Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Script, Character, Scribble: Writing and Pseudo-Writing in Modern and Contemporary Art
AS.010.451 (01)

Almost readable, but not quite: artists in the twentieth and twenty-first century played with script of all kinds, from ancient glyphs and Persian script to Roman typefaces and Korean Hangul. Artists also scribbled in ways that evoke writing without script or meaning. This course takes on the question of meaning-making in art through the form of script—flirting with that tantalizing feeling that we can almost read the work of art through the marks on its surface. We will engage with artists from around the world whose work grapples with knowledge, meaning, and script, and discuss the limits and possibilities of legibility, knowing, and language. In addition to painting and drawing, we will also discuss conceptual art, installation, video, architecture, tapestry, ceramics, graphic novel forms, book arts, and sculpture. We will have opportunities to situate these works within longer histories of script and pseudo-script and image-text relations. Our discussion-driven seminars will be guided by readings in art history and theory. The course carries no expectation that you are multi-lingual or have experience with multiple scripts. Central to our semester will be group trips to see art in person in DC and Baltimore. Assignments include an option for short, focused writing with feedback and opportunities to experiment with genre and to rewrite, or a longer seminar paper, chosen in consultation with the professor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: BLC 5015  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora Maria Dora
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Literatures and Films of Korea and the Korean Diaspora
AS.310.110 (01)

This survey course introduces students to major events and themes addressed in Korean literature and film such as: Japanese colonialism, modernity, capitalism, the Korean War, rapid industrialization, postmodernity, immigration, transnational adoption, and more. Students will examine the role of literature and film in the development of the nation and the depiction of the Korean and Korean-diasporic subject as a complex set of intersecting social identities that contend with race, class, and gender.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura Ha Ha
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Chinese Leaders: Institutions and Agency
AS.310.285 (01)

This course is a broad survey of what leadership looks like in China. The main through-line of the course is the how China’s leaders navigate the often challenging terrain between constraints and incentives, on the one hand, and opportunities to apply their own individual agency. We will explore the state as the arena in which all this takes place over time (to explore continuity and change) and across space (to explore adaptation and innovation). The course does not presume prior knowledge of China or Chinese language, but students new to the study of China are encouraged to pay special attention to the cumulative nature of the course and invest in the readings, particularly in the first four weeks. Although some of the themes of this course may minimally overlap with/reinforce other Chinese politics courses offered at JHU, the approach to this class will be significantly different.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C
  • Room: Krieger 304  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

China, Southeast Asia, and U.S. National Security
AS.310.305 (01)

The global political and security landscape of the 21st century will be shaped by the rivalry between two superpowers -- China and the U.S. For the foreseeable future, the geographic focus of that contest will be Southeast Asia and the surrounding maritime space, particularly the South China Sea. Southeast Asia is a complex, highly differentiated region of ten-plus nations, each with its own unique history and relationship with China. This course will introduce Southeast Asia as a key region -- geographically, economically, and strategically -- often overlooked by policymakers and scholars. It will also focus on the craft of national security strategy as the best tool for understanding the multi-sided competition, already well underway involving China, the U.S., and the Southeast Asian states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, marvin C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Eurasia's Transformation and the Global Implications
AS.310.318 (01)

Eurasia, stretching from the Western Europe across Russia, Central Asia, and China to the Pacific, is by far the largest continent on earth, with a massive share of global population, economic output, and key natural resources. It has been traditionally Balkanized. Yet since the late 1970s, due to China’s modernizations, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and a series of global geo-economic shocks, the nations of this Super Continent have become increasingly interactive, creating fluid new trans-regional political-economic patterns that remain remarkably unexplored. This course explores the critical junctures that made Eurasia the dynamic, growing colossus that it is becoming today, as well as the global implications, from a unique problem-oriented perspective. It looks first at the developmental and political challenges confronting China, Russia, and key European states as the Cold War waned, how the key nations coped, and how they might have evolved differently. It then considers the new challenges of the post-Cold War world, and how national and local leaders are responding today. Particular attention is given, in this problem—centric approach, to the challenges that growing Eurasian continental connectivity, epitomized in China’s Belt and Road Initiative, are creating for US foreign policy and for the grand strategy of American allies in NATO, Japan, and Korea. Note: Some familiarity with Eurasian history and/or politics is recommended

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Kent
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Labor Politics in China
AS.310.326 (01)

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

COVID-19 and Human Rights in Asia
AS.310.328 (01)

