Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

AS.100.248 - Japan in the World

An introduction to Japan’s history from 1700 to the present, with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas, goods, and people in early modern and modern times. Topics include samurai, nation-building, gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and contemporary popular culture.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kim, Hayang
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
Status: Open

AS.100.347 - Early Modern China

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Rowe, William T
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.010.103 - Introduction to the Art of Asia

A survey of the art and architecture of Asia, from the ancient world to the present and including the Indian subcontinent, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.191.347 - The Political Economy of Climate Change

Scientists tell us that continued reliance on fossil fuels to drive our economies causes global warming, which in turn poses an existential threat to humanity as we know it. But the major tools of societies to steer a clean energy transition—climate and energy policies—often fail, lack ambition, and vary widely from country to country. This is puzzling: Why is it so difficult to pass meaningful policies even though the stakes are so high? How to explain the varying responses to the same problem? In this course, students study the struggle over energy and climate policies through case studies of large industrialized countries. Besides other things, we will ask why the US failed to install any kind of meaningful climate policy, if and how the problems of the EU’s carbon market can be solved, why China cancelled over 100 coal-fired power plants in 2017, and why cloudy Germany became a solar energy powerhouse.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kupzok, Nils
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: F 1:30PM - 4:30PM
Status: Open

AS.100.248 - Japan in the World

An introduction to Japan’s history from 1700 to the present, with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas, goods, and people in early modern and modern times. Topics include samurai, nation-building, gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and contemporary popular culture.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kim, Hayang
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.230.352 - Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.100.478 - Japan from its Peripheries

An advanced undergraduate seminar on the history of modern Japan from the perspective of regions and people often considered as belonging to its geographical, cultural, social, and political peripheries.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kim, Hayang
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.140.341 - Humanoid Robots in Global History

Humanoid machines reflect their creators’ ideals of humanity. Comparing examples from societies across the globe we will investigate what factors shaped these ideals, and how they manifested in technological design.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Frumer, Yulia
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 5:20PM
Status: Open

AS.310.200 - Economic Growth and Development in East Asia

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.100.424 - Women & Modern Chinese History

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas. Cross listed with East Asian Studies.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.190.427 - Political Economy of Japan and Korea

This upper-level seminar examines some of the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese and South Korean political economy. Topics include nationalism, gender politics, civil society, immigration, and US-Japan-South Korea trilateral relations.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chung, Erin
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: T 2:00PM - 4:00PM
Status: Closed

AS.310.222 - The Religions of Korea

This course offers an overview of the religions of Korea, both indigenous and foreign, old and new. Attention will be paid to the history of these religions, their impact on society, as well as their teachings and objectives. Students will engage with various forms of secondary as well as primary sources including scriptures, sermons, and religious tracts.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kim, Nuri
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.310.501 - Independent Study - East Asia

Students carry out an independent research project involving East Asia.

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Andreas, Joel
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Approval Required

AS.373.212 - Second Year Heritage Chinese II

For students who have significant previously-acquired ability to understand and speak Modern Standard Chinese. Course focuses on reading and writing. Teaching materials are the same as used in AS.373.115-116; however, both traditional and simplified versions of written Chinese characters are used. Continuation of AS.373.211. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.211 or permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Open

AS.373.216 - Second Year Chinese II

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.215 or Permission Required. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Chen, Aiguo, Yin, Lu
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.373.314 - Third Year Heritage Chinese II

This course is a continuation of AS.373.313. Students need to have native-level fluency in speaking and understanding Chinese. The course focuses on reading and writing. In addition to the textbooks, downloaded articles on current affairs may also be included on a regular basis. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.313 or Permission Required. Lab required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Yin, Lu
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 4:00PM - 4:50PM, WF 2:00PM - 2:50PM
Status: Open

AS.310.340 - Development and Social Change in Rural China

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: He, Gaochao
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.310.230 - Chinese Politics and Society

This introductory course will familiarize students with the major dynamics of political and social change in contemporary China since 1949. The course will be divided chronologically into four main topics: 1. The contested processes of nation-state making in modern China before 1949; 2. The making of the socialist system during the Mao Years and its dismantling since 1978; 3. The Reform Era transformation to a market economy with Chinese characteristics; 4. The dynamic relationships among the state, market and society since the new millennium. Students will explore how scholars have explained major political and social changes with reference to individual and collective rationalities, specific organizational and institutional arrangements, and specific strategic and cultural mechanisms of Chinese political and social habits.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: He, Gaochao
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.373.112 - First Year Heritage Chinese II

For students who have significant previously-acquired ability to understand and speak Modern Standard Chinese. Course focuses on reading and writing. Teaching materials are the same as used in AS.373.115-116; however, both traditional and simplified versions of written Chinese characters are used. Lab required. Continuation of AS.373.111. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.111 or permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zhao, Nan
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
Status: Open

AS.373.116 - First Year Chinese II

Introductory course in Modern Standard Chinese. Goals: mastery of elements of pronunciation and control of basic vocabulary of 800-900 words and most basic grammatical patterns. Students work first with Pin-Yin system, then with simplified version of written Chinese characters. Continuation of AS.373.115. Note: Student with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.115 or permission required.

