conquer Hollywood was Brazilian? Did you know that cinema has existed in Brazil since 1895, just six months after the first screening in Paris? This course is an introduction to both the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focus on the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production. Film aesthetics are analyzed through a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films, and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2022. Students wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. No Prereq.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (01)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Rachel C
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (02)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Pinar Diaz, Alicia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Rios Saavedra, Veronica
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Cuba y España
AS.215.413 (01)

La frase “más se perdió en Cuba” alude al singular rango de la antigua Provincia de Ultramar en el mapa geopolítico del colonialismo hispánico. Hemos de estudiar la prolongada relación entre España y Cuba, desde 1492 al presente, a través de materiales literarios, crónicas, artes plásticas, música y medios sociales al corriente. Enseñado íntegramente en español.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Latin American Ecocriticism
AS.217.425 (01)

Increased awareness of climate change has led to a shift in the way we address and intervene in environmental issues in the new millennium. Yet the interest in making sense of the environment has a long history in literature and the arts. How have Latin American writers and artists understood and depicted their environments and environmental questions? How do the form and content of texts and cultural artifacts influence our understanding of the non-human world? Can works of fiction shape ecological transformations? In this course we will discuss texts from the early colonial period to the present, including the literary works of Graciliano Ramos, Horacio Quiroga, and Clarice Lispector; political ecology; film; Ana Mendieta’s earth-body art; contemporary experiments in bio-art; postcolonial theory; and the intersection of environmental justice with such topics as nationalism and human rights. Going beyond ecocriticism’s original focus on the Anglo-American world, we will engage recent scholarship on Latin America that sheds light on the region’s cultural and geopolitical importance to the global climate, with particular attention to Brazil. This course aims to introduce students to current debates in Latin American Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene and thus contribute to an incipient but expanding field.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Bedran, Marina
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (02)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (03)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (04)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies
AS.361.100 (01)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the ways of life of Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx peoples, their origins, historical legacies, and current cultural expressions. This course assumes no prior knowledge and incorporates the insights of several disciplines including anthropology, history, political science, economics, cultural studies, literary criticism, and ethnomusicology. The course seeks to comprehend the region from multiple perspectives and to provide a broad conceptual overview.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Cotler, Angelina
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Liberation in the African Diaspora
AS.362.318 (01)

This course explores the historical, theoretical, and political question of liberation in the African diaspora from the period of enslavement up to the current era. We will consider three major themes: enslavement, marronage, and freedom; Pan-Africanism and anti-colonialism; Black Power and national liberation. We will examine how African peoples conceptualized freedom and liberation in each period, the major organizations and intellectuals who framed them, and how popular activity developed and informed all three (ideas, organizations, and intellectuals). Some of the questions taken up include: How did enslaved Africans conceptualize freedom? Did their ideas and activities merely extend western notions of liberty and freedom, or did they develop distinct conceptions of freedom, rights, and humanity? Why, in the early Twentieth Century, did African peoples around the world pursue pan-Africanism as a political philosophy? How do class, nationality, gender, and sexuality inform such movements? Did national liberation struggles from the 1950s through the 1970s in Africa and the Caribbean bring about fundamental changes to those societies or merely replicate colonial regimes? What connections existed between national liberation movements in Africa and the Caribbean, and Civil Rights and Black Power in the United States and England?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Makalani, Minkah
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/35
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.365 (01)Art of the Ancient AndesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 301HART-ANC
AS.010.407 (01)Ancient Americas MetallurgyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 203HART-ANC
AS.010.458 (01)Visualizing Travel, Movement, and Interaction in the Ancient AmericasM 4:30PM - 7:00PMPopovici, Catherine HGilman 119HART-ANC
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 277INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.396 (01)The Gender Binary and American EmpireTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGill Peterson, JulesGilman 10HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.210.277 (01)Intermediate Portuguese IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaAmes 218
AS.210.288 (01)Portuguese: Conversation through Film & MusicMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaffGilman 277
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMRamos, RosarioGilman 381MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRamos, RosarioCroft Hall B32MSCH-HUM
AS.210.316 (01)Advanced Spanish ConversationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRamos, RosarioGilman 381
AS.210.317 (01)Adv Spanish CompositionMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMHubbard, AranchaGilman 400
AS.210.391 (01)Advanced Portuguese IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaffGilman 443
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 217ARCH-ARCH, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 305ARCH-ARCH, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.215.231 (01)Introduction to Literature in SpanishMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMWilliams, Rachel CShriver Hall 001
AS.215.231 (02)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMPinar Diaz, Alicia 
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRios Saavedra, VeronicaSmokler Center 213INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.413 (01)Cuba y EspañaMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMGonzalez, EduardoGilman 277
AS.217.425 (01)Latin American EcocriticismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBedran, MarinaBloomberg 176INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (02)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (03)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (04)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithShriver Hall 104INST-AP, MSCH-HUM
AS.361.100 (01)Introduction to Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx StudiesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMCotler, AngelinaMergenthaler 266HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.362.318 (01)Liberation in the African DiasporaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMakalani, MinkahHodson 203HIST-AFRICA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL