Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Latin America in a Fracturing World
AS.070.324 (01)

This course examines the multiple and overlapping crises afflicting Latin America today through an ethnographic lens. Featuring conversations with authors of recent work on the region’s most pressing issues, we will explore the contours of knowledge production itself under conditions of precarity and violence. Discussions will include the retrenchment of borders, migration crises, the state management of life and death, the resurgence of authoritarianism, food insecurity, and resource conflicts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro, Han, Clara
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic Texts
AS.070.465 (01)

What is the nature of anthropological concepts and what relations do they bear to concepts internal to a society? We invite students to think with key ideas from Hindu and Islamic traditions, asking if anthropological concepts are best seen as abstractions from the particular or as intertwined with ongoing lines of inquiry, say into the nature of the real and continual efforts to test it? Topics in ritual theory, grammar, aesthetics, translation, revelation, luminosity, figuration and the mythological among those to be considered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena, Khan, Naveeda
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST

Freshman Seminar: American Slavery
AS.100.130 (03)

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Philip
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Freshman Seminar: The Politics of the Future
AS.100.130 (04)

This course explores visions of the technological future in literature, film, and social thought in the twentieth-century United States. Topics include the political implications of television, automation, artificial intelligence, globalization, and the internet.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (01)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (02)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (03)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (04)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (05)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Japan in the World
AS.100.165 (06)

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Power and Pleasure in Asian America: Race and Law in Culture
AS.100.235 (01)

This course examines how Asians and Asian Americans became racialized in U.S. law from the early twentieth century through today. Topics include immigration, U.S. empire in Asia, food, and activism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Chua, Jilene Chan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (01)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (02)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (03)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chronicling the Caribbean
AS.100.239 (04)

This course explores innovations in Caribbean Archaeology and Caribbean History and challenges to European writing of the region’s history as mere appendage to imperial history justifying European domination and exploitation of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Turner Bryson, Sasha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and Exchanges
AS.100.246 (01)

Ideas and concepts on colonialism and globalization are reconsidered and refined in this course on the study of early modern Iberian expansion in Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Galasi, Francis
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA

Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the medieval Middle East
AS.100.262 (01)

The course examines religious difference in the medieval Middle East, including the policies of different Islamic states towards non-Muslims; conversion to Islam and Islamization of society; apostasy and martyrdom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

This class focuses on Europe from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss such topics as the Cold War, the welfare state, the arms race, decolonization, migration, 1989, European integration and the EU. We will cover academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources, and more.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-Present
AS.100.283 (01)

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories introduces students to the major themes and historical developments which shape contemporary understandings of LGBTQ+-identified subjects and communities in the US and Western Europe.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Bloomberg 478
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Revolucionarios! Social Movements and Radical Politics from the Spanish Empire to the Catalan Crisis
AS.100.292 (01)

This course examines different radical movement such as anarchism, communism, fascism, nationalism and feminism in the context of the Hispanic world from the nineteenth century to the twenty-first century. Course is in English. No Spanish required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Regue Sendros, Oriol
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-EUROPE, GRLL-ENGL

Peter to Putin: Survey
AS.100.305 (01)

Seminar on modern Russia. No midterm and no final. 6 short weekly journals, two short papers, and two small quizzes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

American Foreign Policy, 1914-2016
AS.100.337 (01)

A history of American foreign relations from 1914-2016. The course focuses on the American creation of an international liberal order and the challenges to that international order.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Delehanty, Sean T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Soviet-American Cold War
AS.100.346 (01)

The focus will be on Soviet-American interactions, Cold-War Cultures, and the impact on both societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (01)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/22
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (02)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/23
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

Sport is our key to understanding the Cold War. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes in public, and international competitions and how Cold War sports relate to race, gender, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Israel and Palestine from 1967 to the Present: a Current and Entangled History
AS.100.409 (01)

Through intensive and extensive reading, we will explore contemporary Israeli society, politics, and culture, contemporary Palestinian society, politics, and culture under occupation, and the historical processes that have shaped both societies and their ongoing entanglement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Telling Japanese Histories
AS.100.443 (01)

This advanced-level seminar explores the political, social, and intellectual concerns that have both shaped and undermined dominant ways of telling Japanese history, especially in Japan and the U.S. since 1945.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

History Research Lab
AS.100.450 (02)

This hands-on course will use historical data and archival material to build a public facing digital atlas of rural Mexico at the end of the nineteenth century. We’ll learn to work with ArcGIS and other platforms, collaborate with scholars in Mexico, and learn about the history of cartography and information technology. Spanish language skills helpful but not required, no programming or GIS background needed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Diplomacy and Conflict in the Ancient Middle East
AS.130.170 (01)

The Middle East is home to the invention of agriculture, cities, and writing. It is also in the Middle East that we find evidence of humanity’s earliest diplomatic activity in, for instance, the actual letters sent by ancient kings to one another, the treaties drawn up after their conflicts, and the inscriptions that commemorate their conquests. In this course, we examine texts such as these to explore questions such as: How do we characterize the international system of the ancient Middle East? Does this system change over the approximately two millennia for which we have documentation? Is it better to approach ancient diplomacy through present-day eyes or in the context of ancient world-views? Is an understanding of diplomacy in the ancient Middle East relevant to our understanding of modern international relations? All texts read in translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lauinger, Jacob
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

History of Public Health in East Asia
AS.140.146 (01)

This course examines the history of disease, epidemics, and public health responses in East Asia from the 17th-20th centuries. This public health history emphasizes the interactions, connections, and comparisons among China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level:
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hanson, Marta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to the History of Modern Philosophy
AS.150.205 (01)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/17
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (02)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (03)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/17
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (04)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro-Political Philosop
AS.150.240 (01)

Course reviews and explores canonical texts in political philosophy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Intro-Political Philosop
AS.150.240 (02)

Course reviews and explores canonical texts in political philosophy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Enlightenment Moral and Political Theory
AS.150.425 (01)

An examination of some of the central texts of the Enlightenment, including works by Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Kant.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Spinoza’s Theological Political Treatise
AS.150.428 (01)

The course is an in-depth study of Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise. Among the topics to be discussed are: Spinoza’s Bible criticism, the nature of religion, philosophy and faith, the nature of the ancient Hebrew State, Spinoza’s theory of the State, the role of religion in Spinoza’s political theory, the freedom to philosophize, the metaphysics of Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise, and finally, the reception of the TTP.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, INST-PT

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (07)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (08)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (11)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (12)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (13)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (14)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (15)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/23
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (16)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (17)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (19)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EU
AS.180.210 (01)

Increased mobility of people across national borders, whether by choice or by force, has become an integral part of the modern world. Using a comparative perspective and an applied economics approach, the course explores the economic and political determinants, and (likely) consequences of migration flows for East Asia, the US and the EU. Lectures, assignments and in class discussions, will be built around the following topics: i) migrants’ self-selection; ii) human capital investment decision-making; iii) remittance decisions and effects; iv) impacts on labor markets of both receiving and sending countries; and v) the economic benefits from immigration. Overall, the course will give students perspective on the why people choose or feel compelled to leave their countries, how receiving countries respond to migrants’ presence, and the key economic policy concerns that are influencing the shaping of immigration policy in East Asia, the US, and the EU.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

The Economic Experience of the BRIC Countries
AS.180.214 (01)

In 2001, Jim O’Neill, the Chief Economist at Goldman Sachs, coined the acronym BRIC to identify the four large emerging economies, Brazil, Russia, India and China. These economies have since had an amazing run, and have emerged as the biggest and fastest growing emerging markets. In this course, we look at the economic experiences of the BRIC countries for the past 50 years. We discuss the reasons that have contributed to their exceptional growth rates, with particular emphasis on their transformation into market economies. We also analyze the challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP

Economics of Transition and Institutional Change
AS.180.233 (01)

This course will introduce students to the comparative analysis of institutions of existing capitalist systems and to the historical evolution of those institutions. By comparing the economic systems of different nations, we will try to reveal the institutional setups that either contribute or hinder economic performance. We will also examine the process of countries transforming their economies and investigate the factors that determine the differences in reforms’ outcomes between countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

International Monetary Economics
AS.180.242 (01)

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crisis, the choice of exchange rate, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Labor Economics
AS.180.351 (01)

The course discusses various issues in labor markets from the perspective of economic theory. We first study the major forces at work that shape labor market behavior; firms’ labor demand and workers’ labor supply. Then we discuss the equilibrium behavior of employment and wages. Using these tools, we also cover various applied topics in labor economics, such as minimum wage regulations, male-female wage differentials, human capital investment, worker mobility, and unemployment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, SPOL-UL

Social Policy Implications of Behavioral Economics
AS.180.389 (01)

Economists increasingly incorporate insights from psychology into models of rational decision-making. Known as "behavioral economics", this line of research considers how, for example, emotions, rules-of-thumb, biased beliefs and time-inconsistent preferences influence how we make choices. Behavioral economics increasingly pervades policy discussions on topics as diverse as: obesity, the role of media, subprime mortgages and voting patterns. Behavioral models are certainly novel, but do they help us to design superior social policies? With the goal of preparing students to address this question, this course (1) provides a thorough overview of the main contributions of behavioral economics, highlighting departures from more traditional economic models and (2) emphasizes how behavioral economic models might (or might not) improve how we think about social policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Papageorge, Nicholas W
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, SPOL-UL, GECS-SOCSCI, BEHB-SOCSCI

Health Economics & Developing Countries
AS.180.390 (01)

Benefits of good health and its costs. Health demand and supply in poor countries. Welfare economics of Public Health. This is a writing seminar. There are some lectures on how to write a paper and on the substance of the economics of international health but the focus and only assignment is a 40-page paper by each student under the supervision of the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Gersovitz, Mark
  • Room: Hackerman 320
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economics of China
AS.180.391 (01)

Discussion of the economic experience of Post-War China, primarily emphasizing topics rather than historical narrative: agriculture, industry including corporate governance and public enterprises, international trade, population, migration, education, health, public finances among other topics. This course is writing intensive and the only assignment for the course is a 40 page paper on some aspect of the Chinese economy to be done under the close supervision of the instructor. The course is not primarily a lecture course, although there will be some lectures on how to do a paper and on the substance of the Chinese economic experience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Gersovitz, Mark
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (01)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (02)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (03)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (04)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (05)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (06)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (03)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (04)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (01)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (02)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (03)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (04)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (05)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (06)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Fictional World Politics: International Relations Through Fiction
AS.190.249 (01)

The plots and settings of fictitious works provide “cases” for the exploration of international relations theories. Incorporates literature, film, and works of IR scholarship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (01)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (02)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (03)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (04)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT

Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases
AS.190.308 (03)

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Colonialism and Foreign Intervention in the Middle East and Africa
AS.190.323 (01)

How did colonial rule and post-colonial foreign intervention shape the history and politics of states in the Middle East and Africa? The first part of this course focuses on the colonial period, examining the era of conquest, considering how and whether colonial rule differed from other types of ruling arrangements, and studying how people in colonized territories reacted to conquest and foreign rule. Part Two focuses on post-colonial foreign military interventions. Part Three considers the potential long-term consequences of colonialism and foreign intervention. The course focuses on British, French, and American imperialism. **This course is eligible for credit toward the Islamic Studies minor, but only if students relate their major research paper to Islam and also notify Prof. Lawrence at the beginning of the course of their intention to seek Islamic Studies credit.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Democracy And Elections
AS.190.326 (01)

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

America and the World
AS.190.331 (01)

This course is a survey of the unique position of the United States in world politics. We will cover the broader international relations literature on the dynamics of hegemony and empire, from work in the realist tradition to more critical approaches. The course will encompass security politics as well as the economic and monetary dimensions of American influence. Interested students must have at least completed one 100 or 200 level introductory course in international relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR

The University in Democracy
AS.190.332 (01)

From the founding of the United States to the COVID-19 pandemic, modern universities have evolved into expansive, complex institutions that play a variety of indispensable roles in the support of democratic societies. They educate citizens as well as specialists; produce new knowledge that shapes discourse and public policy; foster reasoned debate; and act as engines of social mobility. They also incite a great deal of controversy, criticism, and distrust, including for how they have performed these roles. In this course, we will study the centuries-long relationship between universities and democracy, and assess how successfully these institutions (including Johns Hopkins) are fulfilling their most profound functions today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Daniels, Ronald J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Constitutional Law
AS.190.334 (01)

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Korean Politics
AS.190.341 (01)

This course introduces students to the historical and institutional foundations of modern South Korean politics. Topics include nationalism, political economic development, civil society, globalization, and ROK-DPRK relations. Recommended students should take Intro to Comparative Politics or a course related to East Asia first. (CP)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 7:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Foundations of International Relations Theory
AS.190.346 (01)

This course is a broad conceptual introduction to international relations theory in a format that stresses close reading and critical discussion. We will explore mainstream theoretical perspectives and critiques of those perspectives, as well as more recent developments in the field. By the end of the course, students will have a firm grasp of the core issues and debates in the field. The course is conceptually demanding; interested students should have at least completed an introductory course in political science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-PT

A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st Century
AS.190.347 (01)

“Can the United States and China avoid a new Cold War? One might think not given disputes over the South China Sea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, human rights, trade, ideology and so much more. Moreover, competition for influence in the developing world and American concerns as to whether China will replace it as the preeminent world power suggest a new Cold War is in the offing. Nevertheless, their extensive economic ties and need to work together to solve common problems such as climate change, nuclear proliferation, and pandemics argues against a continuing confrontation. This course will examine whether cooperation or conflict will define Sino-American relations, and whether a new Cold War—or even a shooting war—lies in the future.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Comparative Racial Politics
AS.190.355 (01)

This course surveys the major trends and approaches to the comparative study of race in political science and critically examines the link between race and politics. Topics include race and state formation, citizenship and national membership, immigration, racial regimes, and the political economy of race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

Political Arts: Dada, Surrealism, and Societal Transformation
AS.190.368 (01)

An exploration of the political aims, tactics, and strengths and liabilities, of Dada and Surrealism, as it operated in Europe and the Americas in the years between the World Wars, with a comparison to political conditions today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Chinese Politics
AS.190.370 (01)

