Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Ancient Americas in Motion
AS.010.214 (01)

This course critically examines the visual arts through the medium of documentary, historical, and Hollywood film. Coverage is mostly North America and Mesoamerica.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Hodson 311  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/45
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Writing Systems of the Ancient Americas
AS.010.302 (01)

The Indigenous peoples of the Americas developed several writing systems, including Zapotec, Isthmian, Mixteca-Puebla, Inka Khipu, and Maya. Of these, Maya script stands out as among the most complex. In this course you will learn about the different writing systems of the Americas, as you acquire the skills to “read” Maya script, interpret complex artistic programs and decipher numbers, dates and names of individuals who lived long ago, as well as build an understanding of how archaeologists utilize such information alongside the material record to illuminate histories and narratives difficult if not impossible to obtain otherwise.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Rossi, Franco (Franco)
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Tombs for the Living
AS.010.398 (01)

Centering on the tomb as the unit of analysis, this course examines the cultural and material aspects of death and funerary ritual. Case studies are drawn from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, HART-ANC

Without Representation: Race, Gender, and Belonging in American Art
AS.010.442 (01)

This course explores the fundamental question: who counts as an American in American Art? Through our examination of objects, texts, and public collections we will document the marginalized, obscured, and omitted populations in traditional conceptions of American Art. Our goal is to understand the political and social impact of these absences. In this seminar, we will address the concept of cultural representation, both as image and agent, in art produced in the United States. Texts from art criticism, museum studies, gender studies, and ethnic studies will inform our investigations. We will also survey museum collections to understand the role of institutions in selecting, canonizing, and preserving a particular view of American culture. Throughout the course, we will pay close attention to power as it relates to class, race, gender, and sexuality. We will begin in the mid-nineteenth century with the emergence of photography and the establishment of public art museums in the United States. At the postwar period, when the art world shifted from Paris to New York, we will consider how culture externally served political dominance while internally reinscribing elitism. We will examine the role of art in feminist, Black, Chicano, and Asian American civil rights movements and conclude with an investigation of museum efforts to address the complexity of American identity today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Flores-Garcia, Jez
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Brazil History and Cultures: A Glance from Baltimore
AS.100.379 (01)

Using textual and visual documents (including books from Peabody Library), we will examine the contrasts of Brazilian history and culture, and its connections with 19th and 20th century Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis (Jean)
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Health & Society in Latin America & the Caribbean
AS.140.231 (01)

Medical practice is complex in Latin America and the Caribbean. Most countries in the region have universal healthcare; yet, the quality of clinical services varies widely, and is influenced by degrees of incorporation into—or marginalization from—social power structures. Many people take their health into their own hands by supplementing biomedicine with plant based remedies as well as religious and spiritual services. This course will interrogate the history and contemporary relevance of healthcare in Latin America and the Caribbean, with particular interest in how medicine intersects with colonialism, slavery, capitalism, neo-colonialism, grassroots revolutionary movements, the Cold War, and neoliberalism. Drawing on films, visual and performance art, and music, students will consider the ways in which race, gender, indigeneity, ability, class, and nation have affected people’s experiences with medical practice. Informed by postcolonial and decolonial scholarship, we will also examine why Latin America and the Caribbean have become “laboratories” for the production of medical knowledge, and importantly, how that knowledge was created by indigenous, enslaved, and migrant people as well as professionals. Finally, we seek to understand individual health problems in relation to the social and political determinants of health. As such, the course prompts students to reflect on why healthcare professionals—in the United States and abroad—would benefit from historically-informed communication with patients and their communities. This is a discussion-based seminar that requires active participation. There are no exams. The course does not assume any previous knowledge of the history of medicine or Latin American history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: O'brien, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

International Trade
AS.180.241 (01)

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Intermediate Portuguese I
AS.210.277 (01)

More advanced training in the skills of the language with emphasis on vocabulary building, ease and fluency in the language through the use of a multifaceted approach. Materials used immerse students in the cultures of Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese-speaking Africa, and reflect the mix of cultures at work in the contemporary Lusophone world. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Lab is required. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prereq: AS.210.178, or placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia), Spiker, Magali T
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the fourth class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio
  • Room: Hodson 315  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the fourth class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Alvarez Torres, Mariana
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Advanced Spanish Conversation
AS.210.316 (01)

Conversational Spanish surveys high-interest themes, discusses short films by contemporary Hispanic filmmakers and offers a thorough review of grammar. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as personality traits, social media, political power, art and lifestyles on completion of this course. Conversational skills mastered during the course apply to all careers interconnected by Spanish. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Torres-Burgos, Carmen
  • Room: Bloomberg 274  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Adv Spanish Composition
AS.210.317 (01)

This third-year course is a hands-on and process-oriented introduction to discussion and compositional analysis. On completion of this course, students will have improved their Spanish writing skills in various types of compositions they might be expected to write in academic settings and in real-life formats such as film reviews, letters to the editor, cover letters, etc. The course also focuses on refinement of grammar and vocabulary use. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after September 13th.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Chirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix (Grecia)
  • Room: Ames 320  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Portuguese I: Language and Literature
AS.210.391 (01)

This third-year course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Students will read two complete works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers each semester, followed by intense writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Prereq: 210.278, placement test or instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Portuguese: Language and Literature II
AS.210.392 (01)

This course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will read several works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers, followed by intensive writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. The course is conducted entirely in Portuguese. No satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Pre-requisites: 210.391 or placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia), Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planet Amazonia: Culture, History, and the Environment
AS.211.231 (01)

Without Amazonia, global warming could reach levels that threaten life on the planet. Yet, in an era of deforestation and climate change, Amazonia itself might be on the verge of disappearance, with disastrous consequences for the world. This course proposes interdisciplinary perspectives on Amazonia through a range of works drawn from history, anthropology, archeology, environmental studies, literature, and the arts. We’ll look at texts by European travelers and missionaries who contributed to the paradoxical image of Amazonia as a “virgin paradise” or a “green hell”; scientific studies and artists’ depictions of the region’s flora and fauna; the often-overlooked history of human occupation of the region; and projects to colonize, develop, or conserve the world’s largest tropical forest. What importance does Amazonia hold for Latin American and global geopolitics? How do art and literature, including indigenous writings, create, reinforce, or deconstruct clichés about the region? What alternative futures for our planet can Amazonia help us to imagine?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2019. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)
  • Room: Hodson 315  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)
  • Room: Hodson 315  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (01)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Clarke, Rhiannon Taylor, Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo)
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (02)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Ugarelli Risi, Mariangela
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, David
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Hackerman 320
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Gilman 381
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 302
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Gilman 381
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (09)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (10)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (11)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (12)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26 Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith (Meredith)
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.214 (01)Ancient Americas in MotionW 4:30PM - 7:00PMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 311
 
HART-ANC
AS.010.302 (01)Writing Systems of the Ancient AmericasTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMRossi, Franco (Franco)Gilman 177
 
HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.398 (01)Tombs for the LivingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 303
 
ARCH-ARCH, HART-ANC
AS.010.442 (01)Without Representation: Race, Gender, and Belonging in American ArtM 4:30PM - 7:00PMFlores-Garcia, Jez 
 
HART-MODERN
AS.100.379 (01)Brazil History and Cultures: A Glance from BaltimoreTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel Louis (Jean)Maryland 114
 
HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.140.231 (01)Health & Society in Latin America & the CaribbeanTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMO'brien, ElizabethGilman 400
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.180.241 (01)International TradeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeMergenthaler 111
 
INST-ECON
AS.210.277 (01)Intermediate Portuguese IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia), Spiker, Magali TGilman 219
 
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLópez Raja, JulioHodson 315
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAlvarez Torres, MarianaHodson 301
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.210.316 (01)Advanced Spanish ConversationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMTorres-Burgos, CarmenBloomberg 274
 
AS.210.317 (01)Adv Spanish CompositionTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMChirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix (Grecia)Ames 320
 
AS.210.391 (01)Advanced Portuguese I: Language and LiteratureMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)Gilman 10
 
AS.210.392 (01)Advanced Portuguese: Language and Literature IIMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia), Staff 
 
AS.211.231 (01)Planet Amazonia: Culture, History, and the EnvironmentW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMiguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)Shriver Hall 001
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)Hodson 315
 
GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)Hodson 315
 
GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.231 (01)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMClarke, Rhiannon Taylor, Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo)Hodson 211
 
AS.215.231 (02)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Ugarelli Risi, MariangelaGilman 400
 
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, DavidGilman 400
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Hackerman 320
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Gilman 381
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Krieger 302
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Krieger 300
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Bloomberg 276
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Gilman 381
AS.230.101 (09)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Krieger 304
AS.230.101 (10)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Bloomberg 172
AS.230.101 (11)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Bloomberg 276
AS.230.101 (12)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
Bloomberg 172
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, Meredith (Meredith)Bloomberg 276
 
INST-AP