Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Courses beginning with AS.145 are specifically for the MSH major.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and Films
AS.140.398 (01)

Japan is often described as “nature-loving,” and is considered to be one of world leaders in environmental protection policies. Yet current environmental successes come on the heels of numerous environmental disasters that plagued Japan in the past centuries. Juxtaposing Japanese environmental history and its reflection in popular media, the course will explore the intersection between technology, environment, and culture. Students are encouraged to enroll in AS.140.198, “Technology and Environment in Japanese Films and Anime” (1 credit) to attend movie screenings accompanying the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Frumer, Yulia
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (01)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Art, Medicine, and the Body: Middle Ages to Modernity
AS.010.235 (01)

This course explores seven centuries of fruitful collaboration between physicians and artists, uncovering the shared discourses, diagnostic techniques and therapeutic agendas that united the art of picture-making with the art of healing. Topics include the origin and development of medical illustration; the long, cross-cultural history of the therapeutic artefact; the anatomical investigations of Renaissance artists such as Leonardo and Michelangelo; depictions of bodily pain and disease in the art of Matthias Grünewald and psychosomatic syndromes like melancholy in the work of Albrecht Dürer; the spectacularization of the body in Enlightenment science and the ethics of medical specimen display today -- all in order to bring the complex intersections of the history of medicine and the history of art into view.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Merback, Mitchell
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR, MSCH-HUM

Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Religion and Science
AS.130.420 (01)

This writing intensive seminar examines the relationship between religion and science in ancient Mesopotamia and the rest of the Near East from the 4th millennium to the Hellenistic period. Using a variety of case studies, and through engagement with scholarly literature pertaining to the topic of the course, students will develop skills in specific research skills such as critical reading, analysis, and interpretation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 2:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Delnero, Paul
  • Room: Gilman 130G
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Rise of Modern Science
AS.140.302 (01)

Survey of major scientific developments from the eighteenth-century Age of Enlightenment to the Cold War era of Big Science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Mercelis, Joris Hans Angele
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Clues: Unreasoning the Medical Mystery
AS.145.201 (01)

Pioneering authors of detective fiction, including Edgar Allen Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Pauline Hopkins, often used medical doctors and themes in their mystery plots. It's no coincidence that medicine and crime fiction share a vocabulary of clues, evidence, and diagnosis. The mystery genre was integrally tied to the rise of scientific medicine as a respected profession. Indeed, classic detective stories are practically propaganda for the scientific method, showing readers how the powerful tools of observation and inference can solve any problem. Over the course of the 20th century, not only doctors, but also psychologists, social scientists and historians adopted the authoritative stance of the detective in constructing or reconstructing facts. However, as we study Sherlock Holmes and his modern proteges, such as TV doctor Gregory House, we will analyze how "medical mystery" narratives can limit our thinking about problems and solutions in medicine. We will consider post-modern detective stories that offer alternatives to the "Holmsian" model for understanding the complex clinical realities of today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Puglionesi, Alicia
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/21
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Rise of Modern Science
AS.140.302 (02)

Survey of major scientific developments from the eighteenth-century Age of Enlightenment to the Cold War era of Big Science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Mercelis, Joris Hans Angele
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Freshman Seminar: Minds and Machines
AS.145.105 (01)

Our desire to create human-like functional robots has a long history. From Ismail al-Jazari’s automata and Leonardo da Vinci’s mechanical knight to today’s latest developments within artificial intelligence, the intelligent and conscious robot is a potential future reality. In this introductory course at the intersection of the history of robotics, world literature, and cognitive science, we will explore the changing face of the robot and its societal consequences through classic fictional narratives (the short story, novel, and theatrical play) from the eighteen hundreds to today. Merging empirical fact with creative fiction, students will write their own short story, one-act theatrical play, or storyboard as a final project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History of Chinese Medicine
AS.140.346 (01)

Students will study the most recent anthropological, philosophical, and historical scholarship on medicine in traditional and modern Chinese society. They will approach the topic from several angles including medical pluralism, the range of healers, domestic and literate medicine, gender, emergence of new disciplines, public health and the history of disease. The course relies on secondary sources and primary sources in English translation. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hanson, Marta
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (02)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: López Raja, Julio
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Medical Spanish
AS.210.313 (03)

Medical Spanish is a comprehensive examination of vocabulary and grammar for students who either work or intend to work in medicine and health-related fields in Spanish-speaking environments. The student will be able to participate in conversations on topics such as contrasting health systems, body structures, disorders and conditions, consulting your doctor, physical and mental health, first-aid, hospitalization and surgery on completion of this course. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been learned in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their professional interests. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Chirinos Delgado, Grecia Bellatrix
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Rise of Modern Science
AS.140.302 (03)

Survey of major scientific developments from the eighteenth-century Age of Enlightenment to the Cold War era of Big Science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Mercelis, Joris Hans Angele
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Love and its maladies
AS.300.334 (01)

