Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found Student Information Services (SIS) website.

Please consult the online course catalog for complete course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

History Research Lab: Discovering Hard Histories at Hopkins
AS.100.450 (03)

It is time at Johns Hopkins University to rewrite out own history, one that takes a frank look at how race and racism have shaped the university and its community. This research seminar will build upon the recent revelations about found Johns Hopkins, his family and their relationships to slave holding. Taught as part of the Hard Histories at Hopkins Project, this seminar will center on new student research into the private and public records of early American, aiming to provide new insights into the nature and extent of Mr. Hopkins involvement in slavery and the lives of those Black Americans whom he held enslaved. Students will read deeply into the history of slavery, will learn new research techniques, and will publish the results of their work as part of the Hard Histories at Hopkins Project. Students will also participate in public seminars where, alongside experts, they will bring this history to broader audiences, including the university community and residents of Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jones, Martha Suzanne
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Introduction to the Museum: Issues and Ideas
AS.389.202 (01)

Museums face practical, political and ethical challenges, including economic difficulties, debates over interpretation of culture and pressure to demonstrate social value. This course considers how museums are answering these challenges.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Forloney, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-INTRO

Queer Sixties
AS.389.220 (01)

Introduction to queer & trans politics and culture in the period immediately preceding the gay liberation movement, from the early to late 1960s, focusing on intersections of race, sexuality, and gender. Course examines how we have come to narrate queer & trans history and investigates the ways archival practices shape conceptions of queer & trans life. Students learn research methods as they draw on and contribute to the university’s digitized archival collections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Plaster, Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-INTRO

The BMA Seminar: Digital Interpretation
AS.389.324 (01)

When museums shut their galleries in response to the global pandemic they saw a surge in digital audiences and engagement, athough not everyone can access digital content equally. Continued public health risks bring new challenges to digital interpretation, while universal access as well as embedded racial and gender bias remain significant issues. Students research what works and what doesn't in digital interpretation for art museums, centering social equity and accessibility in their assessment, and develop principles and guidelines for the museum's digital interpretation strategy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC

Critical Issues in Art Conservation
AS.389.340 (01)

The course examines recent controversies in the conservation of major global art works and sites, raising questions concerning the basic theoretical assumptions, practical methods and ethical implications of art conservation. Cross-Listed with History of Art and Anthropology

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Balachandran, Sanchita
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Visualizing Africa
AS.389.405 (01)

Examines the history of African art in the Euro-American world, focusing on the ways that Western institutions have used African artworks to construct narratives about Africa and its billion residents.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:30PM - 9:00PM
  • Instructor: Tervala, Kevin Dixon
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.450 (03)History Research Lab: Discovering Hard Histories at HopkinsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMJones, Martha SuzanneHodson 210HIST-LATAM, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.389.202 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Issues and IdeasT 1:30PM - 4:00PMForloney, Robert PMUS-INTRO
AS.389.220 (01)Queer SixtiesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPlaster, Joseph PMUS-INTRO
AS.389.324 (01)The BMA Seminar: Digital InterpretationTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsley, Jennifer P PMUS-PRAC
AS.389.340 (01)Critical Issues in Art ConservationF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBalachandran, Sanchita ARCH-ARCH
AS.389.405 (01)Visualizing AfricaT 6:30PM - 9:00PMTervala, Kevin Dixon INST-GLOBAL