Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Transatlantic Slave Trade, c. 1450-1850
AS.100.312 (01)

The course explores the origins, organization and abolition of the trans-Atlantic slave trade c. 1450-1850. It delves into the historiographical debates over the impact of the trade on the development of Africa, Europe and the Americas in the early modern period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (02)

From Simón Bolivar to the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to the Zapatistas, this course asks what it means to be Latin American through the lenses of state formation, artistic expression, and international relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Freshman Seminar: American Slavery
AS.100.211 (01)

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives. Freshman only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Ancient Americas Metallurgy
AS.010.407 (01)

This course addresses the technology, aesthetics, and social significance of metals. Case studies are drawn from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Urban CItizenship in Latin America
AS.070.209 (01)

Latin American cities are among the largest in the world, but also among the most unequal. Significant proportions of the urban populations reside informally on the fringes of metropolitan areas without access to services or amenities, secure tenure, or adequate sanitary conditions. This course will study several ethnographies to examine the intricacies of the notion of "urban citizenship” and how the "right to the city" has been imagined, demanded and struggled for in Latin American cities. Cases will include Sao Paulo in Brazil, El Alto in Bolivia, or Bogota in Colombia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-NWHIST

Freshman Seminar: Human Nature Under Captialism
AS.070.113 (01)

Think about the wide range of lives people lead today. Financial traders, stay-at-home parents, tech entrepreneurs, slum dwellers, corporate office drones, migrant workers, indebted college students. Our identities, aspirations, and anxieties are reflections of a capitalist system that has always relied on claims to what it means to be human. In this course we treat capitalism not as an abstraction for political debate but as a social force shaping the human lives and the planet. Departing from a conception of human nature not as fixed and universal but as formed by the totality of social relations, we explore how capital shapes human needs, desires, and relations to each other and the world.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Art of Colonial Latin America
AS.010.210 (01)

This course offers a broad introduction to the arts of colonial Latin America: students will become familiar with the artistic production in the areas of Latin America invaded and controlled by the Spanish Crown from the time of the conquests in the sixteenth century to independence movements in the early nineteenth century. We will explore a wide range of materials from maps to featherwork, paintings to urban grids, cathedrals to mummy bundles. The course is thematically organized, such that students will not only become familiar with the art of Latin America, but will come to understand critical topics related to the study of early modern colonialism: conquest, race, missionary control, literacy, extraction, and indigenous and imperial systems of governance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (01)

From Simón Bolivar to the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to the Zapatistas, this course asks what it means to be Latin American through the lenses of state formation, artistic expression, and international relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Tombs for the Living
AS.010.398 (01)

Centering on the tomb as the unit of analysis, this course examines the cultural and material aspects of death and funerary ritual. Case studies are drawn from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/35
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/16
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Capitalism, Dependency, and Development in Latin America
AS.230.350 (01)

This course examines Latin American insertion into the global capitalist economy from the colonial period to the present. Examining various historical, sociological, and political-economic theories, this course will ask not only how Latin American economies and societies have developed their particular characteristics, but also how theorists within and outside the region have understood Latin American development over time. development over time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Science and Technology in Slave Regimes
AS.140.328 (01)

What does science and technology look like in slave regimes? This seminar explores this question from a trans-national perspective by comparing cases in the Antebellum US, Cuba, Brazil and other countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Conversational Spanish
AS.210.316 (01)

Conversational Spanish surveys high-interest themes, discusses short films by contemporary Hispanic filmmakers and offers a thorough review of grammar. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as personality traits, social media, political power, art and lifestyles on completion of this course. Conversational skills mastered during the course apply to all careers interconnected by Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/2
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Latin American Critical Perspectives on Colonialism: From the 'World Upside Down' to the 'Coloniality of Power'
AS.215.290 (01)

This course, taught in English, examines how indigenous and local (postcolonial) intellectuals in Latin America responded to the ideology and practices of Spanish Colonialism in the earliest post-conquest years (1532), continued to battle colonialism during the period of the wars of independence, and finally arrived at the production of an analysis that shows how modernity is but the other face of colonialism. Among key works to be discussed are Guaman Poma's illustrated sixteenth-century chronicles, D.F. Sarramiento's _Civilization and Barbarism_ (1845), and Anibal Quijano's "Coloniality of Power" (2000).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Portuguese for the professions
AS.210.394 (01)

