Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

AS.100.211 - Freshman Seminar: American Slavery

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives. Freshman only

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Philip
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.100.115 - Modern Latin America

From Simón Bolivar to the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to the Zapatistas, this course asks what it means to be Latin American through the lenses of state formation, artistic expression, and international relations.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Open

AS.010.407 - Ancient Americas Metallurgy

This course addresses the technology, aesthetics, and social significance of metals. Case studies are drawn from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.070.113 - Freshman Seminar: Human Nature Under Captialism

Think about the wide range of lives people lead today. Financial traders, stay-at-home parents, tech entrepreneurs, slum dwellers, corporate office drones, migrant workers, indebted college students. Our identities, aspirations, and anxieties are reflections of a capitalist system that has always relied on claims to what it means to be human. In this course we treat capitalism not as an abstraction for political debate but as a social force shaping the human lives and the planet. Departing from a conception of human nature not as fixed and universal but as formed by the totality of social relations, we explore how capital shapes human needs, desires, and relations to each other and the world.

Credits: 2.00
Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Canceled

AS.010.210 - The Art of Colonial Latin America

This course offers a broad introduction to the arts of colonial Latin America: students will become familiar with the artistic production in the areas of Latin America invaded and controlled by the Spanish Crown from the time of the conquests in the sixteenth century to independence movements in the early nineteenth century. We will explore a wide range of materials from maps to featherwork, paintings to urban grids, cathedrals to mummy bundles. The course is thematically organized, such that students will not only become familiar with the art of Latin America, but will come to understand critical topics related to the study of early modern colonialism: conquest, race, missionary control, literacy, extraction, and indigenous and imperial systems of governance.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hyman, Aaron M.
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Open

AS.070.209 - Urban CItizenship in Latin America

Latin American cities are among the largest in the world, but also among the most unequal. Significant proportions of the urban populations reside informally on the fringes of metropolitan areas without access to services or amenities, secure tenure, or adequate sanitary conditions. This course will study several ethnographies to examine the intricacies of the notion of "urban citizenship” and how the "right to the city" has been imagined, demanded and struggled for in Latin American cities. Cases will include Sao Paulo in Brazil, El Alto in Bolivia, or Bogota in Colombia.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.010.398 - Tombs for the Living

Centering on the tomb as the unit of analysis, this course examines the cultural and material aspects of death and funerary ritual. Case studies are drawn from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.100.394 - Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Open

AS.100.115 - Modern Latin America

From Simón Bolivar to the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to the Zapatistas, this course asks what it means to be Latin American through the lenses of state formation, artistic expression, and international relations.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Open

AS.100.312 - The Transatlantic Slave Trade, c. 1450-1850

The course explores the origins, organization and abolition of the trans-Atlantic slave trade c. 1450-1850. It delves into the historiographical debates over the impact of the trade on the development of Africa, Europe and the Americas in the early modern period.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Krichtal, Alexey
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.140.328 - Science and Technology in Slave Regimes

What does science and technology look like in slave regimes? This seminar explores this question from a trans-national perspective by comparing cases in the Antebellum US, Cuba, Brazil and other countries.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kargon, Robert H, Portuondo, Maria M
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.210.313 - Medical Spanish

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix, Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.210.313 - Medical Spanish

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: López Raja, Julio, Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.210.394 - Portuguese for the professions

Portuguese for the professions is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in a Portuguese speaking environment. It focuses on the development of advanced communication skills according to students’ individualized professional interests through conversations, readings, discussions, writings and media. The course also highlights cultural nuances of the professional Portuguese-speaking world. Grammar will be reviewed as needed in class, but most of it will be done outside of class with tutors or a TA, freeing class time for more communicative activities. There is no final exam. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: one semester of Portuguese (AS.210.177), Two semesters of Spanish or Placement test.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Open

AS.215.380 - Modern Latin American Culture

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D, Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.150 - Issues in International Development

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Dong, Yige
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.210.316 - Conversational Spanish

Conversational Spanish surveys high-interest themes, discusses short films by contemporary Hispanic filmmakers and offers a thorough review of grammar. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as personality traits, social media, political power, art and lifestyles on completion of this course. Conversational skills mastered during the course apply to all careers interconnected by Spanish.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Ramos, Maria Del Rosario, Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.211.316 - Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.211.316 - Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.230.350 - Capitalism, Dependency, and Development in Latin America

This course examines Latin American insertion into the global capitalist economy from the colonial period to the present. Examining various historical, sociological, and political-economic theories, this course will ask not only how Latin American economies and societies have developed their particular characteristics, but also how theorists within and outside the region have understood Latin American development over time. development over time.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Thornton, Christy
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.361.511 - Senior Thesis II

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.230.101 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.101 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Open

AS.361.336 - Hugo Chávez, Fidel Castro, and Bolivar's Venezuela

Are the current extreme hard times in Venezuela's Bolivarian Republic irreversible? Is there a ballpark somewhere for Thomas Jefferson and Simón Bolívar to hold a debate match about democracy, achieved emancipations, republican values and the lure of dictatorship? The course welcomes serious and sharply political dialogue about ideals of democratic republicanism in clash from the rise and apparent fall of Fidelismo and Chavismo in the Caribbean region to the agitations and alliances dictated by Trump's seizure of American politics.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.215.231 - Introduction to Literature in Spanish

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo, Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.397 - The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Thornton, Christy
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.210.392 - Advanced Portuguese: Language and Literature II

This course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will read several works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers, followed by intensive writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. The course is conducted entirely in Portuguese. No satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Pre-requisites: 210.391 or placement test.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spiker, Magali T, Staff
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.215.290 - Latin American Critical Perspectives on Colonialism: From the 'World Upside Down' to the 'Coloniality of Power'

This course, taught in English, examines how indigenous and local (postcolonial) intellectuals in Latin America responded to the ideology and practices of Spanish Colonialism in the earliest post-conquest years (1532), continued to battle colonialism during the period of the wars of independence, and finally arrived at the production of an analysis that shows how modernity is but the other face of colonialism. Among key works to be discussed are Guaman Poma's illustrated sixteenth-century chronicles, D.F. Sarramiento's _Civilization and Barbarism_ (1845), and Anibal Quijano's "Coloniality of Power" (2000).

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Castro-Klaren, Sara
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open