Much of what we know about love and desire we owe to fiction’s ability to evoke these experiences. Consider for example that the publication, in Germany, of The Sorrows of Young Werther inspired young men across Europe to dress and behave just like this lover. Just as nowadays film and television represent, as well as mold our conceptions of love, love-stories from the eighteenth-century onwards have given shape to gendered subjectivities in ways that still matter now. As, intriguingly, illness is a recurrent theme in many modern love stories, we will be prompted to decipher signs and symptoms in the bodies of mind of our protagonists. Why is it that in Western cultures, passion is tightly interwoven with a landscape of pain, suffering, and disease? In studying texts that represent major aspects of a romantic sensibility, we are indeed invited to trace the steps of a history of the body increasingly defined by gender and by medical knowledge. The readings for this class (all available in English) include: Austen, Persuasion; Balzac, The Unknown Masterpiece; Barthes, Lover’s Discourse; Goethe; The Sorrows of Young Werther; Mann, Death in Venice; Winterson, Written on the Body.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Ender, Evelyne
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course investigates recent debates about being a person in literature and law. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Although our explorations will be focused on these questions, the genre of materials examined will be wide-ranging (including legal essays, philosophy, contemporary novels, and film). Texts will include novels by William Gibson and Lydia Millet, essays by John Dewey and Daniel Dennett, and films such as Ex Machinaand Her.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levi, Jacob Ezra, Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Imagining Climate Change
AS.300.342 (01)

Climate change poses an existential threat to human civilization. Yet the attention and concern it receives in ordinary life and culture is nowhere near what science tells us is required. What are the causes of this mismatch between crisis and response? What accounts for our collective inability to imagine and grasp this new reality, and how can it be overcome? In pursuit of these questions, we will look at texts from politics, philosophy, literary theory, and religion that frame climate change as a fundamental challenge not only to humanity but to the humanities: the disciplines and modes of thought that we rely on to make sense of the human condition. The second part of the course will examine works of literature and film for examples of how contemporary artists attempt to make the climate crisis visible and intelligible to us.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Freshman Seminar: Borges and Scientific Knowledge
AS.211.137 (01)

A survey of the stories and essays of the great Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges focusing on the theory of knowledge he developed over his long career. Special attention will be paid to the implications his ideas have for the mathematical and physical sciences, in particular cosmology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Egginton, William
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Science as Narrative
AS.220.424 (01)

Class reads the writings of scientists to explore what their words would have meant to them and their readers. Discussion will focus on the shifting scientific/cultural context throughout history. Authors include Aristotle, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Darwin, Freud, Einstein, Heisenberg, Bohr, Crick and Watson.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Panek, Richard
  • Room: Bloomberg 274
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology, literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/40
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, ENGL-PR1800

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.140.398 (01)Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and FilmsM 3:00PM - 5:30PMFrumer, YuliaHodson 301INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.210.313 (01)Medical SpanishTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLópez Raja, JulioGilman 381MSCH-HUM
AS.010.235 (01)Art, Medicine, and the Body: Middle Ages to ModernityTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMerback, MitchellGilman 177HART-RENBAR, MSCH-HUM
AS.130.420 (01)Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Religion and ScienceW 2:00PM - 4:30PMDelnero, PaulGilman 130GARCH-RELATE
AS.140.302 (01)Rise of Modern ScienceMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMercelis, Joris Hans AngeleShaffer 304GECS-SOCSCI
AS.145.201 (01)Clues: Unreasoning the Medical MysteryMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMPuglionesi, AliciaGilman 377MSCH-HUM
AS.140.302 (02)Rise of Modern ScienceMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMercelis, Joris Hans AngeleShaffer 304GECS-SOCSCI
AS.145.105 (01)Freshman Seminar: Minds and MachinesMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMLopez-Gonzalez, MonicaGilman 381
AS.140.346 (01)History of Chinese MedicineMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMHanson, MartaGilman 186
AS.210.313 (02)Medical SpanishTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLópez Raja, JulioGilman 313MSCH-HUM
AS.210.313 (03)Medical SpanishTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMChirinos Delgado, Grecia BellatrixShaffer 300MSCH-HUM
AS.140.302 (03)Rise of Modern ScienceMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMercelis, Joris Hans AngeleShaffer 304GECS-SOCSCI
AS.300.334 (01)Love and its maladiesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMEnder, EvelyneGilman 219
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyGilman 50PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyGilman 50PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyGilman 50PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevi, Jacob Ezra, Siraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
AS.300.342 (01)Imagining Climate ChangeTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLisi, LeonardoGilman 208GRLL-ENGL, INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyGilman 50PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.211.137 (01)Freshman Seminar: Borges and Scientific KnowledgeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMEgginton, WilliamGilman 413GRLL-ENGL
AS.220.424 (01)Science as NarrativeT 1:30PM - 4:00PMPanek, RichardBloomberg 274
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStephens, Walter EGilman 132GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, ENGL-PR1800