Portuguese for the professions is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in a Portuguese speaking environment. It focuses on the development of advanced communication skills according to students’ individualized professional interests through conversations, readings, discussions, writings and media. The course also highlights cultural nuances of the professional Portuguese-speaking world. Grammar will be reviewed as needed in class, but most of it will be done outside of class with tutors or a TA, freeing class time for more communicative activities. There is no final exam. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: one semester of Portuguese (AS.210.177), Two semesters of Spanish or Placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/16
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/22
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Advanced Portuguese: Language and Literature II
AS.210.392 (01)

This course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will read several works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers, followed by intensive writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. The course is conducted entirely in Portuguese. No satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Pre-requisites: 210.391 or placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (01)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Hugo Chávez, Fidel Castro, and Bolivar's Venezuela
AS.361.336 (01)

Are the current extreme hard times in Venezuela's Bolivarian Republic irreversible? Is there a ballpark somewhere for Thomas Jefferson and Simón Bolívar to hold a debate match about democracy, achieved emancipations, republican values and the lure of dictatorship? The course welcomes serious and sharply political dialogue about ideals of democratic republicanism in clash from the rise and apparent fall of Fidelismo and Chavismo in the Caribbean region to the agitations and alliances dictated by Trump's seizure of American politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.312 (01)The Transatlantic Slave Trade, c. 1450-1850MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKrichtal, AlexeyGilman 134HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.115 (02)Modern Latin AmericaMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLurtz, CaseyGilman 17HIST-LATAM
AS.100.211 (01)Freshman Seminar: American SlaveryTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMorgan, PhilipGilman 75HIST-US
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 277HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.010.407 (01)Ancient Americas MetallurgyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 305ARCH-ARCH
AS.070.209 (01)Urban CItizenship in Latin AmericaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMProcupez, ValeriaMergenthaler 426INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-NWHIST
AS.070.113 (01)Freshman Seminar: Human Nature Under CaptialismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroBloomberg 168
AS.010.210 (01)The Art of Colonial Latin AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHyman, Aaron M.Gilman 119HART-RENBAR
AS.100.115 (01)Modern Latin AmericaMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLurtz, CaseyGilman 17HIST-LATAM
AS.010.398 (01)Tombs for the LivingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 305ARCH-ARCH
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMChirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix, StaffGilman 381MSCH-HUM
AS.230.350 (01)Capitalism, Dependency, and Development in Latin AmericaT 3:00PM - 5:30PMThornton, ChristyOlin 305INST-ECON, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.140.328 (01)Science and Technology in Slave RegimesW 1:30PM - 3:50PMKargon, Robert H, Portuondo, Maria MGilman 300INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyLatrobe 120INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.210.316 (01)Conversational SpanishMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMRamos, Maria Del Rosario, StaffGilman 219
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.290 (01)Latin American Critical Perspectives on Colonialism: From the 'World Upside Down' to the 'Coloniality of Power'W 1:30PM - 4:00PMCastro-Klaren, SaraBloomberg 274GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.210.394 (01)Portuguese for the professionsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaSmokler Center 301
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLópez Raja, Julio, StaffGilman 381MSCH-HUM
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.210.392 (01)Advanced Portuguese: Language and Literature IIMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMSpiker, Magali T, StaffGilman 443
AS.215.231 (01)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo, StaffShriver Hall 104
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSeguin, Becquer D, StaffGilman 219INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDong, YigeHodson 301
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.361.336 (01)Hugo Chávez, Fidel Castro, and Bolivar's VenezuelaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMGonzalez, EduardoKrieger 302INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Online Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (87)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.230.101 (87)Online Introduction to SociologyReese, Michael Joseph, Jr. 

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Enthnographic Perspectives on Brazil
AS.070.336 (01)

This seminar offers an examination of Brazilian culture and politics through close readings of classic and contemporary ethnography. The course will track how anthropologists have approached the complexities and contradictions of Brazilian society. And, conversely, we investigate how studies in Brazil have prompted challenges to and generated innovations in anthropological thought.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Jade, Turquoise, Feathers, and Gold: Valued Materials in Aztec Art
AS.010.332 (01)

This seminar (which meets twice weekly) introduces students to the art of the Aztec Empire (1428-1521 CE) through the lens of the production of art from valued materials. The issue of value—how it is constructed, conceptualized, and deployed—provides key insights into the political, religious, economic, and conceptual life of a society. Throughout this course, we will examine these questions by focusing on the major themes of art’s social functions, materiality and artistic process, historicity, and cross-cultural exchange. Special emphasis will be placed on in-person examination of objects in local museum collections and the study of writings by indigenous authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-NW, ARCH-ARCH

Problems in Art of the Ancient Americas
AS.010.334 (01)

Following a historical narrative that traces the formation of princely collections in the sixteenth century, to the establishment of national museums in the nineteenth, this course surveys the acts of collecting, preserving, interpreting, and appropriating ancient American art. Draws on case studies from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Arts of the Spanish Empire
AS.010.325 (01)

From the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, visual forms and practices linked such far-flung places as Mexico City and Naples, Manila and Lima, Cuzco and Antwerp, Quito and Madrid: all cities in the Spanish Empire. This course is conceived as a voyage, moving city by city to explore objects that connected Spain’s vast holdings. We will investigate how the Spanish Crown and the Catholic Church used visual strategies to consolidate political power and instill religious faith across the world; and, alternatively, we will consider how local conditions, concerns, and resistance reshaped those efforts. This course surveys a diverse range of artistic production: religious paintings and sculptures; maps used for imperial surveillance; luxury goods crafted from shimmering feathers, ceramics, ivory, and precious metals; urban design and architecture from the ports of Europe to the highland outposts of the Andes; ephemeral cityscapes for civic performances. In examining such materials, students will be introduced to the art historical methods and theoretical concerns used to study a wide diversity of objects within an imperial frame.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/19
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR

Art of the Ancient Andes
AS.010.365 (01)

The ancient visual arts of Andean South America and their respective cultural contexts form the basis of this course. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum students will have access to collections for study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (01)

That the world is rapidly changing is so evident as to seem cliché to recognize it. But the question what it then means to be human requires continual investigation. This course introduces students to anthropology as a field of research and reflection. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding the world as it is and as it is becoming.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (04)

That the world is rapidly changing is so evident as to seem cliché to recognize it. But the question what it then means to be human requires continual investigation. This course introduces students to anthropology as a field of research and reflection. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding the world as it is and as it is becoming.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

The Haitian Revolution in Global Perspective
AS.100.376 (01)

An advanced undergraduate seminar tracing the history of the Haitian Revolution from its origins in the early modern Atlantic world to its global impact and continuing legacies in the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (02)

That the world is rapidly changing is so evident as to seem cliché to recognize it. But the question what it then means to be human requires continual investigation. This course introduces students to anthropology as a field of research and reflection. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding the world as it is and as it is becoming.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (03)

That the world is rapidly changing is so evident as to seem cliché to recognize it. But the question what it then means to be human requires continual investigation. This course introduces students to anthropology as a field of research and reflection. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding the world as it is and as it is becoming.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

Impeachments and Beyond: Law, Justice, and Politics in Latin America
AS.100.391 (01)

This class invites students to examine changing legal cultures in a discussion- and primary-source-based environment, and through the lens of Latin America's political history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 19/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-EUROPE, INST-CP, POLI-AP

International Trade
AS.180.241 (01)

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (01)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 23/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

This course will provide an undergraduate level introduction to the study and practice, as well as the successes and failures, of international development. Students will be introduced to the various theoretical frameworks used to explain underdevelopment. Students will also explore the practice of development since the 1950s by examining specific strategies employed in Latin America, South Asia, East Asia, and Africa. Using a variety of country-specific case studies, students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical and practical frameworks learned in the class to assess the successes and failures of real-life cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

The Politics of Global Development
AS.190.245 (01)

