Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information, including courses that are offered on a rotating basis.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Intermediate Film Production: First Person/Third Person Essay Film
AS.061.211 (01)

Each student shoots an essay film (16mm color and/or black and white) written either in first person or third person, or perhaps, both. The third person essay incorporates the ideas of various authors while the first person film is written chiefly from personal experience. Each film should run between 4-8 minutes. Lab Fee: $200. This course satisfies the Intermediate Film Production requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 6/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Hollywood and the Culture Industry
AS.060.122 (01)

For an average consumer in the first half of the twentieth century, American culture meant Hollywood, and “Hollywood” was something of an insult. Associated with mass produced spectacles of questionable artistic value, the American movie industry played a powerful role in defining “popular culture” as we understand it today. This course will examine how Hollywood contributed to the popularization of cultural production and consumption, and how Hollywood itself was constructed as a cultural icon. What are the myths and tropes that govern Hollywood? How does Hollywood transmit economic, social, national, gender, and racial ideologies? How did Hollywood, in the face of corporate hegemony, still manage to create some of the most enduring cultural artifacts of the twentieth century? The course will begin with readings by Nathanael West and F. Scott Fitzgerald, two authors who worked as screenwriters to support their aspirations as novelists. We will then turn to the crucial influence made by non-American writers on Hollywood, starting with Evelyn Waugh’s "The Loved One" about the “British Colony” Waugh discovered during a visit to Southern California. Two weeks will be spent on Frankfurt School theorists of popular culture Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, and the final third of the course will focus on films. We will start by examining three filmmakers whose careers were defined by the “studio system,” the oligopoly that controlled American cinema during the so-called “classical era.” The course concludes with two weeks devoted to films about Hollywood by notable directors. Classes will be supplemented by relevant secondary scholarship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Digital Video Production
AS.061.152 (01)

This course introduces students to the world of digital filmmaking. Through screenings, production assignments, and in-class labs, students will develop proficiency in digital cameras, sound recording devices, and software. Students will work individually and in groups to produce several video projects. For their final projects students will pitch an idea and develop a more complex film. Lab fee: $100

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Special Topics: Producing the Independent Film
AS.061.221 (01)

This class will guide students through the process of producing an independent film in the United States. The chronology of lectures and coursework will follow the lifeline of a project, from conception through financing and development, production, postproduction, marketing, and exhibition. Students will learn how to package and pitch projects, budget and schedule a screenplay, develop a financing plan, supervise production and post-production, and mount a viable festival and distribution strategy. Lab Fee: $50

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/9
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: The Films of 1968
AS.061.105 (01)

1968 was a year of protest and revolution around the globe, and a new audience of youthful cinephiles was hungry for movies that reflected the changing political and cultural landscape. The films of 1968 rose to the challenge, comprising a remarkable document of the times that collectively upended cinematic traditions and old ways of viewing with bold new forms and content. This course examines those cinematic visions—from classics like 2001: A Space Odyssey, Once Upon a Time in the West and Night of the Living Dead to influential groundbreakers like John Cassevetes’ Faces, Jean-Luc Godard’s La Chinoise and Lindsay Anderson’s If . . . –looking closely at individual films and examining both their contemporary contexts and their relevance today. Films will be viewed and discussed in class.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Cinema, 1892-1941
AS.061.140 (01)

This course explores the fundamentals of film analysis and encourages students to embark on an exploration of the first half of our first century of movies. It teaches the basic elements of film form, as well as their use in films across the globe from the turn of the twentieth century through the start of World War II. Movements discussed include the silent comedy of Charles Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd, moody German Expressionism, the playful anarchy of Surrealism, the fundamentals of editing with Soviet Montage, the beauty of French poetic realism, the rule-breaking of Pre-Production Code cinema, the work of the young Alfred Hitchcock, and, of course, highlights of classical Hollywood filmmaking. Students must attend one screening weekly: either on Friday afternoon or Thursday evening. Lab fee: $50

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/45
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Digital Video Production: Visual Language
AS.061.145 (01)

This course is a study of the visual language used to create a moving picture. Through screenings and discussion of films, videos, and related readings, students will develop a visual critical facility and will demonstrate this facility in a few response papers to screenings and video projects. The course will focus on image construction, including composition, framing, movement inside the frame and use of light. Students will learn to be attentive to rhythm and tempo in picture editing and sound. In-class video assignments included, in which students will work in small groups of three. Lab fee: $100

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Introduction to Film Production
AS.061.150 (01)

This course introduces students to basic considerations of shooting 16mm film. Through lectures and practice, the course approaches the basics of light meter readings, basic camera operations and shot composition. The course also highlights specific readings from classical film theory to augment weekly shooting exercises. Each week students, working in groups, shoot film exercises, providing a general overview of film production. For the final project, each group shoots and edits (physical edits) a short (3-5 minutes) film on 16mm black and white reversal film stock. Lab fee: $200

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Introduction to Screenwriting
AS.061.205 (01)

In this course we will explore the basic principles of visual storytelling in narrative film as they apply to the design and execution of a screenplay. During the course of the semester, each student will work on different writing exercises while they search for their specific story and the best way to approach it. We will study different narrative tools and methods of screenwriting by analyzing films to ascertain how they work or fail to do so at script level. Through in-class critiques, group discussions and one-on-one sessions, students will apply these techniques to their own work as they undergo the process of designing, breaking down, outlining and writing a screenplay for a short film. In-class analysis and debate on the strengths and challenges posed by the students' work will help shape the thematic emphasis of the second half of the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Lights, Camera, Action: On Location
AS.061.156 (01)

This mini-course will explore the role of place in film; location not merely as setting, but as character, condition, mode of thought. Real and imagined, found and constructed worlds will be considered. Are all cinematic worlds virtual? In-class screenings and an emphasis on discussion over lecture. This 1-credit course will be graded Pass/Fail. Perfect attendance required. Class meets September 19, 26, October 3, 10.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/53
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Special Topics: Writing About Film
AS.061.226 (01)

A workshop that focuses on writing critical and analytical essays about movies recent and classic. Students will write progressively longer and more complex essays– submitting working drafts and making revisions– and participate in critiques and discussions of one another’s writings. Fulfills Film and Media Studies expository writing requirement. Lab Fee: $50

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (03)

Permission Required. Production track students complete an independent film project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Documentary Photography in a Changing China
AS.310.301 (01)

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Cinema and Philosophy
AS.300.399 (01)

Do movies have anything to say about philosophical problems? Why is contemporary philosophy so interested in cinema? What are the most productive ways of bringing films and philosophy into conversation?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

The Films of P. T. Anderson: Innovation and Influences
AS.061.409 (01)

This course will investigate Paul Thomas Anderson’s stylistic and narrative innovations, as well as cinematic influences such as Altman, Kubrick, Scorsese, and Welles. $50 Lab fee.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Women in Popular Film and Television
AS.061.322 (01)

A survey of female beauty, villainy, comedy, and humanity in film and television from the silent era to the present. $50 lab fee.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Intermediate Digital Video Production: Experimental Forms
AS.061.234 (01)

This Production course focuses on key movements in both Experimental Film and Video Art. Production assignments will arise from: Structural Film, Performance Art, Lyrical Film, Psychedelic Video, and Experimental Ethnography. Students will explore how these movements developed outside (and at times in opposition to) the mainstream, and became integral to the aesthetics of contemporary art, film, and television. Students will think critically about the personal and societal function that video artwork serves, and gain insight into the history of Experimental Film. At the end of this course, students will have a more nuanced understanding of contemporary media art, and they will be more proficient in video editing and cinematography, which they can apply to future work on: commercials, music videos, webcasts, and feature films.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 3/8
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (01)

Permission Required. Production track students complete an independent film project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Advanced Video Production: Influence and Anxiety
AS.061.309 (01)

This is an advanced production course focusing on artistic influence. Each student will be working with and around a filmmaker who greatly inspires and influences their work. The evolution of style will be considered. The work will include screenings, readings, and short projects all feeding into a final movie. This course fulfills the advanced production requirement. Students should have completed a Introductory and Intermediate Digital Video Production course prior to enrollment. $100 Lab fee.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 4/7
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Acting and Screenwriting for Narrative Productions
AS.061.348 (01)

This pre-production course brings together student filmmakers from Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) and Johns Hopkins University (JHU), providing intensive training in the crucial aspects of preparing to shoot a successful narrative film. Students work with a professional screenwriter, allowing students to hone and improve their existing screenplays, practice the elements of writing for film, and learn how to do a script breakdown. Workshops on working with actors, taught by a professional actor, will teach students the ins and outs of casting and directing. Supplemental workshops will cover elements of pre-production such as budgets, production schedules, call sheets, and legal issues. Film screenings will train students to see films with an eye towards what constitutes exciting, innovative filmmaking. Students who wish to enroll in this course should have a prepared treatment, outline or script for a short film that they wish to develop during the semester. This course may be taken independently or as the prelude and prerequisite to Narrative Productions in the spring. Be advised that students who wish to enroll in the production course, Narrative Productions MUST have first completed Acting and Screenwriting for Narrative Productions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Lost & Found Film
AS.061.413 (01)

