Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Japanese Robots
AS.001.102 (01)

Japan is a world leader in biomimetic robotics. Japanese society enthusiastically embraces robotic nurses, robotic guides, robotic waiters, robotic pets, and even robotic girlfriends. What are the origins of the Japanese love of robots? What role did robotics engineers play in creating the image of loveable robots? What societal fears do Japanese robots assuage and what hopes do they foster? In the course of the semester, students will learn about the evolution of Japanese robotics, and explore the implications of this evolution to humans’ relationship with robots. While learning about Japanese robots, students will acquire skills necessary for college-level education, including how to write an email to a professor, how to organize and manage digital tools, how to navigate the information resources, and how to develop, complete, and present research projects. This course will equip students with skills essential to their success in college and beyond.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Frumer, Yulia
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South Asia
AS.010.352 (01)

This course will explore modern and contemporary art in colonial and postcolonial contexts from Bangladesh to northern Africa. How do artists negotiate demands to support their national and local identities while participating in modernism across borders? What role do secularism and spirituality have in modern art? How do anticolonial, Marxist, and feminist politics shape art in these regions? How do global economic forces and the rise of powerful collectors, private museums, and international art fairs shape art and artists working across this geographic area? We will foreground the role of women as artists, collectors, patrons, and scholars throughout.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Reverberations Of The Korean War
AS.070.332 (01)

This course will takes the reverberations of the Korean War to examine the ways in which catastrophic violence is absorbed into and corrodes social life. Particular attention is paid to the transnational nature of conflict, how boundaries around peace and war are established, and how recent scholarly and artistic work on the Korean War has critically engaged dominant frameworks of memory and trauma. Readings will draw from fiction, ethnography, historiography and will also include film. This course also draws from the public syllabus on Ending the Korean War.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Han, Clara
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and Exchanges
AS.100.246 (01)

This course examines Iberian-Asian relations in the early modern period. It enriches and complicates our understandings of important concepts, such as colonialism, religious conversion, and global trade.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Galasi, Francis
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA

The Qing Empire and its Global Context
AS.100.311 (01)

This is an upper level undergraduate class. It offers a case-based global history of early modern empires.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Wu, Man-Chu (Julia)
  • Room: Krieger 180  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

Asian American Art and Activism: Third World, Feminist, and Queer Solidarities
AS.100.340 (01)

This interdisciplinary course surveys critical themes related to Asian American art and activism including perspectives from history, art and visual culture, literature and gender and sexuality studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Shirazi, Sadia
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

Survey of the history of China from ca. 1895 to ca. 1976.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Historiography of Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

Study of Western, Chinese, and Japanese understandings of the history of China, emphasizing their implications for cultural understanding and for policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Eating in Early Modern East Asia
AS.140.323 (01)

Can we identify a distinctly East Asian food culture, or can we only speak of East Asian food cultures, plural? How are regional food cultures and culture writ large mutually constitutive? In this discussion-based course, we explore these questions through focused readings on the following aspects of local and regional foodways: agricultural environment, ingredient availability, recipe composition, meal preparation, dining practices, and the relationship between diet, health, and illness in early modern medical discourse.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Zanolini, Sarah Jean (Arah)
  • Room: Krieger 306  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (01)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (03)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 302
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (04)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 306
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

What You Need to Know About Chinese Politics (Part 1)
AS.190.264 (01)

What you need to know about Chinese politics covers the major scandals, political events, and policy debates that every China watcher needs to know. This first module of a two-semester experience brings together two professors, Prof. Andrew Mertha (SAIS) and Prof. John Yasuda (KSAS), with very different perspectives on China's past achievements, its political and economic futures, and the global implications of China's rise. The course seeks to give ample coverage to every major political question about China that is often missed in a semester long class. In addition to lively debates between the instructors, students can also expect guest speakers from the policy world, business, and the academy for a fresh take on what's going on in China today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C (Andrew), Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Asian American Politics
AS.190.315 (01)

