Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Diplomats, Dealers, and Diggers: The Birth of Archaeology and the Rise of Collecting from the 19th c. to Today
AS.010.307 (01)

This course investigates the confluence of archaeology as a discipline, collecting of cultural heritage, and their ongoing roles in the socio-politics of the Western world and Middle East. It focuses primarily on the Middle East, first tracing a narrative history of archaeology in the region during the 19th and early 20th centuries, with its explorers, diplomats, missionaries and gentlemen-scholars. It then examines the relationship of archaeology to the creation of the encyclopedic museum and collecting practices more generally, considering how these activities profoundly shaped the modern world, including the antiquities market and looting. A central theme is the production of knowledge through these activities and how this contributes to aspects of power and (self-)representation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

The Future of Here: An Art and Anthropology Studio
AS.070.361 (01)

This class is an occasion for speculative anthropology, a chance to reimagine this place (an American city on the Jones Falls river) in a future beyond the bustle of our fossil-fueled present. What culture might people of that distant time produce, and how might they make creative use of the many things we leave behind? In this class, we will work together as anthropologists and artists of another time, crafting an inventive and collaborative story about a culture to come, and the material artifacts of a very different collective life. The class will be co-taught by anthropologist Anand Pandian and visual artist Jordan Tierney. We will nurture our imaginations through experiential practices of observing nature, collecting materials, and assembling artifacts. What we build will serve as the core of a spring 2025 local museum exhibition we will plan together.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pandian, anand
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM

Data and the Digital in Museums
AS.389.313 (01)

Digital media play an increasingly significant role in museums from how museums share and narrate their collections online to the use of AI to catalog things and create metadata about them. This class explores critically how digital tools work to tell stories and invites students to unpack the resulting museum narratives. Students will learn by doing, creating a digital exhibit of five museum objects using Omeka and later transforming their exhibits by creating data of their own design to tell a new story about their objects. This new narrative will apply critical perspectives considered in the course such as, but not limited to, repatriation, critical cataloging, and geo-politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: BLC 4040
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC, MSCH-HUM

Monuments and Memory in Washington DC
AS.389.344 (90)

Traditionally defined as placeholders of memory, monuments and memorials supposedly help us remember and reflect. But who, what and how do they remember? Who decides how and where they are built? This course poses these and other questions about the politics of public commemoration amid the rich monumental landscape of the nation’s capital. Site visits allow students to experience monuments as living, built ideas and ideals, and to participate in the conversation among memorials. For example, how does the Vietnam Veterans Memorial—which remains the most original and poignant built expression of remembrance—dialogue with the nearby Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial? And how is Lincoln’s legacy recorded differently in the contested Emancipation Memorial in Lincoln Park? Onsite engagement with DC monuments will be paired with discussing scholarly works on the theory and history of monuments and reflecting on talks by members of the National Capital Memorial Advisory Commission, the National Park Service, and the American Battle Monuments Commission. This integrative learning approach invites students to grapple with the complex and ever-evolving process of making and maintaining public memory while placing recent controversies in a broader historical perspective.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 10:00AM - 12:30PM
  • Instructor: Jewiss, Virginia C
  • Room: 555 Penn 
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Landscaping Baltimore: Interpreting the City through its Parks, Campuses, and Neighborhoods
AS.389.347 (01)

This course will explore the landscape history of Baltimore City, including JHU’s Homewood campus, Evergreen Museum, and surrounding areas. Special attention will be paid to the role of the Frederick Law Olmsted, and the Olmsted design firm, who played an important role in the development of several Baltimore parks and neighborhoods. This class will culminate in either small student exhibition or creation of a public-facing tour.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Finkelstein, Lori
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Visualizing Africa
AS.389.405 (01)

Examines the history of African art in the Euro-American world, focusing on the ways that Western institutions have used African artworks to construct narratives about Africa and its billion residents.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 6:00PM - 8:30PM
  • Instructor: Tervala, Kevin
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Storytelling in the Nation’s Capital
AS.389.412 (90)

We live our lives through story. The narratives we circulate—songs, Instagram posts, podcasts, coming out stories—shape the world around us just as they shape our own lives. This course explores the politics of storytelling with a focus on Washington DC-based oral history initiatives, podcasts, and museum exhibitions. Students will examine the power of narrative to uphold and contest power structures by engaging with scholarship produced by ethnographers, historians, queer theorists, critical race theorists, and performance studies scholars. The class will venture into Washington DC to talk with museum curators about the contested politics of producing historical narratives, local activists about the utility of movement narratives, and oral historians about the vital counternarratives they surface in collaboration with local Black, LGBTQ, and indigenous communities. Combining theory and practice, students will critically examine and creatively engage with the role of storytelling in our everyday lives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 2:30PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Plaster, Joseph
  • Room: 555 Penn 
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Hopkins in DC Research Seminar: Humanities in the Public Sphere
AS.389.414 (90)

Students lead a project of their own design under the instructor’s close mentorship and supervision. Students may build on an existing project or develop a new project. Students consider and evaluate concepts and methods of publicly engaged research and their applicability to their own projects. Students debate the ethics of varied methods by reading and analyzing case studies. Students reflect on the ethical stakes of their own topic, process, and desired outcomes. Students discuss and train in strategies of research communication and their ethics by engaging with professionals such as museum interpreters, podcasters, exhibit designers, documentary filmmakers, and magazine editors. Students share works in progress at a salon style gathering midway through the semester and present their concluding findings at a public celebration at the end of the semester.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 2:30PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: 555 Penn 
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.307 (01)Diplomats, Dealers, and Diggers: The Birth of Archaeology and the Rise of Collecting from the 19th c. to TodayTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFeldman, MarianGilman 177HART-ANC
AS.070.361 (01)The Future of Here: An Art and Anthropology StudioF 1:30PM - 4:00PMPandian, anandMergenthaler 426
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer PGilman 400HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM
AS.389.313 (01)Data and the Digital in MuseumsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaffBLC 4040PMUS-PRAC, MSCH-HUM
AS.389.344 (90)Monuments and Memory in Washington DCW 10:00AM - 12:30PMJewiss, Virginia C555 Penn 
AS.389.347 (01)Landscaping Baltimore: Interpreting the City through its Parks, Campuses, and NeighborhoodsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMFinkelstein, LoriGilman 277ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.389.405 (01)Visualizing AfricaM 6:00PM - 8:30PMTervala, KevinGilman 10
AS.389.412 (90)Storytelling in the Nation’s CapitalW 2:30PM - 5:30PMPlaster, Joseph555 Penn 
AS.389.414 (90)Hopkins in DC Research Seminar: Humanities in the Public SphereT 2:30PM - 5:30PMKingsley, Jennifer P555 Penn