Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Advanced Spanish Conversation
AS.210.316 (01)

Conversational Spanish surveys high-interest themes, discusses short films by contemporary Hispanic filmmakers and offers a thorough review of grammar. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as personality traits, social media, political power, art and lifestyles on completion of this course. Conversational skills mastered during the course apply to all careers interconnected by Spanish. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ramos, Maria Del Rosario, Staff
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (03)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Chirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Adv Spanish Composition
AS.210.317 (01)

This third-year course is a hands-on and process-oriented introduction to discussion and compositional analysis. On completion of this course, students will have improved their Spanish writing skills in various types of compositions they might be expected to write in academic settings and in real-life formats such as film reviews, letters to the editor, cover letters, etc. The course also focuses on refinement of grammar and vocabulary use. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after September 13th.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Native American Art
AS.010.366 (01)

The works of Native American artists are examined and discussed in their respective social and historical contexts. Such works include Hopewell stone sculpture, Mimbres pictorial painting, and Tlingit guardian figures. We examine the concept of sacred landscape through analysis of monumental earthworks and effigy mounds, Anasazi architecture, and rock art. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA), and Johns Hopkins Special Collections, students will have access to collections for study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/22
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (02)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/2
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (01)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Mexico and the Culture of Death
AS.215.460 (01)

Drawing from sources in popular culture, literature, folk religion, and the media, we will explore the myths and daily practices of death-related representations of Mexico’s survival against enemies, from within the state apparatus, and the insertion into it of drug traffickers, on both sides of the so-called Crystal Frontier with the US.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Bloomberg 168
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/40
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Beyond the Wall: The Political Economy of the US and Mexico
AS.230.238 (01)

Examining the exchange of culture, people, and commodities between the United States and Mexico since the 19th century, this course asks not just how US practices and policies have shaped Mexican society, but how, in turn, Mexico has shaped the United States. We will examine the social, political, and economic forces that have long pulled these two societies together – and pushed them apart.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 413HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMazzuca, Sebastian LHodson 213INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.210.316 (01)Advanced Spanish ConversationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRamos, Maria Del Rosario, StaffGilman 277
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLópez Raja, JulioGilman 313MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (03)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMChirinos Delgado, Grecia BellatrixShaffer 300MSCH-HUM
AS.210.317 (01)Adv Spanish CompositionTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLópez Raja, JulioGilman 313
AS.010.366 (01)Native American ArtTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 315HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 75GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.231 (02)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGonzalez, EduardoHodson 303
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 75GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLópez Raja, JulioGilman 381MSCH-HUM
AS.215.231 (01)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGonzalez, EduardoHodson 301
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMudd 26
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMudd 26
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMudd 26
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMudd 26
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, EduardoGilman 186INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMudd 26
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCalder, RyanMudd 26
AS.215.460 (01)Modern Mexico and the Culture of DeathTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMGonzalez, EduardoBloomberg 168GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMudd 26
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, RinaHodson 303
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 413INST-AP
AS.230.238 (01)Beyond the Wall: The Political Economy of the US and MexicoMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMudd 26
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Online Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (87)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.230.101 (87)Online Introduction to SociologyReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.