This seminar explores the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and government responses on a range of human rights in Asia, with a focus on the cases of China, Japan, Taiwan, India, South Korea, and Myanmar. In the first part of the course, we will investigate the fundamentals of the international human rights system, the foundational Universal Declaration of Human Rights and core human rights treaties, and the role of civil society in protecting, defending , and advancing human rights. We will then explore the United Nations’ human rights-based guidance for Covid-19 response and prevention, the right to health, and approaches to the balancing of rights and duties, including freedom of movement, freedoms of association and assembly, individuals’ right to health and duties to others, the right to education, rights to privacy, freedom of expression, right to information (and the problem of disinformation) and governments’ emergency powers (and their limits) to protect public health. Inequities and discrimination exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic will also be discussed, as will the necessity for international cooperation to effectively battle Covid-19 and vaccine inequity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Worden, Andrea Joan
  • Room: Gilman 381  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Theorizing Race and Mixed-Race in Asia and its Diasporas
AS.310.335 (01)

This class will explore the construction of race and its applications in Asia and its diasporas. Using the notion of “mixed-race” as an analytic, we will examine how the colonial origins of race and the ensuing Cold War have influenced concepts of national identity and belonging. Employing an inter-sectional approach towards race, gender, and sexuality, the course will draw on a variety of media including memoirs, archives, and videos, to contemplate the locus of race and mixed-race and their importance within the larger nexus of identity formation in Asia and its diasporas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura Ha Ha
  • Room: Shaffer 100  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies
AS.310.431 (01)

The East Asian Studies Senior Honors Thesis Seminar is a workshop for EAS majors writing an honors thesis. It is a year-long course with meetings scheduled in both the fall and spring semesters. Please note that in order to qualify for honors in the major, the thesis must receive a final grade of A- or better. Students will receive credit for the seminar regardless of whether their thesis qualifies for honors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 5:30PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Feminist and Queer Theory: Women in Western Thought an Introduction
AS.363.302 (01)

Women in Western Thought is an introduction to (the history of) Western thought from the margins of the canon. The class introduces you to some key philosophical question, focusing on some highlights of women’s thought in Western thought, most of which are commonly and unjustly neglected. The seminar will be organized around a number of paradigmatic cases, such as the mind/body question in Early Modern Europe, the declaration of the rights of (wo)men during the French revolution, the impact of slavery on philosophical thought, the MeToo debate and others. By doing so, the course will cover a range of issues, such as the nature of God, contract theory, slavery, standpoint epistemology, and queer feminist politics. Students will engage with questions about what a canon is, and who has a say in that. In this sense, Women in Western Thought introduces you to some crucial philosophical and political problems and makes you acquainted with some women in the field. The long term objective of a class on women in Western thought must be to empower, to inspire independence, and to resist the sanctioned ignorance often times masked as universal knowledge and universal history. People of all genders tend to suffer from misinformation regarding the role of women and the gender of thought more generally. By introducing you to women who took it upon themselves to resist the obstacles of their time, I am hoping to provide role models for your individual intellectual and political development. By introducing you to the historical conditions of the exclusion and oppression of women (including trans and queer women as well as black women and women of color), I hope to enable you to generate the sensitivities that are required to navigate the particular social relations of the diverse world you currently inhabit. By introducing philosophical topics in this way, I hope to enable you to have a positive, diversifying influence on you future endeavours.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: deLire, Luce Marcella
  • Room: Maryland 104  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, MSCH-HUM

First Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.111 (01)

This course is designed for students who were raised in an environment in which Chinese is spoken by parents or guardians at home and for those who are familiar with the language and possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course therefore focuses on reading and writing (including the correct use of grammar). Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan
  • Room: Gilman 381  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.111 (02)

This course is designed for students who were raised in an environment in which Chinese is spoken by parents or guardians at home and for those who are familiar with the language and possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course therefore focuses on reading and writing (including the correct use of grammar). Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan
  • Room: Bloomberg 168  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (01)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian, Zhao, Nan
  • Room: Shaffer 2 Shaffer 2
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (02)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian, Zhao, Nan
  • Room: Shaffer 2 Croft Hall B32
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (03)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian, Zhao, Nan
  • Room: Krieger 504 Croft Hall B32
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.211 (01)

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.112 with C+ and above (or equivalent). Students in this course possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course focuses on reading and writing. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.211 (02)

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.112 with C+ and above (or equivalent). Students in this course possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course focuses on reading and writing. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi
  • Room: Shaffer 202  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese
AS.373.215 (01)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi
  • Room: Bloomberg 168  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese
AS.373.215 (02)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.313 (01)

This course is designed for those who have already taken AS.373.212 or equivalent. Students need to have native-level fluency in speaking and understanding Chinese. The course focuses on reading and writing. In addition to the textbooks, downloaded articles on current affairs may also be introduced on a regular basis. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room: Bloomberg 168  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Chinese
AS.373.315 (01)

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible and written assignments will be given. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room: Gilman 77  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Chinese
AS.373.315 (02)

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible and written assignments will be given. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room: Krieger 521  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fourth Year Chinese
AS.373.415 (01)

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.316 with a C+ or above (or equivalent). Readings in modern Chinese prose, including outstanding examples of literature, newspaper articles, etc. Students are supposed to be able to understand most of the readings with the aid of a dictionary, so that class discussion is not focused primarily on detailed explanation of grammar. Discussion, to be conducted in Chinese, will concentrate on the cultural significance of the readings' content. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 5:45PM - 6:35PM, WF 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian
  • Room: Krieger 504 Krieger 504
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

5th Year Chinese
AS.373.491 (01)

Fifth Year Chinese is designed for students who finished fourth year regular or third year heritage Chinese course at JHU or its equivalent and wish to achieve a higher advanced proficiency level in Chinese. The goal of the course is to help students further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills cohesively and to enhance students’ understanding of Chinese culture and society through language learning.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan
  • Room: Krieger 517  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (01)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Yuki Yuki, Naganuma, Rena
  • Room: Krieger 302 Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (02)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Yuki Yuki, Naganuma, Rena
  • Room: Krieger 302 Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (03)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Yuki Yuki, Naganuma, Rena
  • Room: Gilman 75 Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Japanese
AS.378.215 (01)

Training in spoken and written language, increasing their knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115 and AS.378.116 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room: Ames 320 Ames 320
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Japanese
AS.378.215 (02)

Training in spoken and written language, increasing their knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115 and AS.378.116 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room: Ames 320  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Japanese
AS.378.315 (01)

Emphasis shifts toward reading, while development of oral-aural skills also continues apace. The course presents graded readings in expository prose and requires students to expand their knowledge of Kanji, grammar, and both spoken and written vocabulary. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 8:00AM - 8:50AM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room: Gilman 381  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fundamentals of Japanese Grammar
AS.378.396 (01)

This course is designed for students who have already studied 1st Year Japanese grammar and wish to develop a thorough knowledge of Japanese grammar in order to advance all aspects of language skills to a higher level. It is also appropriate for graduate students who need to be able to read materials written in Japanese. The goal of the course is to provide students with a thorough knowledge of Japanese grammar; therefore, knowledge of vocabulary (including kanji) in depth is not requisite. In addition, since this is not a language course that places equal focus on all four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading), there will be no conversation practice – this is a lecture course on grammar. 2 credits. Pass-fail grade option only

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 9:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Yuki Yuki
  • Room: Krieger 504  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fourth Year Japanese
AS.378.415 (01)

By using four skills in participatory activities (reading, writing, presentation, and discussion), students will develop reading skills in modern Japanese and deepen and enhance their knowledge on Kanji and Japanese culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.315 and AS.378.316 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 2.00 - 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naganuma, Rena
  • Room: Gilman 77  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Korean
AS.380.101 (01)

Introduces the Korean alphabet, hangeul. Covers basic elements of the Korean language, high-frequency words and phrases, including cultural aspects. Focuses on oral fluency reaching Limited Proficiency where one can handle simple daily conversations. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Gilman 17 Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Korean
AS.380.101 (02)

Introduces the Korean alphabet, hangeul. Covers basic elements of the Korean language, high-frequency words and phrases, including cultural aspects. Focuses on oral fluency reaching Limited Proficiency where one can handle simple daily conversations. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Krieger 504 Shaffer 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Korean
AS.380.201 (01)

Aims for improving oral proficiency and confident control of grammar with vocabulary building and correct spelling intended. Reading materials of Korean people, places, and societies will enhance cultural understanding and awareness. Project due on Korean cities. Existing demonstrable skills in spoken Korean preferred.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Gilman 17 Shaffer 2
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Korean
AS.380.301 (01)

Emphasizes reading literacy in classic and modern Korean prose, from easy essays to difficult short stories. Vocabulary refinement and native-like grasp of grammar explored. Project due on Korean culture. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Krieger 180  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fourth Year Korean
AS.380.401 (01)

This course is designed for those who have finished AS 380.302 or beyond advanced mid level of competency in Korean in four skills. By dealing with various topics on authentic materials including news, articles on websites, short stories, this course aims to help students enhance not only linguistics knowledge and skills, but also current issues in Korea. It is expected that, by the end of the term, students will be able to discuss a variety of topics and express opinions fluently in both spoken and written language.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Krieger 504  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.451 (01)Script, Character, Scribble: Writing and Pseudo-Writing in Modern and Contemporary ArtTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 177
 
HART-MODERN
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TBLC 5015
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TKrieger 302
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora Maria DoraMergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.310.110 (01)Literatures and Films of Korea and the Korean DiasporaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMReizman, Laura Ha HaGilman 132
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.285 (01)Chinese Leaders: Institutions and AgencyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMertha, Andrew CKrieger 304
 
INST-CP
AS.310.305 (01)China, Southeast Asia, and U.S. National SecurityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, marvin CMergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.318 (01)Eurasia's Transformation and the Global ImplicationsT 4:30PM - 7:00PMCalder, KentKrieger 300
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.326 (01)Labor Politics in ChinaW 4:30PM - 7:00PMHe, GaochaoGilman 119
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.310.328 (01)COVID-19 and Human Rights in AsiaF 1:30PM - 4:00PMWorden, Andrea JoanGilman 381
 
INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.310.335 (01)Theorizing Race and Mixed-Race in Asia and its DiasporasW 4:30PM - 7:00PMReizman, Laura Ha HaShaffer 100
 
INST-CP
AS.310.431 (01)Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian StudiesM 5:30PM - 8:00PMAndreas, JoelMergenthaler 266
 
AS.363.302 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Women in Western Thought an IntroductionT 4:30PM - 7:00PMdeLire, Luce MarcellaMaryland 104
 
INST-PT, MSCH-HUM
AS.373.111 (01)First Year Heritage ChineseMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMZhao, NanGilman 381
 
AS.373.111 (02)First Year Heritage ChineseMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMZhao, NanBloomberg 168
 
AS.373.115 (01)First Year ChineseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMWang, Qian, Zhao, NanShaffer 2
Shaffer 2
AS.373.115 (02)First Year ChineseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMWang, Qian, Zhao, NanShaffer 2
Croft Hall B32
AS.373.115 (03)First Year ChineseMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMWang, Qian, Zhao, NanKrieger 504
Croft Hall B32
AS.373.211 (01)Second Year Heritage ChineseMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMYang, ShuyiGilman 186
 
AS.373.211 (02)Second Year Heritage ChineseMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMYang, ShuyiShaffer 202
 
AS.373.215 (01)Second Year ChineseMTWThF 12:00PM - 12:50PMChen, Aiguo, Yang, ShuyiBloomberg 168
 
AS.373.215 (02)Second Year ChineseMTWThF 3:00PM - 3:50PMChen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi 
 
AS.373.313 (01)Third Year Heritage ChineseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMChen, AiguoBloomberg 168
 
AS.373.315 (01)Third Year ChineseMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMChen, AiguoGilman 77
 
AS.373.315 (02)Third Year ChineseMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMChen, AiguoKrieger 521
 
AS.373.415 (01)Fourth Year ChineseM 5:45PM - 6:35PM, WF 4:00PM - 4:50PMWang, QianKrieger 504
Krieger 504
AS.373.491 (01)5th Year ChineseTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZhao, NanKrieger 517
 
AS.378.115 (01)First Year JapaneseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMJohnson, Yuki Yuki, Naganuma, RenaKrieger 302
Krieger 304
AS.378.115 (02)First Year JapaneseMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Yuki Yuki, Naganuma, RenaKrieger 302
Krieger 180
AS.378.115 (03)First Year JapaneseMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Yuki Yuki, Naganuma, RenaGilman 75
Krieger 180
AS.378.215 (01)Second Year JapaneseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMNakao, Makiko PenningtonAmes 320
Ames 320
AS.378.215 (02)Second Year JapaneseMTWThF 12:00PM - 12:50PMNakao, Makiko PenningtonAmes 320
 
AS.378.315 (01)Third Year JapaneseMWF 8:00AM - 8:50AMNakao, Makiko PenningtonGilman 381
 
AS.378.396 (01)Fundamentals of Japanese GrammarW 9:00AM - 10:50AMJohnson, Yuki YukiKrieger 504
 
AS.378.415 (01)Fourth Year JapaneseTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaganuma, RenaGilman 77
 
AS.380.101 (01)First Year KoreanMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMKim, Soo Yun LeeGilman 17
Shaffer 303
AS.380.101 (02)First Year KoreanMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMKim, Soo Yun LeeKrieger 504
Shaffer 303
AS.380.201 (01)Second Year KoreanMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMKim, Soo Yun LeeGilman 17
Shaffer 2
AS.380.301 (01)Third Year KoreanMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMKim, Soo Yun LeeKrieger 180
 
AS.380.401 (01)Fourth Year KoreanTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMKim, Soo Yun LeeKrieger 504