Development is often assumed to be an economic issue. In this course we examine the politics of development on a global scale. We begin by looking at the colonial and Cold War histories of development. We then use these histories to contextualise contemporary development issues that directly affect international relations such as aid and debt, humanitarianism, food security, land “grabs”, migration and indigenous rights. The course also seeks to understand the ways in which the issues underlying global development have always connected and continue to connect the peoples and polities of the Global North and Global South.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON

Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases
AS.190.382 (02)

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases
AS.190.382 (04)

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases
AS.190.382 (03)

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Intermediate Portuguese I
AS.210.277 (01)

More advanced training in the skills of the language with emphasis on vocabulary building, ease and fluency in the language through the use of a multifaceted approach. Materials used immerse students in the cultures of Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese-speaking Africa, and reflect the mix of cultures at work in the contemporary Lusophone world. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Lab is required. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: AS.210.178, or placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-DIASPO

Portuguese Elements I
AS.210.177 (01)

This one-year course introduces students to the basic skills in reading, writing, and speaking the language. Emphasis is placed on oral communication with extensive training in written and listening skills. Class participation is encouraged from the very beginning. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Students must complete both semesters with passing grades to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis. No previous knowledge of Portuguese is required.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/17
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-DIASPO

Portuguese: Conversation through Film & Music
AS.210.288 (01)

Improve your Portuguese conversational and speaking skills through colorful Brazilian media. This course is designed for highly motivated undergraduate and graduate students who want to SPEAK Portuguese. Conversation sessions provide intensive work on communication skills through discussion on issues raised in films, news media & music. Grammar will be reviewed as needed outside of class with tutors or TA, freeing class time for more communicative activities. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: one semester of Portuguese (AS.210.177), two semesters of Spanish or Placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature I
AS.210.391 (01)

This third-year course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will read two complete works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers each semester, followed by intense writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Prereq: 210.278 or placement test. Permission required

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Populism
AS.215.412 (01)

What do Hugo Chávez, Marine Le Pen, and Donald Trump have in common? According to many from across the political spectrum, they are all populists. But what is populism, exactly, and how can it describe such disparate phenomena as left-wing social movements, xenophobic anti-immigrant policies, and economic redistribution? This advanced seminar will examine the history, culture, and political theory of populism. We will pay special attention to the resurgence of populism after the Great Recession and examine a number of cases from Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (03)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases
AS.190.382 (01)

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Freshman Seminar: Soccer in Brazil: opium of the masses
AS.211.294 (01)

The course is taught IN ENGLISH. Futebol offers a unique perspective on politics, race and citizenship in Brazil. This course seeks to understand Brazilian culture through the historic national pastime of futebol. In addition to the main textbooks chosen for the class, by reading a variety of texts from newspapers, academic journals, fiction and film, students will be able to find their own approach to understanding the phenomenon of futebol within the social and political traditions of Brazil. No knowledge of Portuguese is required, but those who can read in Portuguese will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Portuguese words and expressions. This class may count toward the Minor in Portuguese.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Conversational Spanish
AS.210.316 (01)

Conversational Spanish surveys high-interest themes, discusses short films by contemporary Hispanic filmmakers and offers a thorough review of grammar. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as personality traits, social media, political power, art and lifestyles on completion of this course. Conversational skills mastered during the course apply to all careers interconnected by Spanish. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Emerging Latin American Cinema
AS.211.342 (01)

This survey of emerging cinema in Latin America focuses on thematic clusters such as gender identity, violence against women, the struggle for indigenous rights and recognition of their history, the politics of ecological crises, and the plight of youth who don’t see a viable future. We will focus on films from Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, and Colombia, among other cultures.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/25
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN

An Interdisciplinary Introduction to the Study of Latin America
AS.215.309 (01)

The course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Latin America. It brings together archeology, ethno-history, art history, literature and environmental studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/2
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/33
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Spanish for International Commerce
AS.210.314 (01)

Spanish for international business is an overview of business topics in an international Spanish-speaking context with an emphasis on deep review of grammar and vocabulary acquisition. On completion of this course the student will have developed the ability to read and critically discuss business and government relations in Latin America and will have examine entrepreneurship, finance, marketing, business ethics, human resources and commerce in the Spanish speaking world. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been covered in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their own professional interests. Concepts learned in this course will be directly applicable to careers linked to international relations and will apply to various careers in business. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session. Language Program Director: Loreto Sanchez-Serrano

