Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Political Economy of Climate Change
AS.191.347 (01)

Scientists tell us that continued reliance on fossil fuels to drive our economies causes global warming, which in turn poses an existential threat to humanity as we know it. But the major tools of societies to steer a clean energy transition—climate and energy policies—often fail, lack ambition, and vary widely from country to country. This is puzzling: Why is it so difficult to pass meaningful policies even though the stakes are so high? How to explain the varying responses to the same problem? In this course, students study the struggle over energy and climate policies through case studies of large industrialized countries. Besides other things, we will ask why the US failed to install any kind of meaningful climate policy, if and how the problems of the EU’s carbon market can be solved, why China cancelled over 100 coal-fired power plants in 2017, and why cloudy Germany became a solar energy powerhouse.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Kupzok, Nils
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-CP, INST-ECON, INST-IR

Science and Science Fiction in Global Perspective
AS.140.423 (01)

What can we learn from science fiction about the history of science and technology? What ideas about science do Sci-Fi novels manifest? Is the relationship between science and science fiction always the same, across different time periods and geographical areas? This course will explore these questions by taking a comparative perspective. Each meeting we will read a Sci-Fi novel from Europe, America, South and East Asia, and discuss it in conjunction with historical writing about relevant scientific developments. Reading Sci-Fi novels from 17th-century Germany, 19th-century England and India, and 20th-century Japan, China, Korea and the US, the students will explore how actual scientific developments were reflected in fiction, and what fictional depictions say about the aspirations and anxieties provoked by new technologies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Frumer, Yulia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Precarity in South Korea through TV and Film:Aesthetics and everyday life
AS.070.389 (01)

This seminar explores how precarity in South Korea gains expression in the medium of TV and film. In particular, this seminar will focus on how the moving image brings the viewer into the texture of everyday life. We will focus on the TV show Misaeng and include films such as Parasite and Burning. TV and film will be paired with readings on the transformations of intimate life in contemporary South Korea and comparative work on precarity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Han, Clara
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

America after the Civil Rights Movement
AS.100.301 (01)

This course explores the history of late twentieth-century America by examining the social, economic, and political legacies of 1960s civil rights protest for the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Connolly, Nathan D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/50
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

A survey of the history of China from the late Qing era to the early People’s Republic.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Women & Modern Chinese History
AS.100.424 (01)

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Historiography of Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

A survey of assumptions and approaches in the study of modern Chinese history, as written by Chinese, Japanese, and Western historians.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Politics of the Korean Diaspora
AS.190.337 (01)

This seminar explores some of the core questions in the study of citizenship, migration, and racial and ethnic politics through the lens of Korean diasporic populations in the United States, Japan, China, and the former Soviet Union. We will examine how immigration, citizenship, and minority policies have structured and constrained the relationship of Korean communities to both the receiving and sending states. As a diasporic group, is there a collective self-identification among members of Korean communities that transcends territorial, hemispheric, linguistic, and cultural differences? Or is the Korean ethnic identity more a reflection of racial and ethnic politics in the receiving society? What factors determine the assimilability of a particular group at a given historical moment?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Business, Finance, and Government in E. Asia
AS.190.348 (01)

Business, Finance, and Government in East Asia explores the dynamics of East Asia's economic growth (and crises) over the last fifty years. We will examine Japan's post-war development strategy, the Asian tiger economies, and China's dramatic rise. Centered on case studies of major corporations, this course examines the interplay between politics and economics in East Asia, and considers the following questions: How have businesses navigated East Asia’s complex market environment? In what ways can the state foster economic development? How has the financial system been organized to facilitate investment? What are the long-term prospects for growth in the region?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

North Korea, Identity, and International Politics
AS.191.359 (01)

This course analyzes the role of identity and foreign policy in contemporary North Korea. We begin with an overview of North Korea's political economic development and the role of national identity in state formation. We will then use those concepts to explore North Korea's relations with South Korea, China, and the United States through topics such as regime security, nuclear weapons, human rights, and social change. The course ties together academic literature, journalistic sources, and policy research with in-class activities and writing assignments. It is recommended that students have taken a survey course on International Relations (e.g., Global Security Politics, Contemporary International Politics).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Draudt, Darcie Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

First Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.111 (02)

This course is designed for students who were raised in an environment in which Chinese is spoken by parents or guardians at home and for those who are familiar with the language and possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course therefore focuses on reading and writing (including the correct use of grammar). Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (01)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Students may choose to attend either lecture at 12pm or 3pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

5th Year Chinese
AS.373.491 (01)

Fifth Year Chinese is designed for students who finished fourth year regular or third year heritage Chinese course at JHU or its equivalent and wish to achieve a higher advanced proficiency level in Chinese. The goal of the course is to help students further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills cohesively and to enhance students’ understanding of Chinese culture and society through language learning.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fourth Year Chinese
AS.373.415 (01)

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.316 with a C+ or above (or equivalent). Readings in modern Chinese prose, including outstanding examples of literature, newspaper articles, etc. Students are supposed to be able to understand most of the readings with the aid of a dictionary, so that class discussion is not focused primarily on detailed explanation of grammar. Discussion, to be conducted in Chinese, will concentrate on the cultural significance of the readings' content. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.313 (01)

This course is designed for those who have already taken AS.373.212 or equivalent. Students need to have native-level fluency in speaking and understanding Chinese. The course focuses on reading and writing. In addition to the textbooks, downloaded articles on current affairs may also be introduced on a regular basis. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese
AS.373.215 (02)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Chinese
AS.373.315 (01)

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible and written assignments will be given. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (01)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Student may choose to attend either lecture at 10:30 am or 12 pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM, MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

China, Human Rights, and U.S. Policy Responses
AS.310.302 (01)

This seminar explores select human rights issues in China (e.g., human rights impacts of the management of COVID-19, the Hong Kong protests, mass detentions/forced labor in Xinjiang province) and the extraterritorial reach of China’s human rights challenges. As a practice and policy-oriented course, we will also investigate different responses and actions taken by the U.S. government and Congress, including hearings, legislation, reports, statements, etc. Class assignments include advocacy for Chinese prisoners of conscience (each student will “adopt” one currently detained PoC), and written work that mirrors real-world writing. We’ll also have several human rights advocates and experts visit the class to share their experiences and insights. This seminar explores select human rights issues in China (e.g., human rights impacts of the management of COVID-19, the Hong Kong protests, mass detentions/forced labor in Xinjiang province) and the extraterritorial reach of China’s human rights challenges. As a practice and policy-oriented course, we will also investigate different responses and actions taken by the U.S. government and Congress, including hearings, legislation, reports, statements, etc. Class assignments include advocacy for Chinese prisoners of conscience (each student will “adopt” one currently detained PoC), and written work that mirrors real-world writing. We’ll also have several human rights advocates and experts visit the class to share their experiences and insights.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Worden, Andrea Joan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Korean History Through Film and Literature
AS.310.322 (01)

In this course, students will engage with select topics in Korean history from premodern and modern times and examine how the past has been represented through various forms of film and literature. This will be combined with readings of academic articles to allow students to gauge the distance between scholarship and cultural expressions of history. Through this, students will be introduced to the highly contested and often polarizing nature of Korean history and the competition surrounding historical memory. Prior coursework in East Asian Studies strongly recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 7:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Korean History and Culture
AS.310.106 (01)

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history and culture from ancient times to the modern era. Through primary, secondary, and audio-visual sources, students will become familiar not only with the overall contours of the entirety of Korean history, but also with its cultural and religious legacy. The course combines lectures and class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Third Year Chinese
AS.373.315 (02)

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible and written assignments will be given. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Aiguo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Chinese Revolutions
AS.230.175 (01)

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Fourth Year Japanese
AS.378.415 (01)

By using four skills in participatory activities (reading, writing, presentation, and discussion), students will develop reading skills in modern Japanese and deepen and enhance their knowledge on Kanji and Japanese culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.315 and AS.378.316 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Katagiri, Satoko
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (03)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Students may choose to attend either lecture at 12pm or 3pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.111 (01)

This course is designed for students who were raised in an environment in which Chinese is spoken by parents or guardians at home and for those who are familiar with the language and possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course therefore focuses on reading and writing (including the correct use of grammar). Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Heritage Chinese
AS.373.211 (01)

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.112 with C+ and above (or equivalent). Students in this course possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course focuses on reading and writing. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (03)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Student may choose to attend either lecture at 10:30 am or 12 pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Chinese
AS.373.115 (02)

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Students may choose to attend either lecture at 12pm or 3pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Yang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Third Year Japanese
AS.378.315 (01)

Emphasis shifts toward reading, while development of oral-aural skills also continues apace. The course presents graded readings in expository prose and requires students to expand their knowledge of Kanji, grammar, and both spoken and written vocabulary. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Korean
AS.380.201 (01)

Aims for improving oral proficiency and confident control of grammar with vocabulary building and correct spelling intended. Reading materials of Korean people, places, and societies will enhance cultural understanding and awareness. Project due on Korean cities. Existing demonstrable skills in spoken Korean preferred.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Lee, Soo Yun
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Japanese
AS.378.215 (01)

Training in spoken and written language, increasing their knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115 and AS.378.116 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Transwar Japanese and Japanophone Literatures
AS.300.341 (01)

A survey of Japanese and Japanese- language literatures produced in Japan and its (former)colonies during the “transwar” period, or the several years before and after the end of WWII. This periodization enables us to take into account the shifting boundaries, sovereignties, and identities amid the intensification of Japanese imperialism and in the aftermath of its eventual demise. We aim to pay particular attention to voices marginalized in this political watershed, such as those of Japanese-language writers from colonial Korea and Taiwan, intra-imperial migrants, and radical critics of Japan’s “postwar” regime. Underlying our investigation is the question of whether literature can be an agent of justice when politics fails to deliver it. We will introduce secondary readings by Adorno, Arendt, Levinas, Derrida, and Scarry, among others, to help us interrogate this question. All readings are in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Third Year Korean
AS.380.301 (01)

Emphasizes reading literacy in classic and modern Korean prose, from easy essays to difficult short stories. Vocabulary refinement and native-like grasp of grammar explored. Project due on Korean culture. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lee, Soo Yun
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Korean
AS.380.101 (01)

Introduces the Korean alphabet, hangeul. Covers basic elements of the Korean language, high-frequency words and phrases, including cultural aspects. Focuses on oral fluency reaching Limited Proficiency where one can handle simple daily conversations. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Lee, Soo Yun
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Capitalism, Development, and Resistance in South Korea
AS.230.229 (01)

This course examines the origins, processes, and consequences of economic development in South Korea. Attention will be paid to the rise of big business, strong state, and contentious society in the post-1945 period. The first part of the course focuses on the academic debates on Korea's economic miracle and introduces theories of late development and state formation. The second part of the course explores labor unrest and social conflicts that have emerged in response to capitalist development in twentieth and twenty-first century Korea.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kang, Minhyoung
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Fourth Year Korean
AS.380.401 (01)

This course is designed for those who have finished AS 380.302 or beyond advanced mid level of competency in Korean in four skills. By dealing with various topics on authentic materials including news, articles on websites, short stories, this course aims to help students enhance not only linguistics knowledge and skills, but also current issues in Korea. It is expected that, by the end of the term, students will be able to discuss a variety of topics and express opinions fluently in both spoken and written language.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Lee, Soo Yun
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies
AS.310.431 (01)

Students may earn honors in the East Asian Studies major by maintaining a 3.7 average in the major and completing a senior thesis by taking the year-long AS.310.431 & AS.310.432 Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies. Students are required to secure the mentorship of an adviser among the EAS faculty before asking for permission to enroll in the course. Students who decide, after the fall semester, that they are unable to complete the senior thesis and who do not enroll for the spring will be graded S/U for the fall semester. Only students who complete the fall semester course will be permitted to enroll for the spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Chinese
AS.373.215 (01)

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Wang, Qian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

First Year Japanese
AS.378.115 (02)

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Student may choose to attend either lecture at 10:30 am or 12 pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/21
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fundamentals of Japanese Grammar
AS.378.396 (01)

This course is designed for students who have already studied 1st Year Japanese grammar and wish to develop a thorough knowledge of Japanese grammar in order to advance all aspects of language skills to a higher level. It is also appropriate for graduate students who need to be able to read materials written in Japanese. The goal of the course is to provide students with a thorough knowledge of Japanese grammar; therefore, knowledge of vocabulary (including kanji) in depth is not requisite. In addition, since this is not a language course that places equal focus on all four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading), there will be no conversation practice – this is a lecture course on grammar. 2 credits. Pass-fail grade option only

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 10:00AM - 11:40AM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Mayumi Yuki
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Second Year Japanese
AS.378.215 (02)

Training in spoken and written language, increasing their knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115 and AS.378.116 or equivalent.

  • Credits: 5.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Nakao, Makiko Pennington
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Urban China
AS.310.320 (01)

Urban China has gone through two major social transformations since 1949: the embrace of a central planning socialist system between early 1950s and late 70s, and the embrace of neo-liberal market economy in the so-call “socialism with Chinese characteristics” since 1980. While the political regime remains the same over time, many profound changes have occurred in economic life, social life, cultural life, spiritual life and civil life. What really happened in the social transformation of urban China? What would explain those changes? How did people in different walk of life deal with those huge and deep social transformation? To address these concerns, we will exam a list of issues. Topics includes changes in population and demographic characteristics, employment structure and job market, workplace and residential communities, income and wealth distributions, segregation impacts of urban household registration systems, urban consumption patterns, courting cultures and dressing codes, spiritual practices, and social mobility and social stratifications. In the realm of public policies, we will pay special attentions to the issues of transportation, housing, medical service, public education, social insurance, and environmental protection. We will also study the characteristics of contentious politics and how social conflicts of power, interest, justice, cultural and belief were processed in urban China.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.191.347 (01)The Political Economy of Climate ChangeTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMKupzok, Nils ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-CP, INST-ECON, INST-IR
AS.140.423 (01)Science and Science Fiction in Global PerspectiveT 3:00PM - 5:20PMFrumer, Yulia INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.070.389 (01)Precarity in South Korea through TV and Film:Aesthetics and everyday lifeW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHan, Clara INST-CP
AS.100.301 (01)America after the Civil Rights MovementConnolly, Nathan D HIST-US
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William T INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.424 (01)Women & Modern Chinese HistoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMeyer-Fong, Tobie INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography of Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William T INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.190.337 (01)Politics of the Korean DiasporaM 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, Erin INST-CP
AS.190.348 (01)Business, Finance, and Government in E. AsiaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMYasuda, John Kojiro INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.191.359 (01)North Korea, Identity, and International PoliticsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDraudt, Darcie Anne INST-CP
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.373.111 (02)First Year Heritage ChineseMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMZhao, Nan 
AS.373.115 (01)First Year ChineseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMYang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan 
AS.373.491 (01)5th Year ChineseTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZhao, Nan 
AS.373.415 (01)Fourth Year ChineseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMChen, Aiguo 
AS.373.313 (01)Third Year Heritage ChineseMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMChen, Aiguo 
AS.373.215 (02)Second Year ChineseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMWang, Qian 
AS.373.315 (01)Third Year ChineseMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMChen, Aiguo 
AS.378.115 (01)First Year JapaneseTTh 10:30AM - 11:20AM, MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko 
AS.310.302 (01)China, Human Rights, and U.S. Policy ResponsesTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMWorden, Andrea Joan INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.310.322 (01)Korean History Through Film and LiteratureW 7:00PM - 9:30PMKim, Nuri INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.106 (01)Introduction to Korean History and CultureTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKim, Nuri INST-GLOBAL
AS.373.315 (02)Third Year ChineseMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMChen, Aiguo 
AS.230.175 (01)Chinese RevolutionsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.378.415 (01)Fourth Year JapaneseTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKatagiri, Satoko 
AS.373.115 (03)First Year ChineseMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMYang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan 
AS.373.111 (01)First Year Heritage ChineseMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMZhao, Nan 
AS.373.211 (01)Second Year Heritage ChineseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMYang, Shuyi 
AS.378.115 (03)First Year JapaneseMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko 
AS.373.115 (02)First Year ChineseMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM, TTh 3:00PM - 3:50PMYang, Shuyi, Zhao, Nan 
AS.378.315 (01)Third Year JapaneseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMNakao, Makiko Pennington 
AS.380.201 (01)Second Year KoreanMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMLee, Soo Yun 
AS.378.215 (01)Second Year JapaneseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, TTh 10:30AM - 11:20AMNakao, Makiko Pennington 
AS.300.341 (01)Transwar Japanese and Japanophone LiteraturesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, Satoru INST-GLOBAL
AS.380.301 (01)Third Year KoreanMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMLee, Soo Yun 
AS.380.101 (01)First Year KoreanMTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AMLee, Soo Yun 
AS.230.229 (01)Capitalism, Development, and Resistance in South KoreaTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKang, Minhyoung INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.380.401 (01)Fourth Year KoreanTTh 1:30PM - 2:20PMLee, Soo Yun 
AS.310.431 (01)Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian StudiesM 1:30PM - 3:50PMAndreas, Joel 
AS.373.215 (01)Second Year ChineseMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMWang, Qian 
AS.378.115 (02)First Year JapaneseTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki, Katagiri, Satoko 
AS.378.396 (01)Fundamentals of Japanese GrammarW 10:00AM - 11:40AMJohnson, Mayumi Yuki 
AS.378.215 (02)Second Year JapaneseMTWThF 12:00PM - 12:50PMNakao, Makiko Pennington 
AS.310.320 (01)Sociology of Urban ChinaM 3:00PM - 5:30PMHe, Gaochao INST-CP