Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (01)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (02)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (03)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (04)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (05)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (06)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (07)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Power and Pleasure in Asian America: Race and Law in Culture
AS.100.235 (01)

This course examines how Asians and Asian Americans became racialized in U.S. law from the early twentieth century through today. Topics include immigration, U.S. empire in Asia, food, and activism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Chua, Jilene Chan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and Exchanges
AS.100.246 (01)

Ideas and concepts on colonialism and globalization are reconsidered and refined in this course on the study of early modern Iberian expansion in Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Galasi, Francis
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

History of Public Health in East Asia
AS.140.146 (01)

This course examines the history of disease, epidemics, and public health responses in East Asia from the 17th-20th centuries. This public health history emphasizes the interactions, connections, and comparisons among China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level:
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hanson, Marta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Public Health in East Asia Through Films & Documentaries
AS.140.176 (01)

This course uses contemporary films and documentaries to address issues in public health in East Asia, past & present. Topics covered include medicine in turn-of-the-twentieth century Japan and China, revolutionary medicine, STDS, mental illness, HIV/AIDs in China, industrial pollution, the politics of universal health care insurance, and pandemics in East Asia.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 6:30PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Hanson, Marta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/50
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EU
AS.180.210 (01)

Increased mobility of people across national borders, whether by choice or by force, has become an integral part of the modern world. Using a comparative perspective and an applied economics approach, the course explores the economic and political determinants, and (likely) consequences of migration flows for East Asia, the US and the EU. Lectures, assignments and in class discussions, will be built around the following topics: i) migrants’ self-selection; ii) human capital investment decision-making; iii) remittance decisions and effects; iv) impacts on labor markets of both receiving and sending countries; and v) the economic benefits from immigration. Overall, the course will give students perspective on the why people choose or feel compelled to leave their countries, how receiving countries respond to migrants’ presence, and the key economic policy concerns that are influencing the shaping of immigration policy in East Asia, the US, and the EU.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Korean Politics
AS.190.341 (01)

This course introduces students to the historical and institutional foundations of modern South Korean politics. Topics include nationalism, political economic development, civil society, globalization, and ROK-DPRK relations. Recommended students should take Intro to Comparative Politics or a course related to East Asia first. (CP)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 7:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st Century
AS.190.347 (01)

“Can the United States and China avoid a new Cold War? One might think not given disputes over the South China Sea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, human rights, trade, ideology and so much more. Moreover, competition for influence in the developing world and American concerns as to whether China will replace it as the preeminent world power suggest a new Cold War is in the offing. Nevertheless, their extensive economic ties and need to work together to solve common problems such as climate change, nuclear proliferation, and pandemics argues against a continuing confrontation. This course will examine whether cooperation or conflict will define Sino-American relations, and whether a new Cold War—or even a shooting war—lies in the future.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Chinese Politics
AS.190.370 (01)

This course is designed to help students better understand the politics of China. Lectures will focus on the tools of governance that China has employed to navigate its transition from plan to market, provide public goods and services to its citizens, and to maintain social control over a rapidly changing society. The course will draw heavily from texts covering a range of subjects including China's political economy, social and cultural developments, regime dynamics, and historical legacies. Students interested in authoritarian resilience, governance, post-communist transition, and domestic will find this course particularly instructive.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

China's Political Economy
AS.190.389 (01)

This course examines the most important debates about China’s political economic development. After exploring Mao Zedong’s disastrous economic policies, we will consider the politics of reform and opening under Deng Xiaoping, and finally conclude with China’s state capitalist policies across a variety of issue areas. The course will cover literatures on financial reform, public goods provision, foreign trade and investment, agriculture, corruption, business groups, and regulatory development. Where possible we will draw comparisons with the economic experiences of other East Asian nations as well as other post-communist states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 5:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Asian Cities in Comparative Perspectives
AS.191.314 (01)

The postwar era marked the rise of Asian cities. Not only do Asian cities host more than half of the world urban population, the majority of world megacities are also located in Asia. Notwithstanding its unprecedented scope and speed, an urbanizing Asia also offers fascinating alternative routes to prosperity outside the Western world. How did Tokyo rise from the ashes of war to be the global hub of trade and technology? How did Singapore and Hong Kong transform themselves from small towns to global metropolises? Why do we see fewer slums in Beijing than in New York? To engage these critical questions of cities, students in this course will pursue two modes of comparison: comparisons between newly-developed Asian cities and early capitalist cities in the West and comparisons among Asian cities. The material in this course will mainly discuss cities in East Asia and Southeast Asia. Nonetheless, students are welcome to draw examples from Western and Central Asia in discussions and assignments. Part I of the course introduces key concepts and major theories on cities and urbanization. Through problematizing familiar concepts like urbanism, urbanization, development, and slum, students will develop a critical understanding of concepts that might be taken for granted in everyday conversation. Part II moves to more empirically-grounded discussions of Asian cities. Each week, we will study a set of cities under a particular theme, where students will learn to apply but also challenge the concepts and theories that we learned in Part I. We will explore a wide range of topics that are central to development in Asian cities, including developmentalism, neoliberalism, city-states, authoritarianism, uneven development, and globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Zeng, Nanxi
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Economic Growth and Development in East Asia
AS.192.225 (01)

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China
AS.230.233 (01)

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Liang, Guowei
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Coffee, Tea and Empires
AS.230.239 (01)

The course introduces the transformation of the coffee and tea industries in the long nineteenth century against the backdrop of European and Japanese colonial expansion. It surveys the social changes in the colonial world under the development of the cash crop economy. It also analyzes how the consumption of such caffeinated beverages became sources of heritage makings both in the metropoles and colonies and the latter's postcolonial reconstructions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Contemporary Sinophone Literature and Film
AS.300.328 (01)

A survey of contemporary literature and film from the peripheries of the Chinese-speaking world, with a special focus on Hong Kong, Taiwan, and overseas Chinese communities in Southeast Asia, the Americas, and Europe. We will not only examine literary and filmic works in the contexts of the layered histories and contested politics of these locations, but will also reexamine, in light of those works, critical concepts in literary and cultural studies including, but not limited to, form, ideology, hegemony, identity, history, agency, translation, and (post)colonialism. All readings are in English; all films subtitled in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern East Asian Literatures Across Boundaries
AS.300.330 (01)

Modern literature in East Asia is as much defined by creation of national boundaries as by their transgressions, negotiations, and reimaginations. This course examines literature originally written in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean in light of contemporary understandings of political, social, and cultural boundary demarcation and crossings. How do experiences of border-crossing create and/or alter literary forms? How, in turn, does literature inscribe, displace, and/or dismantle boundaries? Our readings will include, but not limited to, writings by intra- and trans-regional travelers, exiles, migrants, and settlers; stories from and on contested borderlands and islands (e.g. Manchuria, Okinawa, Jeju); and works and translations by bilingual authors. All readings are provided in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy
AS.310.305 (01)

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, Marvin C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

First Year Classical Chinese: Philosophers, Poets and Fantasists: An Introduction to Chinese Literature in the Original Classical Texts
AS.310.316 (01)

We will read arguments, anecdotes and stories, beginning with the philosophers of the ancient period, including the imaginative paradigms of the Daoist writer Zhuangzi, and continue with the strange writings allied with shamanism and goddess-worship. We will continue with the fantastical writers of the medieval world and finish with anecdotes of the strange from the Ming and Qing. Because this is a language as well as a literature class, in addition to literary content and social history as background, we will emphasize grammar and vocabulary. Class preparation will require language exercises, translations, readings in English and there will be a final translation/research paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Cass, Victoria B
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Digital Games in East Asia and Beyond
AS.310.317 (01)

This course explores different ways to engage with digital games as an object of academic inquiry. We will discuss the history and culture of digital games, their place and significance in contemporary society, as well as the experience they provide through novel narrative structures. Geographically, the primary focus is East Asia, but due to the transnational nature of digital games, the course will also at times look at other areas, especially North America. Students will design their own research projects and participate actively in shaping the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 7:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The History and Culture of North Korea
AS.310.323 (01)

This course investigates the history and culture of North Korea. In doing so, the class seeks to address topics not often discussed in the media and eschew a focus on international relations and security issues. Course material include conventional scholarship, political tracts, biographies, movies, as well as works of fiction. For the final project, students will write a research paper on a topic of their choice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies
AS.310.432 (01)

This course is the continuation of Senior Thesis Course AS.360.431 for students completing their thesis in the East Asian Studies program.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Foreign at Home: Asian Scientists at Johns Hopkins
AS.365.104 (06)

Today Johns Hopkins prides itself on its diverse body of scholars, doctors, and researchers. This course will follow scientists from East Asia who decided to make Johns Hopkins University their home. We will follow their professional trajectories, explore their struggles with international politics, and examine the effects of their “Asian” identity on their ability to conduct research. As a Freshman Seminar, the course will emphasize the acquisition of academic skills including navigating university resources, formulating research questions and hypotheses, structuring and writing a research paper, and presenting research findings in a public setting.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Frumer, Yulia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Heritage Chinese II
AS.373.112 (01)

For students who have significant previously-acquired ability to understand and speak Modern Standard Chinese. Course focuses on reading and writing. Teaching materials are the same as used in AS.373.115-116; however, both traditional and simplified versions of written Chinese characters are used. Lab required. Continuation of AS.373.111. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.111 or permission required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Heritage Chinese II
AS.373.112 (02)

For students who have significant previously-acquired ability to understand and speak Modern Standard Chinese. Course focuses on reading and writing. Teaching materials are the same as used in AS.373.115-116; however, both traditional and simplified versions of written Chinese characters are used. Lab required. Continuation of AS.373.111. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.111 or permission required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese II
AS.373.116 (01)

Introductory course in Modern Standard Chinese. Goals: mastery of elements of pronunciation and control of basic vocabulary of 800-900 words and most basic grammatical patterns. Students work first with Pin-Yin system, then with simplified version of written Chinese characters. Continuation of AS.373.115. Note: Student with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.115 or permission required.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese II
AS.373.116 (02)

Introductory course in Modern Standard Chinese. Goals: mastery of elements of pronunciation and control of basic vocabulary of 800-900 words and most basic grammatical patterns. Students work first with Pin-Yin system, then with simplified version of written Chinese characters. Continuation of AS.373.115. Note: Student with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.115 or permission required.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese II
AS.373.116 (03)

Introductory course in Modern Standard Chinese. Goals: mastery of elements of pronunciation and control of basic vocabulary of 800-900 words and most basic grammatical patterns. Students work first with Pin-Yin system, then with simplified version of written Chinese characters. Continuation of AS.373.115. Note: Student with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.115 or permission required.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Heritage Chinese II
AS.373.212 (01)

For students who have significant previously-acquired ability to understand and speak Modern Standard Chinese. Course focuses on reading and writing. Teaching materials are the same as used in AS.373.115-116; however, both traditional and simplified versions of written Chinese characters are used. Continuation of AS.373.211. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.211 or permission required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese II
AS.373.216 (01)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.215 or Permission Required. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese II
AS.373.216 (02)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.215 or Permission Required. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Heritage Chinese II
AS.373.314 (01)

This course is a continuation of AS.373.313. Students need to have native-level fluency in speaking and understanding Chinese. The course focuses on reading and writing. In addition to the textbooks, downloaded articles on current affairs may also be included on a regular basis. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.313 or Permission Required. Lab required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Chinese II
AS.373.316 (01)

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible, and written assignments will be given. Continuation of AS.373.315. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.315 or permission required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Chinese II
AS.373.316 (02)

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible, and written assignments will be given. Continuation of AS.373.315. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.315 or permission required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fourth Year Chinese II
AS.373.416 (01)

Continuation of AS.373.415. Readings in modern Chinese prose, including outstanding examples of literature, newspaper articles, etc. Students should understand most of the readings with the aid of a dictionary, so that class discussion need not focus primarily on detailed explanations of grammar. Discussion, to be conducted in Chinese, will concentrate on the cultural significance of the readings' content. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.415 or Permission Required. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese II
AS.378.116 (01)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the fall term, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 60 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in 2nd year Japanese. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese II
AS.378.116 (02)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the fall term, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 60 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in 2nd year Japanese. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese II
AS.378.116 (03)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the fall term, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 60 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in 2nd year Japanese. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Japanese II
AS.378.216 (01)

Continuation of Beginning Japanese and Intermediate Japanese I. Training in spoken and written language, increasing students' knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Lab required. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.215 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Japanese II
AS.378.216 (02)

Continuation of Beginning Japanese and Intermediate Japanese I. Training in spoken and written language, increasing students' knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Lab required. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.215 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Japanese II
AS.378.316 (01)

Emphasis shifts toward reading, while development of oral-aural skills also continues apace. The course presents graded readings in expository prose and requires students to expand their knowledge of Kanji, grammar, and both spoken and written vocabulary. Lab required. Continuation of AS.378.315. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.315 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Korean II
AS.380.102 (01)

Focuses on improving speaking fluency to Limited Proficiency so that one can handle simple daily conversations with confidence. It provides basic high-frequency structures and covers Korean holidays. Continuation of AS.380.101. Recommended Course Background: AS.380.101 or permission required.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Lee, Aimee, Lee, Soo Yun
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Korean II
AS.380.202 (01)

Aims for improving writing skills with correct spelling. Reading materials of Korean people, places, and societies will enhance cultural understanding and awareness, including discussion on family tree. Continuation of AS.380.201. Recommended Course Background: AS.380.201 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Lee, Aimee, Lee, Soo Yun
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Korean II
AS.380.302 (01)

Emphasizes reading literacy in classic and modern Korean prose. By reading Korean newspapers and professional articles in one’s major, it enables one to be well-versed and truly literate. Continuation of AS.380.301. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies Prerequisite: AS.380.301 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lee, Giseung, Lee, Soo Yun
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.165 (01)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (02)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (03)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (04)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (05)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (06)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (07)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.235 (01)Power and Pleasure in Asian America: Race and Law in CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMChua, Jilene Chan HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.246 (01)Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and ExchangesMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMGalasi, Francis INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaRowe, William T HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William T INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.140.146 (01)History of Public Health in East AsiaMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMHanson, Marta INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.176 (01)Public Health in East Asia Through Films & DocumentariesTh 6:30PM - 7:30PMHanson, Marta 
AS.180.210 (01)Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EUTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraShaffer 3INST-ECON
AS.190.341 (01)Korean PoliticsW 7:00PM - 9:30PMChung, Erin INST-CP
AS.190.347 (01)A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st CenturyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDavid, Steven R POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.370 (01)Chinese PoliticsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMYasuda, John Kojiro POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.190.389 (01)China's Political EconomyTh 5:00PM - 7:30PMYasuda, John Kojiro POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.191.314 (01)Asian Cities in Comparative PerspectivesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMZeng, Nanxi INST-CP
AS.192.225 (01)Economic Growth and Development in East AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraShaffer 3INST-ECON
AS.230.233 (01)Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary ChinaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLiang, Guowei INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.239 (01)Coffee, Tea and EmpiresTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.300.328 (01)Contemporary Sinophone Literature and FilmWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMHashimoto, Satoru INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.330 (01)Modern East Asian Literatures Across BoundariesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, Satoru INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.305 (01)Southeast Asia and US Security StrategyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, Marvin C INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.316 (01)First Year Classical Chinese: Philosophers, Poets and Fantasists: An Introduction to Chinese Literature in the Original Classical TextsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMCass, Victoria B 
AS.310.317 (01)Digital Games in East Asia and BeyondW 7:00PM - 9:30PMKim, Nuri 
AS.310.323 (01)The History and Culture of North KoreaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKim, Nuri INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, Gaochao INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.310.432 (01)Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian StudiesM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, Joel 
AS.365.104 (06)Foreign at Home: Asian Scientists at Johns HopkinsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFrumer, Yulia 
AS.373.112 (01)First Year Heritage Chinese IIMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMZhao, Nan 
AS.373.112 (02)First Year Heritage Chinese IIMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMZhao, Nan 
AS.373.116 (01)First Year Chinese IIMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMYang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan 
AS.373.116 (02)First Year Chinese IIMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMYang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan 
AS.373.116 (03)First Year Chinese IIMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMYang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan 
AS.373.212 (01)Second Year Heritage Chinese IIMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMYang, Shuyi 
AS.373.216 (01)Second Year Chinese IIMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMWang, Qian 
AS.373.216 (02)Second Year Chinese IIMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 11:00AM - 11:50AMWang, Qian 
AS.373.314 (01)Third Year Heritage Chinese IIMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMChen, Aiguo 
AS.373.316 (01)Third Year Chinese IIMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMChen, Aiguo 
AS.373.316 (02)Third Year Chinese IIMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMChen, Aiguo 
AS.373.416 (01)Fourth Year Chinese IIMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMChen, Aiguo 
AS.378.116 (01)First Year Japanese IIMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko 
AS.378.116 (02)First Year Japanese IIMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko 
AS.378.116 (03)First Year Japanese IIMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko 
AS.378.216 (01)Second Year Japanese IIMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMNakao, Makiko Pennington 
AS.378.216 (02)Second Year Japanese IIMTWThF 12:00PM - 12:50PMNakao, Makiko Pennington 
AS.378.316 (01)Third Year Japanese IIMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMNakao, Makiko Pennington 
AS.380.102 (01)First Year Korean IIMTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AMLee, Aimee, Lee, Soo Yun 
AS.380.202 (01)Second Year Korean IIMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMLee, Aimee, Lee, Soo Yun 
AS.380.302 (01)Third Year Korean IIMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMLee, Giseung, Lee, Soo Yun