This course examines issues of political identity, political incorporation, and political participation of Asian Americans. Themes include Asian American panethnicity, the struggle for immigration and citizenship, Asian American electoral politics, political activism and resistance since the 1960s, and the impact of Asian Americans on the politics of race and ethnicity in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

The Citizen and the Foreigner in South Asia
AS.191.306 (01)

This course will take students through the histories of belonging and non-belonging of the peoples that populate South Asia. This will involve examining the administrative as well as emotional consequences of colonial rule, the politics of legal and illegal identity documents, the continuing legacies of the partition of the Indian subcontinent, climate-change-related migration, refugee experiences and detention centers, and the dimensions of caste and tribal identities on citizenship. Towards the latter end of the course, we will examine how citizenship is an ongoing process that is intimately connected to national identity and competing ideas of who and what constitutes the nation. The course will end with considering some implications for development on citizenship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 8:30AM - 9:45AM
  • Instructor: Dey, Nandini
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora (Giovanna Maria Dora)
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies
AS.230.228 (01)

This course surveys the impacts of colonialism in East and Southeast Asia. Special attention will be paid to the social and economic development in British Singapore and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Korea and Taiwan. Topics include free-trade imperialism, colonial modernity, anticolonial movements, pan-Asianism, and post-war U.S. hegemony.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying)
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Lu Xun And His Times: China’s Long 20th Century And Beyond
AS.300.322 (01)

The “founding father of modern Chinese literature,” Lu Xun (1881-1936) saw himself as a contemporary of writers like Gogol, Ibsen, and Nietzsche in creating his seminal short stories and essays, and likewise, he has been seen by numerous Chinese, Sinophone, and East Asian writers as their contemporary since his lifetime until today. In this course, we will survey Lu Xun's canonical works and their legacies through a comparative approach. What echoes do Lu Xun's works have with the European and Russian texts he engaged with? Why did his works manage to mark a “new origin” of Chinese literature? How were his works repeated, adapted, and appropriated by Chinese writers from the Republican period through the Maoist era to the post-socialist present, even during the Covid-19 pandemic? How do we assess his cross-cultural reception? Are his times obsolete now that China is on the rise? Or, have his times come yet? Through our comparative survey, Lu Xun's works and their afterlives will offer us a window onto China's long twentieth century and beyond in a transnational context. All materials are provided in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Freshman Seminar: Literatures of Korea and the Korean Diaspora
AS.310.110 (01)

Utilizing both peninsular and diasporic writings, this survey course introduces students to major events and themes addressed in Korean literature such as: Japanese colonialism, modernity, capitalism, the Korean War, rapid industrialization, postmodernity, immigration, transnational adoption, and more. Students will examine the role of literature in the development of the nation and the depiction of the Korean and Korean-diasporic subject as a complex set of intersecting social identities that contend with race, class, and gender.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura (Laura Ha)
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Photography in a Changing China
AS.310.210 (01)

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy
AS.310.305 (01)

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, Marvin C (marvin)
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Belonging and Difference in Modern Korea
AS.310.324 (01)

Drawing on critical race theory, and gender and sexuality studies, this course provides the analytical framework necessary to grapple with how belonging and difference are produced, manifested, and challenged within Korea’s citizenry. Students will gain knowledge on modern Korea and its diasporas and examine its construction as one rooted in a history of empire, nationalism, militarism, and neoliberalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura (Laura Ha)
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Global Health and Human Rights: COVID-19 Case Studies from Asia
AS.310.328 (01)

Using the lens of international human rights, humanitarian law, and the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, this seminar explores a range of Covid-19 response and prevention issues and best practices focusing on case studies, including China, Japan, Taiwan, India, and South Korea, among others. We will examine the human rights-based guidance from the UN for Covid-19 response and prevention as well as the geopolitics of PPE and vaccine distribution (i.e., “mask” and vaccine diplomacy). The course will explore approaches to the balancing of rights and duties, including freedom of movement, freedoms of association and assembly, individuals’ right to health, duties to others, rights to privacy, freedom of expression, disinformation and governments’ emergency powers (and their limits) to protect public health. Inequities and discrimination exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic will also be discussed. Several health and human rights advocates and experts will visit the class to share their experiences and insights.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Worden, Andrea Joan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

First Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.111 (01)

This course is designed for students who were raised in an environment in which Chinese is spoken by parents or guardians at home and for those who are familiar with the language and possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course therefore focuses on reading and writing (including the correct use of grammar). Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan (Nan)
  • Room: Gilman 381  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.111 (02)

This course is designed for students who were raised in an environment in which Chinese is spoken by parents or guardians at home and for those who are familiar with the language and possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course therefore focuses on reading and writing (including the correct use of grammar). Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan (Nan)
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (01)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Students may choose to attend either lecture at 12pm or 3pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian, Zhao, Nan (Nan)
  • Room: Shaffer 2 Hodson 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (02)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Students may choose to attend either lecture at 12pm or 3pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 4:00PM - 4:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian, Zhao, Nan (Nan)
  • Room: Krieger 504 Maryland 201
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (03)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Students may choose to attend either lecture at 12pm or 3pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian, Zhao, Nan (Nan)
  • Room: Krieger 517 Maryland 201
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.211 (01)

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.112 with C+ and above (or equivalent). Students in this course possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course focuses on reading and writing. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese
AS.373.215 (01)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi (Shuyi)
  • Room: Ames 218 Krieger 309
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese
AS.373.215 (02)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi (Shuyi)
  • Room: Gilman 377 Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese
AS.373.215 (03)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi (Shuyi)
  • Room: Gilman 377 Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.313 (01)

This course is designed for those who have already taken AS.373.212 or equivalent. Students need to have native-level fluency in speaking and understanding Chinese. The course focuses on reading and writing. In addition to the textbooks, downloaded articles on current affairs may also be introduced on a regular basis. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi (Shuyi)
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Chinese
AS.373.315 (01)

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible and written assignments will be given. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Chinese
AS.373.315 (02)

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible and written assignments will be given. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room: Krieger 504  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fourth Year Chinese
AS.373.415 (01)

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.316 with a C+ or above (or equivalent). Readings in modern Chinese prose, including outstanding examples of literature, newspaper articles, etc. Students are supposed to be able to understand most of the readings with the aid of a dictionary, so that class discussion is not focused primarily on detailed explanation of grammar. Discussion, to be conducted in Chinese, will concentrate on the cultural significance of the readings' content. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

5th Year Chinese
AS.373.491 (01)

Fifth Year Chinese is designed for students who finished fourth year regular or third year heritage Chinese course at JHU or its equivalent and wish to achieve a higher advanced proficiency level in Chinese. The goal of the course is to help students further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills cohesively and to enhance students’ understanding of Chinese culture and society through language learning.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan (Nan)
  • Room: Krieger 504  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (01)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Student may choose to attend either lecture at 10:30 am or 12 pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki (Yuki), Naganuma, Rena (Rena)
  • Room: Krieger 111 Gilman 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (02)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Student may choose to attend either lecture at 10:30 am or 12 pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki (Yuki), Naganuma, Rena (Rena)
  • Room: Gilman 217 Krieger 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (03)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Student may choose to attend either lecture at 10:30 am or 12 pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki (Yuki), Naganuma, Rena (Rena)
  • Room: Gilman 217 Krieger 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (04)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Student may choose to attend either lecture at 10:30 am or 12 pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki (Yuki), Naganuma, Rena (Rena)
  • Room: Croft Hall G02 Krieger 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Japanese
AS.378.215 (01)

Training in spoken and written language, increasing their knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115 and AS.378.116 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room: Ames 320 Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Japanese
AS.378.215 (02)

Training in spoken and written language, increasing their knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115 and AS.378.116 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room: Gilman 413 Gilman 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Japanese
AS.378.315 (01)

Emphasis shifts toward reading, while development of oral-aural skills also continues apace. The course presents graded readings in expository prose and requires students to expand their knowledge of Kanji, grammar, and both spoken and written vocabulary. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fourth Year Japanese
AS.378.415 (01)

By using four skills in participatory activities (reading, writing, presentation, and discussion), students will develop reading skills in modern Japanese and deepen and enhance their knowledge on Kanji and Japanese culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.315 and AS.378.316 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 2.00 - 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Naganuma, Rena (Rena)
  • Room: Krieger 522  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Korean
AS.380.101 (01)

Introduces the Korean alphabet, hangeul. Covers basic elements of the Korean language, high-frequency words and phrases, including cultural aspects. Focuses on oral fluency reaching Limited Proficiency where one can handle simple daily conversations. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Krieger 306 Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Korean
AS.380.101 (02)

Introduces the Korean alphabet, hangeul. Covers basic elements of the Korean language, high-frequency words and phrases, including cultural aspects. Focuses on oral fluency reaching Limited Proficiency where one can handle simple daily conversations. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Krieger 517 Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Korean
AS.380.201 (01)

Aims for improving oral proficiency and confident control of grammar with vocabulary building and correct spelling intended. Reading materials of Korean people, places, and societies will enhance cultural understanding and awareness. Project due on Korean cities. Existing demonstrable skills in spoken Korean preferred.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Krieger 308 Maryland 309
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Korean
AS.380.301 (01)

Emphasizes reading literacy in classic and modern Korean prose, from easy essays to difficult short stories. Vocabulary refinement and native-like grasp of grammar explored. Project due on Korean culture. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Krieger 504  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fourth Year Korean
AS.380.401 (01)

This course is designed for those who have finished AS 380.302 or beyond advanced mid level of competency in Korean in four skills. By dealing with various topics on authentic materials including news, articles on websites, short stories, this course aims to help students enhance not only linguistics knowledge and skills, but also current issues in Korea. It is expected that, by the end of the term, students will be able to discuss a variety of topics and express opinions fluently in both spoken and written language.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Soo Yun Lee
  • Room: Krieger 504  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.102 (01)FYS: Japanese RobotsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFrumer, YuliaGilman 177
 
AS.010.352 (01)Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South AsiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.332 (01)Reverberations Of The Korean WarW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHan, ClaraGilman 134
 
INST-CP
AS.100.246 (01)Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and ExchangesMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMGalasi, Francis 
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.311 (01)The Qing Empire and its Global ContextTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWu, Man-Chu (Julia)Krieger 180
 
HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.340 (01)Asian American Art and Activism: Third World, Feminist, and Queer SolidaritiesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMShirazi, Sadia 
 
HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 132
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography of Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TMaryland 114
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.140.323 (01)Eating in Early Modern East AsiaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMZanolini, Sarah Jean (Arah)Krieger 306
 
AS.190.109 (01)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 308
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.109 (03)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 302
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.109 (04)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 306
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.264 (01)What You Need to Know About Chinese Politics (Part 1)T 1:30PM - 4:00PMMertha, Andrew C (Andrew), Yasuda, John KojiroAmes 234
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.315 (01)Asian American PoliticsT 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, ErinHodson 313
 
INST-AP
AS.191.306 (01)The Citizen and the Foreigner in South AsiaMW 8:30AM - 9:45AMDey, NandiniKrieger Laverty
 
POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora (Giovanna Maria Dora)Gilman 75
 
INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.228 (01)Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested LegaciesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying)Gilman 413
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.322 (01)Lu Xun And His Times: China’s Long 20th Century And BeyondWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMHashimoto, SatoruGilman 208
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.110 (01)Freshman Seminar: Literatures of Korea and the Korean DiasporaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMReizman, Laura (Laura Ha)Gilman 217
 
AS.310.210 (01)Documentary Photography in a Changing ChinaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoHodson 313
 
INST-CP
AS.310.305 (01)Southeast Asia and US Security StrategyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, Marvin C (marvin)Mergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.324 (01)Belonging and Difference in Modern KoreaW 4:30PM - 7:00PMReizman, Laura (Laura Ha)Gilman 217
 
AS.310.328 (01)Global Health and Human Rights: COVID-19 Case Studies from AsiaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWorden, Andrea JoanMergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.373.111 (01)First Year Heritage ChineseMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMZhao, Nan (Nan)Gilman 381
 
AS.373.111 (02)First Year Heritage ChineseMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMZhao, Nan (Nan)Gilman 75
 
AS.373.115 (01)First Year ChineseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMWang, Qian, Zhao, Nan (Nan)Shaffer 2
Hodson 305
AS.373.115 (02)First Year ChineseMWF 4:00PM - 4:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMWang, Qian, Zhao, Nan (Nan)Krieger 504
Maryland 201
AS.373.115 (03)First Year ChineseMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMWang, Qian, Zhao, Nan (Nan)Krieger 517
Maryland 201
AS.373.211 (01)Second Year Heritage ChineseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMChen, AiguoKrieger 308
 
AS.373.215 (01)Second Year ChineseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMChen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi (Shuyi)Ames 218
Krieger 309
AS.373.215 (02)Second Year ChineseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMChen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi (Shuyi)Gilman 377
Hodson 313
AS.373.215 (03)Second Year ChineseMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMChen, Aiguo, Yang, Shuyi (Shuyi)Gilman 377
Hodson 313
AS.373.313 (01)Third Year Heritage ChineseMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMYang, Shuyi (Shuyi)Krieger 302
 
AS.373.315 (01)Third Year ChineseMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMChen, AiguoKrieger 308
 
AS.373.315 (02)Third Year ChineseMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMChen, AiguoKrieger 504
 
AS.373.415 (01)Fourth Year ChineseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMWang, QianGilman 313
 
AS.373.491 (01)5th Year ChineseTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZhao, Nan (Nan)Krieger 504
 
AS.378.115 (01)First Year JapaneseTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki (Yuki), Naganuma, Rena (Rena)Krieger 111
Gilman 217
AS.378.115 (02)First Year JapaneseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki (Yuki), Naganuma, Rena (Rena)Gilman 217
Krieger 111
AS.378.115 (03)First Year JapaneseMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki (Yuki), Naganuma, Rena (Rena)Gilman 217
Krieger 111
AS.378.115 (04)First Year JapaneseMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki (Yuki), Naganuma, Rena (Rena)Croft Hall G02
Krieger 111
AS.378.215 (01)Second Year JapaneseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMNakao, Makiko PenningtonAmes 320
Gilman 219
AS.378.215 (02)Second Year JapaneseMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMNakao, Makiko PenningtonGilman 413
Gilman 217
AS.378.315 (01)Third Year JapaneseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMNakao, Makiko PenningtonKrieger 308
 
AS.378.415 (01)Fourth Year JapaneseTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMNaganuma, Rena (Rena)Krieger 522
 
AS.380.101 (01)First Year KoreanMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMKim, Soo Yun LeeKrieger 306
Hodson 216
AS.380.101 (02)First Year KoreanMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMKim, Soo Yun LeeKrieger 517
Hodson 216
AS.380.201 (01)Second Year KoreanMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMKim, Soo Yun LeeKrieger 308
Maryland 309
AS.380.301 (01)Third Year KoreanMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMKim, Soo Yun LeeKrieger 504
 
AS.380.401 (01)Fourth Year KoreanTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMKim, Soo Yun LeeKrieger 504