Courses

This listing provides a snapshot of courses within this program and may not be complete. All course registration information can be found on the SIS website.

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Modern Hebrew for Beginners II
AS.210.121 (01)

Hebrew for Beginners 106 is a continuation of Hebrew 105 and as such, students are required to have a foundation in Hebrew. The course will enhance and continue to expose students to Hebrew grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. All components of the Hebrew language will be emphasized in this course; we will highlight verbs, adjectives, and the ability to read longer texts. Speaking in Hebrew will also be highlighted to promote students’ engagement and communication. Cultural aspects of the language will be incorporated into lessons as well.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM 01-24-2022 to 04-29-2022
  • Instructor: Bessire, Mirit
  • Room: Gilman 488
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR

Elementary Yiddish II
AS.210.164 (01)

Year-long course that includes the four language skills--reading, writing, listening, and speaking--and introduces students to Yiddish culture through text, song, and film. Emphasis is placed both on the acquisition of Yiddish as a tool for the study of Yiddish literature and Ashkenazic history and culture, and on the active use of the language in oral and written communication. Both semesters must be taken with a passing grade to receive credit. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.163 or instructor permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM 01-24-2022 to 04-29-2022
  • Instructor: Lang, Beatrice
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/17
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR

Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
AS.210.221 (01)

Intermediate Hebrew level II is a continuation of the course Hebrew 205 and as such is a requirement for entry. In the course, grammatical aspects of the language will be introduced in the focus of past and future tenses. Combined and complex sentences with proper syntax and reading comprehension and writing skills will be required. Modern Israeli cultural aspects of the Hebrew language will be introduced as well and will be part of the holistic understanding of the modern language.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM 01-24-2022 to 04-29-2022
  • Instructor: Bessire, Mirit
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR

Modern Hebrew via the Lens of Israeli Cinema
AS.210.321 (01)

This course will expand students’ fluencies in Modern Hebrew through Hebrew-dialogic Israeli and Palestinian cinema, examining and comparing several layers of a contemporary Hebrew-speaking society. For this class, students will view, discuss, and write about films with Hebrew as the primary spoken language. Through aural interpretation and subtitles, students will understand, analyze, and reflectively discuss the diversity of Hebrew-speaking cultures within society and the provenance and intentionalities of the dialects exhibited throughout a given film. Linguistic nuance, slang, and interpretive aspects of Hebrew as shown in the chosen films will prompt students to examine this modality of the expression of contemporary Hebrew. The course will be taught primarily in Hebrew and will be open to students who have matriculated to at least 200-level coursework of Modern Hebrew.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM 01-24-2022 to 04-29-2022
  • Instructor: Bessire, Mirit
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR

The Holocaust in Israeli Society and Culture
AS.216.342 (01)

This course examines the role of the Holocaust in Israeli society and culture. We will study the emergence of the discourse on the Holocaust in Israel and its development throughout the years. Through focusing on scholarly, literary, artistic, and cinematic responses to the Holocaust, we will analyze the impact of its memory on the nation, its society, politics, and collective self. The course is divided to three general categories: Historical and Sociological Perspective, Literary Perspective, and Cinematic Perspective. However, we will study the crossroad between these three categories, and will explore them in relation to one another.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 01-24-2022 to 04-29-2022
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Gilman 474
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-CP

Exilic Chronotope
AS.216.615 (01)

The concept of exile relies on the existence of differentiated space and of borders. It also presupposes affective attachment: to be exiled is to be forcibly removed from the space of belonging. And yet time cannot be excluded from a consideration of exile. Hence exilic chronotope, the timespace of forcible displacement. Beginning with the canonical banishment from the Garden of Eden, the seminar will trace the implications of exile in its historical and metaphysical sense: social alienation caused by displacement, creative fulfillment of the distance from home, phenomenological aspects of exilic topology. The readings and visual works will include Georg Simmel, Alfred Schuetz, Kurt Zadek Lewin, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, Aby Warburg, Mascha Kaleko, Zuzanna Ginczanka, Charlotte Salomon, and Daniel Mendelson.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:00PM 01-24-2022 to 04-29-2022
  • Instructor: Jerzak, Katarzyna, Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Gilman 488
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL

Independent Study
AS.216.800 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-24-2022 to 04-29-2022
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Yiddish Independent Study
AS.216.802 (01)

