Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: The Politics of Reproduction
AS.001.114 (01)

The idea that the “personal” is “political” finds no greater example than in the politics of reproduction. From inheritance laws, the rights of the offspring of enslaved peoples, or policies to reduce (or increase) fertility, the modern nation state has had a great deal to say about the use and produce of human bodies. In this First-Year Seminar, we will examine how formal and informal institutions have governed reproductive practices over the past 200 years. We will look at how family structures and economic development map onto fertility, and at how technological innovations in fertility control (including birth control and IVF) have influenced women's economic and political participation. We will also consider whether reproductive policies have differential impacts for LGBTQ households. Finally, we examine the “dark side” of reproductive policies -- not only sterilization campaigns but also the treatment of sex workers and sex-selective abortion -- to understand how state policies have divided households based on race, class, and occupation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Teele, Dawn
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: The Politics of Reproduction
AS.001.114 (02)

The idea that the “personal” is “political” finds no greater example than in the politics of reproduction. From inheritance laws, the rights of the offspring of enslaved peoples, or policies to reduce (or increase) fertility, the modern nation state has had a great deal to say about the use and produce of human bodies. In this First-Year Seminar, we will examine how formal and informal institutions have governed reproductive practices over the past 200 years. We will look at how family structures and economic development map onto fertility, and at how technological innovations in fertility control (including birth control and IVF) have influenced women's economic and political participation. We will also consider whether reproductive policies have differential impacts for LGBTQ households. Finally, we examine the “dark side” of reproductive policies -- not only sterilization campaigns but also the treatment of sex workers and sex-selective abortion -- to understand how state policies have divided households based on race, class, and occupation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Teele, Dawn
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

From Mystique to Critique: Feminism and the Visual Arts 1970 to present
AS.010.328 (01)

This course examines the relationship between feminism and the visual arts from the 1970s until the present day. Through close analysis of individual works of art and detailed attention to particular historical contexts, we will uncover how specific media, processes, and subject matter articulate an array of feminist attitudes towards issues such as gender, subjectivity, race, class, sexuality, motherhood, labor, abortion, and religion. Relevant theoretical texts will be juxtaposed to specific case studies in order to further illuminate the works’ feminist stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Antonucci, Marica Francesca
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic Empires
AS.010.338 (01)

Long characterized in the Western imagination as exotic realms of fantasy, harems in Islamic tradition served as private domestic quarters for the women of elite households. This course explores the harem—as an institution, a physical space, and a community of women—from various art-historical perspectives, considering such topics as the harem’s architecture, the agency of its inhabitants as patrons and collectors, the mediating role of eunuchs in the harem’s visual and material culture, and the ability of harem women to make their mark through public artistic commissions. Our case studies will address a range of Islamic geographical and chronological contexts, though we will focus on the empires of the early modern period and, above all, the famous harem of the Ottoman sultans at the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul. In challenging popular misconceptions, the course will also look at the wealth of exoticizing imagery that the harem inspired in Western art, which we will consider through Orientalist paintings at the Walters Art Museum and illustrated rare books at Hopkins itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South Asia
AS.010.352 (01)

This course will explore modern and contemporary art in colonial and postcolonial contexts from Bangladesh to northern Africa. How do artists negotiate demands to support their national and local identities while participating in modernism across borders? What role do secularism and spirituality have in modern art? How do anticolonial, Marxist, and feminist politics shape art in these regions? How do global economic forces and the rise of powerful collectors, private museums, and international art fairs shape art and artists working across this geographic area? We will foreground the role of women as artists, collectors, patrons, and scholars throughout.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Historical and Conceptual Bases of Art History
AS.010.413 (01)

This course introduces students to the principal methods and theories of art history. Students will work through readings foundational for the discipline, texts that define key methodological consolidations in the twentieth century, and more recent (e.g. feminist, visual studies, global, post-colonial, and/or ecological) critiques and rethinking. Specific texts will vary by instructor, but the course seeks—in any instantiation—to include a plurality of perspectives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Stager, Jennifer M S
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Visions of the Home: Communes and Collective Living in American Culture
AS.060.168 (01)

In this course, we will examine stories of intentional and communal living, attending to the ways in which narratives of home life have been shaped by larger social and historical structures. We will read autobiographical narratives, collectively written guides to structure and etiquette, satirical novels, and science fiction in order to query what the possibilities and limits of the home are envisioned to be. We will consider, among other issues: gendered labor and queer kinship; the shifting economics of housing, real estate, and rent; the formation of neighbourhoods and local identities; questions of movement, immigration, citizenship, and race; the dynamics of interpersonal conflict in intimate spaces; and how questions of familial belonging and kinship affect one’s sense of home.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Giardini, Joseph Aurelio (Jo)
  • Room: Maryland 309  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Masculinities
AS.061.323 (01)

From tap dancer to gangster, assassin to anguished teen, versions of the male in film from the silent era to the present. Cross-listed with Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality. One core course in Film and Media Studies is preferred but not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM, S 7:00PM - 9:30PM Screenings, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Bucknell, Lucy
  • Room: Bloomberg 178 Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Love, Sex, and Marriage in Medieval Europe
AS.100.222 (01)

This course examines sexual desire and romantic attachment in medieval Europe, as well as the interpersonal, economic, and spiritual relations medieval society negotiated through sex and marriage.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Hadzhikova, Kalina Valentinova
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, MSCH-HUM

Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present Considerations
AS.100.258 (01)

Students will examine marriage in the United States historically and theoretically, as well as matrimony’s role in contemporary culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Lauren B
  • Room: Gilman 108  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Asian American Art and Activism: Third World, Feminist, and Queer Solidarities
AS.100.340 (01)

This interdisciplinary course surveys critical themes related to Asian American art and activism including perspectives from history, art and visual culture, literature and gender and sexuality studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Shirazi, Sadia
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (01)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality. Students may receive credit for either AS.200.204 or AS.290.420, but not both.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (02)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality. Students may receive credit for either AS.200.204 or AS.290.420, but not both.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, Queer
AS.211.362 (01)

How does what we learn and what we call knowledge matter? Is it clear what “knowledge” means? Does it have the same meaning historically, across different academic disciplines and in daily life? Never have such questions been more relevant than in these volatile times. This course offers a literary and theoretical inquiry into the matter of knowledge/s. Through works by authors from diverse, interdisciplinary traditions including German and American thought and literature, as well as critical, Black, feminist, and queer theory, we will address alternative epistemologies that operate with “partial” or “unfinished” models of knowledge. Thus, students will become familiar with difficult, influential material from various disciplines, while focusing less on judgment and more on dialogical aspects of knowing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Nitis, Maya
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Topics in French Cinema: Masculin féminin
AS.212.346 (01)

What does it mean to be a man or a woman? How has the way that we imagine masculinity and femininity changed over time? Is your gender identity something that you are born with or something that you have to earn—or as something that you elect or perform? An exploration of how a set of exemplary French films have expressed the way French society has imagined gender. Focus on discussion and analyses of film sequences in class and on oral presentations. Students will have the opportunity to progress in vocabulary, oral expression, and in critical analysis. Recommended course background: completion of AS.210.301 or equivalent score on Placement test. (Taught in French)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Roos, Suzanne
  • Room: Gilman 443  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Power And Gender In Hispanic American Novels And Films
AS.215.407 (01)

We will analyze and discuss four novels and three films impacted by gender violence and political idolatry under shattering stress. Oficio de tinieblas or The Book of Lamentations (1962) by Rosario Castellanos (Mexico). Zama (1956) by Antonio di Benedetto (Argentina). Delirio or Delirium (2004) by Laura Restrepo (Colombia). El ruido de las cosas al caer or The Noise of Things Falling (2011) by Juan Gabriel Vásquez (Colombia). In addition, we will examine in depth films by Lucrecia Martel (Argentina): the short Rey muerto (1995), La ciénaga (2001), and her own version of Zama (2017). Course taught in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, David, Perez Marsilla, Francisco (francisco)
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and Culture
AS.217.427 (01)

The vast body of work produced women artists and writers in Brazil has been marginalized by canonical cultural narratives, which are now being contested by a spate of scholarly and artistic projects. This course spotlights the production of women from the early twentieth century to the present, including renowned and lesser-known works. We’ll discuss art, literature, and film alongside feminist theory, exploring radicality as it relates to aesthetics and politics. How do women’s art, literature, and thought engage with and transform Brazilian cultural production? What are their contributions to global discussions about gender and sexuality? How do these works respond to historical events? Among the topics addressed are the body, feminism, race, indigeneity, and politics. We’ll study Clarice Lispector’s acclaimed stories, the first Brazilian proletarian novel written by modernist icon Patricia Galvão, known as Pagu, the diaries of Carolina Maria de Jesus, the emblematic paintings of Tarsila do Amaral, and Lygia Clark’s artwork, as well as the booming scene of contemporary cinema and poetry. The course is taught in English, but those interested in doing the coursework in Portuguese (4 credits) should register for section 02.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and Culture
AS.217.427 (02)

The vast body of work produced women artists and writers in Brazil has been marginalized by canonical cultural narratives, which are now being contested by a spate of scholarly and artistic projects. This course spotlights the production of women from the early twentieth century to the present, including renowned and lesser-known works. We’ll discuss art, literature, and film alongside feminist theory, exploring radicality as it relates to aesthetics and politics. How do women’s art, literature, and thought engage with and transform Brazilian cultural production? What are their contributions to global discussions about gender and sexuality? How do these works respond to historical events? Among the topics addressed are the body, feminism, race, indigeneity, and politics. We’ll study Clarice Lispector’s acclaimed stories, the first Brazilian proletarian novel written by modernist icon Patricia Galvão, known as Pagu, the diaries of Carolina Maria de Jesus, the emblematic paintings of Tarsila do Amaral, and Lygia Clark’s artwork, as well as the booming scene of contemporary cinema and poetry. The course is taught in English, but those interested in doing the coursework in Portuguese (4 credits) should register for section 02.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)
  • Room: Gilman 10 Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/3
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and Aging
AS.230.154 (01)

In this course students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the ntersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith (Meredith)
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Reproductive Physiology
AS.250.351 (01)

Focuses on reproductive physiology and biochemical and molecular regulation of the female and male reproductive tracts. Topics include the hypothalamus and pituitary, peptide and steroid hormone action, epididymis and male accessory sex organs, female reproductive tract, menstrual cycle, ovulation and gamete transport, fertilization and fertility enhancement, sexually transmitted diseases, and male and female contraceptive methods. Introductory lectures on each topic followed by research-oriented lectures and readings from current literature.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Zirkin, Barry R
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/140
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH

Population, Health and Development
AS.280.225 (01)

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, contraceptive methods as well as family planning and child survival programs, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS. This course is restricted to Public Health Studies majors. Students minoring in Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality can register with instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Becker, Stanley (stan)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/75
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR

Belonging and Difference in Modern Korea
AS.310.324 (01)

Drawing on critical race theory, and gender and sexuality studies, this course provides the analytical framework necessary to grapple with how belonging and difference are produced, manifested, and challenged within Korea’s citizenry. Students will gain knowledge on modern Korea and its diasporas and examine its construction as one rooted in a history of empire, nationalism, militarism, and neoliberalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura (Laura Ha)
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
AS.363.201 (01)

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Gill Peterson, Julian (Jules)
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Curatorial Seminar: Ancient Art
AS.389.420 (01)

Course focuses on the theory, ethics, issues, and practice of curatorial work. This semester we will curate a new, more global, installation of ancient art at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Applied work will include finalizing the list of artworks to include, working with lead curator Kevin Tervala on the installation plan and design; developing new interpretations for the Antioch mosaics and for artworks drawn from collections that span Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas; and writing and workshopping labels.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P, Tervala, Kevin Dixon
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.114 (01)FYS: The Politics of ReproductionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMTeele, DawnGilman 10
 
AS.001.114 (02)FYS: The Politics of ReproductionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMTeele, DawnGilman 186
 
AS.010.328 (01)From Mystique to Critique: Feminism and the Visual Arts 1970 to presentTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAntonucci, Marica FrancescaGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN
AS.010.338 (01)Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic EmpiresW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverGilman 177
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.352 (01)Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South AsiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.413 (01)Historical and Conceptual Bases of Art HistoryM 1:30PM - 4:00PMStager, Jennifer M SBloomberg 172
 
AS.060.168 (01)Visions of the Home: Communes and Collective Living in American CultureT 4:00PM - 6:30PMGiardini, Joseph Aurelio (Jo)Maryland 309
 
AS.061.323 (01)MasculinitiesM 3:00PM - 5:30PM, S 7:00PM - 9:30PM Screenings, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucyBloomberg 178
Gilman 186
FILM-CRITST
AS.100.222 (01)Love, Sex, and Marriage in Medieval EuropeWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMHadzhikova, Kalina ValentinovaGilman 219
 
HIST-EUROPE, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.258 (01)Theorizing Marriage in the United States: Historical and Present ConsiderationsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, Lauren BGilman 108
 
HIST-US
AS.100.340 (01)Asian American Art and Activism: Third World, Feminist, and Queer SolidaritiesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMShirazi, Sadia 
 
HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.200.204 (01)Human SexualityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218
 
BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.204 (02)Human SexualityT 4:00PM - 6:30PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218
 
BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.211.362 (01)Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, QueerTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMNitis, MayaGilman 130G
 
INST-PT
AS.212.346 (01)Topics in French Cinema: Masculin fémininMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMRoos, SuzanneGilman 443
 
AS.215.407 (01)Power And Gender In Hispanic American Novels And FilmsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, David, Perez Marsilla, Francisco (francisco)Gilman 132
 
AS.217.427 (01)Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and CultureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMiguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)Gilman 10
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.217.427 (02)Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and CultureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMiguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)Gilman 10
Gilman 479
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.154 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and AgingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAgree, Emily 
 
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, Meredith (Meredith)Krieger 308
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.250.351 (01)Reproductive PhysiologyW 3:00PM - 4:45PMZirkin, Barry R 
 
BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.280.225 (01)Population, Health and DevelopmentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBecker, Stanley (stan) 
 
ENVS-MAJOR
AS.310.324 (01)Belonging and Difference in Modern KoreaW 4:30PM - 7:00PMReizman, Laura (Laura Ha)Gilman 217
 
AS.363.201 (01)Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and SexualityM 4:30PM - 7:00PMGill Peterson, Julian (Jules)Gilman 17
 
AS.389.420 (01)Curatorial Seminar: Ancient ArtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsley, Jennifer P, Tervala, Kevin DixonHodson 301
 
PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE