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The Alexander Grass Humanities Institute is a focal point for the 10 world-renowned humanities departments at Johns Hopkins, other dynamic departments in the humanistic social sciences, and related centers and programs. The institute sponsors scholarly meetings, public events, visiting scholars, and student fellowships and research projects.

Upcoming AGHI-sponsored Events

A complete calendar of all humanities-related events, including all AGHI-sponsored events, happening at Johns Hopkins is available on our events page.

Humanities Highlights
Humanities Stories from Across Hopkins

Media studies professor produces film that explores various aspects of breast cancer

Media studies professor produces film that explores various aspects of breast cancer

From The Hub:

Bernadette Wegenstein, a Johns Hopkins professor of media studies and filmmaker, recalls working on her new documentary, The Good Breast, and feeling a bit hesitant to put too much of herself into the film.

Yes, her voice is heard asking questions, since she’s the director. And her considerable research shaped The Good Breast, which is a deep dive into understanding surgical breast cancer interventions in a cultural context. But could she also be more of an onscreen presence shaping the cinematic experience?

News & Events

The Peabody Ballroom Experience

Part One: the Ball https://blogs.library.jhu.edu/2019/05/the-peabody-ballroom-experience-part-1-of-3/ Part Two: Peabody Dance https://blogs.library.jhu.edu/2019/05/the-peabody-ballroom-experience-part-2-of-3/ Part Three: oral histories https://blogs.library.jhu.edu/2019/05/peabody-ballroom-experience-part-3-of-3/

The old humanities and the new science at 100: Osler’s enduring message

The year 2019 marks the 100th anniversary of Sir William Osler’s last public speech. In the speech, he called for a reunification of the old humanities and the new science. “Humanists have not enough Science” he warned, “and Science sadly lacks the Humanities…this unhappy divorce…should never have taken place.” 100 years after his death, what can Osler teach the high-tech physician of today?