Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found Student Information Services (SIS) website.

Please consult the online course catalog for complete course information.

AS.389.501 - Independent Study-Museums & Society

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.100.301 - America after the Civil Rights Movement

This course explores the history of late twentieth-century America by examining the social, economic, and political legacies of 1960s civil rights protest for the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Students will also participate on an archiving project capturing the experience of Hopkins employees who have recollections of the decades immediately following the civil rights legislations of the 1960s.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Connolly, Nathan D
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.389.379 - In the Gardens at Evergreen Museum

Investigate how historic houses design and manage their grounds for leisure, community engagement, environmental initiatives, art installations and special events. Consider the history of Evergreen’s 25-acre estate and create concepts for how to engage its many communities. Multiple class meetings take place at the Museum. Class runs 1:30-3:50 most days; 2:00-4:30 at the museum on field trip days.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Maloney, Elizabeth
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 5:00PM
Status: Open

AS.130.334 - Egyptian Funerary Arts in the Archaeological Museum

This class will aim to cover the production and choice of funerary objects for Egyptian elite tombs in several eras of antiquity: the Middle and New Kingdoms, the Third Intermediate Period, and the Late Periods. Students will work with specific objects after learning generally about them, and they will carry out analyses of materials, pigments, construction methods, and erosion and degradation effects. They will create a virtual exhibition for the Museum's website and present their results for inclusion in the museum cataloguing project.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Balachandran, Sanchita, Bryan, Betsy Morrell
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 2:00PM - 4:30PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.389.329 - Author/Canon/Archive

Why are some literary works from the past reprinted, anthologized, and considered worthy of study, but not others? Why are some works “lost” and some “rediscovered,” while others simply fall out of favor? Focusing on nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literary culture, we will use rare books and archival materials from JHU collections to examine Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Stephen Crane, Charles Chesnutt, and Zora Neale Hurston, along with a few authors you’ve never heard of, in terms of the relationship between authorship, stewardship, and status.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Dean, Gabrielle
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 4:00PM - 6:20PM
Status: Open

AS.010.310 - The ‘Long Sixties’ in Europe

This seminar examines aspects of advanced artistic production that emerged in France, Italy, the Benelux, and German-speaking countries primarily in the years 1945-1972 as constituent elements of the “Long Sixties,” a period of extraordinary and often rapid social transformation. Among our questions: How was the work of art reimagined and repositioned in the wake of World War II and the horrors of the Holocaust, in the context of reconstruction and an emerging consumer society, and in light of the Cold War, decolonization, and other political tensions and cataclysms? How did artists conceive the claims of artistic tradition in a rapidly expanding field of aesthetic practices and possibilities? What were the relations among advanced artistic practices and the “cultural revolutions” generally taken to have come to a head ca. 1968? Integral to this course is a student-curated exhibition of avant-garde materials at the MSE Library, to open in November 2018.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Warnock, Molly
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Closed

AS.389.384 - Object Encounters at the Baltimore Museum of Art

Using the Baltimore Museum of Art as a laboratory, students examine canonical narratives in art museums and iterate new approaches to objects in museums that build equity, interrogate privilege, decolonise, revisualise and offer alternative stories. Class meets at the museum every other week.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.389.201 - Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Cross-listed with History and History of Art.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Open

AS.389.351 - Women of the Book: Female Mystics, Miracles, and Material Culture in Early Modern Europe

Students will study and assess JHU’s new, unparalleled rare book and manuscript collection about the spiritual lives of women, at the crossroads of religious mysticism, miracles, and material culture, 1575-1800.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Havens, Earle Ashcroft, II.
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM
Status: Canceled

AS.389.311 - From Treasure House to Production House: Exploring New Roles for the Museum in the 21st Century

Students work with the Director of, the Peale Center for Baltimore History and Architecture as it reinvents itself as a museum for the twenty-first century. Involves working with community story-tellers in residence. Extra time is to allow for field trip travel - most days class runs 1:30-3:50.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Proctor, Nancy
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 5:00PM
Status: Open

AS.389.521 - Capstone in Museums and Society

The Capstone allows students to develop and carry out their own, hands-on research project in a museum, collection, archive, or other living resource. Final projects must involve some form of public presentation (exhibition, lecture, poster, web-based, etc.) and a work of self-reflection (journal, brief paper, blog, or other). Projects must be approved and overseen by a supervising faculty member and approved by the Program's Director, in keeping with the University's Independent Work Policy. Instructor permission required.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.389.522 - Capstone in Museum and Society

The Capstone allows students to develop and carry out their own, hands-on research project in a museum, collection, archive, or other living resource. Final projects must involve some form of public presentation (exhibition, poster, web-based, etc.) and a work of self-reflection (journal, brief paper, blog, or other). Projects must be approved and overseen by a supervising faculty member and approved by the Program's Director, in keeping with the University's Independent Work Policy. Department permission required.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.211.329 - Museums and Identity

The museum boom of the last half-century has centered largely around museums dedicated to the culture and history of identity groups, including national, ethnic, religious, and minority groups. In this course we will examine such museums and consider their long history through a comparison of the theory and practice of Jewish museums with other identity museums. We will study the various museological traditions that engage identity, including the collection of art and antiquities, ethnographic exhibitions, history museums, heritage museums, art museums, and other museums of culture. Some of the questions we will ask include: what are museums for and who are they for? how do museums shape identity? and how do the various types of museums relate to one another? Our primary work will be to examine a variety of contemporary examples around the world with visits to local museums including the Jewish Museum of Maryland, the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of the American Indian.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.389.502 - Independent Study- Museum and Society

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.389.250 - Conservation of Material Culture: Art, Artifacts and Heritage Sites

This course will introduce students to the field of art conservation through the study of paintings, paper, books, objects, contemporary sculpture and historic preservation. Topics covered will include: methods of manufacture, agents of deterioration, preservation initiatives, conservation treatment and ethics, and conservation science. Cross-listed with History of Art. Class usually meets at 1:30 - 3:50 PM, except for days with field trips.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Trusheim, Lorraine
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 5:00PM
Status: Approval Required

AS.389.242 - Museum Education: From Contested Knowledge to Reflective Narrative

This practicum course critically considers current art and history museum education practices and explores social justice discourses through museum visits, visitor studies, and museum learning strategies.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Rose, Julia
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.389.325 - Women of the Book: Female Mystics, Miracles, and Material Culture in Early Modern Europe

Students will study and assess JHU’s new, unparalleled rare book and manuscript collection about the spiritual lives of women at the crossroads of religious mysticism, miracles, and material culture, 1450-1800.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Havens, Earle Ashcroft, II.
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.389.303 - World of Things

The course introduces and applies new concepts about materials, and materiality to museum objects. It treats the museum as a site for investigating the relationship between people and things.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.389.378 - Collections Remix

The course invites students to mine the archival, literary and cultural collections of the university for materials that reflect African-American experiences and stage campus interventions based on their findings. Participates in the Housing Our Story: Archival Justice for Black Baltimore project. M&S Practicum..

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Canceled

AS.389.340 - Critical Issues in Art Conservation

The course examines recent controversies in the conservation of major global art works and sites, raising questions concerning the basic theoretical assumptions, practical methods and ethical implications of art conservation. Cross-Listed with History of Art and Anthropology

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Balachandran, Sanchita
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.389.202 - Introduction to the Museum: Issues and Ideas

Museums face practical, political and ethical challenges, including economic difficulties, debates over interpretation of culture and pressure to demonstrate social value. This course considers how museums are answering these challenges. Extra time is to allow for field trip travel - most days class runs 1:30-3:50

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Forloney, Robert
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 5:00PM
Status: Open