Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Art of Colonial Peru
AS.010.320 (01)

Viewed within the dynamic historical context of colonial society, we consider the pictorial, sculptural, and architectural programs that ensued in viceregal Peru (1532-1825). We examine the role of religious orders, art schools, artisan guilds and cofradía, and consider the social and political implications of art patronage.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Art of the Ancient Andes
AS.010.365 (01)

The ancient visual arts of Andean South America and their respective cultural contexts form the basis of this course. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum students will have access to collections for study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, HART-ANC

Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and Beyond
AS.060.157 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the texts and rhetoric of the movement that abolished slavery in the Caribbean. Among other topics, we examine: how the formerly enslaved represented their experiences of slavery; how abolitionism emerged across the West Indies, Cuba, and Haiti; and the techniques artists used to imagine radical, post-slavery worlds. Authors include: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Esteban Montejo, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, and Aimé Césaire (all texts will be available in English).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Loker, Evan (Evan)
  • Room: Latrobe 120  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (01)

The question what it means to be human requires continual investigation. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding humanity in its diverse manifestations. This course familiarizes students with anthropological concepts and methods, and engages in critical analysis of a broad range of subjects including language, exchange, class, race, gender, kinship, sexuality, religion, and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Shaffer 301 Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/27
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (02)

The question what it means to be human requires continual investigation. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding humanity in its diverse manifestations. This course familiarizes students with anthropological concepts and methods, and engages in critical analysis of a broad range of subjects including language, exchange, class, race, gender, kinship, sexuality, religion, and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Shaffer 301 Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/26
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

Invitation to Anthropology
AS.070.132 (03)

The question what it means to be human requires continual investigation. Anthropology offers conceptual tools and an ethical groundwork for understanding humanity in its diverse manifestations. This course familiarizes students with anthropological concepts and methods, and engages in critical analysis of a broad range of subjects including language, exchange, class, race, gender, kinship, sexuality, religion, and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Shaffer 301 Shaffer 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (01)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (02)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (03)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (04)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Slavery in the Americas and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, 1450-1890
AS.100.224 (01)

This course explores the origins, organization and abolition of the institution of Slavery in the Americas, the Transatlantic slave trade and their impacts on the formation of the Early Modern World c. 1450-1890.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Krichtal, Alexey
  • Room: Maryland 201  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Science and Technology in Slave Regimes
AS.140.328 (01)

This course explores the questions that arise when we juxtapose slave regimes with scientific and technological change. We’ll consider very broad questions, such as, was slavery compatible with modernity? As well as study specific cases where slavery and technology intersected, such as the cotton gin or sugar cane plantations, but also the existence of “modern” scientific societies within slave regimes. We’ll explore these questions from a trans-national perspective by comparing cases in the Antebellum US, Cuba, Brazil, Haiti and other countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kargon, Robert H (Robert), Portuondo, Maria M
  • Room: Gilman 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Science & Technology in the Development of Modern Latin America
AS.140.339 (01)

This seminar will survey the development of science and technology in modern Latin America, and explore their dynamics in the context of cultural, political, and economic forces.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Alsina, Marc Joseph (Marc)
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Alvarez Torres, Mariana, Sanchez, Loreto
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio, Sanchez, Loreto
  • Room: Shaffer 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (03)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Chirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix (Grecia), Sanchez, Loreto
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Spanish for International Commerce
AS.210.314 (01)

Spanish for international business is an overview of business topics in an international Spanish-speaking context with an emphasis on deep review of grammar and vocabulary acquisition. On completion of this course the student will have developed the ability to read and critically discuss business and government relations in Latin America and will have examine entrepreneurship, finance, marketing, business ethics, human resources and commerce in the Spanish speaking world. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been covered in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their own professional interests. Concepts learned in this course will be directly applicable to careers linked to international relations and will apply to various careers in business. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session. Language Program Director: Loreto Sanchez-Serrano

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hubbard, Aranzazu (Arancha)
  • Room: Gilman 443  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Conversational Spanish
AS.210.316 (01)

Conversational Spanish surveys high-interest themes, discusses short films by contemporary Hispanic filmmakers and offers a thorough review of grammar. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as personality traits, social media, political power, art and lifestyles on completion of this course. Conversational skills mastered during the course apply to all careers interconnected by Spanish. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Ramos, Maria Del Rosario (Rosario), Torres-Burgos, Carmen
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Adv Spanish Composition
AS.210.317 (01)

This third-year course is a hands-on and process-oriented introduction to discussion and compositional analysis. On completion of this course, students will have improved their Spanish writing skills in various types of compositions they might be expected to write in academic settings and in real-life formats such as film reviews, letters to the editor, cover letters, etc. The course also focuses on refinement of grammar and vocabulary use. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after September 13th.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio, Ramos, Maria Del Rosario (Rosario)
  • Room: Hodson 213  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature I
AS.210.391 (01)

