Undergraduate Courses

All current offerings are below. This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found on the SIS website. To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

Undergraduate coursework in French falls under two main areas that each provide necessary training for the major and minor in French.

  • The sequence in French Language (210 prefix) aims to bring students to advanced proficiency in reading, writing, understanding, and speaking French as well as an awareness of the history and sociology of the French language.
    • Students acquire fundamentals of spoken exchange and written composition and become familiar with the various registers of French, from streetwise slang to the highly codified discourses used in international relations, science, or medicine, among others.
    • The sequence culminates in the capstone course Eloquent French, required of French majors and minors.
    • Also featured are themed courses on the presence of French around the globe and on the sounds of the French language.
  • Courses in French Literary and Cultural Studies (212 prefix) focus on the interpretation and analysis of texts from a rich variety of genres and modes of writing in French (e.g., the novel, poetry, short fiction, autobiography, the essay, memoirs, digital writing).
    • Coursework in literary studies introduces students to techniques of close reading (explication de texte), linguistic analysis, historical and cultural contextualization, and theoretical questions about the nature, purposes, and history of literature and its institutions.
    • Courses in cultural studies push students to engage critically with a wide range of documents past and present, from speeches and illustrations to films, news clips, and current events, and to develop sensitivity to social and historical context. These courses present techniques for situated analysis in a French and Francophone context.
  • On occasion the French section offers special topics courses taught in English (211 prefix). These courses are also open to students with limited or no prior exposure to French.

Motivated students are encouraged to pursue study of another Romance language or of German. Students majoring in French who are interested in the Renaissance or Middle Ages are advised to acquire reading knowledge of Latin.

Majors and minors are encouraged to spend a semester at one of the JHU-approved study abroad programs, preferably during the spring of the junior year, both to perfect their command of the French language and to gain exposure to the methods and culture of research in the higher education system in the French-speaking world.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

French Elements I

Provides a multi-faceted approach to teaching language and culture to the novice French student. The first semester emphasizes listening and speaking, while laying the foundation in grammar structures, reading, and writing. This course is designed for true beginners: Students with any previous background must take the placement test (http://www.advising.jhu.edu/placement_french.php) and receive below 30 . Must complete both semesters successfully in order to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Elements I

Provides a multi-faceted approach to teaching language and culture to the novice French student. The first semester emphasizes listening and speaking, while laying the foundation in grammar structures, reading, and writing. This course is designed for true beginners: Students with any previous background must take the placement test (http://www.advising.jhu.edu/placement_french.php) and receive below 30 . Must complete both semesters successfully in order to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Elements I

Provides a multi-faceted approach to teaching language and culture to the novice French student. The first semester emphasizes listening and speaking, while laying the foundation in grammar structures, reading, and writing. This course is designed for true beginners: Students with any previous background must take the placement test (http://www.advising.jhu.edu/placement_french.php) and receive below 30 . Must complete both semesters successfully in order to receive credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Learner Managed French Elements I

This beginner course is specifically designed for students who have had some exposure to French. They must take the mandatory placement test: http://www.advising.jhu.edu/placement_french.php, and receive between 30 and 49. They will cover the first semester of French Elements at a pace suited for "false beginners" with major online components to supplement class instruction. Must complete the year with 210.102 to obtain credit. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 17/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French for Writing

Students in AS.210.301 will focus primarily on written expression, learning to ‘decipher’ classic and contemporary French texts, in order to expand their vocabulary and communicate their ideas in writing with clarity and accuracy. (A primary focus on oral expression is provided in AS.210.302; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.) Language Program Director: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate French I

This course develops skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Systematic review of language structures with strong focus on oral communication and acquisition of vocabulary; extensive practice in writing and speaking; readings and films from French-speaking countries. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.102 or AS.210.104 or score between 65 and 89 on Placement test I.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French for Writing

