Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Writing Systems of the Ancient Americas
AS.010.302 (01)

This course explores writing as both technology and social process. It surveys several Indigenous writing and notational systems of the Americas, focusing in particular on Maya glyphic script. In this class, students will learn to “read” Maya script, interpret complex artistic programs and decipher numbers, dates and names of historical figures. The course will also discuss the ways in which archaeology can inform or unsettle written narratives, with implications for approaching contested histories today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Rossi, Franco
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Blood, Gold, and Souls: The Arts of the Spanish Empire
AS.010.325 (01)

From the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, visual forms and practices linked such far-flung places as Mexico City and Naples, Manila and Lima, Cuzco and Antwerp, Quito and Madrid: all cities in the Spanish Empire. This course is conceived as a voyage, moving city by city to explore objects that connected Spain’s vast holdings. We will investigate how the Spanish Crown and the Catholic Church used visual strategies to consolidate political power and instill religious faith across the world; and, alternatively, we will consider how local conditions, concerns, and resistance reshaped those efforts. This course surveys a diverse range of artistic production: religious paintings and sculptures; maps used for imperial surveillance; luxury goods crafted from shimmering feathers, ceramics, ivory, and precious metals; urban design and architecture from the ports of Europe to the highland outposts of the Andes; ephemeral cityscapes for civic performances. In examining such materials, students will be introduced to the art historical methods and theoretical concerns used to study a wide diversity of objects within an imperial frame.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hyman, Aaron M.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Native American Art
AS.010.366 (01)

The works of Native American artists are examined and discussed in their respective social and historical contexts. Such works include Hopewell stone sculpture, Mimbres pictorial painting, and Tlingit guardian figures. We examine the concept of sacred landscape through analysis of monumental earthworks and effigy mounds, Anasazi architecture, and rock art. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA), and Johns Hopkins Special Collections, students will have access to collections for study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

The Stone and the Thread
AS.010.389 (01)

Advanced inquiry into imperial Inka architecture and fiber arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Latin America in a Fracturing World
AS.070.324 (01)

This course examines the multiple and overlapping crises afflicting Latin America today through an ethnographic lens. Featuring conversations with authors of recent work on the region’s most pressing issues, we will explore the contours of knowledge production itself under conditions of precarity and violence. Discussions will include the retrenchment of borders, migration crises, the state management of life and death, the resurgence of authoritarianism, food insecurity, and resource conflicts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro, Han, Clara
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Freshman Seminar: American Slavery
AS.100.130 (03)

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Philip
  • Room: Bloomberg 478
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (01)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (02)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (03)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (04)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

History Research Lab
AS.100.450 (02)

This hands-on course will use historical data and archival material to build a public facing digital atlas of rural Mexico at the end of the nineteenth century. We’ll learn to work with ArcGIS and other platforms, collaborate with scholars in Mexico, and learn about the history of cartography and information technology. Spanish language skills helpful but not required, no programming or GIS background needed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Intermediate Portuguese I
AS.210.277 (01)

More advanced training in the skills of the language with emphasis on vocabulary building, ease and fluency in the language through the use of a multifaceted approach. Materials used immerse students in the cultures of Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese-speaking Africa, and reflect the mix of cultures at work in the contemporary Lusophone world. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Lab is required. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: AS.210.178, or placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the fourth class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Alvarez Torres, Mariana
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the fourth class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Chirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Advanced Spanish Conversation
AS.210.316 (01)

Conversational Spanish surveys high-interest themes, discusses short films by contemporary Hispanic filmmakers and offers a thorough review of grammar. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as personality traits, social media, political power, art and lifestyles on completion of this course. Conversational skills mastered during the course apply to all careers interconnected by Spanish. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Davila, Cortney Maria
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Adv Spanish Composition
AS.210.317 (01)

This third-year course is a hands-on and process-oriented introduction to discussion and compositional analysis. On completion of this course, students will have improved their Spanish writing skills in various types of compositions they might be expected to write in academic settings and in real-life formats such as film reviews, letters to the editor, cover letters, etc. The course also focuses on refinement of grammar and vocabulary use. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after September 13th.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Portuguese: Language and Literature II
AS.210.392 (01)

This course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will read several works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers, followed by intensive writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. The course is conducted entirely in Portuguese. No satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Pre-requisites: 210.391 or placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Portuguese for the professions
AS.210.394 (01)

Portuguese for the professions is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in a Portuguese speaking environment. It focuses on the development of advanced communication skills according to students’ individualized professional interests through conversations, readings, discussions, writings and media. The course also highlights cultural nuances of the professional Portuguese-speaking world. Grammar will be reviewed as needed in class, but most of it will be done outside of class with tutors or a TA, freeing class time for more communicative activities. There is no final exam. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: one semester of Portuguese (AS.210.177), Two semesters of Spanish or Placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2019. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/3
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (01)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (02)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Blood Cinema in films by Pedro Almodóvar, Julio Medem, and Alejandro Amenábar
AS.215.414 (01)

Films by three leading Spanish male directors from different generational backgrounds and sexual and political orientations. We will study their respective filming and mythmaking of kinship and regional passions in mixing love with hate, attraction with rejection. Our dialogue will revive and debate the polemical psycho-analytic theses in Marsha Kinder’s Blood Cinema: The Reconstruction of National Identity in Spain.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-SPAN

Impure Images: Latin American Film and Poetry at the End of the 20th Century
AS.215.418 (01)

