Current Fellows

2020-2021 AGHI Fellows

Zachary GartenbergZachary Gartenberg

BA in philosophy, JHU

zgarten1@jhu.edu

Biography

Zachary Gartenberg is a PhD candidate in philosophy at Johns Hopkins University. He received his BA in philosophy at Hopkins and spent three years as a PhD student in philosophy at Yale before returning to Hopkins to finish his doctorate.

Dissertation

After more than three-hundred years of interpreting the philosophy of Spinoza, commentators are often left puzzled by his use of important metaphysical concepts whose role he neglects to spell out. One such concept, ‘expression’ (derived from the Latin transitive verb exprimere), shows up repeatedly in Spinoza’s philosophy. The range of contexts in which expression is invoked reveals its far-reaching scope. And because it is so closely tied to Spinoza’s characterizations of the essences of God and modes (finite things which depend for their essence and existence on God’s essence), an adequate understanding of expression could uniquely illuminate his foundational views on essence and being. Hence, the driving question of my project is: Can we recover a unified account of expression in Spinoza?

I head my approach to this question with an examination of the connection between expression and Spinoza’s preeminent relations of metaphysical dependence: conception, causation, and inherence. Through this inquiry, I argue, we discover an intimate association between what it means for one thing to ‘express’ another thing, and what it means for one thing to be ‘conceived’ — understood or explained — through another thing.

In this way, Spinoza’s account of expression has a great deal to teach us about the character of his rationalism, the view that there is an explanation for every fact. Developing Spinoza’s thought along these lines involves, in the end, uncovering Spinoza’s position on whether expression is “brute,” i.e., whether one thing’s expressing another is to be regarded as a fact that cannot be explained. If there is any sense in which the answer to this question is affirmative, then Spinoza — widely regarded as the arch-rationalist among early modern philosophers — espouses a more mitigated form of rationalism than is typically supposed. As readers of Spinoza and historians of early modern thought, I contend, we would be well-served by getting clear on this question.


Ghazal AsifGhazal Asif

MA in Social Sciences, University of Chicago

gasif1@jhu.edu

Biography

Ghazal Asif is a PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University Department of Anthropology. Before arriving at Hopkins, she completed an M.A. from the University of Chicago and a B.A. from LUMS, Pakistan.

Dissertation

Ghazal Asif’s research examines minority rights and gendered practices of emplacement and belonging that decenter the nation-state, broadly defined. Drawing on the case of the Hindu religious minority in Muslim-majority Pakistan, her dissertation argues that multivocal histories of religion among minority Hindu women in Muslim-majority Pakistan enable creative responses to the vicissitudes of contemporary minority identity and the secular political imagination. Yet at the same time, these traditions also engender ethical conundrums by pitting different visions of collective futures and emancipatory relationships against one another. While the state conceives of minority rights as gifts of hospitality, Pakistani Hindus coopt or challenge these gifts in creative ways to articulate belonging on their own terms, despite the ever-present possibility of failure or unsalutary repercussions. In dialogue with history, gender studies, critical legal studies, political theory, and literary theory, her work theorizes the ways in which communities on the margins of power participate in economies of effect so as to remain oriented towards a hopeful political future. Ghazal’s writing has been published in South Asia and Political and Legal Anthropology Review (PoLAR).


Royce Best

Royce Best 

MA in English, JHU and the University of Tennessee

BA in English and in Classical Civilization, Ohio University

rbest5@jhu.edu

Biography

Royce Best is a PhD candidate in the English Department. He focuses on Shakespeare, disability studies, and early modern literature in his scholarship and teaching. His peer-reviewed articles appear in Disability Studies Quarterly, Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Theatre Research, and The George Eliot Review. Royce received MAs in English from Johns Hopkins University and the University of Tennessee. He also holds a BA in English and Classical Civilization from Ohio University.