This course explores various elements of film production and filmic expression through a somewhat nebulous field typically described as lost films. Lost films (or as they are sometimes called, "orphan" films) can be generally described as films that have, for a variety of reasons, fallen out of the public view. They frequently come from educational, scientific, medical, or industrial films from the 1950s and 1960s. Using these films as source materials, lost film filmmakers explore and expose cultural conventions, visual icons, and historical value materials. Each week, students are responsible for re-editing sources found on an internet archive site. The assignments follow thematic concerns related to film editing. Students complete a final project (4-8 minutes). All editing for the course is accomplished with non-linear software, generally Adobe Premiere or Final Cut. This course fulfills the FMS advanced production requirement. $100 lab fee.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 0/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Film Genres
AS.061.244 (01)

A survey of American genres: the Western, the Gangster Film, Science Fiction, Horror, Comedy, Melodrama, and others. Twice-weekly screenings. Short film responses and a final paper. $50 lab fee.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (02)

Permission Required. Production track students complete an independent film project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Senior Capstone Project: Critical Studies
AS.061.441 (02)

Critical studies track students complete an independent research project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 4/4
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Capstone Project: Critical Studies
AS.061.441 (01)

Critical studies track students complete an independent research project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 3/4
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.
AS.211.222 (01)

This course traces the history of Italian cinema from the silent era to the new millennium, highlighting its main trends and genres, and reflecting on the major transformations modern and contemporary Italian society experienced over the twentieth and twentieth-first centuries. We shall examine iconic films such as Vittorio De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves, Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura, and Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Mamma Roma, that received international recognition and influenced other national, cinematic productions. We shall also look at the work of less famous, or independent filmmakers who received less critical attention. While this class takes an historical approach, it also includes a theoretical component and introduces students to the specificity of the cinematic language, examining films in relation to the mise-en-scène, frame composition, camera movements, editing, and sound. This class is taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL

Senior Capstone Project: Critical Studies
AS.061.441 (03)

Critical studies track students complete an independent research project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Religious Themes in Film and Literature
AS.211.480 (01)

This course would be of interest to anyone who would like to learn about the intersection of religion and modern culture. At the center of the course will stand a close study of the representation of religious themes and their role in modern literature and cinema. The works which we will deal with are not considered religious and yet they include religious themes as part of their narrative, images, language or symbolic meaning. We will trace in various works from various countries and genre, themes such as: divine justice, providence, creation, revelation, the apocalypse, prophecy, sacrifice and religious devotion. We will also study the ways in which Biblical and New Testament stories and figures are represented in these works. The course will have a comparative nature with the aim of learning more about the differences between the literary and cinematic representations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/16
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (04)

Permission Required. Production track students complete an independent film project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Imagining Revolution and Utopia
AS.300.312 (01)

What form should revolution take, and what should society look like after the revolution? What would happen to the state, family, home, status of women, human interrelations, and everyday life? These questions consumed radicals in 19th century Russia and Europe, and their answers helped to shape the political culture of the 20th century. This course examines theories of revolution and utopia and responses to them in literature, art and film. Primary case study is Russia and the Soviet Union, with a comparative look at influential European works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (05)

Permission Required. Production track students complete an independent film project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Senior Capstone Project: Critical Studies
AS.061.441 (04)

Critical studies track students complete an independent research project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 4/4
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Photography
AS.371.303 (02)

In this course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography including: the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda. Field trips offer opportunities to work in the field. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Camera experience is a plus, but not a prerequisite. Students will be loaned a digital SLR for the semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Photography
AS.371.303 (01)