Yiddish Independent Study

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  01-24-2022 to 04-29-2022
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Story, Song, Food, And Film: A Thousand Years Of Jewish Culture
AS.001.112 (01)

Most Jews in America today are descendants of Ashkenazi Jews from Central and Eastern Europe. This First-Year Seminar will introduce students to the thousand-year history and culture of Ashkenazi Jews through their vernacular, Yiddish. How did Ashkenazi Jews maintain a distinct identity, even while borrowing cultural forms from their non-Jewish neighbors? How did Jews in the modern period challenge tradition and create new forms of Jewish identity? How did Eastern European immigrants adapt to life in America? In addition to studying a wide range of texts—including fiction, poetry, memoir, song, and film—students will learn how to read the Yiddish alphabet, and will explore food culture by preparing Ashkenazi Jewish dishes. No prior knowledge of Yiddish is necessary for this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:00PM - 3:30PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Lang, Beatrice
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Modern Hebrew
AS.210.120 (01)

Elementary Modern Hebrew is the first exposure to the language as currently used in Israel in all its functional contexts. All components of the language are discussed: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Simple idiomatic sentences and short texts in Hebrew are used. Students learn the Hebrew alphabet, words and short sentences. Cultural aspects of Israel will be intertwined throughout the course curriculum.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Bessire, Mirit
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR

Elementary Yiddish I
AS.210.163 (01)

Year-long course. Includes the four language skills, reading,writing, listening, and speaking, and introduces students to Yiddish culture through text, song, and film. Emphasis is placed both on the acquisition of Yiddish as a tool for the study of Yiddish literature and Ashkenazic history and culture, and on the active use of the language in oral and written communication. This class will be using In Eynem, the brand new Yiddish language program from the Yiddish Book Center. Cannot be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 4:15PM, Th 4:00PM - 5:15PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Shoulson, Sophia Elizabeth
  • Room: Smokler Center 214
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Modern Hebrew I
AS.210.220 (01)

Intermediate Modern Hebrew enhances and enforces previous knowledge of Hebrew as acquired from previous foundational coursework and/or experience. Grammatical aspects of the language such as past and present tenses as well as combined and complex sentence syntax and construction would be applied. Reading comprehension and writing skills will be emphasized. Modern Israeli cultural links and facets of the Hebrew language will also be introduced to inform the holistic understanding of the modern language.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Bessire, Mirit
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR

Intermediate Yiddish I
AS.210.263 (01)

For students who have completed one year of Yiddish language study or equivalent, this course will provide the opportunity to broaden and deepen their knowledge of Yiddish culture while continuing to improve their skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking Yiddish. Alongside textbook-based language work, students will read, listen to and interact with a variety of texts, for example literature, journalism and oral history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Lang, Beatrice
  • Room: Smokler Center 214
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Modern Hebrew I
AS.210.320 (01)

Advanced Modern Hebrew I will focus on conversational and interactive language skills to expose learners to attributes of different genres and layers of the language. Students will be introduced to various original texts and lingual patterns to better understand and formulate proper syntax. The course will include contemporary readings from Israeli journalism and essays, along with other relevant Hebrew resources to inform class discussions and students’ reflective writings. Israeli cultural aspects will be integral to the course curriculum.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Bessire, Mirit
  • Room: Gilman 474
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR

American Yiddish Literature and Culture
AS.211.313 (01)

Yiddish was the language of European Jews for 1000 years. From the 19th century to the present day it has been a language that millions of Americans -- Jewish immigrants and their descendants -- have spoken, written in, conducted their daily lives in, and created culture in. This course will examine literature, film, newspapers, and more to explore how Jewish immigrants to American shaped their identities--as Jews, as Americans, and as former Europeans. What role did maintaining, adapting, or abandoning a minority language play in the creation of Jewish American identity--cultural, ethnic, or religious? How was this language perceived by the majority culture? What processes of linguistic and cultural translation were involved in finding a space for Yiddish in America, in its original or translated into English? The overarching subjects of this course include migration, cultural translation, race, ethnicity, multilingualism, and assimilation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR, MLL-ENGL

Representing Otherness in Literature and Film
AS.211.325 (01)