Dissertation

My dissertation, Crip Estrangement: Shakespeare, Disability, Metatheatre, explores how disabled characters in Shakespeare trouble the way that other characters understand reality, while also metatheatrically staging the means by which this discommodity is achieved for theatregoers to observe. Moments like these ones stem from two concurrent historical phenomena. The English Reformation during the early Tudor period led to the dismantling of the Roman Catholic Church’s systems of almsgiving and charity, which caused disabled people to be re-aligned with the categories of wonder and monstrosity in the cultural imagination. Meanwhile, metatheatrical devices recycled from medieval drama became fashionable in English popular drama shortly after the first public theaters were opened in the 1560s and 1570s. The combination of these two self-referential phenomena into single instances in Shakespearean drama results in moments that I call “crip estrangement,” which are centrally important to early modern disability studies because they frame, focus, and muddle the encounter with disability as readable junctures that expose the protocols of both mimetic representation and dramatic phenomenology in the period. My dissertation, therefore, brings explicit attention to the intersections of form, performance and embodiment, and builds upon prominent discussions of early modern disability in works focused on drama (Row-Heyveld), monstrosity and norming influences (Bearden), and other aspects of Renaissance culture (Hobgood, Wood, Iyengar). Moreover, because the history of disabled embodiment features fluctuating sets of definitions and associations across time, my project helps make sense of the vexed treatment that these scenes have received across theatre history, and what these responses indicate for the history of disability.


Ayah NuriddinAyah Nuriddin

BA in International Studies (International Peace and Conflict Resolution) and History from American University

MA in History and in Library Science, University of Maryland, College Park

anuridd1@jhmi.edu

Biography

Ayah Nuriddin is a Ph.D. Candidate in History of Medicine. She received a BA in International Studies (International Peace and Conflict Resolution) and History from American University in 2009. She received a dual Masters in History and Library Science from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2014. She was also a Graduate Fellow in the Center for Medical Humanities and Social Medicine​ at Johns Hopkins University in 2017-2018 and a Dissertation Fellow at the Consortium for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine (CHSTM) in 2018-2019.

Dissertation

My dissertation analyzes black eugenics, which I define as a hereditarian approach to racial uplift that emphasized social reform, reproductive control, and public health as strategies of biological racial improvement. It emerged from a longer tradition of black political organizing for racial equality and the beginnings of black engagement with medicine and science, especially as greater educational opportunities became available in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I argue that black eugenics is a set of iterations of black engagement with racial science and hereditarian thought across the twentieth century. African American physicians, biologists, social scientists, and others across different social strata mobilized a form of eugenics without racism to argue for racial equality. Using a broad set of archival material, institutional records, African American periodicals, and African American newspapers, this dissertation will track the evolution and transformation of black eugenics, and its relationship to black politics.


Franziska StrackFranziska Strack

MA in Political Science, Freie Universität Berlin
fstrack1@jhu.edu

Biography

Franziska Strack is a doctoral candidate in the Political Science Department. She holds an MA in Political Science from Freie Universität Berlin and a BA in Cultural Studies/Social Science from Humboldt Universität Berlin. Her current research focuses on the role of sound in conceptions of the political, examining both the musical tropes in prominent political philosophies and the socio-political dimensions of sound studies literature.

Dissertation

My dissertation offers a sonic perspective on the political. Specifically, it develops a theoretical vocabulary for the affective, corporal, and nonhuman dimensions of communicative interactions. The dissertation creates this vocabulary using an interdisciplinary approach. It highlights how distinct sonic figures (such as rhythm, song, voice, or vibration) have been employed in various traditions in the history of political philosophy to describe the world and the individual’s place in it, and it puts those descriptions in conversation with sound studies literature. Bringing together musical, linguistic, and infra/ultrasonic terms under the umbrella of sound in this way, my dissertation proposes a model of communication which emerges from constant exchanges between deliberate articulations and affective flows that pursue bodies before being consciously recognized. It thereby configures speech as one type of expression amongst many other (nonlinguistic) modes of articulation and acknowledges the involvement of nonhuman agents in communicative processes. With this model, the dissertation challenges logocentric notions of subjectivity, power, and collectivity, and complicates dominant responses to ethico-political events by including worldly noises in the creation of intimate modes of belonging.


Xiaoqian Ji Xiaoqian Ji

MA in East Asian Studies, Columbia University
xji8@jhu.edu

Biography

Xiaoqian Ji is a PhD candidate in the Department of History. Before arriving at Johns Hopkins, she completed an MA in East Asian Studies at Columbia University and a BA in Chinese literature at Peking University.

Dissertation

My dissertation uses a single class of objects – cosmetics – to connect material culture, medicine, gender, and the senses and to explore patterns of consumption and trade, the transmission and production of knowledge, and technologies of gender in China from the late 16th century to the early 19th century. First, I integrate cosmetics into the study of global exchanges, connecting consumption in Ming and Qing China to the early modern world. Second, I explain how medical and craft knowledge associated with cosmetics entered into vernacular culture. Third, I demonstrate that cosmetics enabled individuals to perform gender identities.