Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Women, Gender, and Sexuality: An Introduction to the History of Chinese Art
AS.010.290 (01)

An introduction to Chinese Art, with a focus on the (often absence of) women, through the lens of gender and sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Liu, Yinxing
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-MODERN

An Empire’s Diversity: Ottoman Art and Architecture beyond the Imperial Court
AS.010.421 (01)

The established historiography of Ottoman architecture is dominated by the patronage of the sultans and their elites, particularly as it shaped the empire’s third and final capital, Istanbul. While this focus on the “center” and its leadership reflects the Ottoman state’s own hierarchical structure, it also obscures the larger network of places and people that enabled the imperial system to develop and acquire meaning in the first place. This course will explore Ottoman architecture and its patronage from the perspective of these neglected regions and actors, covering such examples as Christian vassal states along the empire’s European borders, Arab lands with existing traditions of Islamic art, the curious persistence of Gothic models in the former Crusader kingdom of Cyprus, and the distinctive architectural practices of non-Muslim minorities within Istanbul itself. Drawn primarily from the early modern and modern periods, our case studies will be treated not as imitations of or deviations from the metropolitan mainstream, but as vital expressions of Ottoman culture that assertively engaged with, and themselves contributed to, the better-known strategies of the sultan’s court. We will also go beyond issues of architecture and patronage and consider these buildings as lived spaces whose associated objects, furnishings, and social and ceremonial activities were no less constitutive of the empire’s diverse architectural landscape.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENEM, INST-GLOBAL

Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran
AS.070.267 (01)

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
  • Room: Mergenthaler 439
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (01)

This course explores selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the wider world in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the fourteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as it reorganized itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world. Topics include: religious plurality, sovereignty and subjecthood, flourishing of learning, chivalric culture, crusading, and the plague and its effects. We will follow the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne E.
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (02)

This course explores selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the wider world in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the fourteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as it reorganized itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world. Topics include: religious plurality, sovereignty and subjecthood, flourishing of learning, chivalric culture, crusading, and the plague and its effects. We will follow the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne E.
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (03)

This course explores selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the wider world in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the fourteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as it reorganized itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world. Topics include: religious plurality, sovereignty and subjecthood, flourishing of learning, chivalric culture, crusading, and the plague and its effects. We will follow the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne E.
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (04)

This course explores selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the wider world in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the fourteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as it reorganized itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world. Topics include: religious plurality, sovereignty and subjecthood, flourishing of learning, chivalric culture, crusading, and the plague and its effects. We will follow the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne E.
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST

Modern Europe in a global context, 1789-Present
AS.100.104 (01)

Modern Europe familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have defined European experiences in global encounters since the Revolutionary era. We will particularly focus on European imperial expansion, the formation of the modern nation-state, the history of political ideas and their global ramifications, and popular culture and social change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie Anne
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Europe in a global context, 1789-Present
AS.100.104 (02)

Modern Europe familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have defined European experiences in global encounters since the Revolutionary era. We will particularly focus on European imperial expansion, the formation of the modern nation-state, the history of political ideas and their global ramifications, and popular culture and social change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie Anne
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Europe in a global context, 1789-Present
AS.100.104 (03)

Modern Europe familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have defined European experiences in global encounters since the Revolutionary era. We will particularly focus on European imperial expansion, the formation of the modern nation-state, the history of political ideas and their global ramifications, and popular culture and social change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie Anne
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Europe in a global context, 1789-Present
AS.100.104 (04)

Modern Europe familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have defined European experiences in global encounters since the Revolutionary era. We will particularly focus on European imperial expansion, the formation of the modern nation-state, the history of political ideas and their global ramifications, and popular culture and social change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie Anne
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

From Mass Conversion to Mass Incarceration: The History of the Uyghurs from the 10th Century to the Present Day
AS.100.221 (01)

This course offers an overview of the history of the Uyghur people from their conversion to Islam in the tenth century to the present-day human rights crisis in Xinjiang, China.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Kind, Kevin William
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL

History of Modern Germany
AS.100.233 (01)

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its role in Europe and the world from the 18th century to the 2015 ‘Refugee Crisis’, climate change, EU and NATO politics today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elisabeth
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL

China: Neolithic to Song
AS.100.243 (01)

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE!). It features discussion of art, material culture, philosophical texts, religious ideas, and literary works as well as providing a broad overview of politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will allow students to consider the relationship between what (sources) we have—and what we can know about the past.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

China: Neolithic to Song
AS.100.243 (02)

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE!). It features discussion of art, material culture, philosophical texts, religious ideas, and literary works as well as providing a broad overview of politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will allow students to consider the relationship between what (sources) we have—and what we can know about the past.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (01)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (02)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

History of the French-Algerian War, 1954-1962
AS.100.302 (01)

The Algerian Revolution (1954-1962) successfully challenged French claims that Algeria was part of France and led to an independent Algerian Republic. This struggle is often seen as the touchstone anti-colonial struggle as well as the matrix for modern forms of terrorism and state-sponsored torture. We will explore its history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Shepard, Todd
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Political Thought and Social Transformation in the Haitian Revolution and Early Independent Mexico, c. 1789-1850
AS.100.321 (01)

This course will examine both the Haitian Revolution and the early period of Mexican independence by engaging with the ideas of actors within these events in international contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Borocz-Johnson, Lee Michael
  • Room: Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

The Islamic Age of Empires: The Ottomans, the Mughals, and the Safavids
AS.100.327 (01)

“In the sixteenth century of our era”, wrote the eminent historian of Muslim societies Marshall Hodgson, “a visitor from Mars might well have supposed that the human world was on the verge of becoming Muslim”. They would have based this assertion, continues Hodgson, on the political, cultural, and economic vitality of the empires of the Ottomans, the Mughals, and the Safavids. This survey course will introduce students to the history, culture, institutions, and socio-religious makeup of these three early modern polities that ranged from the Balkans to Bengal, paying particular attention on issues of dynastic and religious law, cultural, religious, and military-diplomatic exchanges with the world and with each another, and their impact on the social, religious, and ethnic makeup of modern Europe and Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Noor, Rao Mohsin Ali
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the present
AS.100.360 (01)

The Modern British World introduces some of the major events, themes, and controversies that led to Britain’s global dominance and ultimate decline as an imperial power. This course focuses on varying forms of imperial governance, the interrelationships between metropole and colony, and the formation of British and colonial national identities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie Anne
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

European Socialist Thought
AS.100.368 (01)

A survey of European socialist theories, including Marxism, anarchism, Social Democracy, feminism, and anti-imperialism. Authors include Proudhon, Marx, Engels, Bakunin, Bernstein, Lenin, Luxemburg, Kollontai, Césaire, and Fanon.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jelavich, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL

London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city
AS.100.413 (01)

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Bloomberg 274
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

A Celluloid Archive: Constructing Modern Indian History through Film
AS.100.447 (01)

Cinema enjoys extraordinary prominence in India, where in a given year the output of films in Bombay—to say nothing of other Indian film centers—far surpasses the number produced by all American studios combined. While many of India’s most successful films have been derided by critics in Europe and North America, this course takes them seriously both as an artistic form and as a historical tool, treating the films, together with their consumption and circulation, as a critical window into the social history of India. We will begin our investigation in the silent era to demonstrate how, even though the majority of early films are lost, reception histories can reveal much about the communities that viewed them. Moving into the Golden Age of Hindi cinema in the 1950s and 1960s, we will consider how the popularity of these films in Pakistan, Iran, West Africa, and the Soviet Union was tied to India’s global aspirations and self-representation. This course closes with an examination of the current era of Indian cinema and the extent to which its production values, moral and political claims, and viewership (especially in the diaspora) have responded to, and perhaps emboldened, domestic shifts toward economic liberalization and rightwing politics. Focusing more on the social spaces around Indian cinema than on specific films, this course touches on such topics as the segregation of cinemas, the politics of tiered seating, and the rise of multiplexes and (il)legal streaming. Our interrogation of these spaces will reveal how these films can expose social attitudes, even on matters like caste, class, religion, language, and race that they may address only obliquely. More than this, however, this course proposes that Indian cinema, as a primary means of social interaction, entertainment, and information for millions, is not only a historical record but a historical force in its own right.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Halladay, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

War and the Environment
AS.140.360 (01)

How have wars shaped the natural world, and vice versa? How have affected communities responded to environmental harm? This course explores the environmental history of warfare from the 18th century through the 20th century. It interrogates the relationship between imperialism, nation-building, and environmental destruction, while asking how the natural world might or might not have influenced the outcome of these military conflicts. The course demonstrates how warfare drew attention to environmental vulnerabilities, both on a local and a global scale. Topics include resource extraction in Euro-American empires, WWII recycling campaigns, ecological violence in the Vietnam War, and nuclear weapons testing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: McManus, Alison L
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Cities of the World: Urbanization and the Environment in the Nineteenth Century
AS.140.363 (01)

The nineteenth century witnessed a dramatic change in the dynamic of urbanization, as the share of the world’s urban population doubled from 6.6 per cent in 1800 to 12 per cent in 1900. Cities around the world were being built and rebuilt during this period with the aim of creating productive urban spaces by bringing about transformations in urban infrastructure like water supply, sanitation engineering, architecture, zoning and street planning, transportation engineering, and so forth. This seminar will survey the transnational history of the development and transformation of cities around the world, including in the United States of America, and their environments during the nineteenth century. The histories of these cities are intimately linked with both the natural environment surrounding them and the communities living and building on them, and we will explore a different city every week with the help of different kind of media, like literary fiction, film, maps, newspaper articles, etc.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Mukherjee, Urna
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

International Development in Action: America’s Cold War Technical Cooperation in East Asia
AS.140.367 (01)

Technical cooperation has been one of the most favored formats of international development because it aims to provide internal capacity for future development. Nevertheless, technical cooperation has been a site of political conflicts where different countries, social groups, capital funds, forms of knowledge, expertise, and opportunities collide. This course critically analyzes the political, diplomatic, social, and cultural surroundings of technical cooperation projects between the United States and East Asia during the second half of the 20th century. The course has three parts, each focusing on 1) theoretical and conceptual approaches to technical cooperation projects in East Asia, 2) different stakeholders, and 3) specific examples that display how the projects unfolded in real-life situations. Throughout the course, students will analyze various formats of historical sources such as photography, diary, correspondence, pamphlet, interview transcripts, and more!

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Lee, Juyoung
  • Room: Gilman 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Politics, Technology and the Media: 1800 to the present
AS.140.386 (01)

This seminar will explore scientific-technological innovations and how they affected politics and communication in the United States from the introduction of steam railways and boats, the newspaper, the telegraph, telephone, photography, radio, the movies, television, and the digital computer. In lieu of a final examination, each student will be asked to write a research paper in consultation with the faculty. Lectures, discussions, films.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin; Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (07)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (08)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 32/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Economic Experience of the BRIC Countries
AS.180.214 (01)

In 2001, Jim O’Neill, the Chief Economist at Goldman Sachs, coined the acronym BRIC to identify the four large emerging economies, Brazil, Russia, India and China. These economies had an amazing run for the next decade, and emerged as the biggest and fastest growing emerging markets. However, since 2014 there has been some divergence in the BRICs’ economic performance. In this course, we look at the economic experiences of the BRIC countries for the past several decades. We discuss the reasons that contributed to their exceptional growth rates, with particular emphasis on their transformation into market economies, and the reasons for their eventual divergence. We also analyze some of the challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP

Game Theory in Social Sciences
AS.180.217 (01)

Game Theory is the study of multiple person decision problems in which the well-being of a decision maker depends not only on his own actions but also on those of others. Such problems arise frequently in economics, political science, business, military science and many other areas. In this course, we will learn how to model different social situations as games and how to use solution concepts to understand players' behavior. We will consider various examples from different fields and will play several games in class. The emphasis of the class is on the conceptual analysis and applications and we will keep the level of mathematical technicalities at the minimum -- high school algebra and one term of calculus will be sufficient. Students who took AS.180.117 are not eligible to take AS.180.217.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Ying
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, BEHB-SOCSCI

Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa
AS.180.223 (01)

Many sub-Saharan African countries are among the least developed countries in the world. In this course, we explore the economic development experiences of African countries, with more focus on sub-Saharan Africa. The course starts with a historical perspective, delves into development strategies, and examines evidence on successes and failures of some case study countries. We conclude by analyzing the many challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process. Elements of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics are required prerequisites. There would be group presentations on assigned readings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Health and Education in South Asia
AS.180.229 (01)

Human capital is an important factor of economic growth in South Asian economies, along with physical capital and technology. Addressing health and education challenges has implications for improving a country’s human capital formation and income growth. In this course, we look at past and present health and educational outcomes in South Asian Countries. We discuss the gaps in access to education and health care services, the quality of education and health care services as well as the impacts on the productivity of the labor force. We also empirically analyze the link between economic growth and human capital development. Furthermore, we focus on some challenges and future policy options for economies in South Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Fatehin, Sohani
  • Room: Hackerman 320
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Rethinking Economics After the Great Recession
AS.180.238 (01)

The financial crisis that began in the United States in 2007 threw virtually the entire world into recession. This class will look at the causes of the crisis and at how it unfolded. It will look into the conventional wisdom of economists, circa 2006, and why that wisdom proved to be so wrong. It will examine the financial innovations that contributed to the crisis, at the reasons financial regulators were blindsided, and at the reforms enacted after the crisis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Norris, Floyd
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (01)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 26/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Financial Markets and Institutions
AS.180.266 (01)

Understanding design and functioning of financial markets and institutions, connecting theoretical foundations and real-world applications and cases. Basic principles of asymmetric information problems, management of risk. Money, bond, and equity markets; investment banking, security brokers, and venture capital firms; structure, competition, and regulation of commercial banks. Importance of electronic technology on financial systems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Feinman, Josh
  • Room: Shaffer 302
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Economics of Health
AS.180.289 (01)

Application of economic concepts and analysis to the health services system. Review of empirical studies of demand for health services, behavior of providers, and relationship of health services to population health levels. Discussion of current policy issues relating to financing and resource allocation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: De Broucker, Gatien
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Topics in International Macroeconomics and Finance
AS.180.303 (01)

The course will review selected topics in international macroeconomics and finance. The topics include: financial globalization; international portfolio diversification; capital account liberalization and the choice of the exchange rate regime in emerging markets. The analysis will be motivated by current policy issues but will also be based on mathematical models of the international economy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jeanne, Olivier
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Economics of Race, Gender and Culture
AS.180.349 (01)

This course will review popular causal analysis tools used in economics research and cover papers on race, gender, and culture that used the causal analysis tools. This course will ask you to use STATA to solve problem sets and exams. Exams will take place in a computer lab. Students must be familiar with undergraduate-level econometrics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Hwang, Yujung
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Labor Economics
AS.180.351 (01)

The course discusses various issues in labor markets from the perspective of economic theory. We first study the major forces at work that shape labor market behavior; firms’ labor demand and workers’ labor supply. Then we discuss the equilibrium behavior of employment and wages. Using these tools, we also cover various applied topics in labor economics, such as minimum wage regulations, male-female wage differentials, human capital investment, worker mobility, and unemployment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (01)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (02)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (03)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (04)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (05)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (06)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (01)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (02)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (03)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (04)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (05)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (06)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (07)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (08)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Simon, Josh David
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Simon, Josh David
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (03)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Simon, Josh David
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (04)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Simon, Josh David
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

The American Presidency
AS.190.228 (01)

Over the past several decades, the power and importance of America’s presidency have greatly expanded . Of course, presidential history includes both ups and downs, some coinciding with the rise and fall of national party systems and others linked to specific problems, issues, and personalities. We should train our analytic eyes, however, to see beneath the surface of day-to-day and even decade-to-decade political turbulence. We should focus, instead, on the pronounced secular trend of more than two and a quarter centuries of American history. Two hundred years ago, presidents were weak and often bullied by Congress. Today, presidents are powerful and often thumb their noses at Congress and the courts. For better or worse, we have entered a presidentialist era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

Climate Solutions: The Global Politics and Technology of Decarbonization
AS.190.246 (01)

This course provides an introduction to climate solutions by reviewing the politics and technologies in all major sectors: electricity, transportation, biofuels, hydrogen, buildings, heavy industry, and agriculture. In each area, we will first understand the existing technologies and potential solutions. But to understand decarbonization, we also have to study the political economy of these technologies. What role do the technologies play in the broader economy? Who will win or lose from the transition? What firms and countries dominate and control current and emerging supply chains? What makes a climate solutions project bankable? How can states design policies, regulations, and programs to successfully manage the politics of technology change?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Allan, Bentley
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Climate Solutions: The Global Politics and Technology of Decarbonization
AS.190.246 (02)

This course provides an introduction to climate solutions by reviewing the politics and technologies in all major sectors: electricity, transportation, biofuels, hydrogen, buildings, heavy industry, and agriculture. In each area, we will first understand the existing technologies and potential solutions. But to understand decarbonization, we also have to study the political economy of these technologies. What role do the technologies play in the broader economy? Who will win or lose from the transition? What firms and countries dominate and control current and emerging supply chains? What makes a climate solutions project bankable? How can states design policies, regulations, and programs to successfully manage the politics of technology change?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Allan, Bentley
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Climate Solutions: The Global Politics and Technology of Decarbonization
AS.190.246 (03)

This course provides an introduction to climate solutions by reviewing the politics and technologies in all major sectors: electricity, transportation, biofuels, hydrogen, buildings, heavy industry, and agriculture. In each area, we will first understand the existing technologies and potential solutions. But to understand decarbonization, we also have to study the political economy of these technologies. What role do the technologies play in the broader economy? Who will win or lose from the transition? What firms and countries dominate and control current and emerging supply chains? What makes a climate solutions project bankable? How can states design policies, regulations, and programs to successfully manage the politics of technology change?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Allan, Bentley
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Climate Solutions: The Global Politics and Technology of Decarbonization
AS.190.246 (04)

This course provides an introduction to climate solutions by reviewing the politics and technologies in all major sectors: electricity, transportation, biofuels, hydrogen, buildings, heavy industry, and agriculture. In each area, we will first understand the existing technologies and potential solutions. But to understand decarbonization, we also have to study the political economy of these technologies. What role do the technologies play in the broader economy? Who will win or lose from the transition? What firms and countries dominate and control current and emerging supply chains? What makes a climate solutions project bankable? How can states design policies, regulations, and programs to successfully manage the politics of technology change?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Allan, Bentley
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Democratic Political Theory
AS.190.254 (01)

This course will plumb the theoretical depths of democracy and its manifold forms, ideas, and arguments. After sampling a handful of the many democratic traditions in the field, we will attempt to ‘apply’ these theories to two issues that have proven particularly sticky for democratic thinkers: the global nuclear arrangement, and global climate change. The course will require significant reading and writing and will be driven by in-class discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Phillips, Chas.
  • Room: Maryland 109
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Race and Racism in International Relations
AS.190.255 (01)

This course introduces students to the foundational importance of race and racism to the construction of our contemporary global order. Topics include the Crusades, European imperialism, eugenics, Apartheid, freedom struggles, decolonization, and global development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian; Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, POLI-CP

Democracy And Elections
AS.190.326 (01)

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

National Security-Nuclear Age
AS.190.329 (01)

This course examines the impact of weapons of mass destruction on international politics with an emphasis on security issues. The first half of the course focuses on the history of nuclear weapons development during the Cold War and theories of deterrence. The second half of the class considers contemporary issues including terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missile defense and proliferation. Requirements include a midterm, final and a ten page paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Japanese Politics
AS.190.330 (01)

This course introduces students to the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese politics. Topics include nationalism, electoral politics, civil society, and immigration.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Imagining Borders
AS.190.335 (01)

What is a border and why do borders matter in global politics. What do borders mean under conditions of globalization? An examination of the politics of borders, transborder flows, and networks within and across borders. The readings, which come from political science and other social science disciplines, will include theoretical and case-specific works. Goals for this writing intensive course also include learning to identify researchable questions, to engage with the scholarly literature, and to understand appropriate standards of evidence for making claims.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee E
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

China and the World
AS.190.353 (01)

This introductory course explores China's expanding global presence and influence in the context of rising US-China tensions. We will begin with an overview of China's rise since market opening in the 1980s, leading up to its ascendence as a global power in recent times. In addition to learning about the historical and political-economic dimensions of China's engagement with the world, the course aims to impart you with some basic skills in evaluating the quality of evidence and expertise, so that you can form your own informed assessment of contentious issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ang, Yuen Yuen; Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-IR

Urban Politics & Policy
AS.190.384 (01)

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross-listed with Africana Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (01)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (02)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Political Arts: Dada, Surrealism, and Societal Metamorphoses
AS.190.415 (01)

In the years between World Wars I and II, a fascinating group of artists, manifesto-writers, performers, intellectuals, and poets, in Europe and the Caribbean, who were put off by conventional politics of the time, decided to pursue other means of societal transformation. This seminar explores the aims and tactics, and strengths and liabilities, of Dada and Surrealism, as it operated in Europe and the Americas in the years between the World Wars. We will also read texts and images from writers and artists influenced by Dada and Surrealism but applied to different historical and political contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Violence: State and Society
AS.190.421 (01)

This course will examine violence that occurs mainly within the territory of nominally sovereign states. We will focus on violence as an object of study in its own right. For the most part, we will look at violence as a dependent variable, though in some instances it will function as an independent variable, a mechanism, or an equilibrium. We will ask why violence starts, how it “works” or fails to work, why it takes place in some locations and not others, why violence take specific forms (e.g., insurgency, terrorism, civilian victimization, etc.), what explains its magnitude (the number of victims), and what explains targeting (the type or identity of victims).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Race and Ethnic Politics in the United States
AS.190.437 (01)

Race has been and continues to be centrally important to American political life and development. In this course, we will engage with the major debates around racial politics in the United States, with a substantial focus on how policies and practices of citizenship, immigration law, social provision, and criminal justice policy shaped and continue to shape racial formation, group-based identities, and group position; debates around the content and meaning of political representation and the responsiveness of the political system to American minority groups; debates about how racial prejudice has shifted and its importance in understanding American political behavior; the prospects for contestation or coalitions among groups; the “struggle with difference” within groups as they deal with the interplay of race and class, citizenship status, and issues that disproportionately affect a subset of their members; and debates about how new groups and issues are reshaping the meaning and practice of race in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla Mae
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

War and Society in World Politics
AS.190.449 (01)

This course is an advanced introduction to war in the modern world, encompassing its political, social, cultural and ecological dimensions. It adopts a “war and society” approach in that it covers the ways in which society shapes war and, in turn, how war shapes society. It situates “war and society” in an historically evolving global context, attending to the nature of war in both the core and the periphery of world politics. Topics include the totalization and industrialization of war; civil-military relations; modernity, reason and war; “small war”; and race, culture and war.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Barkawi, Tarak Karim
  • Room: Krieger 308
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Climate Geopolitics: New-Zero Industrial Policy and World Order
AS.190.458 (01)

This course will survey the history of industrial policies for clean technologies from China’s wind and solar push in the 1990s to the Inflation Reduction Act. We will seek to understand the determinants of industrial policy, best practices for industrial policy, and the effects of industrial policy on climate politics. The lens of industrial policy provides a unique avenue to understand world order. Through this lens, we will see how nature, knowledge, and geopolitics come together in various formations throughout world history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Allan, Bentley
  • Room: Maryland 201
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)
AS.191.335 (01)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 307
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Russian Foreign Policy (IR)
AS.191.345 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 307
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

The Political History of Police
AS.191.365 (01)

This course investigates the roots of the American police, and its impact on people and place. Political theorist Markus Dubber calls police the “most expansive, most amorphous of governmental powers.” Policing is a key component of state power, but the current web of police institutions was never inevitable. In studying the deliberate creation of the police, we will pay particular attention to race-class hierarchies in the historical and contemporary carceral state. We will struggle through questions on safety, freedom, repression, and political power, such as: How did a country founded on principles of radical republicanism develop vast institutions of patrol and surveillance? Under what conditions do police powers expand or contract? And what contributes to safety in America? This course will first, look at the historic roots of American police. The next section of the course attempts to analyze how or when these institutions intervene in the lives of Americans. Next, we will study police from the perspective of policed populations and think about what impact these interactions have on American democracy and belonging. Through studying police and prisons, students will learn about an important face of the American state and how certain state functions are differentially distributed along lines of race and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Saxton, Stephanie Alexandra
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP

(Mis)Measuring Human Progress
AS.191.370 (01)

This course will explore the ways in which human progress, societal prosperity, economic growth, and development have been understood in the modern era. It will do so by investigating the political processes that surround decisions about the measurement of these concepts, the underlying worldviews that support them, and their normative implications. The first part of the course is historically oriented. Students will study the processes of emergence, consolidation, and globalization of the prevailing, or “hegemonic”, view of progress: economic growth measured by GDP. They will learn the causes that led to this choice and the problems that resulted from it. The second part of the course explores alternatives to this mainstream conceptualization and teaches students how some socio-economic indicators of prosperity are created. Student are then asked to apply the historical and practical knowledge to build their own vision and measurement of human progress.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Trasi, Aila
  • Room: Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Economic Growth and Development in East Asia
AS.192.225 (01)

Over the past three decades, East Asia has been the most dynamic region in the world. East Asia has a remarkable record of high and sustained economic growth. From 1965 to 1990, the twenty-three economies of East Asia grew faster than all other regions of the world mostly thanks to the ‘miraculous growth’ of Japan, Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand; these eight countries, in fact, have grown roughly three times as fast as Latin America and South Asia, five times faster than Sub-Saharan Africa, and significantly outperformed the industrial economies and the oil-rich Middle East and North Africa regions. Poverty levels have plummeted and human-development indicators have improved across the region. The course is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “fast-paced, sustained economic growth.” Part I will introduce the subject, consider the origins of Asian economic development, and analyse the common economic variables behind the region’s success. It will look at the East Asian Crisis and will consider its lessons and assess whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. While the course will show that there are many common ingredients to the success of the region’s economies, it will also show that each country is different, and that differences could be, at times, quite stark. Hence, Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with a special emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Finally, Part III will consider various topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness in the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, Politics
AS.194.205 (01)

For over a thousand years, the Sufi tradition has been a dynamic force in Islamic social, political and spiritual life. The tradition offers a treasure trove of devotional literature and music, philosophical treatises, contemplative practices, and institutions of social and political organization. After unpacking the politics of the term “Sufi,” we will trace the historical development of the tradition from the early ascetics in Iraq and Syria to the age of trans-national Sufi orders, with case studies from South Asia, Turkey, and the United States. We will then move into some of the key constructs of the tradition of spiritual growth and character formation: the divine-human relationship, the stages of the spiritual path, contemplative and practical disciplines, ideas of sainthood, discipleship and ethical perfection, and the psychology of love. Throughout the class, we will explore the nature of experiential language and interrogate the tradition through the lens of gender. We will also experience Sufism through ritual and music.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: 3003 N. Charles OMA Lounge
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Civic Life
AS.196.201 (01)

What does it take for people to engage productively as informed, skilled, and effective members of democratic communities and the world? Whether we are scientists, doctors, engineers, advocates, public servants, or anything else, we are all members of pluralistic communities. This introductory course seeks to introduce students to the theory and principles of civic life and the rights and responsibilities of active citizenship. We’ll examine the history of and struggles for freedom, inclusion, and civic participation, the role of information, deliberation, and free expression in the public sphere, and the threats and opportunities for global democracy. Students will read and discuss materials by civic studies and democracy scholars, building a foundational understanding of civic life across disciplines and perspectives. Many of these scholars and practitioners will appear in class to discuss their work directly with students. The course will pay particular attention to the ways that students from all backgrounds can apply these ideas in their everyday lives, regardless of the professions they pursue. This course is also the first course for students interested in minoring in the SNF Agora Institute Minor on Civic Life, but is designed to inspire a commitment to participation in civic life for all students, including those who do not major or minor in related fields.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Amat Matus, Consuelo; Mason, Lily Hall
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Democracy by the Numbers
AS.196.306 (01)

How is democracy doing around the world? This course will help students to answer this question and ask their own questions about political systems by examining a variety of quantitative measures of facets of democracy in the U.S. and internationally. We consider general indices as well as those that focus on specific normatively-appealing aspects—the absence of fraud in and broader integrity of the electoral process itself, the guarantees of fundamental human rights to all, governments’ effectiveness and accountability to the public, the equity of both representation and policy outcomes for minority groups and those historically disadvantaged or excluded, and the possibility and extent of civic engagement in non-government institutions. Wherever possible, the course will present evidence about the kinds of institutions and policies that seem to bolster democracy. Students can expect to gain hands-on experience with publicly-available subnational and national indicators of electoral and democratic quality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Corrigan, Bryce
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (01)

This course will survey German ideas—in philosophy, social and political theory, and drama—since the Enlightenment. Authors include Kant, Schiller, Lessing, Goethe, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, Horkheimer, and Adorno.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Jelavich, Peter
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT, HIST-EUROPE

Jewish in America, Yiddish in America: Literature, Culture, Identity
AS.211.314 (01)

iddish was the language of European Jews for 1000 years. From the 19th century to the present day it has been a language that millions of Americans — Jewish immigrants and their descendants–have spoken, written in, conducted their daily lives in, and created culture in. This course will examine literature, film, newspapers, and more to explore how Jewish immigrants to America shaped their identities—as Jews, as Americans, and as former Europeans. What role did maintaining, adapting, or abandoning a minority language play in the creation of Jewish American identity—cultural, ethnic, or religious? How was this language perceived by the majority culture? How was it used to represent the experiences of other minoritized groups? What processes of linguistic and cultural translation were involved in finding a space for Yiddish in America, in its original or translated into English? The overarching subjects of this course include migration, race, ethnicity, multilingualism, and assimilation. We will analyze literature (novels, poetry, drama); film; comedy; and other media. All texts in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Dissent and Cultural Productions: Israeli Culture as a Case Study
AS.211.361 (01)

This course explores the interplay between protest and cultural productions using the Israeli society as a case study. We will examine the formation and nature of political and social protest movements in Israel, such as the Israeli Black Panthers, Israeli feminism, the struggle for LGBTQ rights and the 2011 social justice protest. Dissent in the military and protest against war as well as civil activism in the context of the Palestinians-Israeli conflict will serve us to explore the notion of dissent in the face of collective ethos, memory and trauma. The literary, cinematic, theatrical and artistic productions of dissent will stand at the center of our discussion as well as the role of specific genres and media, including satire and comedy, television, popular music, dance and social media. We will ask ourselves questions such as how do cultural productions express dissent? What is the role of cultural productions in civil activism? And what is the connection between specific genre or media and expression of dissent? All material will be taught in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Italian Cinema
AS.211.386 (01)

From the epic movies of the silent era to neorealist and auteur films of the post-war period, all the way to contemporary Academy winner The Great Beauty, Italian cinema, has had and continues to have a global impact, and shape the imaginary of filmmakers all over the world. This course traces Italian film history from its origins to recent times, highlighting its main genres and trends beyond the icons of neorealist and auteur cinema, including the so-called ‘comedy Italian style,’ spaghetti westerns, horror, mafia-mockery films, feminist filmmaking, and ecocinema. While learning to probe the cinematic frame, and examine composition, camera movements, cinematography, editing, and sound, and interrogating issues of gender, class, and race, we will screen classics such as Bicycle Thieves, La Dolce Vita, and L’Avventura, but also forgotten archival films by pioneer women filmmakers, and works by emergent, independent filmmakers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

Did you know that Brazil is very similar to the United States? This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, politics, economy, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how Indigenous, Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required). No Prereq. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

Did you know that Brazil is very similar to the United States? This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, politics, economy, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how Indigenous, Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required). No Prereq. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (01)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended course background: AS.210.301 and AS.210.302 or permission of instructor. Contact April Wuensch ([email protected]).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wuensch, April
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Pinar Diaz, Alicia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Rachel C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Chinese Revolutions
AS.230.175 (01)

This survey course examines the foreign influence on China’s political changes between the nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries. The topics include Chinese Christians and anti-dynastic revolutions, Japanese imperialism and Chinese nationalism, Chinese overseas and federalist movements, as well as global connections of Chinese communist movements between 1921 and 1949.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Coffee, Tea and Empires
AS.230.239 (01)

The course examines the modern transformation of social life from the prism of coffee and tea. The topics include colonial expansion and cash-crop production, pan-Asianism and Orientalism, the question of the public sphere, and food nationalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Immigration
AS.230.317 (01)

This course surveys sociological theories and research on immigration to the U.S. Theoretical approaches include theories of international migration, economic sociology, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include the impact of U.S. immigration laws and policies on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population and the U.S. labor market and economy, and the adaptation of the first and second generations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Agrarian Change in Post-Reform China and Beyond
AS.230.328 (01)

Rural China is experiencing profound socioeconomic and political transformations during four decades of reform. When millions of rural migrants leave their hometown to work in factories, the countryside is simultaneously being remade by the expansion of cities and state policies that seek to revolutionize Chinese agriculture. These ongoing and uncertain dynamics reshape social relations, conflicts, and tensions among state, peasants, and capital in the rural social space. This course examines the historical origins, uncertain processes, and profound social consequences of these major changes that are taking place in post-reform rural China. The course is organized around 4 modules. In each of them, students will first read about key concepts and theoretical frameworks, such as socialist primitive accumulation, collective action, social reproduction, and peasant moral economy. They will then use these analytical tools to critically engage with the more empirically grounded research on China’s agrarian transformation. While the course primarily focuses on China, students will have opportunities to conduct research on other parts of the world, which will provide useful, comparative viewpoints.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Liu, Tiantian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 16/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Family, Gender, and Sexuality in East Asia
AS.230.332 (01)

How do men and women make decisions about marriage and childbearing, negotiate work-family demands, and divide housework and childcare? Why are East Asian societies experiencing lowest-low fertility? What are the legacies of the one-child policy? How does homosexuality transcend patriarchal family? To answer these questions, this course will explore in depth the dynamics of family, gender, and sexuality in contemporary East Asia (mainly China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Wan, Yifeng
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Human Rights Activism: Between Theory and Practice
AS.230.340 (01)

The right to freedom from slavery. The right to movement. The right to healthcare. These rights, as described in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, are typically pitched as a universal good. But are they truly universal? Or do human rights discourses reflect a particular set of priorities and values, articulated in particular times and places? This course will address this question by exploring both current debates surrounding human rights, and the real-life challenges that activists face in putting them into practice. However powerful they may sound on paper, how binding are human rights treaties in the public sphere? How can human rights advocacy prompt governments to protect women, refugees, and sexual and gender minorities? Secondly, do understandings of justice in the Global South ever differ from those articulated in the 1948 Declaration? Finally, do human rights discourses embrace all kinds of rights equally? For example, why have human rights organizations like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch historically prioritized civil and political rights, like freedom of religion, over economic rights, like the right to healthcare? And more broadly, what can human rights advocacy do in the global fight against capitalist exploitation? The emancipatory rhetoric of human rights, critics worry, cannot itself undo the grim realities of global inequality. In an unequal world, could human rights organizations compel corporations to pay livable wages to their employees? Or obligate governments to provide healthcare to their citizens? Drawing on global case studies ranging from pro-refugee activists along the Greece-Turkey border to anti-FGC (female genital cutting) activism in the Gambia, this course aims to provide students with the tools to think critically about rights as a vehicle for social change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Migration and Development
AS.230.345 (01)

Global migration is a hot topic in the news and in political campaigns today. It has reached an unprecedented size, and it has also fueled countless social protests around racial, ethnic, and class-based tensions. Indeed, the speed, size, and controversies around global migration are re-shaping our conventional understandings of the nation-state, citizenship, and welfare rights. But global migration is not new. Therefore contemporary migration raises important questions about what is and is not unique about the present moment. This course will begin my introducing students to the long history of global migration and capitalism. It will then examine the various aspects of contemporary migration--covering issues of gender, South-South migration, class and skill, sending and receiving countries' roles in controlling migration, migrants' protests, diaspora organizations, and the connections between immigration and emigration. Through in-depth reading and discussion, the course engages students in understanding and critiquing contentious perspectives on these issues. The course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of the theories, methodologies, research, and debates that shape contemporary discussions of international migration and development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON

Caste and Race in Capitalism
AS.230.355 (01)

This course investigates two familiar concepts in sociology: race and caste. For the majority of theoretical contributions on race and caste focus on North America or the developed world, this course aims at advancing an understanding of race and caste from non-western experiences. In modern history, many scholars have debated the similarities and differences between the two concepts and the course aims at introducing the students to these writings. The course focuses on a specific historical phase: capitalism. To build more explicit connections of both race and caste with class, the course will focus on developments since colonization in most of the world, which introduced capitalist relations as a hegemonic force. The students will engage with broader questions such as: how are caste and race different from and similar to each other? Is it possible to use one category to describe the other? If so, how? What are the essential elements of these two categories in their given social contexts? How does incorporating ‘class’ into analysis shape the defining elements of race and caste?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Sharma, Sonal
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-GLOBAL

Finance Capitalism
AS.230.360 (01)

Cryptocurrencies? NFTs? Meme stocks? What is happening in contemporary capitalism? To answer this question, our seminar will facilitate an in-depth engagement with the theories and histories of finance capitalism. We will focus on how the financial transformations of capitalism over the past century have been theorized and historicized towards answering the following questions: is finance capitalism an aberration, a phase, or the norm of capitalism? What are the underlying forces driving financialization? What is the relationship between finance capitalism, economic crises, rising indebtedness, and racial capitalism? And what can we say about where contemporary capitalism is headed? This seminar will take an interdisciplinary approach, reading prominent thinkers across political economy, history, sociology, geography, and political science. Our readings and discussions will explore the past, structure, and movement of contemporary capitalist society and help to orient us in this bewildering era of financial exuberance, taking stock of the present and its possible trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Jacober, Conrad
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Water, Energy, and Food Nexus
AS.271.402 (01)

The water, energy and food (WEF) nexus is a topic of growing interest in the research and policy communities. This course will survey WEF concepts and principles, introduce tools of analysis, and engage students in case studies of critical WEF issues in the United States and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Burgess, Jerry
  • Room: Olin 247
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, ENGY-SCIPOL

Modern East Asian Literatures Across Boundaries
AS.300.330 (01)

Modern literature in East Asia is as much defined by creation of national boundaries as by their transgressions, negotiations, and reimaginations. This course examines literature originally written in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean in light of contemporary understandings of political, social, and cultural boundary demarcation and crossings. How do experiences of border-crossing create and/or alter literary forms? How, in turn, does literature inscribe, displace, and/or dismantle boundaries? Our readings will include, but not limited to, writings by intra- and trans-regional travelers, exiles, migrants, and settlers; stories from and on contested borderlands and islands (e.g. Manchuria, Okinawa, Jeju); and works and translations by bilingual authors. All readings are provided in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

China, Southeast Asia, and U.S. National Security
AS.310.305 (01)

The global political and security landscape of the 21st century will be shaped by the rivalry between two superpowers -- China and the U.S. For the foreseeable future, the geographic focus of that contest will be Southeast Asia and the surrounding maritime space, particularly the South China Sea. Southeast Asia is a complex, highly differentiated region of ten-plus nations, each with its own unique history and relationship with China. This course will introduce Southeast Asia as a key region -- geographically, economically, and strategically -- often overlooked by policymakers and scholars. It will also focus on the craft of national security strategy as the best tool for understanding the multi-sided competition, already well underway involving China, the U.S., and the Southeast Asian states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, marvin C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Women in China from Antiquity to MeToo
AS.310.327 (01)

This interdisciplinary survey course considers questions related to women and gender in Chinese society. Taking a long historical view, the course examines ideologies, social institutions, and literary representations of women and gender in traditional society and their modern transformation. Specific topics to be explored include the concept of Yin and Yang, Confucian gender ideology and the family, sex and sexuality, marriage and concubinage, footbinding, and calls for women's liberation in the context of twentieth-century Chinese revolutions. The course will end with an examination of the relationship between social media and gender politics as seen through the Chinese MeToo movement. Students will have the opportunity to work with a variety of primary sources including historical, literary, and visual materials.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Ethnicity in China
AS.310.332 (01)

Ever since the Chinese Empire fell in 1911, Chinese have tried to think of themselves as modern and to build a modern Chinese state. Among the Western concepts that Chinese appropriated to define and comprehend themselves were the notions of ethnicity, culture, nationality, and race. We will try to answer the following questions: What was the allure of arcane and elusive Western categories on culture, ethnicity, and race for Chinese scientists in the 20th century, and how did these categories come to underpin the rule of the Chinese state over its enormous population since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949? How have the Chinese state’s policies on nationality and ethnicity shaped the minds of American China scholars as they study ethnicity and nationality in China?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Rebellion and Its Enemies in China Today
AS.310.336 (01)

On 13 October 2022, a middle-aged upper-middle class Chinese man staged a public political protest on an elevated road in Beijing. Peng Lifa, or “Bridge Man,” as he has become known in allusion to Tank Man from the Tiananmen demonstrations in 1989, demanded elections and reforms. How have urban Chinese been able to be so content or even happy despite their lack of political freedom? The class readings will introduce you to different kinds of activists who have confronted the authoritarian state since the late 1990s, among them human rights lawyers, reporters, environmental activists, feminists, religious activists, and labor activists. We will ask whether freedom, an obviously Western notion, is useful as an analytical category to think about China. Does freedom translate across the West/non-West divide?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Humanities Research Lab: The Dutch Americas
AS.360.410 (01)

The Dutch East India Company, or VOC, is historically and art historically well documented and firmly understood. But the Dutch also had significant holdings to the west via the Dutch West India Company, or WIC. They operated and held outposts in the present-day United States (New York/New Amsterdam), Caribbean (Surinam, Curaçao, Bonaire), Latin America (Brazil), and West Africa. Despite the abundance of materials associated with the WIC from this wide geography, these have been scarcely assessed by art historians, and a defined and comprehensive corpus has never been assembled. This class will act as a research lab in which to do so. In research teams, students will map artworks and objects created from that broad, transnational cultural ambit—categories that might include maps, landscape paintings, still life paintings featuring American flora and fauna, botanical illustrations, plantation architecture, luxury objects made from precious raw materials gathered in the Americas, the urban environment of slavery—and develop individual research questions around them. The class will run with a partner lab in the form of a course led by Professor Stephanie Porras at Tulane University. The course will feature speakers; and there is potential for funded travel to conduct research. We will start at the ground level; no previous knowledge about the field is required. Students from all disciplines are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hyman, Aaron M.
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENEM

Introduction to Police and Prisons
AS.362.115 (01)

This introductory course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of three parts. First, we will define key concepts in police and prison studies. Then, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Third, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-AP