This course will study ideas and images of and from Latin America that appear in poetic and cinematographic productions from 1968 to 2001. It explores connections between aesthetics and politics in Latin American film and poetry after 1968. We will address questions such as: How do images from poetry and film embody and represent tensions between the rural and the urban, the private and the public, the national and the international spheres? How do multimedia productions destabilize the purity of genres and call attention to the form? We will also look at some recent productions, in order to see continuities and transformations in form and content, and in the role that cinema and poetry play in Latin American societies. Taught in Spanish

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Galindo Orrego, Liliana
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-SPAN

Whose Caribbean and the Epic of Race
AS.215.442 (01)

We will study literary claims of epic colonial possession and aesthetic dispossession through close readings of five works in reverse chronological order: V.S. Naipaul’s late historical novel, A Way in the World (1994); Derek Walcott’s transoceanic poem, Omeros (1990); Alejo Carpentier’s short anti-Enlightenment moral tale, El reino de este mundo (1949) and his short tale in celebration of Afro Cuban wizardry, Viaje a la semilla (1944); Aimé Césaire’s prose poetry, mixed chronicle, Cahier d'un retour au pays natal, or Notebook of a Return to the Native Land (1939-1947). We will address questions of temporality and historicity (Heidegger) and a base-materialist political blocking of wild dreams as attainable through translation (Bataille). Such formal and epistemic problems will draw us into issues of race across the colonial spectrum of Caribbean histories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL

Cultura e Ditadura [Culture and Dictatorship]
AS.217.307 (01)

In the 20th century, the Lusophone world saw the rise and fall of such authoritarian governments as the Estado Novo in Portugal (1933–74) and the military dictatorship in Brazil (1964–85). During this period, a series of revolutionary political movements sprung up, as well as innovative cultural production. How does culture respond to censorship? How do art and politics comment on and ultimately transform each other? In this course we will discuss novels, poetry, film, songs, and artworks from Brazil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa that engage critically with dictatorships and their aftermaths. Topics include violence, trauma and memory, colonialism, post-colonialism, and decoloniality, race and the legacies of slavery, counterculture, and popular cultures. Readings and discussion in Portuguese. Interested students who have not completed course prerequisites should contact the instructor for permission to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Latin American Ecocriticism
AS.217.425 (01)

Increased awareness of climate change has led to a shift in the way we address and intervene in environmental issues in the new millennium. Yet the interest in making sense of the environment has a long history in literature and the arts. How have Latin American writers and artists understood and depicted their environments and environmental questions? How do the form and content of texts and cultural artifacts influence our understanding of the non-human world? Can works of fiction shape ecological transformations? In this course we will discuss texts from the early colonial period to the present, including the literary works of Graciliano Ramos, Horacio Quiroga, and Clarice Lispector; political ecology; film; Ana Mendieta’s earth-body art; contemporary experiments in bio-art; postcolonial theory; and the intersection of environmental justice with such topics as nationalism and human rights. Going beyond ecocriticism’s original focus on the Anglo-American world, we will engage recent scholarship on Latin America that sheds light on the region’s cultural and geopolitical importance to the global climate, with particular attention to Brazil. This course aims to introduce students to current debates in Latin American Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene and thus contribute to an incipient but expanding field.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/9
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Feminist and Queer Theory: Black Decolonial Feminisms in the Americas
AS.363.301 (01)

This course will use both historical and contemporary readings focusing on Black and decolonial feminisms as theory and praxis to reflect on the particular experiences of afro-descendants throughout the Americas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Estrella, Amarilys
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.302 (01)Writing Systems of the Ancient AmericasTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRossi, Franco HART-ANC
AS.010.325 (01)Blood, Gold, and Souls: The Arts of the Spanish EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHyman, Aaron M. 
AS.010.366 (01)Native American ArtTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaBloomberg 272HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.389 (01)The Stone and the ThreadTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDeleonardis, Lisa HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.070.324 (01)Latin America in a Fracturing WorldW 1:30PM - 4:00PMAngelini, Alessandro, Han, Clara INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.130 (03)Freshman Seminar: American SlaveryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMorgan, PhilipBloomberg 478HIST-US
AS.100.239 (01)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (02)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (03)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (04)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel Louis HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.450 (02)History Research LabT 3:00PM - 5:30PMLurtz, Casey HIST-LATAM, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.210.277 (01)Intermediate Portuguese IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina 
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAlvarez Torres, Mariana MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMChirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix MSCH-HUM
AS.210.316 (01)Advanced Spanish ConversationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDavila, Cortney Maria 
AS.210.317 (01)Adv Spanish CompositionTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLópez Raja, Julio 
AS.210.392 (01)Advanced Portuguese: Language and Literature IIMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina 
AS.210.394 (01)Portuguese for the professionsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina 
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.231 (01)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGonzalez, Eduardo 
AS.215.231 (02)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGonzalez, Eduardo 
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.414 (01)Blood Cinema in films by Pedro Almodóvar, Julio Medem, and Alejandro AmenábarTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGonzalez, Eduardo GRLL-SPAN
AS.215.418 (01)Impure Images: Latin American Film and Poetry at the End of the 20th CenturyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMGalindo Orrego, Liliana GRLL-SPAN
AS.215.442 (01)Whose Caribbean and the Epic of RaceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGonzalez, Eduardo GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.217.307 (01)Cultura e Ditadura [Culture and Dictatorship]TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMMiguel Bedran, Marina 
AS.217.425 (01)Latin American EcocriticismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMiguel Bedran, Marina GRLL-ENGL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, Meredith INST-AP
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, Christy INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.363.301 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Black Decolonial Feminisms in the AmericasTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMEstrella, Amarilys INST-PT