Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th Century
AS.100.408 (01)

We will read and analyze key works of social and critical theory produced in relation to 20th and 21st century problems of state and society, nationalism, empire, totalitarianism, genocide, capitalism, political order, gender, race, sexuality, secularism, religion, environmental catastrophe. Possible readings include Weber, Du Bois, Adorno, Arendt, Foucault, Balibar, Beck among others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Love and Film
AS.061.391 (01)

In this course, we explore different understandings of "love" and the way that film has dealt with the concept as a medium. We explore a variety of approaches to the question of "love" - from the agapic to the familial to the romantic - through a series of interdisciplinary readings ranging from philosophy to anthropology. We will also equally explore the question of how film has engaged with the question of love as a concept, and what depictions of human affection - from the general to the personal - it has offered us. Screenings are required for this course. Lab fee: $50

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:00AM - 12:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Ward, Meredith C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present Considerations
AS.100.258 (01)

This course provides a historical and theoretical overview regarding thinking about marriage. Students will think critically about how matrimony has changed over time, and marriage in contemporary culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Lauren B
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/14
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Reproductive Physiology
AS.250.351 (01)

Focuses on reproductive physiology and biochemical and molecular regulation of the female and male reproductive tracts. Topics include the hypothalamus and pituitary, peptide and steroid hormone action, epididymis and male accessory sex organs, female reproductive tract, menstrual cycle, ovulation and gamete transport, fertilization and fertility enhancement, sexually transmitted diseases, and male and female contraceptive methods. Introductory lectures on each topic followed by research-oriented lectures and readings from current literature.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Zirkin, Barry R
  • Room: Shaffer 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/100
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (01)

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Shepard, Todd
  • Room: Gilman 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 31/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Human Sexual Orientation
AS.290.420 (01)

This course will examine the historical and current theories of sexual orientation and sexual variation development by examining the biological, psychological and social contributing factors that influence the development of sexual orientations and variations along with treatment and modification of problematic sexual behaviors. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester. Enrollment is limited to Senior Majors & Minors in Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychology; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 6:30PM - 8:50PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/30
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and Aging
AS.230.154 (01)

In this course students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the ntersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Population, Health and Development
AS.280.225 (01)

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, contraceptive methods as well as family planning and child survival programs, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS. This course is restricted to Public Health Studies majors. Students minoring in Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality can register with instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Becker, Stanley
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/72
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MAJOR

Icons of Feminism
AS.060.320 (01)

This course looks at four crucial figures who have haunted feminist thought and responses to feminism over the centuries. Sappho, known as the first female poet, remains an enigmatic icon of feminine desire and creativity; Antigone, the daughter of Oedipus and the heroine of Sophocles’s play Antigone, still inspires feminist analyses of women’s relationship to law, the state and civil society; and Joan of Arc, the militant maid of Orleans, troubles thinking about women and violence as well as women, religion and spirituality. The last figure is Mary Wollstonecraft, often cited as the first modern feminist. The course will examine literary works written about these iconic figures, as well as contemporary feminist writing about their influence and viability as models for the future of feminism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Favret, Mary
  • Room: Mattin Center 161
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West: Home and World: Women, Gender and Sexuality in India
AS.363.330 (01)

The course is an exploration of issues of gender and sexuality as they have emerged in historical and contemporary South Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Bagaria, Swayam
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Poetics and Politics of Sex: Feminist Utopia in Theory and Fiction
AS.363.338 (01)

This course examines the historical development of feminist utopia in theory and fiction. Readings will center Indigenous, Black, postcolonial, diasporic, and transnational perspectives that engage the topic of feminist utopia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lee, Sung Mey
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.408 (01)Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th CenturyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethGilman 10INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.061.391 (01)Love and FilmT 10:00AM - 12:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsWard, Meredith C FILM-CRITST
AS.100.258 (01)Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present ConsiderationsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, Lauren BGilman 313HIST-US
AS.250.351 (01)Reproductive PhysiologyW 3:00PM - 4:45PMZirkin, Barry RShaffer 301BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.363.201 (01)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityT 1:30PM - 4:30PMShepard, ToddGilman 305
AS.290.420 (01)Human Sexual OrientationW 6:30PM - 8:50PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.230.154 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and AgingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAgree, EmilyGilman 217
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 301INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.280.225 (01)Population, Health and DevelopmentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBecker, StanleyMergenthaler 111GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MAJOR
AS.060.320 (01)Icons of FeminismTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMFavret, MaryMattin Center 161
AS.363.330 (01)Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West: Home and World: Women, Gender and Sexuality in IndiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBagaria, SwayamGilman 55
AS.363.338 (01)The Poetics and Politics of Sex: Feminist Utopia in Theory and FictionMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLee, Sung MeyGilman 75

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Philosophy of Gender
AS.150.436 (01)

In this class we will examine philosophical questions about gender, and about the intersections between gender and other social categories including race, class and sexuality. We will focus specifically on questions about the metaphysics of gender and other social categories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Elanor J.
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND

The Idea of Power
AS.150.404 (01)

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury
AS.060.348 (01)

An exploration of the achievements and investments of one of the most influential coteries in the history of Britain. In addition to delving into key fictions by Virginia Woolf, we will examine novels by Leonard Woolf and E. M. Forster, art criticism by Roger Fry and Clive Bell, biographical essays by Lytton Strachey, economic writings by John Maynard Keynes, and poetry by T. S. Eliot.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

21st Century Female Playwrights
AS.225.318 (01)

This is a writing intensive class exploring the current wealth of women playwrights, including Pulitzer Prize winners: Wendy Wasserstein, Paula Vogel, Lynn Nottage, and Jackie Sibblies Drury (2019 Prize for FAIRVIEW). We will discuss Script Analysis and read (and see) plays by numerous writers including Claire Barron, Kia Corthron, Theresa Rebeck, Sarah Ruhl, Danai Gurira, Caleen Sinnette Jennings, and Hansol Jung. This class will include a mid-term and a Final Paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 8:30PM
  • Instructor: Denithorne, Margaret
  • Room: Merrick 105
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Michelangelo: Religion, Sexuality, and the Crisis of Renaissance Art
AS.010.301 (01)

The course will focus on the controversies surrounding the representation of the body in the writings and figurative art of Michelangelo and his contemporaries, the historical circumstances under which the most admired artist in Europe was attacked as a blasphemer and an idolator, and the effect of widespread calls for censorship on his later production. The writings of Michelangelo, Pietro Aretino, Benvenuto Cellini and own writings will be considered with a focus on their staging of an ambivalent and transgressive eroticism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Campbell, Stephen
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR

French Masculinities
AS.061.397 (01)

Examines changing ideals of masculinity in France after 1960 as they found expression on film, rooting the work of iconic stars and directors in their cultural, political and historical contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Mason, Laura
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (01)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Sociology of the Family
AS.230.388 (01)

Sociological perspectives on contemporary family life, including marriage and divorce, cohabitation, single parenthood, same sex partnerships, children’s wellbeing, balancing work and family responsibilities, domestic violence, and government policy toward families.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-Present
AS.100.283 (01)

Making and unmaking queer histories introduces students to some of the major themes and historical developments which shape contemporary understandings of past queer lives and communities in the United States and Western Europe since the nineteenth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Human Sexual Orientation
AS.290.420 (01)

This course will examine the historical and current theories of sexual orientation and sexual variation development by examining the biological, psychological and social contributing factors that influence the development of sexual orientations and variations along with treatment and modification of problematic sexual behaviors. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester. Enrollment is limited to Senior Majors & Minors in Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychology; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Cinema of the 1930s: Communist and Capitalist Fantasies
AS.300.324 (01)

Comedy and musical comedy film flourished in the USA during the Great Depression as well as in the USSR during the Stalinist Great Terror. This course will compare films of the era in a variety of genres (musical, epic, Western, drama), examining the intersections between politics and aesthetics as well as the lasting implications of the films themselves in light of theoretical works on film as a medium, ethics and gender.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

WGS Internship/Practicum: Feminist Animals: Sex, Nature, and Nonhumans
AS.363.416 (01)

Introducing feminist approaches to ecology and nonhumans, this course considers the interconnections between heteropatriarchal domination and the domination of nonhuman animals and ecologies. What different sensibilities and ways of seeing sex and gender open up when attention shifts to nonhumans? What tensions within and between feminism, animal liberation, and ecological concern come to the fore when each approach is alongside the others? How does the study of nonhumans extend the promise of feminism, and vice versa? In responding to these questions, we will see the real breadth of issues that the theory and practice of feminism can address.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Guha-Majumdar, Jishnu
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Feminist and Queer Theory: Family Matters: Queer and Feminist Responses to Family Life
AS.363.307 (01)

This course examines the historical development of feminist and queer critique, focusing on how the concept of family life has been understood by generations of writers, activists, and theorists. We will read important early works on western forms of kinship and family structure, and investigate how contemporary developments in reproductive technology, queer marriage, and workplace integration have produced new imaginings of familial belonging and its alternatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Giardini, Joseph Aurelio
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Queer & Trans Public History
AS.389.230 (01)

This course introduces students to a blend of public history, queer studies and transgender studies. Students learn oral history and archival research methods as they draw on and contribute to the university’s archival, museum, and library collections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Plaster, Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-INTRO

Scribbling Women in the Literary Archive
AS.389.346 (01)

Students examine select texts and archival materials related to Emily Dickinson, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Edith Wharton, Ida B. Wells, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sui Sin Far, Alice Duer Miller, and Zora Neale Hurston. Students interrogate how these writers navigated the constraints of gender, as informed by race and class, in the decades before and after the 19th Amendment and consider literary collecting in relation to gendered cultural politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Dean, Gabrielle
  • Room: BLC Macksey
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan England
AS.363.445 (01)

If Shakespeare had a sister who went to London to be a writer, what would she write? Virginia Woolf’s account of the thwarted career of Shakespeare’s hypothetical sister, Judith, in A Room of One’s Own frames our reading of plays and poetry by Shakespeare and contemporary women writers, including Isabella Whitney, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Sidney, Aemelia Lanyer, and Mary Wroth. Working within a selected historical context, students will create fictional biographies of “Judith Shakespeare,” including her perspective on our identified authors and a sample or description of Judith’s own literary accomplishments. Secondary course readings will reflect contemporary economic, political, and religious contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Feminist Modernisms
AS.363.400 (01)

Prize Teaching Fellowship seminar. Triangulating feminist psychoanalysis and theories of embodiment and subjectivity with art criticism and case studies of artistic practice (primarily painting), this course comparatively investigates the routes modernism takes after the Second World War and decolonization (1945/1947). We will be interested in specific postcolonial and postwar contexts where modernism in the domain of the visual arts was mounted as a feminist project. Each week will pair readings that establish conceptual frameworks with close analyses of works by specific artists, including those represented by the Library's Special Collections and the Baltimore Museum of Art. Texts include Freud, Spivak, Butler, Irigaray, Kristeva, and Mahmood.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Ballakrishnen, Meghaa
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Love and its maladies
AS.300.334 (01)

Much of what we know about love and desire we owe to fiction’s ability to evoke these experiences. Consider for example that the publication, in Germany, of The Sorrows of Young Werther inspired young men across Europe to dress and behave just like this lover. Just as nowadays film and television represent, as well as mold our conceptions of love, love-stories from the eighteenth-century onwards have given shape to gendered subjectivities in ways that still matter now. As, intriguingly, illness is a recurrent theme in many modern love stories, we will be prompted to decipher signs and symptoms in the bodies of mind of our protagonists. Why is it that in Western cultures, passion is tightly interwoven with a landscape of pain, suffering, and disease? In studying texts that represent major aspects of a romantic sensibility, we are indeed invited to trace the steps of a history of the body increasingly defined by gender and by medical knowledge. The readings for this class (all available in English) include: Austen, Persuasion; Balzac, The Unknown Masterpiece; Barthes, Lover’s Discourse; Goethe; The Sorrows of Young Werther; Mann, Death in Venice; Winterson, Written on the Body.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Ender, Evelyne
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 75INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.150.436 (01)Philosophy of GenderMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMTaylor, Elanor J.Gilman 288PHIL-MIND
AS.150.404 (01)The Idea of PowerTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLebron, Christopher JosephMaryland 202INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.060.348 (01)Virginia Woolf and BloomsburyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMao, DouglasSmokler Center 301
AS.225.318 (01)21st Century Female PlaywrightsT 6:00PM - 8:30PMDenithorne, MargaretMerrick 105
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 134INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.010.301 (01)Michelangelo: Religion, Sexuality, and the Crisis of Renaissance ArtTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCampbell, StephenGilman 177HART-RENBAR
AS.061.397 (01)French MasculinitiesT 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsMason, LauraLatrobe 120FILM-CRITST
AS.200.204 (01)Human SexualityW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.230.388 (01)Sociology of the FamilyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCherlin, Andrew JMattin Center 162
AS.100.283 (01)Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-PresentTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHindmarch-Watson, KatieShriver Hall 001HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.290.420 (01)Human Sexual OrientationW 4:00PM - 6:30PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.300.324 (01)Cinema of the 1930s: Communist and Capitalist FantasiesMW 10:30AM - 11:45AMEakin Moss, AnneGilman 208INST-GLOBAL
AS.363.416 (01)WGS Internship/Practicum: Feminist Animals: Sex, Nature, and NonhumansW 1:30PM - 4:30PMGuha-Majumdar, Jishnu 
AS.363.307 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Family Matters: Queer and Feminist Responses to Family LifeTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMGiardini, Joseph AurelioMudd 26
AS.389.230 (01)Queer & Trans Public HistoryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPlaster, Joseph PMUS-INTRO
AS.389.346 (01)Scribbling Women in the Literary ArchiveM 3:00PM - 5:30PMDean, GabrielleBLC Macksey
AS.363.445 (01)Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan EnglandW 1:30PM - 4:00PMPatton, ElizabethShaffer 304ENGL-PR1800
AS.363.400 (01)Feminist ModernismsT 3:00PM - 5:30PMBallakrishnen, MeghaaGilman 134
AS.300.334 (01)Love and its maladiesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMEnder, EvelyneGilman 219