Events

Bodian Seminars are scheduled for every Monday at 4 p.m. If there is not a specific date listed below, then that date is open. Please contact us to schedule a seminar for an open date.

Sep
24
Mon
Bodian Seminar: Aaron McGee, Ph.D.
Sep 24 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Bodian Seminar:

Aaron McGee, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Anatomical Science & Neurobiology

University of Louisville

“A genetic dissection of circuits and mechanisms for critical period plasticity”

Experience refines developing brain circuitry and this plasticity is most prominent during transitory critical periods. Yet abnormal experience during critical periods can yield changes in neural function that are difficult to reverse and subsequently maladaptive. A premier model for studying how experience alters neural circuitry is the effect of monocular deprivation on ocular dominance (OD) and visual acuity. Over the last several years we have investigated how specific genes govern the onset, magnitude, and duration, of the critical period(s) for OD and acuity with a genetic dissection strategy. This seminar will focus on our efforts to manipulate a specific neuronal gene that limits experience-dependent plasticity, the nogo-66 receptor (NgR1), to improve understanding of the circuits and mechanisms that operate during critical periods, and to develop therapeutics to promote plasticity in the adult brain.

Oct
1
Mon
Bodian Seminar: W. Martin Usrey, Ph.D.
Oct 1 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Bodian Seminar:

Martin Usrey, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair

Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior

University of California, Davis

“Dissecting the dynamics of signal transmission in thalamocortical circuits”

The thalamus and cerebral cortex are intimately interconnected by a dense network of feedforward and feedback circuits. In the visual system, the response properties of neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus and primary visual cortex (V1) are governed by the anatomical organization of connections and the temporal patterns of impulse arrival. Recent advances in optogenetics and multielectrode recording technology have made it possible to study the role of both features in the same experiment. Results will be presented from experiments that examined the specificity of neuronal connections and the role of spike timing and behavioral modulation in the reciprocal exchange of information between the LGN and V1 in the alert macaque monkey. These results reveal a striking relationship between the parallel feedforward and feedback processing streams, as well as the biophysical properties that govern spike transfer and the encoding of visual information in neuronal spike trains.

Oct
2
Tue
Bodian Seminar: Marius Usher, Ph.D.
Oct 2 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Bodian Seminar:

Marius Usher, Ph.D.

Professor

Computational Neuroscience

Tel Aviv University

TBA

Oct
8
Mon
Bodian Seminar: Archana Venkataraman, Ph.D.
Oct 8 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Bodian Seminar:

Archana Venkataraman, Ph.D.

John C. Malone Assistant Professor

Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

Johns Hopkins University

TBA

Oct
15
Mon
Bodian Seminar: Kishore Kuchibhotla, Ph.D.
Oct 15 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Bodian Seminar:

Kishore Kuchibhotla, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Psychological & Brain Sciences

Department of Neuroscience

Johns Hopkins University

TBA

Oct
22
Mon
Bodian Seminar: Peter Tse Ph.D.
Oct 22 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Bodian Seminar:

Peter Tse, Ph.D.

Professor

Dartmouth College

TBA

Nov
12
Mon
Bodian Seminar: Vikram Chib PhD.
Nov 12 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Bodian Seminar:

Vikram Chib PhD.

Assistant Professor

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Johns Hopkins University

TBA

Dec
10
Mon
Bodian Seminar: Isabel Muzzio Ph.D.
Dec 10 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Bodian Seminar: Isabel Muzzio Ph.D.

University of Texas at San Antonio

TBA