The term 'Otherness' is known to be rooted in the Self-Other opposition as it emerged in German Idealism, adopted by psychoanalysis and transformed to Post-Colonial and Feminist theories. This theoretical framework will allow us to explore the role of the Other in literature and cinema. Students will become familiar with the historical development of the notion of the “stranger” through reading and analyzing various contemporary works of prose, poetry and cinema from various countries. We will analyze the ways in which these works depict Otherness and will investigate questions regarding their social, political and philosophical framework as well as the literary and cinematographic devices they employ. The course will have a comparative nature with the aim of learning more about the differences between the literary and cinematic representations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Eastern European Literature
AS.216.601 (01)

Twentieth-century and contemporary Eastern European Literature is the locus of poetry and the essay. In this course we shall examine classic authors, such as Bruno Schulz, Zbigniew Herbert, and Adam Zagajewski, as well as those less known in the English-speaking world: Zuzanna Ginczanka, Ota Pavel, Henryk Grynberg, Oksana Lutsyshyna. We will consider verse, poetic prose and lyrical essays. The issues that will inform our readings will be internal and actual emigration, translingualism, and the persistence of war. Polish, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Czech, Serbo-Croatian, but also French and American English are the languages in which these authors speak to us. Eastern European literature resonates with voices that have, time and again, brushed against catastrophe.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:30PM - 5:30PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Jerzak, Katarzyna
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Jesus in Modern Hebrew Literature
AS.216.620 (01)

This seminar will track the changes in the representations of Jesus in modern Hebrew literature. Reading will include prose-fiction, poetry, drama, and intellectual essays from the late 19th century to the beginning of the 21st century. We will study the mutual influences of the scholarship on Jesus, national Zionist ideology, changes in cultural and theological perceptions of Jesus and the literary representations of his figure.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 3:30PM 08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): MLL-HEBR

Independent Study
AS.216.800 (01)

This research course focuses on surveying and deepening the students’ familiarity with the historical, cultural, and linguistic aspects of modern Jewish literature.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.216.800 (02)

This research course focuses on surveying and deepening the students’ familiarity with the historical, cultural, and linguistic aspects of modern Jewish literature.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:  08-29-2022 to 12-09-2022
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Location Term Course Details
AS.210.121 (01)Modern Hebrew for Beginners IIMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMBessire, MiritHomewood CampusSpring 2022
AS.210.164 (01)Elementary Yiddish IITTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLang, BeatriceHomewood CampusSpring 2022
AS.210.221 (01)Intermediate Modern Hebrew IIMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMBessire, MiritHomewood CampusSpring 2022
AS.210.321 (01)Modern Hebrew via the Lens of Israeli CinemaMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMBessire, MiritHomewood CampusSpring 2022
AS.216.342 (01)The Holocaust in Israeli Society and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaHomewood CampusSpring 2022
AS.216.615 (01)Exilic ChronotopeT 3:00PM - 5:00PMJerzak, Katarzyna, Stahl, NetaHomewood CampusSpring 2022
AS.216.800 (01)Independent StudyStahl, NetaHomewood CampusSpring 2022
AS.216.802 (01)Yiddish Independent StudySpinner, Samuel JacobHomewood CampusSpring 2022
AS.001.112 (01)FYS: Story, Song, Food, And Film: A Thousand Years Of Jewish CultureTh 1:00PM - 3:30PMLang, BeatriceHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.120 (01)Elementary Modern HebrewTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBessire, MiritHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.163 (01)Elementary Yiddish IT 3:00PM - 4:15PM, Th 4:00PM - 5:15PMShoulson, Sophia ElizabethHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.220 (01)Intermediate Modern Hebrew ITTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBessire, MiritHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.263 (01)Intermediate Yiddish IMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMLang, BeatriceHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.210.320 (01)Advanced Modern Hebrew IW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBessire, MiritHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.211.313 (01)American Yiddish Literature and CultureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSpinner, Samuel JacobHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.211.325 (01)Representing Otherness in Literature and FilmTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.216.601 (01)Eastern European LiteratureM 3:30PM - 5:30PMJerzak, KatarzynaHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.216.620 (01)Jesus in Modern Hebrew LiteratureT 1:30PM - 3:30PMStahl, NetaHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.216.800 (01)Independent StudyStahl, NetaHomewood CampusFall 2022
AS.216.800 (02)Independent StudySpinner, Samuel JacobHomewood CampusFall 2022