This third-year course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Students will read two complete works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers each semester, followed by intense writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Prereq: 210.278, placement test or instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia), Spiker, Magali T
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshmen seminar: The missing “A” | STEM to STEAM for Hispanics
AS.211.103 (01)

Seminar participants immerse on stories and issues affecting Hispanics in the US, specifically questioning if social media and information created by artificial intelligence perpetuate subordination and miscommunication. By investigating platforms such as TikTok, Youtube and Twitter this course hones foundational critical thinking skills in the arts and humanities. Upon completion of this seminar, you will innovate and perfect research questions to continue studies in Hispanic and Latin American cultures. The course focusses on reading and analysis of distinct influencers such as #latinasinmedicine, @lin-manuel, @CDC, @johnshopkinssph, @WHO. Critical reading required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Ramos, Maria Del Rosario (Rosario), Sanchez, Loreto
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL

Freshman Seminar: Soccer in Brazil: opium of the masses
AS.211.294 (01)

The course is taught IN ENGLISH. Futebol offers a unique perspective on politics, race and citizenship in Brazil. This course seeks to understand Brazilian culture through the historic national pastime of futebol. In addition to the main textbooks chosen for the class, by reading a variety of texts from newspapers, academic journals, fiction and film, students will be able to find their own approach to understanding the phenomenon of futebol within the social and political traditions of Brazil. No knowledge of Portuguese is required, but those who can read in Portuguese will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Portuguese words and expressions. This class may count toward the Minor in Portuguese.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (01)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, David, Sanchez, Loreto
  • Room: Hodson 203  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literature in Spanish
AS.215.231 (02)

The main objective of this course is to examine and discuss specific authors and topics in literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The course is designed to cover a selection of Hispanic texts from Spain and Latin America. Literary genres to be studied will include narratives, poetry, and drama. The bulk of each class session will be dedicated to the discussion of the assigned readings. This course is taught in Spanish. This course is required for the major in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Jagdale, Tanavi Shirish, Sanchez, Loreto
  • Room: Hodson 311  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Sanchez, Loreto, Ugarelli Risi, Mariangela
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Power And Gender In Hispanic American Novels And Films
AS.215.407 (01)

We will analyze and discuss four novels and three films impacted by gender violence and political idolatry under shattering stress. Oficio de tinieblas or The Book of Lamentations (1962) by Rosario Castellanos (Mexico). Zama (1956) by Antonio di Benedetto (Argentina). Delirio or Delirium (2004) by Laura Restrepo (Colombia). El ruido de las cosas al caer or The Noise of Things Falling (2011) by Juan Gabriel Vásquez (Colombia). In addition, we will examine in depth films by Lucrecia Martel (Argentina): the short Rey muerto (1995), La ciénaga (2001), and her own version of Zama (2017). Course taught in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, David, Perez Marsilla, Francisco (francisco)
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and Culture
AS.217.427 (01)

The vast body of work produced women artists and writers in Brazil has been marginalized by canonical cultural narratives, which are now being contested by a spate of scholarly and artistic projects. This course spotlights the production of women from the early twentieth century to the present, including renowned and lesser-known works. We’ll discuss art, literature, and film alongside feminist theory, exploring radicality as it relates to aesthetics and politics. How do women’s art, literature, and thought engage with and transform Brazilian cultural production? What are their contributions to global discussions about gender and sexuality? How do these works respond to historical events? Among the topics addressed are the body, feminism, race, indigeneity, and politics. We’ll study Clarice Lispector’s acclaimed stories, the first Brazilian proletarian novel written by modernist icon Patricia Galvão, known as Pagu, the diaries of Carolina Maria de Jesus, the emblematic paintings of Tarsila do Amaral, and Lygia Clark’s artwork, as well as the booming scene of contemporary cinema and poetry. The course is taught in English, but those interested in doing the coursework in Portuguese (4 credits) should register for section 02.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)
  • Room: Gilman 50  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and Culture
AS.217.427 (02)

The vast body of work produced women artists and writers in Brazil has been marginalized by canonical cultural narratives, which are now being contested by a spate of scholarly and artistic projects. This course spotlights the production of women from the early twentieth century to the present, including renowned and lesser-known works. We’ll discuss art, literature, and film alongside feminist theory, exploring radicality as it relates to aesthetics and politics. How do women’s art, literature, and thought engage with and transform Brazilian cultural production? What are their contributions to global discussions about gender and sexuality? How do these works respond to historical events? Among the topics addressed are the body, feminism, race, indigeneity, and politics. We’ll study Clarice Lispector’s acclaimed stories, the first Brazilian proletarian novel written by modernist icon Patricia Galvão, known as Pagu, the diaries of Carolina Maria de Jesus, the emblematic paintings of Tarsila do Amaral, and Lygia Clark’s artwork, as well as the booming scene of contemporary cinema and poetry. The course is taught in English, but those interested in doing the coursework in Portuguese (4 credits) should register for section 02.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina (Rina)
  • Room: Bloomberg 176  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR

Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Latin America
AS.230.342 (01)

This course will examine the dynamics of transformative social change in Latin America and the Caribbean through analyses of resistance, rebellion, and revolution. Because revolutionary change is at once the most transformative and the most rare, this course will cover the exemplary cases of the Haitian, Mexican, and Cuban revolutions, but then also ask how theorists have understood the dynamics of both open rebellion and of everyday resistance in societies deeply structured by racial, gender, and class power, situated within an unequal world system. Attending to both local and global dynamics, this course will ask how Latin American dynamics have both conformed to and challenged universalist theories of social change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Bloomberg 176  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Caribbean Music
AS.376.342 (01)

This course will explore the many genres of traditional and popular music that have emerged among the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean region and its Diaspora. We will examine the social, political, and economic issues that have shaped the region’s music and how that music may have intersected with migration, colonization, ethnicity, race and tourism. Using a “participant observation” approach, students will read about, listen to and research a variety of musical experiences within the relevant sociopolitical context. Students should expect to fully participate in discussions about the assigned readings and music, and should be prepared to conduct their own research and share their own or newly acquired knowledge of contemporary and “historical/traditional” musical themes, and local and regional artists. Our collective goal will be to enjoy as well as to think critically about music, culture and performance and within a more informed understanding of the complex, multi-varied and multi-vocal context—know as “The Caribbean”.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Shaffer 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.320 (01)Art of Colonial PeruTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDeleonardis, LisaBloomberg 172
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.365 (01)Art of the Ancient AndesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaGilman 119
 
ARCH-ARCH, HART-ANC
AS.060.157 (01)Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and BeyondTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLoker, Evan (Evan)Latrobe 120
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.132 (01)Invitation to AnthropologyW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroShaffer 301
Gilman 55
ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.070.132 (02)Invitation to AnthropologyW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroShaffer 301
Gilman 400
ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.070.132 (03)Invitation to AnthropologyW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, M 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroShaffer 301
Shaffer 100
ARCH-RELATE, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.100.115 (01)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLurtz, CaseyVirtual Online
Gilman 132
HIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (02)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLurtz, CaseyVirtual Online
Gilman 55
HIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (03)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLurtz, CaseyVirtual Online
Ames 234
HIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (04)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLurtz, CaseyVirtual Online
Maryland 202
HIST-LATAM
AS.100.224 (01)Slavery in the Americas and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, 1450-1890MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKrichtal, AlexeyMaryland 201
 
HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.328 (01)Science and Technology in Slave RegimesM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKargon, Robert H (Robert), Portuondo, Maria MGilman 300
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.339 (01)Science & Technology in the Development of Modern Latin AmericaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMAlsina, Marc Joseph (Marc)Gilman 400
 
INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 217
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAlvarez Torres, Mariana, Sanchez, LoretoGilman 400
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLópez Raja, Julio, Sanchez, LoretoShaffer 301
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (03)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMChirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix (Grecia), Sanchez, LoretoMergenthaler 111
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.210.314 (01)Spanish for International CommerceMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMHubbard, Aranzazu (Arancha)Gilman 443
 
AS.210.316 (01)Conversational SpanishTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRamos, Maria Del Rosario (Rosario), Torres-Burgos, CarmenHodson 301
 
AS.210.317 (01)Adv Spanish CompositionTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLópez Raja, Julio, Ramos, Maria Del Rosario (Rosario)Hodson 213
 
AS.210.391 (01)Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia), Spiker, Magali THodson 216
 
AS.211.103 (01)Freshmen seminar: The missing “A” | STEM to STEAM for HispanicsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMRamos, Maria Del Rosario (Rosario), Sanchez, Loreto 
 
MLL-ENGL
AS.211.294 (01)Freshman Seminar: Soccer in Brazil: opium of the massesMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)Gilman 55
 
GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)Gilman 219
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.215.231 (01)Introduction to Literature in SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, David, Sanchez, LoretoHodson 203
 
AS.215.231 (02)Introduction to Literature in SpanishMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Jagdale, Tanavi Shirish, Sanchez, LoretoHodson 311
 
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Sanchez, Loreto, Ugarelli Risi, MariangelaGilman 413
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.407 (01)Power And Gender In Hispanic American Novels And FilmsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, David, Perez Marsilla, Francisco (francisco)Gilman 132
 
AS.217.427 (01)Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and CultureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMiguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)Gilman 50
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.217.427 (02)Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and CultureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMiguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)Gilman 50
Gilman 479
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentW 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, Rina (Rina)Bloomberg 176
 
GECS-SOCSCI, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR
AS.230.342 (01)Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Latin AmericaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMThornton, ChristyBloomberg 176
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyKrieger Laverty
 
INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.376.342 (01)Caribbean MusicM 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaffShaffer 302