This course is designed to help students better understand the politics of China. Lectures will focus on the tools of governance that China has employed to navigate its transition from plan to market, provide public goods and services to its citizens, and to maintain social control over a rapidly changing society. The course will draw heavily from texts covering a range of subjects including China's political economy, social and cultural developments, regime dynamics, and historical legacies. Students interested in authoritarian resilience, governance, post-communist transition, and domestic will find this course particularly instructive.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

Decolonizing Politics
AS.190.372 (01)

This course introduces students to the colonial logics that underpin key categories and concepts in Political Science. Working through four sub-fields – political theory, political behavior, comparative politics and international relations, the course also introduces students to alternative knowledge traditions, emanating from minority communities and colonized peoples, which seek to explain the stuff of Political Science via anti-colonial logics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Nationalism and the Politics of Identity
AS.190.379 (01)

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-CP

The American Welfare State
AS.190.380 (01)

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Trump. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP

Urban Politics and Policy
AS.190.385 (01)

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross listed with Africana Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

China's Political Economy
AS.190.389 (01)

This course examines the most important debates about China’s political economic development. After exploring Mao Zedong’s disastrous economic policies, we will consider the politics of reform and opening under Deng Xiaoping, and finally conclude with China’s state capitalist policies across a variety of issue areas. The course will cover literatures on financial reform, public goods provision, foreign trade and investment, agriculture, corruption, business groups, and regulatory development. Where possible we will draw comparisons with the economic experiences of other East Asian nations as well as other post-communist states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 5:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (01)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (02)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Law, Morality, and the State
AS.190.395 (01)

Beginning with Plato, and using Nietzsche’s history of metaphysics as a guide, this course explores answers provided in Euro-American political thought to a central question in political theory: ‘Why should I (or anyone) obey anyone else?’ While critically examining concepts of power and authority, we will read, in addition to works by Plato and Nietzsche, works by Kant, Mill, Rawls, Foucault, and Bennett. This is an upper-division undergraduate writing intensive seminar limited to 15 students. Final grades will be based on three papers, one revision, and class participation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Politics Of Good & Evil
AS.190.398 (01)

The Politics of Good and Evil examines comparatively a series of classical myths and modern philosophies concerning the sources of evil, the nature of goodness and nobility, the relations of culture to politics, nature and the gods, the degree to which any metaphysic or theological faith is certain, and so on. It is a course in “elemental theory” in the sense that each text pursued challenges and disrupts others we read. Often the reader is disrupted existentially too, in ways that may spur new thought. A previous course in political theory or a theoretical course in the humanities is advised. A high tolerance for theory is essential. Texts on or by Sophocles, Job, Genesis ("J" version), Augustine, Voltaire, Nietzsche, James Baldwin, W. Connolly and Elizabeth Kolbert form the core of the class. Assignments: 1) One 12 page paper and a second 5-7 page paper, both anchored in the readings; 2) a class presentation on one text; 3) regular attendance and quality participation in class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH

The End of Whiteness
AS.190.418 (01)

This is a writing intensive, advanced undergraduate political theory seminar on racial formation. Specifically, the course explores the end of whiteness in multiple senses of the phrase. First, to what extent do the ends served by whiteness change, or remain continuous, over time? What power hierarchies and political goals has white identity been engineered to advance historically? We shall then examine the contemporary phenomenon whereby the end of white supremacy is conceived by some as the end of the world. This, in turn, will lead us to investigate how we should best understand white disavowal of threats of climate change and pandemics/health-care crises currently coursing through white identity politics. The last part of the course will be dedicated to exploring the end of whiteness in terms of the theories and practices potentially required to dismantle whiteness as white supremacy. Readings include Du Bois, Fanon, Painter, Baldwin, Moreton-Robinson, Hartmann, Olson

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Power
AS.190.450 (01)

Power is a -- if not the -- key concept of international relations, yet there is no single definition of power that is accepted by all scholars in the field. In this course we will critically examine definitions of power from classic and contemporary works of international relations, political science, and related areas of study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Political Polarization
AS.190.473 (01)

The American constitutional order, which was designed to operate without political parties, now has parties as divided as any in the democratic world. This course will examine explanations of how this happened, the consequences of party polarization for public policy and governance, and what if anything should be done about it.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Asian Cities in Comparative Perspectives
AS.191.314 (01)

The postwar era marked the rise of Asian cities. Not only do Asian cities host more than half of the world urban population, the majority of world megacities are also located in Asia. Notwithstanding its unprecedented scope and speed, an urbanizing Asia also offers fascinating alternative routes to prosperity outside the Western world. How did Tokyo rise from the ashes of war to be the global hub of trade and technology? How did Singapore and Hong Kong transform themselves from small towns to global metropolises? Why do we see fewer slums in Beijing than in New York? To engage these critical questions of cities, students in this course will pursue two modes of comparison: comparisons between newly-developed Asian cities and early capitalist cities in the West and comparisons among Asian cities. The material in this course will mainly discuss cities in East Asia and Southeast Asia. Nonetheless, students are welcome to draw examples from Western and Central Asia in discussions and assignments. Part I of the course introduces key concepts and major theories on cities and urbanization. Through problematizing familiar concepts like urbanism, urbanization, development, and slum, students will develop a critical understanding of concepts that might be taken for granted in everyday conversation. Part II moves to more empirically-grounded discussions of Asian cities. Each week, we will study a set of cities under a particular theme, where students will learn to apply but also challenge the concepts and theories that we learned in Part I. We will explore a wide range of topics that are central to development in Asian cities, including developmentalism, neoliberalism, city-states, authoritarianism, uneven development, and globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Zeng, Nanxi
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Political Thought and the Horror of Theatricality
AS.191.322 (01)

Actors provoke horror in political philosophers: from Plato's flamboyant poet corrupting the youth of Athens, to the early Christian theologians equating theatricality with sodomy and satanic debauchery, all the way to the Enlightenment thinkers suspecting the licentious actors of working in secret to subvert the public fraternity. It seems that at the very heart of political philosophy there lies the figure of a perverted jester perpetually working to undermine the entire social order with his artful wiles. Is the political ideal of deliberative democracy permanently bedeviled by the phantasm of a cunning histrionic bogeyman turning our public debates into theatrical spectacles and inciting our reasonable citizens to degenerate into impassioned fools? Considering the various contemporary articulations of identity politics, inviting us to cast off our masks and to take pride in our authentic selves, could it be the case that, rather than ridding ourselves of this naive political fiction, we are merely reliving an extension of a two millennia old horror story of theatricality? Are we still subconsciously terrified of actors? Sign up to find out.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Vinketa, Darko
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Comparative Labor Migration
AS.191.324 (01)

This course will arm students with the tools necessary to unpack the dual-faced nature of globalized migration as both a domestic and international policy issue, as well as both a driver of economic growth and a target of discontent. To do so, students will encounter a variety of competing narratives, grounded in substantively differing worldviews and understandings of economic and social behavior, and gain an appreciation for the diversity of both labor migration policy itself and the interdisciplinary study of it using approaches grounded in Political Science, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, and History across a variety of geographic, political, and economic contexts. The course will give particular attention to the distinctive features of labor migration policy in regions such as East Asia, the Middle East, South America, and Africa, while also examining it from race studies, decolonial studies, and gender studies perspectives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Tian, Yunchen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

States, Regimes & Contentious Politics
AS.192.150 (01)