Students in AS.210.301 will focus primarily on written expression, learning to ‘decipher’ classic and contemporary French texts, in order to expand their vocabulary and communicate their ideas in writing with clarity and accuracy. (A primary focus on oral expression is provided in AS.210.302; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.) Language Program Director: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French for Speaking

Students in 210.302 will focus primarily on oral expression through individual and group work on contemporary media (music, film, current events) in order to expand their vocabulary and become fluent in conversation across social-cultural contexts. (A primary focus on written expression is provided in 210.301; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Honors Thesis

An in-depth and closely supervised initiation to research and thinking, oral and written expression, which leads to the composition of a senior thesis in French. Recommended Course Background: AS.212.429

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced French for Speaking

Students in 210.302 will focus primarily on oral expression through individual and group work on contemporary media (music, film, current events) in order to expand their vocabulary and become fluent in conversation across social-cultural contexts. (A primary focus on written expression is provided in 210.301; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Representing the Holocaust

How has the Holocaust been represented in literature and film? Are there special challenges posed by genocide to the traditions of visual and literary representation? Where does the Holocaust fit in to the array of concerns that the visual arts and literature express? And where do art and literature fit in to the commemoration of communal tragedy and the working through of individual trauma entailed by thinking about and representing the Holocaust? These questions will guide our consideration of a range of texts — nonfiction, novels, poetry — in Yiddish, German, English, French and other languages (including works by Primo Levi and Isaac Bashevis Singer), as well as films from French documentaries to Hollywood blockbusters (including films by Alain Resnais, Claude Lanzmann, and Steven Spielberg). All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Introduction to Romance Linguistics

If the modern Romance languages all evolved from Latin, why do they differ in so many important ways? What drives language change in the first place? In what areas do the modern Romance languages, and languages in general, differ the most? Why should this be the case? We approach these questions not only from a linguistic perspective (analyzing Romance sound systems, vocabulary, morphosyntax, and semantics), but from a cognitive-psychological and a socio-political perspective as well. As part of a semester-long research project both in and outside the classroom, students will create linguistic questionnaires, use them to conduct native speaker interviews, analyze the data obtained, and present their findings as part of an end-of-semester colloquium.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction à la littérature française

Introduction à la Littérature française I (212.333) and II (212.334) propose reading and discussion of texts of various genres from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. This sequence is intended as an introduction to the methods, questions, and techniques of textual analysis through intensive reading, discussion, and production of written texts. Introduction à la littérature française I covers some of the greatest classics of French literature and thought from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. The two semesters may be taken in either order. This sequence is a pre-requisite to all further French and francophone literature courses. Students may co-register with an upper-level course during their second semester. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301-AS.210.302 or at least one semester of AS.210.301-AS.210.302 with a grade of A and written permission of the instructor. This course is taught in French

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Le monde francophone

This course examines both sociolinguistic and cultural aspects of the French-speaking world and the relationship between la francophonie and France itself. We focus on five regions—Sub-Saharan Africa (Cameroun and Senegal), Northern Africa (Morocco and Algeria), the Caribbean (Martinique and Haiti), North America (Quebec), and Europe (Belgium)—and consider language features unique to those regional varieties, the status of French as opposed to other indigenous languages and creoles, the demographics of their speakers, and the representation of their culture in media (particularly in short stories, poetry, song, and film). A semester-long research project on one of these main areas will allow students to combine their study of the French-speaking world with other disciplines of interest to them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Honors Thesis

An in-depth and closely supervised initiation to research and thinking, oral and written expression, which leads to the composition of a senior thesis in French. Recommended Course Background: AS.212.429

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction à la littérature française

Introduction à la Littérature française I (212.333) and II (212.334) propose reading and discussion of texts of various genres from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. This sequence is intended as an introduction to the methods, questions, and techniques of textual analysis through intensive reading, discussion, and production of written texts. Introduction à la littérature française I covers some of the greatest classics of French literature and thought from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. The two semesters may be taken in either order. This sequence is a pre-requisite to all further French and francophone literature courses. Students may co-register with an upper-level course during their second semester. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301-AS.210.302 or at least one semester of AS.210.301-AS.210.302 with a grade of A and written permission of the instructor. This course is taught in French

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Impossible Freedoms: Speed, Stillness, and Experience

An examination of French literary depictions of ways in which speed and human locomotion influence the experience of place and time. What happens when life speeds up so much that the world goes by faster than we are able to process it? Would slowing down allow for a different type of spatio-temporal experience? Authors include Victor Hugo, George Sand, Émile Zola, Ernest Hemingway, and André Gide among others. Students wishing to take the class for French major or minor credit should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/6
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN

French Honors Thesis

An in-depth and closely supervised initiation to research and thinking, oral and written expression, which leads to the composition of a senior thesis in French. Recommended Course Background: AS.212.429

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Religion and the Literary Text: The Case of Modern Hebrew Literature

At the center of this course stands the intersection of religion and literature. In its early days, Modern Hebrew literature, which emerged during the nineteenth century attempted to break from the traditional modes of Jewish intellectual and social life while also offering a new understanding of the Jewish literary text. This literature is commonly characterized as secular in nature, defying Orthodoxy and rejecting the old Hebrew God. At the same time, modern Hebrew literature writers maintained a vital dialogue with the divine, traditional elements in their works and often were influenced by various traditional religious trends, such as Kabbalah and Hassidism. Throughout the course we will examine various religious concepts such as prophesy, pantheism, theodicy and the apocalypse by reading and analyzing modern Hebrew and Israeli literary texts. We will study the influence of major events in modern Jewish history, like the emergence of Jewish nationalism and Zionism, the Holocaust and the establishment of the state of Israel on the religious and secular trends in this literary corpus.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Honors Thesis Prep

This course will meet three times during the Fall semester to enable all French majors to prepare their thesis subject, thesis bibliography, and abstract prior to the writing of the Senior Thesis (AS.212.430) in the Spring semester of their senior year. This course is required of all French majors and must be taken during the Fall semester of their senior year. Schedule TBA upon consultation with the class list, as there are only three group meetings. The rest of the meetings are in individual appointments with the DUS or another chosen French professor. Prerequisites: AS.212.333-334 and either prior enrollment or concurrent enrollment in AS.210.417 Eloquent French.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Eloquent French

This interactive, writing intensive course has a double agenda: 1) to guide students towards linguistic proficiency in French by exposing them to an extended range of stylistic, idiomatic and grammatical expressions; 2) to strengthen students' individual voices in written and oral expression. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 and AS.210.302.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Eloquent French

This interactive, writing intensive course has a double agenda: 1) to guide students towards linguistic proficiency in French by exposing them to an extended range of stylistic, idiomatic and grammatical expressions; 2) to strengthen students' individual voices in written and oral expression. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 and AS.210.302.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Impossible Freedoms: Speed, Stillness, and Experience

An examination of French literary depictions of ways in which speed and human locomotion influence the experience of place and time. What happens when life speeds up so much that the world goes by faster than we are able to process it? Would slowing down allow for a different type of spatio-temporal experience? Authors include Victor Hugo, George Sand, Émile Zola, Ernest Hemingway, and André Gide among others. Students wishing to take the class for French major or minor credit should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN

French Honors Thesis

An in-depth and closely supervised initiation to research and thinking, oral and written expression, which leads to the composition of a senior thesis in French. Recommended Course Background: AS.212.429

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 29/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

La France Contemporaine

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Cultures of Love

From the time of its invention, as a kind of counterfeit religion, in the Hispano-Arabic world, love has been an unsettling, paradoxical, transgressive phenomenon: mystical, adulterous, con game, parlor game, poison, illness. Taking a literary, sociological and anthropological approach, this course will try to grasp some of the challenges posed by love's protean discourse: from the fin'amor born in women-ruled Medieval courts, to the language of 17th-century women mystics, to libertinage, to the cold intimacies of today's emotional capitalism. Taught in French.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Theater: Reading and Practice

Reading modern theater in French can be exciting: a battle waged with words instead of swords, a battle of wit and of style. The literature of the nineteenth century was marked by major literary battles opposing young Romantic writers against an old school of Academicians. This battle was fought largely in and through the theatre. In this course the classroom space itself becomes a stage in which to reenact or rehearse some of these battles, through careful readings of texts and by exploring all possible literary contexts. Participants will read together a number of plays as well as take part in collaborative learning and creative activities. Readings to include texts by Césaire, Dumas, Hugo, Marivaux, Musset, Scribe, Sartre, and Vigny. Readings and discussion in French.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-FREN

Advanced French for Writing

Students in AS.210.301 will focus primarily on written expression, learning to ‘decipher’ classic and contemporary French texts, in order to expand their vocabulary and communicate their ideas in writing with clarity and accuracy. (A primary focus on oral expression is provided in AS.210.302; the two advanced-level courses may be taken in either order or simultaneously.) Language Program Director: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.210.101 (02)French Elements IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMGuillemard, Claude H 
AS.210.101 (01)French Elements IMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMGuillemard, Claude H 
AS.210.101 (03)French Elements IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMGuillemard, Claude HOlin 305
AS.210.103 (01)Learner Managed French Elements ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMGuillemard, Claude HHodson 311
AS.210.201 (01)Intermediate French IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMRoos, SuzanneGilman 50
AS.210.201 (02)Intermediate French IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMRoos, Suzanne 
AS.210.201 (03)Intermediate French IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMRoos, SuzanneGilman 50
AS.210.201 (05)Intermediate French IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMRoos, SuzanneGilman 50
AS.210.301 (01)Advanced French for WritingMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMAnderson, BruceGilman 132
AS.210.201 (04)Intermediate French IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMRoos, SuzanneHodson 210
AS.210.301 (02)Advanced French for WritingMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMAnderson, BruceMattin Center 101
AS.210.302 (02)Advanced French for SpeakingTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWuensch, AprilGilman 132
AS.212.430 (04)French Honors ThesisSchilling, Derek 
AS.210.302 (01)Advanced French for SpeakingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWuensch, AprilGilman 132
AS.211.333 (01)Representing the HolocaustW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpinner, Samuel Jacob INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.311 (01)Introduction to Romance LinguisticsMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMAnderson, BruceGilman 132
AS.212.333 (01)Introduction à la littérature françaiseTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAnderson, WildaShaffer 2
AS.210.409 (01)Le monde francophoneMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMAnderson, Bruce, StaffMaryland 201
AS.212.430 (01)French Honors ThesisDesormeaux, Daniel 
AS.212.333 (02)Introduction à la littérature françaiseMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMRusso, ElenaKrieger 205
AS.212.301 (02)Impossible Freedoms: Speed, Stillness, and ExperienceTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMPeak, Benjamin RyanOlin 305GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN
AS.212.430 (03)French Honors ThesisRusso, Elena 
AS.211.429 (01)Religion and the Literary Text: The Case of Modern Hebrew LiteratureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, Neta GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.429 (01)Honors Thesis PrepT 6:30PM - 7:30PMAnderson, Wilda, Desormeaux, Daniel, Russo, Elena, Schilling, Derek, Staff 
AS.210.417 (02)Eloquent FrenchMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMCook-Gailloud, KristinShaffer 301
AS.210.417 (01)Eloquent FrenchMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCook-Gailloud, KristinShaffer 2
AS.212.301 (01)Impossible Freedoms: Speed, Stillness, and ExperienceTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMPeak, Benjamin RyanOlin 305GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN
AS.212.430 (02)French Honors ThesisAnderson, Wilda 
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGuillemard, Claude HShaffer 303INST-CP
AS.212.436 (01)Cultures of LoveMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMRusso, ElenaKrieger 205
AS.212.454 (01)French Theater: Reading and PracticeTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDesormeaux, Daniel GRLL-FREN
AS.210.301 (03)Advanced French for WritingMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMHackerman B 17