In this course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography including: the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda. Field trips offer opportunities to work in the field. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Camera experience is a plus, but not a prerequisite. Students will be loaned a digital SLR for the semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.061.211 (01)Intermediate Film Production: First Person/Third Person Essay FilmW 12:00PM - 2:20PMMann, JohnThe Centre 216FILM-PROD
AS.060.122 (01)Hollywood and the Culture IndustryM 4:00PM - 6:20PMHoffmann, JohnGilman 119
AS.061.152 (01)Introduction to Digital Video ProductionTh 1:00PM - 3:50PMRoche, JimmyThe Centre 239FILM-PROD
AS.061.221 (01)Special Topics: Producing the Independent FilmT 4:00PM - 6:20PM, W 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsPorterfield, MatthewThe Centre 216
AS.061.105 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Films of 1968T 11:00AM - 12:20PM, M 7:00PM - 9:30PM ScreeningsDeLibero, LindaThe Centre 216
AS.061.140 (01)Introduction to Cinema, 1892-1941MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 2:30PM Screenings, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsWard, Meredith CHodson 311
AS.061.145 (01)Introduction to Digital Video Production: Visual LanguageW 12:00PM - 2:20PM, T 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsYasinsky, Karen FILM-PROD
AS.061.150 (01)Introduction to Film ProductionT 1:00PM - 3:20PMPorterfield, MatthewThe Centre 216FILM-PROD
AS.061.205 (01)Introduction to ScreenwritingF 3:00PM - 5:50PMRodgers, Adam FThe Centre 206FILM-SCRWRT
AS.061.156 (01)Lights, Camera, Action: On LocationW 4:30PM - 7:30PMBucknell, Lucy, Mann, JohnGilman 50FILM-CRITST
AS.061.226 (01)Special Topics: Writing About FilmT 10:00AM - 12:30PM, M 7:30PM - 9:30PM ScreeningsMason, LauraThe Centre 206FILM-CRITST
AS.061.440 (03)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionWard, Meredith C FILM-PROD
AS.310.301 (01)Documentary Photography in a Changing ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoMergenthaler 252INST-CP
AS.300.399 (01)Cinema and PhilosophyMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMarrati, Paola, McCreary, Michael DGilman 208FILM-CRITST
AS.061.409 (01)The Films of P. T. Anderson: Innovation and InfluencesTh 3:00PM - 5:20PM, T 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsDeLibero, Linda FILM-CRITST
AS.061.322 (01)Women in Popular Film and TelevisionM 3:00PM - 5:20PM, S 7:00PM - 9:00PM Screenings, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucyHodson 315FILM-CRITST
AS.061.234 (01)Intermediate Digital Video Production: Experimental FormsT 1:30PM - 3:50PMRoche, JimmyThe Centre 239FILM-PROD
AS.061.440 (01)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionMann, John FILM-PROD
AS.061.309 (01)Advanced Video Production: Influence and AnxietyM 12:00PM - 2:20PMYasinsky, Karen FILM-PROD
AS.061.348 (01)Acting and Screenwriting for Narrative ProductionsM 4:00PM - 8:00PMBeller, KathleenThe Centre 206
AS.061.413 (01)Lost & Found FilmF 1:30PM - 3:50PMMann, JohnGilman 381FILM-PROD
AS.061.244 (01)Film GenresW 1:30PM - 3:50PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings, T 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucySmokler Center LibraryFILM-CRITST
AS.061.440 (02)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionPorterfield, Matthew FILM-PROD
AS.061.441 (02)Senior Capstone Project: Critical StudiesDeLibero, Linda 
AS.061.441 (01)Senior Capstone Project: Critical StudiesWard, Meredith C 
AS.211.222 (01)Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.061.441 (03)Senior Capstone Project: Critical StudiesDeLibero, Linda 
AS.211.480 (01)Religious Themes in Film and LiteratureTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStahl, NetaHodson 216GRLL-ENGL
AS.061.440 (04)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionRoche, Jimmy FILM-PROD
AS.300.312 (01)Imagining Revolution and UtopiaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMEakin Moss, AnneShaffer 3
AS.061.440 (05)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionDeLibero, Linda FILM-PROD
AS.061.441 (04)Senior Capstone Project: Critical StudiesDeLibero, Linda 
AS.371.303 (02)Documentary PhotographyF 2:00PM - 4:50PMBerger, Phyllis AMattin Center 204
AS.371.303 (01)Documentary PhotographyF 10:00AM - 12:50PMBerger, Phyllis AMattin Center 204

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Reading the Moving Image
AS.061.238 (01)

This course will emphasize close observation and critical thinking. Through weekly screenings and class discussion, students will practice noticing; seeing and hearing with fresh eyes and ears, and taking nothing on screen for granted. And they’ll learn to reflect on and contextualize what they find, drawing evolved conclusions about how film texts communicate ideas and what those ideas may be. They’ll consider all elements of cinematic form; an array of analytical frameworks including genre, historical era, authorship, and modes of production; and representations of gender, race, and class. Regular quizzes, a short oral presentation, and a short written analysis. No prior experience in film studies required; majors and non-majors welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Introduction to Film Production: Rediscovering Early Cinema
AS.061.150 (01)

This course presents several basic elements of 16mm film production. These include the use of a light meter, an understanding of camera lenses and how they function, and some basic aesthetic concerns. These aesthetic issues primarily involve shot composition and lighting. You will also learn basic concepts of film editing. You will be assigned readings from classical film theory texts (primarily from Jean Epstein and Sergei Eisenstein). These readings will closely align with specific exercises for each class. This coalescence of the practical with the theoretical is a vital component of the class. Lab fee $200.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Acting for Filmmakers
AS.061.138 (01)

This is a series of 3 workshops. 1. ACTORS’ HOMEWORK & CAMERA AS OBSERVER ~Students will discuss and experiment with different methods of preparing for a role. Trying different methods, feel what works for them. We will work on short scenes and have an open discussion about goals, believability, emotional fatigue, distractions of the filming process. ~On the Sound Stage working in front of the camera: ~show how the camera watches performers’ thoughts. ~differences between working in front of a camera and playing to a live audience. ~Shooting: coverage continuity eye lines & marks blocking & restricted movement 2. AUDITIONS AND CASTING: ~Students will be given a variety of scripts to audition for. ~Discussion of casting; from actors’, directors’ and casting directors’ perspectives. ~How others perceive you- an exercise in diplomacy and self awareness. ~Preparing for an audition. both cold and rehearsed. ~Improv during auditions. ~Memorization (quick!) for auditions. ~We will rehearse and film auditions. ~Review and analyze audition videos. 3. ACTORS DIRECTING DIRECTORS. Working in groups and/or pairs, students will explore what kinds of direction works for them and for others. Students will have an open discussion as to what they need to hear from their director. This will be a class where it is safe to learn what does and doesn’t work when communicating with actors- from the actors’ perspective. The goal is not to deliver a professional performance in the class, but to explore how it feels to be directed.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Cinema, 1941-present
AS.061.141 (01)

Introduction to Cinema provides an overview of American and international cinema from the post World War II era to the present. Through lectures and discussion, weekly screenings, and intensive visual analysis of individual films, we will explore the aesthetic, cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped the art and industry of film over the past 70 years. Regular quizzes, writing assignments, class participation required. Mandatory film screenings. Lab fee $50.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Digital Video Production
AS.061.152 (01)

This course introduces students to the world of digital filmmaking. Through screenings, production assignments, and in-class labs, students will develop proficiency in digital cameras, sound recording devices, and software. Students will work individually and in groups to produce several video projects. For their final projects students will pitch an idea and develop a more complex film. Lab fee $100.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Introduction to Screenwriting
AS.061.205 (01)

In this course we will explore the basic principles of visual storytelling in narrative film as they apply to the design and execution of a screenplay. During the course of the semester, each student will work on different writing exercises while they search for their specific story and the best way to approach it. We will study different narrative tools and methods of screenwriting by analyzing films to ascertain how they work or fail to do so at script level. Through in-class critiques, group discussions and one-on-one sessions, students will apply these techniques to their own work as they undergo the process of designing, breaking down, outlining and writing a screenplay for a short film. In-class analysis and debate on the strengths and challenges posed by the students' work will help shape the thematic emphasis of the second half of the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Special Topics: Animation Workshop
AS.061.219 (01)

Students will produce several animations using hand-made techniques, including drawing animation, paper puppets and stop-motion. Screenings and readings will provide a historical and conceptual context to the exploration of animation as an experimental technique within both narrative and non-narrative works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Digital Video Production: Advanced Camera
AS.061.235 (01)

In this production course students will gain proficiency on a variety of Digital Cinema Cameras. Students will work with the Canon C300, C500, and FS7. We will discuss picture profiles, different lense options, external capture devices, and shotgun microphones. We will thoroughly explore the various unique functionality of each camera. Throughout the semester students will complete several cinematography focused video projects.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/6
  • PosTag(s): FILM-PROD

Introduction to Film Theory
AS.061.245 (01)

This course offers an introduction to the major paradigms of film theory, with work ranging from Sergei Eisenstein to Andre Bazin. Frequent film screenings are designed to help illustrate film theory concepts. Designed around one operative question, “What is cinema?” the course explores the varied and divergent answers provided by the great thinkers of the cinema in the past century. Students are expected to enter the course ready to engage in discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/14
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Podcasting: Critical and Creative Practice
AS.061.303 (01)

Podcasting has become an increasingly popular format for journalism, art, and entertainment. In this critical studies course with a creative component, students will learn about the history and cultural significance of audio storytelling, develop tools for critically listening to and analyzing podcasts, and learn how to research, write for, and produce podcasts. Examples will come from a broad sample of narrative, documentary, interview, and discussion panel podcasts on topics ranging from popular culture, sports, politics, history, science, and technology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Screenwriting By Genre
AS.061.315 (01)

Story design for the screenplay with special attention to the genres of comedy, horror, melodrama, and adventure. Regular workshops, short written exercises, and a longer final project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Narrative Productions
AS.061.356 (01)

Narrative Productions is a joint production course for JHU and MICA undergraduates who have completed Acting and Screenwriting for Narrative Productions (AS.061.348). Students work in teams to produce a narrative short from a script written in AS.061.348. Students are assigned a primary and a secondary role on the production or post-production of their chosen film. Students fill all roles from casting, producing, direction, design, cinematography, sound recording and editing. Throughout the course, instructors will facilitate contact with relevant films and film professionals to illuminate the key creative roles necessary in the making of a successful narrative film. Instructors serve in an advisory role in the production of student projects, offering technical information and guidance throughout the filmmaking process. Students should be prepared to spend a significant amount of time outside of class working on their films.

  • Credits: 6.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (04)

Permission required. Production track students complete an independent project. Should must have completed one advanced level FMS production course (POS tag FILM-PROD).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Writers on Film
AS.220.218 (01)

An interdisciplinary course focusing on the film writings of poets, novelists, critics, and essayists such as Virginia Woolf, H.D., James Agee, James Baldwin, and Pauline Kael; and films showing the intertitle and screenplay work of writers such as Anita Loos, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, and Jean Cocteau. Participants will write weekly assignments on film from a critical perspective.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Edit and Post Production
MI.061.325 (01)

Film editor Walter Murch (The Godfather, Apocalypse Now) says that "editing is now something almost everyone can do, but to take it to a higher level requires the same dedication and persistence that any art form does." Through screenings and seminars students will study the art of editing in experimental, documentary and narrative genres while developing a vocabulary to discuss both the function and art of the cut. Additionally, this course will teach advanced editing and finishing techniques including the basics of high definition media formats, frame rates, color correction techniques and working with Photoshop and After Effects. The entire post production work flow will be covered from input to editing to output. Exercises will be part of the course and students are expected to work throughout the semester on one project. Students Students will learn and have the opportunity to work on AVID's Media Composer. Other edit platforms will be demonstrated including FCP X and Adobe Premiere. Recommended Course Background: AS.061.152 Film and Media Studies Majors and Minors Only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Production
MI.061.317 (01)

Explores a wide variety of documentary styles and genres with an overview of the history of documentary film-making. Topics will include pre-production planning, shooting interviews and recording sound in the field. Students will produce several short projects. Recommended Course Prerequisite: AS.061.145 or AS.061.152.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Surrealism and Film
AS.061.375 (01)

We will define Surrealism through primary texts, including those of Andre Breton, Antonin Artaud and Rene Daumal and other works that defined and influenced the movement in the early part of the 20th century. Using an understanding of the practice of surrealism found in the readings, as well as in surrealist games and automatic writing, we'll study a diverse group of filmmakers influenced by the practice, including Luis Buñuel, Joseph Cornell, Raul Ruiz and contemporary artists such as David Lynch. Assignments include weekly papers and one final creative project. Weekly film screenings Thursday 7:30-10:00 PM. $50 lab fee.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (03)

Permission required. Production track students complete an independent project. Should must have completed one advanced level FMS production course (POS tag FILM-PROD).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (01)

Permission required. Production track students complete an independent project. Should must have completed one advanced level FMS production course (POS tag FILM-PROD).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Screenwriting
AS.061.373 (01)

This course will explore strategy and process for developing a short screenplay from pre-existing literary or journalistic source material (short story, news/feature article, etc.). By exploring several “case studies” — feature films and the source material that inspired them — students will identify the practical strategies employed by professional screenwriters with the goal of employing such strategies with their own screenplay adaptations. Bulk of class will focus on designing, writing, and rewriting a 20-30 page screenplay, and sharing multiple drafts with the class (and with the professor one-on-one) for critique over the course of the semester. Each student should have 2-3 pieces of material under consideration for possible adaptation by the start of class. Discussions from time to time will also touch on the business of screenwriting.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Senior Capstone Project: Critical Studies
AS.061.441 (02)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Terrence Malick: The Poetics of Space
AS.061.374 (01)

This course will closely examine Malick's films, with particular emphasis on his visionary manipulation of the epic vastness and lyrical intimacies of screen space. With this primary concern in mind, we will consider his films' engagement with philosophies of history and time; their increasingly experimental approach to narrative and stylistic conventions; and their enduring fascination with the interaction among the human, natural, and spiritual worlds. We will also look at recent films influenced by his work, including Carlos Reygadas's Silent Light and Shane Carruth's Upstream Color, addressing the question of what constitutes a "Malickian" cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Senior Capstone Project: Critical Studies
AS.061.441 (04)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Film Theory
AS.061.361 (01)

Documentary Theory: The Work of Documentary in the Age of Reality Reproduction This course explores contemporary documentary film and video with an emphasis on selected directors and the theoretical implications suggested by their work. In particular, we look at the notion of the ‘real’ as it is constructed and maintained through and by documentaries. This inquiry necessarily involves a reflection that is philosophically as well as politically motivated. Directors include Errol Morris, Trinh Minh-ha, Ross McElwee, and Werner Herzog. Readings are eclectic, ranging from Annie Dillard to Martin Heidegger. Counts toward 300 or 400-level critical studies requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Capstone Project: Critical Studies
AS.061.441 (03)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

French Cinema of Immigration, Cultural Identity, and Difference
AS.061.380 (01)

An exploration of a series of contemporary French films that bear witness to the contemporary reality of France as a multi-ethnic society and ask essential questions about cultural identity. Is cultural and ethnic identity something that you are born into or it is a role that you elect or perform? How should individuals living today understand their relation to historical injustices? Are there things that we can learn only through relationships with people from other cultures? Screenings include works of Abdellatif Kechiche, Jacques Audiard, Claire Denis, Céline Sciamma, Michael Haneke, Mathieu Kassovitz, the Dardennes. $50 LAB FEE

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/2
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/22
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (05)

Permission required. Production track students complete an independent project. Should must have completed one advanced level FMS production course (POS tag FILM-PROD).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Capstone Project: Production
AS.061.440 (02)

Permission required. Production track students complete an independent project. Should must have completed one advanced level FMS production course (POS tag FILM-PROD).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Revolution in European Theater & Film
AS.211.305 (01)

Contemporary local and global social movements such as the uprisings in Egypt, Gezi Park, Occupy Wall Street and Black Lives Matter create modes of non-hierarchical politics beyond established institutions of representation. Artists continue to join this venture by critically examining institutional as well as aesthetic forms of representation and by searching for artistic expressions that accompany and inspire politics in new public spaces. Concomitantly, art institutions – from film festivals to galleries and museums – display a certain hunger for ‘political art’. But what makes art political? Is only socially engaged art political? And how can we characterize the specific forms and modes of engagement? In order to assess these questions, the course will take you onto a journey into the rich history of art and political movements in Europe after World War II with a special emphasis on Germany. We will focus on theater and film as genres that presuppose and promote collective experiences, and discuss how artists such as Chris Marker, Bertolt Brecht, Helke Sander, Christoph Schlingensief, the Black Audio Collective and others reflected upon, represented, transformed and performed ideas of ‘revolution’. You will practice the analysis of film and theater, will examine key words of the debate on art and politics (such as “autonomy”, “realism”, “documentary” and fiction”) and will explore ideas that continue to shape and inspire contemporary aesthetic practices and notions of “revolution”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-GLOBAL

Senior Capstone Project: Critical Studies
AS.061.441 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

We Conduct: Editing a Documentary
AS.211.369 (01)

This course will provide a hands-on opportunity to work with film director and professor of media studies Bernadette Wegenstein in the editing process of We Conduct, a documentary about the magic of orchestral conducting and the changing face of those who are called to this vocation. The film follows famed conductor Marin Alsop as she breaks new ground in her already distinguished career. The film was shot predominantly in Baltimore, but also in New York, São Paulo, Vienna, Lucerne, and London, with Shana Hagan (Los Angeles) as Director of Photography, additional cinematography by Judith Benedikt (Vienna), and John Benam (Baltimore). During the semester we will be looking at the various narratives in their rough format, and see the film take shape from treatment to full-fledged documentary narrative. Editor Victor Livingston based in Los Angeles will come to work with the class twice during the semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Special Topics: Professional Development
MI.061.399 (01)

Special Topics in Film/ Professional Development offers coursework designed specifically to meet the needs of our students as they are working concurrently on their senior thesis projects. Assignments will be used to establish a well-rounded professional package; helping to foster and provide professional readiness and growth upon graduation. To prepare for their participation in powering the creative economy, students will: complete a professional package, apply for an outside opportunity (grant, residency, film festival or exhibition), construct a business/financial plan, research jobs and help to manage a semester long series of visiting professionals.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Photography
AS.371.303 (01)

In this course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography including: the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda. Field trips offer opportunities to explore Baltimore neighborhoods such as The East Side, Station North and Baltimore’s old Chinatown. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Camera experience is a plus, but not a prerequisite. Digital SLR are available on loan for the semester. Attendance in first class is mandatory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Seeing Like a Woman
AS.300.367 (01)

What does it mean to “see,” think, desire, feel, speak, act, or write “like a woman”? Gendered notions of seeing have had an impact on politics and society long before the #metoo movement and far beyond debates about women’s rights in isolation. This seminar examines the issues of female desire, subjectivity, spectatorship and performance in fiction, poetry, memoir and film from a variety of cultures and theoretical perspectives. This is not a course on “the image of the woman” in literature, film or politics, but a course in which we examine the ways in which both male and female theorists, novelists, poets, and filmmakers have imagined how women “see,” feel, think and behave.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Art of the Story
MI.061.230 (01)

Japanese director Akira Kurosawa noted, "with a good script, a good director can produce a masterpiece, but with a bad script, even a good director can’t possibly make a good film." This course will focus on the art of storytelling, exploring the building blocks of what makes a strong story. Students will study examples in literature, television and cinema, animation, radio and art. Students will have a number of short assignments in these areas but will also work on a semester long story in a medium of their choosing. Recommended Course Background: AS.061.152.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.061.238 (01)Reading the Moving ImageM 4:00PM - 6:20PM, Th 7:30PM - 9:30PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucyGilman 17FILM-CRITST
AS.061.150 (01)Introduction to Film Production: Rediscovering Early CinemaW 12:00PM - 2:20PMMann, JohnThe Centre 206FILM-PROD
AS.061.138 (01)Acting for FilmmakersS 10:00AM - 2:00PMBeller, KathleenThe Centre 223
AS.061.141 (01)Introduction to Cinema, 1941-presentMW 12:00PM - 1:20PM, F 12:00PM - 2:30PM ScreeningsWard, Meredith CHodson 316
AS.061.152 (01)Introduction to Digital Video ProductionTh 12:30PM - 3:20PMRoche, JimmyThe Centre 239FILM-PROD
AS.061.205 (01)Introduction to ScreenwritingTh 9:30AM - 12:20PMRodgers, Adam FThe Centre 206
AS.061.219 (01)Special Topics: Animation WorkshopW 3:00PM - 5:20PMYasinsky, KarenThe Centre 216
AS.061.235 (01)Intermediate Digital Video Production: Advanced CameraT 11:30AM - 1:50PMRoche, JimmyThe Centre 239FILM-PROD
AS.061.245 (01)Introduction to Film TheoryM 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings, T 2:30PM - 4:50PMWard, Meredith CGilman 413FILM-CRITST
AS.061.303 (01)Podcasting: Critical and Creative PracticeM 10:00AM - 12:20PMStine, Kyle J.The Centre 206FILM-CRITST
AS.061.315 (01)Screenwriting By GenreW 1:30PM - 3:50PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucyGilman 277FILM-SCRWRT
AS.061.356 (01)Narrative ProductionsM 4:00PM - 10:00PMPorterfield, MatthewThe Centre 218
AS.061.440 (04)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionRoche, Jimmy 
AS.220.218 (01)Writers on FilmF 1:30PM - 3:50PMStine, Kyle J.Gilman 381
MI.061.325 (01)Advanced Edit and Post ProductionTh 4:00PM - 10:00PMStaffThe Centre 239
MI.061.317 (01)Documentary ProductionT 9:00AM - 3:00PMStaffThe Centre 218
AS.061.375 (01)Surrealism and FilmM 1:30PM - 3:50PM, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsYasinsky, Karen FILM-CRITST
AS.061.440 (03)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionPorterfield, Matthew 
AS.061.440 (01)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionMann, John 
AS.061.373 (01)Intermediate ScreenwritingF 3:00PM - 5:20PMRodgers, Adam FThe Centre 206FILM-SCRWRT
AS.061.441 (02)Senior Capstone Project: Critical StudiesDeLibero, Linda 
AS.061.374 (01)Terrence Malick: The Poetics of SpaceT 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings, Th 4:00PM - 6:20PMDeLibero, LindaGilman 413FILM-CRITST
AS.061.441 (04)Senior Capstone Project: Critical StudiesMason, Laura 
AS.061.361 (01)Documentary Film TheoryF 11:00AM - 1:20PMMann, JohnThe Centre 216
AS.061.441 (03)Senior Capstone Project: Critical StudiesBucknell, Lucy 
AS.061.380 (01)French Cinema of Immigration, Cultural Identity, and DifferenceF 1:30PM - 3:50PM, Th 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsRoos, SuzanneGilman 313
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.061.440 (05)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionDeLibero, Linda 
AS.061.440 (02)Senior Capstone Project: ProductionYasinsky, Karen 
AS.211.305 (01)Revolution in European Theater & FilmM 2:30PM - 5:00PMKetteler, ChristianeAmes 218GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.061.441 (01)Senior Capstone Project: Critical StudiesWard, Meredith C 
AS.211.369 (01)We Conduct: Editing a DocumentaryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMWegenstein, Bernadette GRLL-ENGL
MI.061.399 (01)Special Topics: Professional DevelopmentW 4:00PM - 8:00PMStaffThe Centre 206
AS.371.303 (01)Documentary PhotographyF 10:00AM - 12:50PMBerger, Phyllis AMattin Center 204
AS.300.367 (01)Seeing Like a WomanT 1:30PM - 4:00PMEakin Moss, AnneGilman 208
MI.061.230 (01)Art of the StoryF 10:00AM - 2:00PMStaffThe Centre 206