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Sun, Ying, Zhao, Nan
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.373.316 - Third Year Chinese II

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible, and written assignments will be given. Continuation of AS.373.315. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.315 or permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.310.432 - Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies

This course is the continuation of Senior Thesis Course AS.360.431 for students completing their thesis in the East Asian Studies program.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.373.116 - First Year Chinese II

Introductory course in Modern Standard Chinese. Goals: mastery of elements of pronunciation and control of basic vocabulary of 800-900 words and most basic grammatical patterns. Students work first with Pin-Yin system, then with simplified version of written Chinese characters. Continuation of AS.373.115. Note: Student with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.115 or permission required.

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Sun, Ying, Zhao, Nan
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.373.112 - First Year Heritage Chinese II

For students who have significant previously-acquired ability to understand and speak Modern Standard Chinese. Course focuses on reading and writing. Teaching materials are the same as used in AS.373.115-116; however, both traditional and simplified versions of written Chinese characters are used. Lab required. Continuation of AS.373.111. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.111 or permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Zhao, Nan
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Open

AS.310.404 - Korea in the World

This seminar examines Korea’s interactions with the outside world including Japan, China, and the Americas, as well as Europe and Southeast Asia. We will touch upon a wide range of topics, including political, economic, and military interactions, as well as cultural, intellectual, and religious engagements. The purpose is to identify larger transnational trends and parallels in understanding Korea’s position in the world.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kim, Nuri
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.373.316 - Third Year Chinese II

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible, and written assignments will be given. Continuation of AS.373.315. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.315 or permission required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.310.316 - First Year Classical Chinese: Philosophers, Poets and Fantasists: An Introduction to Chinese Literature in the Original Classical Texts

We will read arguments, anecdotes and stories, beginning with the philosophers of the ancient period, including the imaginative paradigms of the Daoist writer Zhuangzi, and continue with the strange writings allied with shamanism and goddess-worship. We will continue with the fantastical writers of the medieval world and finish with anecdotes of the strange from the Ming and Qing. Because this is a language as well as a literature class, in addition to literary content and social history as background, we will emphasize grammar and vocabulary. Class preparation will require language exercises, translations, readings in English and there will be a final translation/research paper.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Cass, Victoria B
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Open

AS.373.216 - Second Year Chinese II

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.215 or Permission Required. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Chen, Aiguo, Yin, Lu
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Open

AS.378.116 - First Year Japanese II

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the fall term, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 60 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in 2nd year Japanese. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
Status: Open

AS.378.216 - Second Year Japanese II

Continuation of Beginning Japanese and Intermediate Japanese I. Training in spoken and written language, increasing students' knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Lab required. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.215 or equivalent.

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
Status: Open

AS.378.116 - First Year Japanese II

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the fall term, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 60 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in 2nd year Japanese. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Open

AS.373.416 - Fourth Year Chinese II

Continuation of AS.373.415. Readings in modern Chinese prose, including outstanding examples of literature, newspaper articles, etc. Students should understand most of the readings with the aid of a dictionary, so that class discussion need not focus primarily on detailed explanations of grammar. Discussion, to be conducted in Chinese, will concentrate on the cultural significance of the readings' content. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.415 or Permission Required. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Sun, Ying
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.380.102 - First Year Korean II

Focuses on improving speaking fluency to Limited Proficiency so that one can handle simple daily conversations with confidence. It provides basic high-frequency structures and covers Korean holidays. Continuation of AS.380.101. Recommended Course Background: AS.380.101 or permission required.

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Lee, Soo Yun
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.380.302 - Third Year Korean II

Emphasizes reading literacy in classic and modern Korean prose. By reading Korean newspapers and professional articles in one’s major, it enables one to be well-versed and truly literate. Continuation of AS.380.301. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies Prerequisite: AS.380.301 or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Lee, Soo Yun
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open

AS.378.416 - Fourth Year Japanese II

By using four skills in participatory activities (reading, writing, presentation, and discussion), students will develop reading skills in modern Japanese and deepen and enhance their knowledge on Kanji and Japanese culture. Lab required. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.415

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Katagiri, Satoko
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
Status: Open

AS.378.316 - Third Year Japanese II

Emphasis shifts toward reading, while development of oral-aural skills also continues apace. The course presents graded readings in expository prose and requires students to expand their knowledge of Kanji, grammar, and both spoken and written vocabulary. Lab required. Continuation of AS.378.315. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.315 or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
Status: Open

AS.380.202 - Second Year Korean II

Aims for improving writing skills with correct spelling. Reading materials of Korean people, places, and societies will enhance cultural understanding and awareness, including discussion on family tree. Continuation of AS.380.201. Recommended Course Background: AS.380.201 or equivalent.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Lee, Soo Yun
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.378.216 - Second Year Japanese II

Continuation of Beginning Japanese and Intermediate Japanese I. Training in spoken and written language, increasing students' knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Lab required. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.215 or equivalent.

Credits: 4.50
Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
Term: Spring 2019
Meetings: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
Status: Open