Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Online: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750 to Present
AS.100.272 (85)

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context. *This course will view films complementary to the subject but it is not considered a Film Studies course. Therefore, montages and mise-en-scene will not be discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-LATAM, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.272 (85)Online: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750 to PresentStewart, Simone Gamali INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-LATAM, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present Considerations
AS.100.258 (01)

This course provides a historical and theoretical overview regarding thinking about marriage. Students will think critically about how matrimony has changed over time, and marriage in contemporary culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/14
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Economics of Discrimination
AS.180.252 (01)

This course examines labor market discrimination by gender, race and ethnicity in the United States. What does the empirical evidence show, and how can we explain it? How much of the difference in observed outcomes is driven by differences in productivity characteristics and how much is due to discrimination? How have economists theorized about discrimination and what methodologies can be employed to test those theories? What has been the impact of public policy in this area; how do large corporations and educational institutions respond; and what can we learn from landmark lawsuits? The course will reinforce skills relevant to all fields of applied economics, including critical evaluation of the theoretical and empirical literature, the reasoned application of statistical techniques, and analysis of current policy issues. Seniors by Permission Only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Freshman Seminar: Gender and Sexuality in Reformation and Counter Reformation Europe
AS.100.131 (01)

This course will discuss the centrality of gender, sexuality, and gendered rhetoric to the genesis and development of the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation in Europe.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and Aging
AS.230.154 (01)

In this course students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the ntersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Icons of Feminism
AS.060.320 (01)

This course looks at four crucial figures who have haunted feminist thought and responses to feminism over the centuries. Sappho, known as the first female poet, remains an enigmatic icon of feminine desire and creativity; Antigone, the daughter of Oedipus and the heroine of Sophocles’s play Antigone, still inspires feminist analyses of women’s relationship to law, the state and civil society; and Joan of Arc, the militant maid of Orleans, troubles thinking about women and violence as well as women, religion and spirituality. The last figure is Mary Wollstonecraft, often cited as the first modern feminist. The course will examine literary works written about these iconic figures, as well as contemporary feminist writing about their influence and viability as models for the future of feminism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th Century
AS.100.408 (01)

We will read and analyze key works of social and critical theory produced in relation to 20th and 21st century problems of state and society, nationalism, empire, totalitarianism, genocide, capitalism, political order, gender, race, sexuality, secularism, religion, environmental catastrophe. Possible readings include Weber, Du Bois, Adorno, Arendt, Foucault, Balibar, Beck among others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Classics Research Lab: The Symonds Project
AS.040.420 (01)

This course gives participants a unique opportunity to engage directly in empirical research and its interpretation and dissemination. Topics vary. This semester’s offering is organized around a project to reconstruct digitally the library of the nineteenth-century writer John Addington Symonds, author of one of the first studies of ancient sexuality. No prerequisites, but potential students should contact instructor for permission to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (01)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/30
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Love and Film
AS.061.391 (01)

In this course, we explore different understandings of "love" and the way that film has dealt with the concept as a medium. We explore a variety of approaches to the question of "love" - from the agapic to the familial to the romantic - through a series of interdisciplinary readings ranging from philosophy to anthropology. We will also equally explore the question of how film has engaged with the question of love as a concept, and what depictions of human affection - from the general to the personal - it has offered us. Screenings are required for this course. Lab fee: $50

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (02)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/30
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

The Sociology of Gender and Sexuality
AS.230.255 (01)

This course will examine the processes by which gender is socially constructed and how society and its social institutions structure life chances based on gender. It employs Barbara J. Risman’s (2004) conceptualization of “gender as a social structure’: “Gender is deeply embedded as a basis for stratification not just in our personalities, our cultural rules, or institutions but in all these, and in complicated ways.” Course lectures and assignments for this course center on the distinction between biological sex and sociological gender, causes and consequences of gender inequality, and the intersectionality of gender, sexuality, race-ethnicity, class, religions, and other social structures in contemporary society and in everyday life. Students will examine theories of gender through scholarly literature, and popular films are used to help offer insight into gender theory, research, and social and academic commentary. Though the course will primarily cover gender as enacted in the United States, other countries and their gender dynamics will also be addressed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West: Home and World: Women, Gender and Sexuality in India
AS.363.330 (01)

The course is an exploration of issues of gender and sexuality as they have emerged in historical and contemporary South Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Art in North Africa and the Middle East
AS.363.329 (01)

This course aims to explore how gender and sexuality is situated in contemporary artistic practices in the geographical Middle East, through concepts of religion, war, revolution, resistance, nation-state, post-colonialism, and neoliberalism, especially as written and observed first-hand by artists, curators and scholars from the Middle East and North Africa region and their diasporas. Every week, under an overarching topic, notions of gender and sexuality will be questioned through works of selected artists across the region, as well as texts that provide the historical, theoretical, sociological and political background.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST

Population, Health and Development
AS.280.225 (01)

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, contraceptive methods as well as family planning and child survival programs, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS. This course is restricted to Public Health Studies majors. Students minoring in Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality can register with instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/72
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MAJOR

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (01)

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 31/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Human Sexual Orientation
AS.290.420 (01)

This course will examine the historical and current theories of sexual orientation and sexual variation development by examining the biological, psychological and social contributing factors that influence the development of sexual orientations and variations along with treatment and modification of problematic sexual behaviors. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester. Enrollment is limited to Senior Majors & Minors in Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychology; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Reproductive Physiology
AS.250.351 (01)

Focuses on reproductive physiology and biochemical and molecular regulation of the female and male reproductive tracts. Topics include the hypothalamus and pituitary, peptide and steroid hormone action, epididymis and male accessory sex organs, female reproductive tract, menstrual cycle, ovulation and gamete transport, fertilization and fertility enhancement, sexually transmitted diseases, and male and female contraceptive methods. Introductory lectures on each topic followed by research-oriented lectures and readings from current literature.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/100
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH

The Poetics and Politics of Sex: Feminist Utopia in Theory and Fiction
AS.363.338 (01)

This course examines the historical development of feminist utopia in theory and fiction. Readings will center Indigenous, Black, postcolonial, diasporic, and transnational perspectives that engage the topic of feminist utopia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.258 (01)Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present ConsiderationsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, Lauren BGilman 313HIST-US
AS.180.252 (01)Economics of DiscriminationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMorgan, Barbara AnneShriver Hall 104SPOL-UL
AS.100.131 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender and Sexuality in Reformation and Counter Reformation EuropeTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMKeene, Jessica LynnGilman 413HIST-EUROPE
AS.230.154 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and AgingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAgree, EmilyGilman 217
AS.060.320 (01)Icons of FeminismTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMFavret, MaryMattin Center 161
AS.100.408 (01)Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th CenturyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethMudd 26INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.040.420 (01)Classics Research Lab: The Symonds ProjectTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMButler, Michael Shane, Dean, GabrielleGilman 108
AS.200.204 (01)Human SexualityW 1:30PM - 3:50PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.061.391 (01)Love and FilmT 10:00AM - 12:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsWard, Meredith C FILM-CRITST
AS.200.204 (02)Human SexualityW 4:00PM - 6:20PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.230.255 (01)The Sociology of Gender and SexualityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMMcDonald, Katrina BellGilman 186
AS.363.330 (01)Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West: Home and World: Women, Gender and Sexuality in IndiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBagaria, SwayamGilman 55
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 301INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.363.329 (01)Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Art in North Africa and the Middle EastW 2:00PM - 4:30PMInce, Ezgi ISLM-ISLMST
AS.280.225 (01)Population, Health and DevelopmentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBecker, StanleyMergenthaler 111GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MAJOR
AS.363.201 (01)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityT 1:30PM - 4:30PMShepard, ToddBloomberg 272
AS.290.420 (01)Human Sexual OrientationW 6:30PM - 8:50PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.250.351 (01)Reproductive PhysiologyW 3:00PM - 4:45PMZirkin, Barry RShaffer 301BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.363.338 (01)The Poetics and Politics of Sex: Feminist Utopia in Theory and FictionMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLee, Sung MeyGilman 75