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Caribbean Music
AS.376.342 (01)

This course will explore several genres of traditional and popular music from the Caribbean, including Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Haiti, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. We will examine the social, political, and economic issues that have shaped these musics, with migration, colonization, race, and tourism especially informing our studies. Students will read about a variety of musical experiences and listen to representative examples of each music genre in order to think critically about music, culture, and performance in Caribbean contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.070.336 (01)Enthnographic Perspectives on BrazilTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroMergenthaler 426INST-CP
AS.010.332 (01)Jade, Turquoise, Feathers, and Gold: Valued Materials in Aztec ArtTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStaffGilman 119HART-NW, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.334 (01)Problems in Art of the Ancient AmericasTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStaffGilman 119
AS.010.325 (01)Arts of the Spanish EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHyman, Aaron M.Gilman 119HART-RENBAR
AS.010.365 (01)Art of the Ancient AndesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 216ARCH-ARCH
AS.070.132 (01)Invitation to AnthropologyM 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 1:30PM - 2:45PMAngelini, AlessandroRemsen Hall 1ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.070.132 (04)Invitation to AnthropologyM 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 1:30PM - 2:45PMAngelini, AlessandroRemsen Hall 1ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.100.376 (01)The Haitian Revolution in Global PerspectiveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGaffield, Meredith MichelleGilman 186HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM
AS.070.132 (02)Invitation to AnthropologyM 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 1:30PM - 2:45PMAngelini, AlessandroRemsen Hall 1ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.070.132 (03)Invitation to AnthropologyM 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 1:30PM - 2:45PMAngelini, AlessandroRemsen Hall 1ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.100.391 (01)Impeachments and Beyond: Law, Justice, and Politics in Latin AmericaTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMCaso Bello, AlvaroAmes 234HIST-LATAM, HIST-EUROPE, INST-CP, POLI-AP
AS.180.241 (01)International TradeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHodson 210INST-ECON, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.215.231 (01)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGonzalez, Eduardo, StaffHodson 203
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, RinaAmes 218GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 313INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.190.245 (01)The Politics of Global DevelopmentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMShilliam, RobertRemsen Hall 101INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.190.382 (02)Democracy and Development: Theory and CasesMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian LHackerman B 17POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.382 (04)Democracy and Development: Theory and CasesMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMMazzuca, Sebastian LHackerman B 17POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.382 (03)Democracy and Development: Theory and CasesMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian LHackerman B 17POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.210.277 (01)Intermediate Portuguese IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaffGilman 443AFRS-DIASPO
AS.210.177 (01)Portuguese Elements IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, StaffMaryland 109AFRS-DIASPO
AS.210.288 (01)Portuguese: Conversation through Film & MusicWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaffMudd 26
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, EduardoGilman 134INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.210.391 (01)Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature IMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMStaffGilman 313
AS.215.412 (01)PopulismT 3:00PM - 5:30PMSeguin, Becquer DGilman 186INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLópez Raja, JulioGilman 134MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (03)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMChirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix, StaffBloomberg 276MSCH-HUM
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.190.382 (01)Democracy and Development: Theory and CasesMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMMazzuca, Sebastian LHackerman B 17POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.211.294 (01)Freshman Seminar: Soccer in Brazil: opium of the massesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaMaryland 201GRLL-ENGL
AS.210.316 (01)Conversational SpanishTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRamos, Maria Del Rosario, StaffGilman 277
AS.211.342 (01)Emerging Latin American CinemaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWegenstein, BernadetteGilman 443GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN
AS.215.309 (01)An Interdisciplinary Introduction to the Study of Latin AmericaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMCastro-Klaren, SaraSmokler Center 213GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLópez Raja, Julio, StaffGilman 134MSCH-HUM
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, StaffHodson 305INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 305INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.210.314 (01)Spanish for International CommerceMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMHubbard, Aranzazu, StaffGilman 277
AS.376.342 (01)Caribbean MusicM 1:30PM - 4:00PMDonnelly, LauraShaffer 302
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyGilman 219INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST