Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Queer Theory, Western Philosophy and Identity Politics
AS.191.321 (01)

The course focuses on sympathetic links between Western philosophers and queer theory in order to illuminate contemporary understandings of (gender or sexual) identity. The course identifies three strands of queer theory each with its specific understanding of identity and, consequently, each with its specific political solution to issues of persisting structures of patriarchy, homophobia, racism and capitalist exploitation. We begin in Ancient Greece with Plato’s seminal dialogue on Eros - the Symposium, which we will use to explore ancient Greek sexuality as a set of norms, practices, and identities that differ quite significantly from their modern counterparts. Thereafter, the course proceeds in three parts, each analyzing a specific strand of queer theory inspired by different thinkers from the Western philosophical canon: 1. Queer theory inspired by psychoanalytic thought of Freud and Lacan 2. Theories of performativity inspired by Foucault and Derrida 3. Affect and assemblage theory inspired by Deleuze and Guattari.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Skerjanec, Blaz
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Topics in French Cinema: Amour, Sexualité, Mariage
AS.212.344 (01)

What is the nature of desire? Where does it come from, and what determines and conditions it? What do we fall in love with when we fall in love? An exploration of a series of films that ask essential questions about the psychological, political, and social stakes of human love, desire and sexuality, and about the institution of marriage. Focus on discussion and analyses of film sequences in class and on oral presentations. Students will have the opportunity to progress in vocabulary and oral expression. Films studied include works of Truffaut, Godard, Bunuel, Kechiche, Haneke, Breillat and Audiard. Requirements for this course: completion of 210.301, 201.302, or equivalent score on Placement test.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Roos, Suzanne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Women & Modern Chinese History
AS.100.424 (01)

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 7:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Emily Dickinson
AS.060.389 (01)

Dickinson’s poetry, more than most, has seemed to prompt creativity in others. In the past two decades, especially, poets, writers, critics, and filmmakers have found their own voices in response to hers. We will focus on the formal, aesthetic, historical and gendered aspects of her poetry as we try to understand, and benefit from, this power to elicit response. Exams are unlikely. Instead, expect close attention to your own writing, as we pay close attention to hers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Miller, Andrew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th Century
AS.100.408 (01)

We will read and analyze key works of social and critical theory produced in relation to 20th and 21st century problems of state and society, nationalism, empire, totalitarianism, genocide, capitalism, political order, gender, race, sexuality, secularism, religion, environmental catastrophe. Possible readings include Weber, Du Bois, Adorno, Arendt, Foucault, Balibar, Beck among others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

History Research Lab: Histories of Women and the Vote
AS.100.450 (01)

The year 2020 will mark 100 years since the 19th Amendment guaranteed American women the right to vote. Or did it? This course will examine the long history of women’s voting rights in the United States, including the story that extends from a convention at Seneca Falls, NY to a constitutional amendment. It will also examine alternative stories, especially those of women of color whose campaigns for the vote did not end in 1920 – and continue until today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jones, Martha Suzanne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Demons of Democracy
AS.191.348 (01)

This course examines how a political discourse of deviancy, which produces a suspicion and a demonization of the Other, has legitimized the subsequent marginalization of specific groups from the democratic sphere. How has democracy, which promises a universal inclusivity of all its citizens, justified the historical and ongoing exclusion of certain marginalized groups from participating in political life? In this course, we will gain deeper insight into the logics of “demon-making” by turning to Black, feminist and queer critiques of democracy’s core tenets, particularly the values of inclusion, representation, and diversity. We will pay special attention to these scholars’ critiques of the Rational Man, conceived by Enlightenment thinkers to be the ideal subject of political life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Najjar, Stephanie Hanna
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (01)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (02)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:20PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Cultures of Love
AS.212.436 (01)

From the time of its invention, as a kind of counterfeit religion, in the Hispano-Arabic world, love has been an unsettling, paradoxical, transgressive phenomenon: mystical, adulterous, con game, parlor game, poison, illness. Taking a literary, sociological and anthropological approach, this course will try to grasp some of the challenges posed by love's protean discourse: from the fin'amor born in women-ruled Medieval courts, to the language of 17th-century women mystics, to libertinage, to the cold intimacies of today's emotional capitalism. Taught in French.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Russo, Elena
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sex and Society in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.355 (01)

This course will examine how early modern views on the body, gender, and sexuality shaped beliefs about the abilities and rights of women and men.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and Aging
AS.230.154 (01)

In this course students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the ntersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

(Making Space For) Black Thought
AS.230.304 (01)

How do we think about the power relations at work in the scholarship we read and in the important texts we consider essential to our educational experience? This course will critically investigate the role that concepts of race and racism have played in formulating dominant perceptions of who can be the producers of knowledge and what constitutes authoritative knowledge itself. We will consider how and why thinkers and scholarship produced outside of Europe and North America are too often ignored for their scholarly contributions and the dynamics that lead to this situation. We will also explore how and why new and important perspectives emerge from engaging and centering voices from beyond traditional canonical works. With a particular focus on the forms of knowledge arising from European Enlightenment approaches to concepts of thought reason and objective knowledge, this course will critically engage students with a wide range of thinkers such asGWF Hegel, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Davis, Ralph Trouillot, Sadiya Hartman, Walter Rodney, Derek Walcott, Sylvia Wynter and Frantz Fanon. This course will focus largely on thinkers engaging within the Black Atlantic and black diaspora traditions to question how we might consider voices and thought from beyond Eurocentric positions in our own scholarly practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Gender and International Development
AS.230.324 (01)

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine the gendered impact of international development experiences and policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of how the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work political participation and social movements. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Feminist and Queer Theory: Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality-Intersectional Feminist Theory
AS.363.306 (01)

In this course, we will get to know intersectional feminist philosophy through the lens of a Black feminist epistemology. What does this mean? That means that we will focus on how the contributions of Black feminist authors can bring out the specific political and philosophical nature of an intersectional theoretical framework.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Hussein, Rima
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (02)

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 3:00PM, Th 4:00PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Shepard, Todd
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Poetics and Politics: Eros & Literature
AS.363.333 (01)

What does it mean to love? From Antiquity to now, from Plato to Jeanette Winterson, writers have staged conversations on love and sex. In this way, they provide us with a “science of sex” (to use Foucault’s notion) that, though fully attuned to the power differentials that inhabit our most intimate physical experiences, gives free range to the imagination of desires. With Plato, the legend of Tristan and Isolde, and the study a few Renaissance love lyrics as a backdrop, we will delve into stories of desire that chart new configurations and break away from “normative heterosexuality.” Readings involve novellas by Balzac, George Sand, Colette; stories by Woolf, by Proust, and selected from Gender Outlaws as well as two films M. Butterfly and Call Me by Your Name. Meshing such stories with fundamental concepts in gender theory will enable us to chart ever changing configurations of desire from the double perspective of queerness and of sexual politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Ender, Evelyne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Population, Health and Development
AS.280.225 (01)

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, contraceptive methods as well as family planning and child survival programs, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS. This course is restricted to Public Health Studies majors. Students minoring in Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality can register with instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Becker, Stanley
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/72
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR

The Russian Novel
AS.300.317 (01)

This course introduces students to the nineteenth century Russian novel and considers its lasting impact on world culture. We will read classic masterpieces of the psychological and philosophical novel, and their experimental forerunners. Short lectures on historical and cultural context and on methods of literary analysis will be combined with intensive group discussion. Novels include Anna Karenina, Crime and Punishment, Eugene Onegin, Dead Souls, and Hero of our Time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (01)

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 3:00PM, Th 3:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Shepard, Todd
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reproductive Physiology
AS.250.351 (01)

Focuses on reproductive physiology and biochemical and molecular regulation of the female and male reproductive tracts. Topics include the hypothalamus and pituitary, peptide and steroid hormone action, epididymis and male accessory sex organs, female reproductive tract, menstrual cycle, ovulation and gamete transport, fertilization and fertility enhancement, sexually transmitted diseases, and male and female contraceptive methods. Introductory lectures on each topic followed by research-oriented lectures and readings from current literature.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Zirkin, Barry R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/100
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.191.321 (01)Queer Theory, Western Philosophy and Identity PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSkerjanec, Blaz POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.212.344 (01)Topics in French Cinema: Amour, Sexualité, MariageMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMRoos, Suzanne 
AS.100.424 (01)Women & Modern Chinese HistoryW 7:00PM - 9:30PMMeyer-Fong, Tobie INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.060.389 (01)Emily DickinsonT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMiller, Andrew 
AS.100.408 (01)Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th CenturyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, Kenneth INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.100.450 (01)History Research Lab: Histories of Women and the VoteM 1:30PM - 4:00PMJones, Martha Suzanne HIST-US
AS.191.348 (01)Demons of DemocracyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNajjar, Stephanie Hanna POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.200.204 (01)Human SexualityW 1:30PM - 3:50PMKraft, Chris S BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.204 (02)Human SexualityW 4:00PM - 6:20PMKraft, Chris S BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.212.436 (01)Cultures of LoveMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMRusso, Elena 
AS.100.355 (01)Sex and Society in Early Modern EuropeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRowe, Erin HIST-EUROPE
AS.230.154 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and AgingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAgree, Emily 
AS.230.304 (01)(Making Space For) Black ThoughtW 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani Rein INST-PT
AS.230.324 (01)Gender and International DevelopmentF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, Rina INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, Meredith INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.363.306 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality-Intersectional Feminist TheoryM 4:00PM - 6:30PMHussein, Rima 
AS.363.201 (02)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityTh 1:30PM - 3:00PM, Th 4:00PM - 5:00PMShepard, Todd 
AS.363.333 (01)Poetics and Politics: Eros & LiteratureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMEnder, Evelyne 
AS.280.225 (01)Population, Health and DevelopmentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBecker, Stanley ENVS-MAJOR
AS.300.317 (01)The Russian NovelW 1:30PM - 4:00PMEakin Moss, Anne INST-GLOBAL
AS.363.201 (01)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityTh 1:30PM - 3:00PM, Th 3:30PM - 4:30PMShepard, Todd 
AS.250.351 (01)Reproductive PhysiologyW 3:00PM - 4:45PMZirkin, Barry R BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH