John Camp and Mindy Farber ’74 Endowed Award

The John Camp and Mindy Farber ’74 Endowed Award was created to support undergraduates conducting research in brain science, with preference given to students performing research related to brain cancers. The award grants approximately $4000 to each awardee will be administered annually by the Office of Undergraduate Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity.

The Inspiration Behind the John Camp and Mindy Farber ’74 Award:

In Memory of:

  • Jill Hollander Camp
  • Thomas Nicholas Campiglia
  • Rhonda Schneider Casas A&S ‘74
  • Edward Charles Schweitzer

John Camp and Mindy Farber, A&S ’74, have lost loved ones to brain conditions that were diagnosed in the apex of their lives. This award subsidizes undergraduate research aiming towards progress and breakthroughs in treating and eradicating deadly brain cancers. John and Mindy aspire to encourage creativity in the scientific work that will lead to hope and the saving of lives of those diagnosed with brain cancers in the future.

The years of 2018 and 2019 were difficult ones for John and Mindy. In 2018, John lost his first wife, Jill, to metastatic cancer. In that same year, Mindy Farber’s first husband, Ted (Edward) Schweitzer, perished from early-onset Alzheimer’s.

In 2019, Tom Campiglia, John’s identical twin brother, passed away from aggressive brain cancer. Hopkins alumna and Mindy’s former roommate and best friend, Rhonda Schneider Casas, A&S’74, also passed away from the very same glioblastoma as Tom.

In the wake of unimaginable loss, John and Mindy were inspired to create an award dedicated to their loved ones that would provide key funding to encourage novel research so that others diagnosed with brain diseases, and their friends and families, might have hope for their futures.

John Camp graduated with honors in economics from the University of Connecticut. He was a successful real estate developer in Maryland, Virginia and Delaware. Mindy Farber graduated with highest honors, Phi Beta Kappa from Johns Hopkins and was a Root Tilden Scholar at NYU Law School. She was a nationally known employment and labor attorney.