This course introduces students to the study of politics and political life in the world, with a particular focus on the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Throughout the course, we will analyze the sources of order and disorder in modern states, addressing a series of questions, such as: why did nation-states form? What makes a state a nation? Why are some states democracies while others are not? How do people organize to fight oppression? Why does conflict sometimes turn violent? What are the causes of ethnic war? Drawing on a mix of classic works and contemporary scholarship, we will discuss the answers that scholars have formulated to address these and other questions, paying special attention to research design and the quality of argumentation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 34/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social Sciences
AS.192.210 (01)

Are you planning to do a research project for your independent study class, or preparing for a grant application, or working on a big research project for a research intensive class or graduation thesis, or just wishing to improve your research skills? If so, this course is for you! Through weekly two hour sessions over ten weeks, you will receive systematic training on major research tools, resources and techniques useful for any research project in international studies, political science, and other social science subjects. By the end of the course, you will be able to come up with a viable research topic, and complete a research statement that includes an abstract, problem statement and literature review based on in-depth research utilizing tools and techniques covered in the course. The skills you learn through the course will prepare you for any future research projects and advanced studies.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 6:00PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Ye, Yunshan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economic Growth and Development in East Asia
AS.192.225 (01)

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Informational World Orders
AS.192.290 (01)

We are on the cusp of a new era of contention in global politics. For decades, politicians and experts assumed that global information networks like the Internet had an inherently liberal bias, and would weaken autocratic regimes like China and Russia. Now, we are discovering that authoritarian countries can use technology too. The result is increased clashes over information technology between democratic countries and non-democratic countries, and among democratic countries too. All of them find themselves sharing the same global networks, and fighting over how these networks ought to work. In this course, we'll debate the conflict between different informational world orders promoted by the US, Europe and China. We will examine when information technology helps strengthen democracy, and when it benefits autocracies instead. We'll explore how information markets work, and work through the logic of political fights over artificial intelligence and surveillance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Farrell, Henry
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Kissinger Seminar on American Grand Strategy
AS.192.410 (01)

Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructors and space in the course is limited. To apply, email a one-page resume, one-page personal statement on why you want to take the class including how it contributes to your professional interests, and a writing sample of less than ten pages to KissingerCenter@jhu.edu. This course is an initiative of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS, meant to link SAIS with the undergraduate International Studies major at Homewood. It will expose exceptional undergraduate students to the study of grand strategy and the history of U.S. foreign policy. The bulk of the course will explore critical moments, themes, and people in the history of American grand strategy, from Washington’s Farewell Address to the statecraft of Donald Trump. The seminar will be rooted in applied history—the study of the past as a way of better understanding the challenges and opportunities of the present and future. It will also be interdisciplinary, drawing on international relations theory and contemporary policy studies. The seminar will equip students to evaluate and contribute to intense debates about the future of American grand strategy. In addition to regular classroom meetings, the course will feature events at the SAIS campus in Washington, DC, including meetings with current and former policymakers. Transportation between Homewood campus and SAIS will be provided. These sessions will be followed by a dinner hosted by the Kissinger Center.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Brands, Henry S, Gavin, Francis J
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

The Battle of Ideas for the World Economy
AS.192.415 (01)

This seminar is intended as a capstone intellectual experience for seniors and advanced juniors majoring in international studies. The course presumes some background in economics, comparative politics, and international relations. This course will hone your analytical and writing skills by exposing you to theoretically advanced forms of political economy argument in a “proposition-opposition” format. The seminar is organized around a series of thematic pairings, covering such political economy themes like free trade vs. protectionism, free market capitalism vs. socialism, democratic erosion vs. autocratic strength, hegemonic stability vs. US abdication of power, or whether the current populist wave has mainly economic or mostly cultural roots. Each segment will deal with a specific topic area. Our discussions will involve in-depth interrogations of the arguments of these ‘pro-con’ authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Matthijs, Matthias
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Global Health Policy
AS.192.420 (01)

The world’s countries—low, middle and high-income alike—face numerous health challenges, many shaped by processes connected to globalization. We are presently amidst one of the greatest global health challenges of the past century—the COVID-19 pandemic. But there are others that persist, including combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic, addressing non-communicable diseases, expanding health coverage and ensuring effective global governance for health. This course will examine these and other issues with an emphasis on facilitating your understanding and critical analysis of central issues in global health policy, and examining the role you can play to address health conditions—particularly those that affect disadvantaged populations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Shiffman, Jeremy
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

The Politics and International Relations of Iran
AS.192.425 (01)

This course provides a basis for understanding the political, economic and security dimensions of Iran’s politics and the country’s role in World politics. It will discuss the Islamic Republic of Iran's complicated political system and its international politics. A significant and geostrategically situated country, Iran is where Islamic ideology first attained power in form a major social revolution. The unfolding of that revolution has shaped the Middle East, and has posed one of the most important challenges to American foreign policy. As a revolutionary Islamic State Iran experienced a unique path to development and state-building. This course will introduce the students to the main ideological currents and political trends in Iranian politics. It will discuss the structure of its theocracy, and the working of its politics and economy. The course will also examine Iran’s foreign policy posture, with focus on U.S.-Iran relations, quest for nuclear power, and Iran's regional policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Nasr, Vali R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

The Qur'an: Text and Context
AS.194.220 (01)

For 1400 years, the Qur’an has played a central role in Muslim intellectual, spiritual, artistic and ritual life. This course will explore the sacred scripture of Islam through its foundational ideas, history of the text and thematic development, literary style, history and methods of interpretation, and role in Muslim spiritual and ritual life. We will also explore how the Qur’an weaves through literature, music and the visual arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

African-Americans and the Development of Islam in America
AS.194.230 (01)

Muslims have been a part of the American fabric since its inception. A key thread in that fabric has been the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants, some of whom were Muslims, and who not only added to the dynamism of the American environment, but eventually helped shape American culture, religion, and politics. The history of Islam in America is intertwined with the creation and evolution of African American identity. Contemporary Islam in America cannot be understood without this framing. This course will provide a historical lens for understanding Islam, not as an external faith to the country, but as an internal development of American religion. This course will explicate the history of early Islamic movements in the United States and the subsequent experiences of African-Americans who converted to Islam during the first half of the twentieth century. We will cover the spiritual growth of African American Muslims, their institutional presence, and their enduring impact on American culture writ large and African-American religion and culture more specifically.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Cultures of Pilgrimage in Islam
AS.194.305 (01)

The hajj pilgrimage to Mecca is one of the pillars of Islam. But Muslims around the world also take part in many other pilgrimages, from the massive annual Shi’a pilgrimage to Karbala to the smaller ziyarat “visits” to Sufi saint shrines, to travel to centers of Islamic learning, to pilgrimage to isolated natural features like mountains, trees, valleys. What are the theologies that propel the act of travel in Islam? How are cities, architectures, economies shaped by these cultures? And how are these traditions affected by the wars and colonial projects that plague many Muslim-majority countries in the contemporary world? Readings in this course will draw from anthropology, philosophy, Islamic interpretive texts (tafsir), and travelogues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Roy, Arpan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Democracy by the Numbers
AS.196.306 (01)

How is democracy doing around the world? This course will help students to answer this question and ask their own questions about political systems by examining a variety of quantitative measures of facets of democracy in the U.S. and internationally. We consider general indices as well as those that focus on specific normatively-appealing aspects—the absence of fraud in and broader integrity of the electoral process itself, the guarantees of fundamental human rights to all, governments’ effectiveness and accountability to the public, the equity of both representation and policy outcomes for minority groups and those historically disadvantaged or excluded, and the possibility and extent of civic engagement in non-government institutions. Wherever possible, the course will present evidence about the kinds of institutions and policies that seem to bolster democracy. Students can expect to gain hands-on experience with publicly-available subnational and national indicators of electoral and democratic quality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Corrigan, Bryce
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Democracy
AS.196.311 (01)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Democracy
AS.196.311 (02)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Democracy
AS.196.311 (03)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Democracy
AS.196.311 (04)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2019. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/3
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Power and Resistance in French Political Thought
AS.211.478 (01)

Today France is a multicultural, multi-ethnic society fractured by the memories of colonialism. Throughout the country's history, French thinkers – classical and contemporary – have questioned the foundations of power and focused critically not only on the claims of authority issuing from the top, but also on the compliance of the governed. What it is, they ask, that makes people stick together and recognize each other as citizens of one country? Is there such a thing as a shared history, and is Fraternité something more than a slogan? Works by La Boétie, Montaigne, Diderot, Robespierre, Tocqueville, Gobineau, Camus, Sartre, Memmi, Foucault and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Russo, Elena
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-PT

The Martyr’s Crown: Sacrifice in the Renaissance
AS.212.311 (01)

During the Renaissance, the dominance of Catholicism in Western Europe was challenged by a host of Protestant ideologies. Numerous conflicts – often tied to religious tensions – broke out across Europe. In these conflicts, both Catholic and Protestant sides used the figure of the martyr to bolster support for and faith in their respective causes. This course will examine well-known Renaissance martyrological texts, as well as artistic depictions of martyrs, in order to understand the role that these representations played in the period’s many religious wars. This course will also take advantage of local collections (the Walters, the BMA, JHU’s Special Collections).Two classes a week will be taught in English; a third discussion section will be offered in French for those wishing to take the course for French credit. For French credit, students should sign up for section 2, and they should have already completed AS.210.301. This course is also writing intensive.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Konieczny, Claire Margaret
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL

The Martyr’s Crown: Sacrifice in the Renaissance
AS.212.311 (02)

During the Renaissance, the dominance of Catholicism in Western Europe was challenged by a host of Protestant ideologies. Numerous conflicts – often tied to religious tensions – broke out across Europe. In these conflicts, both Catholic and Protestant sides used the figure of the martyr to bolster support for and faith in their respective causes. This course will examine well-known Renaissance martyrological texts, as well as artistic depictions of martyrs, in order to understand the role that these representations played in the period’s many religious wars. This course will also take advantage of local collections (the Walters, the BMA, JHU’s Special Collections).Two classes a week will be taught in English; a third discussion section will be offered in French for those wishing to take the course for French credit. For French credit, students should sign up for section 2, and they should have already completed AS.210.301. This course is also writing intensive.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Konieczny, Claire Margaret
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/7
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (01)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wuensch, April
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

French Identities: Race, Gender, Religion, and Sexual Preference in Contemporary France
AS.212.361 (01)

How should a just society come to terms with persistent inequalities? France, the country of liberty, equality and fraternity, that offered sanctuary from US racism to such figures as James Baldwin, Richard Wright, and Miles Davis and legalized same-sex marriages two years before the US did, is now deeply divided. This course explores the tensions and contradictions between the universalist and color-blind ideals of the French republic and the realities of discrimination in contemporary French society. Topics studied include the status of the concept of race in political discourse; the law forbidding signs of religious belief in the public schools and responses to it; and how American initiatives like Black Lives Matter, #metoo and critical gender studies have both sparked French activism and political movements and generated a powerful backlash. Conducted in English. Students interested in taking an optional additional discussion section in French should take section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Roos, Suzanne
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/8
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

French Identities: Race, Gender, Religion, and Sexual Preference in Contemporary France
AS.212.361 (02)

How should a just society come to terms with persistent inequalities? France, the country of liberty, equality and fraternity, that offered sanctuary from US racism to such figures as James Baldwin, Richard Wright, and Miles Davis and legalized same-sex marriages two years before the US did, is now deeply divided. This course explores the tensions and contradictions between the universalist and color-blind ideals of the French republic and the realities of discrimination in contemporary French society. Topics studied include the status of the concept of race in political discourse; the law forbidding signs of religious belief in the public schools and responses to it; and how American initiatives like Black Lives Matter, #metoo and critical gender studies have both sparked French activism and political movements and generated a powerful backlash. Conducted in English with optional additional discussion section in French.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Roos, Suzanne
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (01)

The Truth behind the Courtly Façade: «Of ladies, knights, of passions and of cutthroat competition»: the truth behind the romantic façade. What did life actually look like at Italian courts of the 1400 ‘s and 1500’s? We will reconstruct life at a Renaissance court through Italian history, literature, music and art of this period. Who were the stars of these scenes? We will explore the complex and intricate world of the Italian courts, including Florence and Ferrara, through the works of art they produced. The course will concentrate on historical, literary and visual representations including modern media such as film and television.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/7
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (02)

The Truth behind the Courtly Façade: «Of ladies, knights, of passions and of cutthroat competition»: the truth behind the romantic façade. What did life actually look like at Italian courts of the 1400 ‘s and 1500’s? We will reconstruct life at a Renaissance court through Italian history, literature, music and art of this period. Who were the stars of these scenes? We will explore the complex and intricate world of the Italian courts, including Florence and Ferrara, through the works of art they produced. The course will concentrate on historical, literary and visual representations including modern media such as film and television.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Whose Caribbean and the Epic of Race
AS.215.442 (01)

We will study literary claims of epic colonial possession and aesthetic dispossession through close readings of five works in reverse chronological order: V.S. Naipaul’s late historical novel, A Way in the World (1994); Derek Walcott’s transoceanic poem, Omeros (1990); Alejo Carpentier’s short anti-Enlightenment moral tale, El reino de este mundo (1949) and his short tale in celebration of Afro Cuban wizardry, Viaje a la semilla (1944); Aimé Césaire’s prose poetry, mixed chronicle, Cahier d'un retour au pays natal, or Notebook of a Return to the Native Land (1939-1947). We will address questions of temporality and historicity (Heidegger) and a base-materialist political blocking of wild dreams as attainable through translation (Bataille). Such formal and epistemic problems will draw us into issues of race across the colonial spectrum of Caribbean histories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL

Mapping Identity in Modern Spain
AS.215.469 (01)

What social, political, and economic forces make groups of people appear out of place in a given society? How have literary works contributed to counteracting the marginalization of certain groups? This course will look at how modern Spanish artists, writers, and intellectuals wrestled with questions of identity and marginalization. We will critically examine how the modern Spanish state was forged from restrictions on cultural difference and consider the various marginalized groups that were left in its wake. These groups include various peoples (e.g. the Romani), ideologies (e.g. anarchism, socialism, communism), social and economic classes (e.g. peasants, the working class), and regional identities (e.g. Catalonia, the Basque Country). Key texts in modern Spanish literature will prompt our investigation into how writers and artists reflected on, contested, and expressed the marginality of the country’s various internal others. Taught in Spanish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Latin American Ecocriticism
AS.217.425 (01)

Increased awareness of climate change has led to a shift in the way we address and intervene in environmental issues in the new millennium. Yet the interest in making sense of the environment has a long history in literature and the arts. How have Latin American writers and artists understood and depicted their environments and environmental questions? How do the form and content of texts and cultural artifacts influence our understanding of the non-human world? Can works of fiction shape ecological transformations? In this course we will discuss texts from the early colonial period to the present, including the literary works of Graciliano Ramos, Horacio Quiroga, and Clarice Lispector; political ecology; film; Ana Mendieta’s earth-body art; contemporary experiments in bio-art; postcolonial theory; and the intersection of environmental justice with such topics as nationalism and human rights. Going beyond ecocriticism’s original focus on the Anglo-American world, we will engage recent scholarship on Latin America that sheds light on the region’s cultural and geopolitical importance to the global climate, with particular attention to Brazil. This course aims to introduce students to current debates in Latin American Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene and thus contribute to an incipient but expanding field.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on three classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. The course is devoted to understanding how each theorist understood the origin, structure and historical dynamics of modern societies. In addition to comparing their theories, we will use them to analyze current social issues, including those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Global Social Change
AS.230.221 (01)

This course introduces students to issues of global social change, with a particular focus on the challenges of international development and the contemporary globalization process. Specific themes include world income inequality and global poverty, the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. WTO and EU) and their relations with sovereign states, anti-globalization activism, the rise of China and India in the global economy, and the origins as well as consequences of the current global economic crisis and global pandemics, among others. Lectures will be aided by documentary films and other multi-media materials. Special Note: Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only. Formerly offered as AS 230.353. Students who took AS.230.353 cannot take AS.230.221.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MINOR

Freshman Seminar: Public Opinion and Democracy
AS.230.224 (01)

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and the contours of democracy in the United States, and how have these relationships changed as techniques for measuring public opinion have evolved since the early twentieth century? To consider this question, the course introduces alternative perspectives on the features of a healthy democracy, including both historical perspectives and current arguments. Interweaved with this material, the course examines how public opinion is measured and interpreted by private pollsters, survey researchers, and data journalists. Emphasis is placed on the alternative claims that opposing analysts adopt, as well as how the technologies of data collection and analysis shape the permissibility of conclusions. Students will learn to interpret public opinion patterns, which requires a brief presentation of basic concepts from survey sampling, including what to make of the polling industry’s most boring concept: margin of error.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China
AS.230.233 (01)

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Liang, Guowei
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Coffee, Tea and Empires
AS.230.239 (01)

The course introduces the transformation of the coffee and tea industries in the long nineteenth century against the backdrop of European and Japanese colonial expansion. It surveys the social changes in the colonial world under the development of the cash crop economy. It also analyzes how the consumption of such caffeinated beverages became sources of heritage makings both in the metropoles and colonies and the latter's postcolonial reconstructions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

War and State: A Social Science Survey
AS.230.251 (01)

This course will introduce you to the cornerstone literature of contemporary social sciences on war and nation-state. Literature in this course comes from a variety of disciplines including sociology, political science, history and archaeology. We will start with basic definitions of key concepts of “war”, “state” and “state formation”. Then we will read different theories of how evolutions in war and military gave rise to modern states as we see today. After that we will survey a stream of historical cases of war and state formation across Europe, Asia and Africa in different historical periods. Finally, we will contemplate what influences war and military continue to exert in contemporary societies and states, and the challenges that lie ahead.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Fang, Zhicao
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Advanced Topics in International Development
AS.230.315 (01)

This class offers an advanced engagement of various topics in international development. The course begins with an historical examination of the actors and global events, as well as the intellectual debates, that birthed the field of international development as a discrete area of study and practice. We will then analyze the evolving theories that dominated the first five decades of the international development effort. The final part of the course will examine more recent perspectives that have attempted to fill the intellectual void left by the demise of the traditional development paradigm. Here we will cover topics that span the global North and South, including issues of race/caste/ethnicity, migration, gender, and right-wing nationalism. Some prior knowledge of international development is recommended

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Gender and International Development
AS.230.324 (01)

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine the gendered impact of international development experiences and policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of how the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work political participation and social movements. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (02)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Contemporary Social Theory
AS.230.395 (01)

What is the structure of society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced? What is the relation between social structures and our ideas about them? What are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? This course will examine how major social theorists of the 20th century advanced novel answers to these questions as they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20thcentury—the Russian revolution and its degeneration into Stalinism, the failure of communist movements in the West, the rise and fall of fascism and Nazism, the consolidation of capitalist democracies and welfare states, the emergence of anti-colonial movements in the “Third World,” and the persistence of race, gender and sexuality as forms of domination. In addition to understanding and comparing theories, we will assess their usefulness for understanding the present. This is a reading and writing-intensive seminar.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Climate Change: Science & Policy
AS.271.360 (01)

Prereq: 270.103 or permission of instructor. This course will investigate the policy and scientific debate over global warming. It will review the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change, examine the potential impacts and implications of climate change, explore our options for responding to climate change, and discuss the present political debate over global warming.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zaitchik, Benjamin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Environmental Ethics
AS.271.401 (01)

Environmental Ethics is a philosophical discipline that examines the moral relationship between humans and the natural environment. For individuals and societies, it can help structure our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Beginning with a comprehensive analysis of their own values, students will explore complex ethical questions, philosophical paradigms and real-life case studies through readings, films and seminar discussions. Traditional ethical theories, including consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics will be examined and applied. Environmental moral worldviews, ranging from anthropocentric to ecocentric perspectives, will be critically evaluated. Organized debates will help students strengthen their ability to deconstruct and assess ethical arguments and to communicate viewpoints rooted in ethical principles. Students will apply ethical reasoning skills to an examination of contemporary environmental issues including, among others, biodiversity conservation, environmental justice, climate change, and overpopulation. Students will also develop, defend and apply their own personal environmental ethical framework. A basic understanding of modern environmental history and contemporary environmental issues is required. Prior experience with philosophy and ethics is not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, INST-PT, ENVS-MINOR

Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis
AS.271.403 (01)

This course provides students with a broad introduction to US environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA, RCRA, and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of this course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the proper perspective. This course is taught in conjunction with an identical graduate course. All students will be expected to perform at a graduate level.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 6:00PM - 8:45PM
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/21
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, ENVS-MINOR

Great Minds
AS.300.102 (01)

Introductory survey of foundational texts of modern philosophy, social and political thought, and literature. This semester will include works by Plato, René Descartes, Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Virginia Woolf, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Iris Murdoch, Cora Diamond, Judith Butler, Kwame A. Appiah, Jacques Derrida, and others. The course is taught in lectures and in seminar discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Contemporary Sinophone Literature and Film
AS.300.328 (01)

A survey of contemporary literature and film from the peripheries of the Chinese-speaking world, with a special focus on Hong Kong, Taiwan, and overseas Chinese communities in Southeast Asia, the Americas, and Europe. We will not only examine literary and filmic works in the contexts of the layered histories and contested politics of these locations, but will also reexamine, in light of those works, critical concepts in literary and cultural studies including, but not limited to, form, ideology, hegemony, identity, history, agency, translation, and (post)colonialism. All readings are in English; all films subtitled in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern East Asian Literatures Across Boundaries
AS.300.330 (01)

Modern literature in East Asia is as much defined by creation of national boundaries as by their transgressions, negotiations, and reimaginations. This course examines literature originally written in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean in light of contemporary understandings of political, social, and cultural boundary demarcation and crossings. How do experiences of border-crossing create and/or alter literary forms? How, in turn, does literature inscribe, displace, and/or dismantle boundaries? Our readings will include, but not limited to, writings by intra- and trans-regional travelers, exiles, migrants, and settlers; stories from and on contested borderlands and islands (e.g. Manchuria, Okinawa, Jeju); and works and translations by bilingual authors. All readings are provided in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

From Chekhov to Chernobyl: Russian Literature of Environmental Catastrophe
AS.300.332 (01)

Environmental degradation and disaster offer a steady backdrop to the 20th century in Russia and the Soviet Union. While the Soviet regime promised mastery over the environment and Russian culture valorized the harmonization of humans with the natural world, environmental catastrophe proved the folly of those dreams. We will read works by authors who have grappled with this ongoing catastrophe and its implications for relations between human beings and the world. Texts range from short stories and novellas to modernist experimental fiction and documentary prose. We will also engage with materials in special collections and screen selected films. Authors include: Chekhov, Bulgakov, Platonov, Solzhenitsyn, Rasputin, Petrushevskaya, and the Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy
AS.310.305 (01)

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, Marvin C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

The History and Culture of North Korea
AS.310.323 (01)

This course investigates the history and culture of North Korea. In doing so, the class seeks to address topics not often discussed in the media and eschew a focus on international relations and security issues. Course material include conventional scholarship, political tracts, biographies, movies, as well as works of fiction. For the final project, students will write a research paper on a topic of their choice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Feminist and Queer Theory: Black Decolonial Feminisms in the Americas
AS.363.301 (01)

This course will use both historical and contemporary readings focusing on Black and decolonial feminisms as theory and praxis to reflect on the particular experiences of afro-descendants throughout the Americas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Estrella, Amarilys
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Poetics and Politics of Sex: Gender and Modernity
AS.363.335 (01)

This course explores the complex and diverse ways in which gender and sexuality have been imagined, constituted and unsettled by the artistic creations and political institutions of modernity around the world. Emphasizing the close relationship between politics and aesthetics, we will study works of cinema and literature to gain a deeper understanding of gender and sexuality with respect to some of the themes of modernity, such as human rights, modernism, psychoanalysis, religion and secularism, the postcolonial order and globalization. Each week, selections from a literary or cinematic work will be paired with a theoretical reading that responds to similar themes and concerns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Sirin, Hale
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Visualizing Africa
AS.389.405 (01)

Examines the history of African art in the Euro-American world, focusing on the ways that Western institutions have used African artworks to construct narratives about Africa and its billion residents.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:30PM - 9:00PM
  • Instructor: Tervala, Kevin Dixon
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.070.324 (01)Latin America in a Fracturing WorldW 1:30PM - 4:00PMAngelini, Alessandro, Han, Clara INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.465 (01)Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic TextsF 1:30PM - 4:00PMDas, Veena, Khan, Naveeda INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.100.130 (03)Freshman Seminar: American SlaveryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMorgan, Philip HIST-US
AS.100.130 (04)Freshman Seminar: The Politics of the FutureM 1:30PM - 4:00PMBurgin, AngusGilman 132HIST-US
AS.100.165 (01)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (02)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (03)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (04)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (05)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.165 (06)Japan in the WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA
AS.100.235 (01)Power and Pleasure in Asian America: Race and Law in CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMChua, Jilene Chan HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (01)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (02)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (03)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 12:00PM - 1:15PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.239 (04)Chronicling the CaribbeanF 1:30PM - 2:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:15PMTurner Bryson, Sasha HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.246 (01)Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and ExchangesMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMGalasi, Francis INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.262 (01)Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the medieval Middle EastMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMEl-leithy, Tamer HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethShaffer 3HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.283 (01)Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-PresentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieBloomberg 478HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.292 (01)Revolucionarios! Social Movements and Radical Politics from the Spanish Empire to the Catalan CrisisTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMRegue Sendros, OriolGilman 50INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-EUROPE, GRLL-ENGL
AS.100.305 (01)Peter to Putin: SurveyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey P HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.337 (01)American Foreign Policy, 1914-2016TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDelehanty, Sean T HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.346 (01)Soviet-American Cold WarT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey P HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaRowe, William T HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (01)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHodson 110HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (02)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHodson 110HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethMergenthaler 111HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel Louis HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.409 (01)Israel and Palestine from 1967 to the Present: a Current and Entangled HistoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMoss, Kenneth HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William T INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John W INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.443 (01)Telling Japanese HistoriesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, Hayang HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.450 (02)History Research LabT 3:00PM - 5:30PMLurtz, Casey HIST-LATAM, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.170 (01)Diplomacy and Conflict in the Ancient Middle EastTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLauinger, Jacob INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, David NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.140.146 (01)History of Public Health in East AsiaMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMHanson, Marta INST-GLOBAL
AS.150.205 (01)Introduction to the History of Modern PhilosophyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMelamed, Yitzhak Yohanan PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (02)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMMelamed, Yitzhak Yohanan PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (03)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMelamed, Yitzhak Yohanan PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (04)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMMelamed, Yitzhak Yohanan PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.240 (01)Intro-Political PhilosopMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLebron, Christopher Joseph PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.240 (02)Intro-Political PhilosopMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLebron, Christopher Joseph PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.425 (01)Enlightenment Moral and Political TheoryF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBok, Hilary PHIL-ETHICS, PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.428 (01)Spinoza’s Theological Political TreatiseM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMelamed, Yitzhak Yohanan PHIL-MODERN, INST-PT
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (04)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (05)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (06)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (07)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (08)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (11)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (12)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (13)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (14)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (15)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (16)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (17)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.102 (19)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHamilton, Bruce W 
AS.180.210 (01)Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EUTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraShaffer 3INST-ECON
AS.180.214 (01)The Economic Experience of the BRIC CountriesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDasgupta, Somasree INST-ECON, INST-CP
AS.180.233 (01)Economics of Transition and Institutional ChangeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, Ludmila INST-ECON
AS.180.242 (01)International Monetary EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, Ludmila INST-ECON
AS.180.351 (01)Labor EconomicsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHusain, Muhammad Mudabbir INST-ECON, SPOL-UL
AS.180.389 (01)Social Policy Implications of Behavioral EconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMPapageorge, Nicholas WLevering ArellanoINST-ECON, SPOL-UL, GECS-SOCSCI, BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.180.390 (01)Health Economics & Developing CountriesGersovitz, MarkHackerman 320
AS.180.391 (01)Economics of ChinaGersovitz, MarkHodson 301INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.101 (01)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (02)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (03)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (04)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (05)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (06)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSheingate, Adam INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (03)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (04)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.220 (01)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (02)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (03)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (04)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (05)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.220 (06)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace INST-IR
AS.190.249 (01)Fictional World Politics: International Relations Through FictionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.267 (01)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 1:30PM - 2:45PMChambers, Samuel Allen POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (02)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChambers, Samuel Allen POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (03)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChambers, Samuel Allen POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (04)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 4:30PM - 5:45PMChambers, Samuel Allen POLI-PT, INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.308 (03)Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and CasesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMazzuca, Sebastian L INST-CP
AS.190.323 (01)Colonialism and Foreign Intervention in the Middle East and AfricaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLawrence, Adria K POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.326 (01)Democracy And ElectionsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKatz, Richard Stephen INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.331 (01)America and the WorldTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchmidt, Sebastian INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.332 (01)The University in DemocracyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMDaniels, Ronald J INST-AP
AS.190.334 (01)Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, Emily INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.341 (01)Korean PoliticsW 7:00PM - 9:30PMChung, Erin INST-CP
AS.190.346 (01)Foundations of International Relations TheoryTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSchmidt, Sebastian INST-IR, INST-PT
AS.190.347 (01)A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st CenturyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDavid, Steven R POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.355 (01)Comparative Racial PoliticsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMChung, Erin POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.190.368 (01)Political Arts: Dada, Surrealism, and Societal TransformationT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBennett, Jane POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.370 (01)Chinese PoliticsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMYasuda, John Kojiro POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.190.372 (01)Decolonizing PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMShilliam, Robert POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.190.379 (01)Nationalism and the Politics of IdentityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew A INST-PT, INST-CP
AS.190.380 (01)The American Welfare StateTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, Daniel POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP
AS.190.385 (01)Urban Politics and PolicyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, Lester INST-AP
AS.190.389 (01)China's Political EconomyTh 5:00PM - 7:30PMYasuda, John Kojiro POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.392 (01)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMMazzuca, Sebastian L POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.392 (02)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian L POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.395 (01)Law, Morality, and the StateTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCulbert, Jennifer POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.398 (01)Politics Of Good & EvilM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William E POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH
AS.190.418 (01)The End of WhitenessT 4:30PM - 7:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.450 (01)PowerT 3:00PM - 5:30PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee INST-IR
AS.190.473 (01)Political PolarizationTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMTeles, Steven Michael INST-AP
AS.191.314 (01)Asian Cities in Comparative PerspectivesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMZeng, Nanxi INST-CP
AS.191.322 (01)Political Thought and the Horror of TheatricalityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMVinketa, DarkoGilman 50POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.191.324 (01)Comparative Labor MigrationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMTian, Yunchen POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.192.150 (01)States, Regimes & Contentious PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLawrence, Adria K INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.192.210 (01)Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social SciencesW 6:00PM - 8:00PMYe, Yunshan 
AS.192.225 (01)Economic Growth and Development in East AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraShaffer 3INST-ECON
AS.192.290 (01)Informational World OrdersW 1:30PM - 4:00PMFarrell, Henry INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.192.410 (01)Kissinger Seminar on American Grand StrategyT 4:30PM - 7:00PMBrands, Henry S, Gavin, Francis JMergenthaler 111INST-GLOBAL
AS.192.415 (01)The Battle of Ideas for the World EconomyW 4:30PM - 7:00PMMatthijs, MatthiasGilman 132INST-ECON
AS.192.420 (01)Global Health PolicyTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMShiffman, Jeremy INST-IR
AS.192.425 (01)The Politics and International Relations of IranM 1:30PM - 4:00PMNasr, Vali R INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.194.220 (01)The Qur'an: Text and ContextW 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, Homayra ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.230 (01)African-Americans and the Development of Islam in AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaff INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.305 (01)Cultures of Pilgrimage in IslamT 1:30PM - 4:00PMRoy, Arpan INST-GLOBAL
AS.196.306 (01)Democracy by the NumbersTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMCorrigan, Bryce INST-CP
AS.196.311 (01)DemocracyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMApplebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha INST-CP
AS.196.311 (02)DemocracyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMApplebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha INST-CP
AS.196.311 (03)DemocracyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMApplebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha INST-CP
AS.196.311 (04)DemocracyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMApplebaum, Anne E, Mounk, Yascha INST-CP
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:20PMPomeranzev, PeterShaffer 303INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.478 (01)Power and Resistance in French Political ThoughtMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMRusso, Elena GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-PT
AS.212.311 (01)The Martyr’s Crown: Sacrifice in the RenaissanceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKonieczny, Claire MargaretHodson 210GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.311 (02)The Martyr’s Crown: Sacrifice in the RenaissanceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMKonieczny, Claire MargaretHodson 210GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWuensch, April INST-CP
AS.212.361 (01)French Identities: Race, Gender, Religion, and Sexual Preference in Contemporary FranceMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMRoos, SuzanneHodson 211GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.212.361 (02)French Identities: Race, Gender, Religion, and Sexual Preference in Contemporary FranceMW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMRoos, SuzanneGilman 177GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.214.362 (01)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMStephens, Walter E GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.214.362 (02)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMStephens, Walter E GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.215.442 (01)Whose Caribbean and the Epic of RaceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGonzalez, Eduardo GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.469 (01)Mapping Identity in Modern SpainTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSeguin, Becquer D GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.217.425 (01)Latin American EcocriticismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMiguel Bedran, Marina GRLL-ENGL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAndreas, Joel INST-PT
AS.230.221 (01)Global Social ChangeMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHung, Ho-Fung INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.224 (01)Freshman Seminar: Public Opinion and DemocracyMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen L INST-AP
AS.230.233 (01)Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary ChinaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLiang, Guowei INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.239 (01)Coffee, Tea and EmpiresTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, Meredith INST-AP
AS.230.251 (01)War and State: A Social Science SurveyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFang, Zhicao INST-IR, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.315 (01)Advanced Topics in International DevelopmentF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, Rina INST-IR, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.324 (01)Gender and International DevelopmentT 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, Rina INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.335 (02)Medical HumanitarianismMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, Meredith INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.395 (01)Contemporary Social TheoryT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, Michael INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, Christy INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.271.360 (01)Climate Change: Science & PolicyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZaitchik, Benjamin INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.271.401 (01)Environmental EthicsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMonopolis, Alexios Nicolaos GECS-SOCSCI, INST-PT, ENVS-MINOR
AS.271.403 (01)Environmental Policymaking and Policy AnalysisM 6:00PM - 8:45PMMonopolis, Alexios Nicolaos INST-AP, INST-CP, ENVS-MINOR
AS.300.102 (01)Great MindsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, Paola INST-PT
AS.300.328 (01)Contemporary Sinophone Literature and FilmWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMHashimoto, Satoru INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.330 (01)Modern East Asian Literatures Across BoundariesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, Satoru INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.332 (01)From Chekhov to Chernobyl: Russian Literature of Environmental CatastropheW 1:30PM - 4:00PMEakin Moss, Anne INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.310.305 (01)Southeast Asia and US Security StrategyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, Marvin C INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.323 (01)The History and Culture of North KoreaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKim, Nuri INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, Gaochao INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.363.301 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Black Decolonial Feminisms in the AmericasTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMEstrella, Amarilys INST-PT
AS.363.335 (01)Poetics and Politics of Sex: Gender and ModernityTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSirin, Hale INST-PT
AS.389.405 (01)Visualizing AfricaT 6:30PM - 9:00PMTervala, Kevin Dixon INST-GLOBAL