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.290 (01)Women, Gender, and Sexuality: An Introduction to the History of Chinese ArtMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLiu, YinxingGilman 177INST-GLOBAL, HART-MODERN
AS.010.421 (01)An Empire’s Diversity: Ottoman Art and Architecture beyond the Imperial CourtTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverGilman 177HART-RENEM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.267 (01)Culture, Religion and Politics in IranTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHaeri, NiloofarMergenthaler 439INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.100.102 (01)The Medieval WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLester, Anne E.Hackerman B 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.102 (02)The Medieval WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLester, Anne E.Hackerman B 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.102 (03)The Medieval WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLester, Anne E.Hackerman B 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.102 (04)The Medieval WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLester, Anne E.Hackerman B 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.104 (01)Modern Europe in a global context, 1789-PresentMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMHindmarch-Watson, Katie AnneKrieger 170HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.104 (02)Modern Europe in a global context, 1789-PresentMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMHindmarch-Watson, Katie AnneKrieger 170HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.104 (03)Modern Europe in a global context, 1789-PresentMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMHindmarch-Watson, Katie AnneKrieger 170HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.104 (04)Modern Europe in a global context, 1789-PresentMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMHindmarch-Watson, Katie AnneKrieger 170HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.221 (01)From Mass Conversion to Mass Incarceration: The History of the Uyghurs from the 10th Century to the Present DayTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKind, Kevin WilliamKrieger 300HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.233 (01)History of Modern GermanyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElisabethAmes 218HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL
AS.100.243 (01)China: Neolithic to SongMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieAmes 218HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.243 (02)China: Neolithic to SongMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieAmes 218HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.250 (01)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPearsall, SarahHodson 313HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.250 (02)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPearsall, SarahHodson 313HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.302 (01)History of the French-Algerian War, 1954-1962T 1:30PM - 4:00PMShepard, ToddMaryland 217HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.321 (01)Political Thought and Social Transformation in the Haitian Revolution and Early Independent Mexico, c. 1789-1850TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBorocz-Johnson, Lee MichaelCroft Hall G02HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.327 (01)The Islamic Age of Empires: The Ottomans, the Mughals, and the SafavidsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMNoor, Rao Mohsin AliHodson 303HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TAmes 218INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.360 (01)The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the presentTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHindmarch-Watson, Katie AnneGilman 186HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.368 (01)European Socialist ThoughtT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJelavich, PeterGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.413 (01)London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital cityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John WGilman 219INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TBloomberg 274INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.447 (01)A Celluloid Archive: Constructing Modern Indian History through FilmTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHalladay, AndrewGilman 308HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center 301INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.360 (01)War and the EnvironmentMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMcManus, Alison LGilman 186INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.363 (01)Cities of the World: Urbanization and the Environment in the Nineteenth CenturyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMukherjee, UrnaGilman 377INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.140.367 (01)International Development in Action: America’s Cold War Technical Cooperation in East AsiaMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMLee, JuyoungGilman 300INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.386 (01)Politics, Technology and the Media: 1800 to the presentW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin; Kargon, Robert HKrieger 180INST-AP
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.101 (05)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.101 (06)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 3:00PM - 3:50PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.101 (07)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 4:30PM - 5:20PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.101 (08)Elements of MacroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.102 (03)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.102 (04)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirRemsen Hall 101
AS.180.214 (01)The Economic Experience of the BRIC CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeShaffer 300INST-ECON, INST-CP
AS.180.217 (01)Game Theory in Social SciencesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMChen, YingHodson 316INST-ECON, BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.180.223 (01)Economic Development in Sub-Saharan AfricaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenMaryland 114INST-ECON
AS.180.229 (01)Economics of Health and Education in South AsiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMFatehin, SohaniHackerman 320INST-ECON
AS.180.238 (01)Rethinking Economics After the Great RecessionW 1:30PM - 4:00PMNorris, FloydMaryland 114INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.261 (01)Monetary AnalysisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, LudmilaMaryland 110INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.266 (01)Financial Markets and InstitutionsW 3:00PM - 5:30PMFeinman, JoshShaffer 302INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.289 (01)Economics of HealthM 4:30PM - 7:00PMDe Broucker, GatienHodson 316INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.180.303 (01)Topics in International Macroeconomics and FinanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJeanne, OlivierHodson 303INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.349 (01)Economics of Race, Gender and CultureT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHwang, Yujung INST-ECON
AS.180.351 (01)Labor EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 211INST-ECON
AS.190.101 (01)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLieberman, Robert CHodson 210INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (02)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLieberman, Robert CHodson 210INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (03)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLieberman, Robert CHodson 210INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (04)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLieberman, Robert CHodson 210INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (05)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMLieberman, Robert CHodson 210INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (06)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMLieberman, Robert CHodson 210INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.108 (01)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 111INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (02)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 111INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (03)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 111INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (04)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 111INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (05)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 111INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (06)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 111INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (07)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 111INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (08)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 111INST-GATEWY, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSimon, Josh DavidMergenthaler 111INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSimon, Josh DavidMergenthaler 111INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (03)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMSimon, Josh DavidMergenthaler 111INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (04)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMSimon, Josh DavidMergenthaler 111INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.228 (01)The American PresidencyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminKrieger 180POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.190.246 (01)Climate Solutions: The Global Politics and Technology of DecarbonizationMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMAllan, BentleyMergenthaler 111INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.246 (02)Climate Solutions: The Global Politics and Technology of DecarbonizationMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMAllan, BentleyMergenthaler 111INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.246 (03)Climate Solutions: The Global Politics and Technology of DecarbonizationMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMAllan, BentleyMergenthaler 111INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.246 (04)Climate Solutions: The Global Politics and Technology of DecarbonizationMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMAllan, BentleyMergenthaler 111INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.254 (01)Democratic Political TheoryTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPhillips, Chas.Maryland 109INST-PT
AS.190.255 (01)Race and Racism in International RelationsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSchmidt, Sebastian; Shilliam, RobbieGilman 377INST-IR
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 217INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.326 (01)Democracy And ElectionsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKatz, Richard StephenKrieger 300INST-CP
AS.190.329 (01)National Security-Nuclear AgeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDavid, Steven RGilman 381INST-IR
AS.190.330 (01)Japanese PoliticsT 4:30PM - 7:00PMChung, ErinGilman 313INST-CP
AS.190.335 (01)Imagining BordersT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee EKrieger 302INST-IR
AS.190.353 (01)China and the WorldTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAng, Yuen Yuen; Yasuda, John KojiroMaryland 202POLI-IR, POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.190.384 (01)Urban Politics & PolicyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, LesterMaryland 114INST-AP
AS.190.392 (01)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 17INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.392 (02)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 17INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.415 (01)Political Arts: Dada, Surrealism, and Societal MetamorphosesW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBennett, JaneGilman 208INST-PT
AS.190.421 (01)Violence: State and SocietyM 3:00PM - 5:30PMKocher, Matthew AGilman 313INST-IR
AS.190.437 (01)Race and Ethnic Politics in the United StatesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, Vesla MaeGilman 55INST-AP
AS.190.449 (01)War and Society in World PoliticsM 4:30PM - 7:00PMBarkawi, Tarak KarimKrieger 308INST-IR
AS.190.458 (01)Climate Geopolitics: New-Zero Industrial Policy and World OrderW 1:30PM - 4:00PMAllan, BentleyMaryland 201INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.191.335 (01)Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)T 4:30PM - 7:00PMFreedman, RobertKrieger 307INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.345 (01)Russian Foreign Policy (IR)W 4:30PM - 7:00PMFreedman, RobertKrieger 307POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.365 (01)The Political History of PoliceMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMSaxton, Stephanie AlexandraGilman 377POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP
AS.191.370 (01)(Mis)Measuring Human ProgressTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMTrasi, AilaBloomberg 172POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.192.225 (01)Economic Growth and Development in East AsiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraSmokler Center 213INST-ECON
AS.194.205 (01)Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, PoliticsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, Homayra3003 N. Charles OMA Lounge
AS.196.201 (01)Introduction to Civic LifeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMAmat Matus, Consuelo; Mason, Lily HallMaryland 114INST-AP
AS.196.306 (01)Democracy by the NumbersTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMCorrigan, Bryce INST-CP
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMJelavich, PeterHodson 316INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT, HIST-EUROPE
AS.211.314 (01)Jewish in America, Yiddish in America: Literature, Culture, IdentityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSpinner, Samuel JacobGilman 381INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.361 (01)Dissent and Cultural Productions: Israeli Culture as a Case StudyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStahl, Neta INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.386 (01)Italian CinemaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 381INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 443INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 443INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWuensch, AprilGilman 479INST-CP
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMPinar Diaz, Alicia INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMWilliams, Rachel C INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.175 (01)Chinese RevolutionsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 413INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.239 (01)Coffee, Tea and EmpiresTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 413INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithSmokler Center 213INST-AP, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.317 (01)Sociology of ImmigrationMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMHao, LingxinGilman 277INST-IR
AS.230.328 (01)Agrarian Change in Post-Reform China and BeyondMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMLiu, Tiantian INST-CP
AS.230.332 (01)Family, Gender, and Sexuality in East AsiaT 1:30PM - 4:00PMWan, Yifeng INST-CP
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilSmokler Center LibraryINST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.340 (01)Human Rights Activism: Between Theory and PracticeTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilSmokler Center LibraryINST-IR
AS.230.345 (01)Global Migration and DevelopmentTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, RinaKrieger 180INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.355 (01)Caste and Race in CapitalismTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMSharma, SonalKrieger 304INST-ECON, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.360 (01)Finance CapitalismT 4:30PM - 7:00PMJacober, ConradKrieger 304INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGreif, MeredithSmokler Center 213INST-AP
AS.271.402 (01)Water, Energy, and Food NexusTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMBurgess, JerryOlin 247ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, ENGY-SCIPOL
AS.300.330 (01)Modern East Asian Literatures Across BoundariesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, SatoruGilman 208
AS.310.305 (01)China, Southeast Asia, and U.S. National SecurityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, marvin CMergenthaler 266INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.327 (01)Women in China from Antiquity to MeTooM 3:00PM - 5:30PMStaffMergenthaler 266INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.310.332 (01)Ethnicity in ChinaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaffMergenthaler 266INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.336 (01)Rebellion and Its Enemies in China TodayTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMStaffMergenthaler 266INST-CP
AS.360.410 (01)Humanities Research Lab: The Dutch AmericasM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHyman, Aaron M.Gilman 277HART-RENEM
AS.362.115 (01)Introduction to Police and PrisonsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceShriver Hall 001INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer PKrieger 300HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL