Events

If you would like your event to be posted on this calendar, please use our event request form. If you would like AGHI to co-sponsor your event, please use the co-sponsorship request form.

Oct
22
Tue
Materializing Relationships:Embodying Absent Kinships in Japanese Child Welfare
Oct 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Homewood Campus, Mergenthaler 266

Materializing Relationships: Embodying Absent Kinships in Japanese Child Welfare

Co-Sponsored with the East Asian Studies Speakers Series  

Kathryn Goldfarb, University of Colorado, Boulder

History of the Book in the Renaissance Lecture Series – SONJA DRIMMER
Oct 22 @ 5:15 pm Macksey Seminar Room, Room 2043, M-level, Brody Learning Commons,
Italian Graduate Student Lecture with Audrey Fastuca and Alberto Zuliani
Oct 22 @ 5:15 pm – 7:00 pm Gilman Hall 479

Title: Dissertation in Progress: How Southern Italy Became Europe’s Other Angelic Speech in Dante’s Divine Comedy

Brad Leithauser and James Arthur: A Faculty Reading
Oct 22 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Gilman 50

Brad Leithauser joined the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars faculty in 2008, having taught at Amherst College, the School of the Arts at Columbia University, and, for 21 years, Mount Holyoke College. His most recent novel is The Promise of Elsewhere (Knopf, 2019). Leithauser’s other books include six collections of poetry, six novels, and various volumes that fall out of the usual categories. A MacArthur Fellow from 1983 to 1988, he was inducted into the Order of the Falcon by the President of Iceland in 2005 for his service in promoting Icelandic literature.

James Arthur was born in Connecticut and grew up in Canada. He is the author of the poetry collection The Suicide’s Son (Véhicule Press 2019) and Charms Against Lightning (Copper Canyon Press 2012). Arthur’s poems have appeared in The New YorkerPoetry, The New York Review of Books, and The London Review of Books. He has received the Amy Lowell Travelling Poetry Scholarship, a Hodder Fellowship, a Stegner Fellowship, a Discovery/The Nation Prize, a Fulbright Scholarship to Northern Ireland, and a visiting fellowship at Exeter College, Oxford. He teaches at Johns Hopkins University.

This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
23
Wed
“Engaged Humanities” Speaker Series: Dr. Stéphane Martelly
Oct 23 @ 12:00 pm Malone Hall, 107
Year One: A Lecture by Susan Buck-Morss
Oct 23 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm Gilman 208

The graduate students of the Department of Comparative Thought and Literature present a lecture and a seminar by Susan Buck-Morss, Distinguished Professor at CUNY Graduate Center and Jan Rock Zubrow Professor Emerita of Government at Cornell University.

Lecture: YEAR ONE
October 23, 2019, 4:15 pm
Gilman 208

Seminar
October 24, 2019, 10 am – 12 pm
Gilman 208

GREAT TALK – BALTIMORE: NOT JUST AN AMERICAN CITY
Oct 23 @ 7:00 pm The Baltimore Museum of Industry
Oct
24
Thu
Seminar by Susan Buck-Morss
Oct 24 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm Gilman 208

The graduate students of the Department of Comparative Thought and Literature present a lecture and a seminar by Susan Buck-Morss, Distinguished Professor at CUNY Graduate Center and Jan Rock Zubrow Professor Emerita of Government at Cornell University

Seminar
October 24, 2019, 10 am – 12 pm
Gilman 208

Lecture: YEAR ONE
October 23, 2019, 4:15 pm
Gilman 208

T&S Lecture – “O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified!”: On the Incapability of Groundlings” Ellen MacKay, University of Chicago @ 130D Gilman Hall
Oct 24 @ 4:00 pm – 5:45 pm

The English Department presents a Tudor and Stuart Lecture by Ellen MacKay, University of Chicago, on Thursday, October 24th at 4:00 PM in 130D Gilman Hall. The title of the talk is “O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified!”: On the Incapability of Groundlings.”

Classics Lecture: Barbara Graziosi (Princeton): “Sappho, Networked”
Oct 24 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm Gilman 108 (Classics seminar room)

Sappho, Networked

A lecture by Barbara Grazioso, Professor of Classics, Princeton University

Two images of Sappho dominate scholarly discussions of her work: the poet as chorus leader, immersed in the ritual life of her community and engaged in the here-and-now of performance (e.g. Calame 1977, Lardinois 2014) and Sappho the introspective author of poetry ‘written for a woman to sing to herself’ (Stehle 1997: 295). This paper proposes a new approach to Sappho’s work based on the concept of the network, understood as ‘a system of interconnected people and things’. Building on recent insights on the pragmatics of Sappho’s songs (D’Alessio, 2018) and on the maritime orientation of Lesbos’ economy (Kowalzig, forthcoming), this paper aims to shed light on Sappho’s oeuvre, its intertexts, social functions, and early reception – by showing how it drew strength from, and in turn helped reinforce, well-articulated networks extending across the sea.