Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Conflict and Security in a Global World
AS.070.295 (02)

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Enthnographic Perspectives on Brazil
AS.070.336 (01)

This seminar offers an examination of Brazilian culture and politics through close readings of classic and contemporary ethnography. The course will track how anthropologists have approached the complexities and contradictions of Brazilian society. And, conversely, we investigate how studies in Brazil have prompted challenges to and generated innovations in anthropological thought.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Conflict and Security in a Global World
AS.070.295 (01)

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran
AS.070.267 (01)

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

Freshman Seminar: Climate Change - Treaties and Politics
AS.070.124 (01)

With a focus on the United Nations organized Conference of Parties that negotiates global climate change policy, this course will ask, how are international environmental agreements made? To what extent are they responsive to scientific knowledge and empirical realities? What possibilities and exclusions are produced by this process for politics and activism? An important task will be to de-center the U.S. from these discussions to consider the issue from the perspective of the Global South, even as we interrogate what such a perspective means. We will draw on scientific reports, policy documents, recordings of negotiations and activist protests, media and expert commentaries and literary works to navigate this bed of thorns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Khan, Naveeda
  • Room: Mergenthaler 439
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Korean War
AS.070.359 (01)

This course takes the Korean War as a site to both explore: 1) contemporary historical and political transformations in East Asia and globally and 2) the ways in which violence, catastrophic loss, and separation are woven into everyday life. It will explore the Korean War through film, fiction, historiography, and draw on comparative materials in anthropology

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Han, Clara
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Making of Minority in South Asia
AS.070.212 (01)

This area studies course on modern South Asia will interrogate conceptions of nation, community, tradition and belonging across the region from the lens of minority groups, in order to equip students with the analytical tools with which to interrogate the politics of inclusion and exclusion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Asif, Ghazal Ghazal Asif
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (01)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (02)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (03)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (04)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Modern Europe and the Wider World
AS.100.104 (04)

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform
AS.100.113 (01)

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Walters, Ronald
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Freshman Seminar Religion and Media
AS.070.124 (02)

This course examines the ways in which conventional and non-conventional media recreate or transform religious experience in modern life. Increasingly, religion is experienced not only in sacred spaces and as ritual prescriptions, but also through the information that is disseminated through radio, TV, and the Internet, as well as in consumer culture and political speeches. Beginning with this proposition that our ideas about religion are shaped not only by historical and scriptural legacies, but as well as by material practices and other sundry conditions of mediation, of which our present times supply many, we will reexamines how questions of revelation, belief, spirituality, ethereality, and ritual practice are constituted by these irreducible ways, thus complicating the neat separation of religion and secularism, or, for that matter, religion and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Bagaria, Swayam
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Modern Europe and the Wider World
AS.100.104 (03)

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform
AS.100.113 (02)

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Walters, Ronald
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/14
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform
AS.100.113 (03)

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Walters, Ronald
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/13
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform
AS.100.113 (04)

This course examines race and social movements in America from the Revolution to 1921.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Walters, Ronald
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/13
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation
AS.100.123 (01)

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Larson, Pier M
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (04)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

A Comparative History of Jewish and Christian Mysticism
AS.100.273 (01)

This course will trace the historical development of Jewish and Christian mysticism between the 11th and the 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL

Freshman Seminar: US-USSR Cold War
AS.100.130 (01)

Focus on Stalin, Khrushchev/ Truman-Eisenhower period but includes Brezhnev-Nixon. 2 sides of cold war, write 6 journals of 300 words, 2 papers of 1200 words, 2 quizzes, no midterm or final.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (01)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Modern Europe and the Wider World
AS.100.104 (01)

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Modern Europe and the Wider World
AS.100.104 (02)

The Modern European World familiarizes students with key moments, ideas, communities, individuals, and movements which have formed European History since the Revolutionary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

History of Modern Germany
AS.100.233 (01)

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We will explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its position within Europe and the world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (02)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

The history of China from the last years of the Qing Empire to the post-Mao reforms.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 26/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Reading through Things: Early Modern Chinese Medicine, Technology, and Art
AS.100.331 (01)

This course introduces the history of late imperial China from the perspective of medicine, technology, and the arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Ji, Xiaoqian
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

Age of Tolstoy
AS.100.361 (01)

Tolstoy and his era, 1820s to 1910s. Topics include state and politics, empire, the Russian identity, and forms of cultural expression. Students consider "War and Peace" and other masterworks.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-EUROPE

Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle Ages
AS.100.374 (01)

Examines case-studies of imperial conquests (Islamic, Mongol, reconquista, early colonialism) and attendant changes in religion (Christianization; Islamization) and in language (Arabization; transition from Latin to European vernaculars) across medieval Eurasia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE

The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing Backlash
AS.100.497 (01)

The shorthand “1968” stands for rebels and revolutions, but also for incremental changes throughout the 1960s that fundamentally changed the post-war order and the Cold War in East and West.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Crime, Punishment, Felony and Freedom: Law and Society in Pre-Modern England
AS.100.373 (01)

Using legal texts as a window into English society, we will address the changing nature of royal power, trial by jury, treason, felony, and the freedoms enshrined in the Magna Carta.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city
AS.100.413 (01)

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th Century
AS.100.408 (01)

We will read and analyze key works of social and critical theory produced in relation to 20th and 21st century problems of state and society, nationalism, empire, totalitarianism, genocide, capitalism, political order, gender, race, sexuality, secularism, religion, environmental catastrophe. Possible readings include Weber, Du Bois, Adorno, Arendt, Foucault, Balibar, Beck among others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

The Haitian Revolution in Global Perspective
AS.100.376 (01)

An advanced undergraduate seminar tracing the history of the Haitian Revolution from its origins in the early modern Atlantic world to its global impact and continuing legacies in the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Gaffield, Meredith Michelle
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (03)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA

Historiography Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

A survey of assumptions and approaches in the study of modern Chinese history, as written by Chinese, Japanese, and Western historians.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Migrants and Refugees in Africa
AS.100.444 (01)

A history of forced and voluntary migration and displacement in Africa, its causes and consequences, with a focus on refugees and labor migrants since 1960.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Larson, Pier M
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (07)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (09)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (11)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (08)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (16)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (13)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (24)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (15)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Game Theory in Social Sciences
AS.180.217 (01)

Game Theory is the study of multiple person decision problems in which the well-being of a decision maker depends not only on his own actions but also on those of others. Such problems arise frequently in economics, political science, business, military science and many other areas. In this course, we will learn how to model different social situations as games and how to use solution concepts to understand players' behavior. We will consider various examples from different fields and will play several games in class. The emphasis of the class is on the conceptual analysis and applications and we will keep the level of mathematical technicalities at the minimum -- high school algebra and one term of calculus will be sufficient. Students who took AS.180.117 are not eligible to take AS.180.217.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Ying
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (23)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (21)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/17
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (22)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Economic Development
AS.180.228 (01)

A comprehensive survey of economic behavior by households, farms and firms in poor countries and the role of and for governments. Discussions include measurement of income levels, economy-wide equilibrium, sources of growth, agriculture and industry, international trade and investment, savings, population, fertility, education, health, income distribution and public finances. Applies economic theory rigorously to interpret and evaluate the economic experience of poor countries. Diagnostic test on Elements of Economics is required in the second week. Grading based on 3 exams and one paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Gersovitz, Mark
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

International Trade
AS.180.241 (01)

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, GECS-SOCSCI

Financial Markets and Institutions
AS.180.266 (01)

Understanding design and functioning of financial markets and institutions, connecting theoretical foundations and real-world applications and cases. Basic principles of asymmetric information problems, management of risk. Money, bond, and equity markets; investment banking, security brokers, and venture capital firms; structure, competition, and regulation of commercial banks. Importance of electronic technology on financial systems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wright, Jonathan H
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/38
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (12)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Rich Countries, Poor Countries
AS.180.361 (01)

Why are some countries rich while some other countries poor? Why does a country’s income per person generally grow over time? We try to analyze these questions using the theoretical and empirical growth literature. We will study seminal growth models, and also try to explain cross-country income differences in terms of factors like geography, institutions and global integration. Knowledge of regression analysis (including instrumental variables estimation) is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Topics in International Macroeconomics and Finance
AS.180.303 (01)

The course will review selected topics in international macroeconomics and finance. The topics for the Fall of 2019 include: financial globalization; international portfolio diversification; capital account liberalization and the choice of the exchange rate regime in emerging markets; the global financial safety net; macroeconomic adjustment in the euro area.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jeanne, Olivier
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Health Economics & Developing Countries
AS.180.390 (01)

Benefits of good health and its costs. Health demand and supply in poor countries. Welfare economics of Public Health. This is a writing seminar. There are some lectures on how to write a paper and on the substance of the economics of international health but the focus and only assignment is a 40-page paper by each student under the supervision of the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Gersovitz, Mark
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (01)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (01)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Poverty/Inequality
AS.180.355 (01)

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Moffitt, Robert A
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/32
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (03)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (02)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (06)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Economics of Health
AS.180.289 (01)

Application of economic concepts and analysis to the health services system. Review of empirical studies of demand for health services, behavior of providers, and relationship of health services to population health levels. Discussion of current policy issues relating to financing and resource allocation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:30PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Bishai, David M
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 64/100
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (01)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (04)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (05)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (02)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (03)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (05)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (06)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (07)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (08)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (07)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (04)

An introduction to Euro-American political thought, with a focus on the role of language, rhetoric, and Eros within politics. Texts by Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Walt Whitman, and Emma Goldman.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (10)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

The Politics of Global Development
AS.190.245 (01)

Development is often assumed to be an economic issue. In this course we examine the politics of development on a global scale. We begin by looking at the colonial and Cold War histories of development. We then use these histories to contextualise contemporary development issues that directly affect international relations such as aid and debt, humanitarianism, food security, land “grabs”, migration and indigenous rights. The course also seeks to understand the ways in which the issues underlying global development have always connected and continue to connect the peoples and polities of the Global North and Global South.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

An introduction to Euro-American political thought, with a focus on the role of language, rhetoric, and Eros within politics. Texts by Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Walt Whitman, and Emma Goldman.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Finding Equality in Law and Society
AS.190.325 (01)

In this class, we will ask questions about the relationship between equality, law, and society. We will investigate how people have used law in their movements for greater equality, and ask whether law has served these movements well and how it has worked. We will pay particular attention to movements based on race, gender, and economic class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room: Mattin Center 160
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

National Security-Nuclear Age
AS.190.329 (01)

This course examines the impact of weapons of mass destruction on international politics with an emphasis on security issues. The first half of the course focuses on the history of nuclear weapons development during the Cold War and theories of deterrence. The second half of the class considers contemporary issues including terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missile defense and proliferation. Requirements include a midterm, final and a ten page paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

The Social Contract and its Discontents
AS.190.356 (01)

This course focuses on one of the most powerful stories told in the tradition of western political theory: the story of the social contract. This story is about the constitution of legitimate political authority. It is told in many ways and each version makes different assumptions, in particular about human nature, the power of reason, the value of order, and the character of justice. We examine this often-conflicting assumptions and explore how they continue to inform the way we think about the possibilities and problems of politics. Readings include texts by Arendt, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Freud, Pateman, the Federalists, Derrida, and Douglass. Final grades are based on class participation, two exams and two papers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (01)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

America and the World
AS.190.331 (01)

This course is a survey of the unique position of the United States in world politics. We will cover the broader international relations literature on the dynamics of hegemony, empire, and asymmetrical relationships, from work in the realist tradition to more critical approaches. We will also assess the importance of American domestic institutions in understanding past and contemporary developments.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (05)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (08)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (09)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

An introduction to Euro-American political thought, with a focus on the role of language, rhetoric, and Eros within politics. Texts by Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Walt Whitman, and Emma Goldman.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (03)

An introduction to Euro-American political thought, with a focus on the role of language, rhetoric, and Eros within politics. Texts by Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Walt Whitman, and Emma Goldman.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (03)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

American Constitutional Law
AS.190.333 (01)

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (04)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

Comparative Political Behavior
AS.190.338 (01)

An introduction to the study of political behavior, emphasizing electoral behavior in democratic countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Nationalism and the Politics of Identity
AS.190.379 (01)

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-PT, INST-CP

The Executive Branch
AS.190.406 (01)

In the 19th Century America was noted for its courts, political parties and representative institutions. Today, America’s political parties and representative institutions have declined in importance while the institutions of the executive branch have increased in importance. This seminar will examine the nation’s key executive institutions and aspects of executive governance in the U.S. Students will alternate primary responsibility for week’s readings. Every student will prepare a 10-15 page review and critique of the books for which they are responsible in class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Global Environmental Politics
AS.190.381 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Allan, Bentley
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-IR

Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases
AS.190.382 (02)

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Hackerman B 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Freshman Seminar: International Politics from the Global South
AS.191.217 (01)

This course focuses on the interests and preferences of developing countries in international politics. The formal and informal rules of international politics tend to favor the interests and preferences of powerful countries: richer states, with better technologies and superior military capabilities. Sometimes, however, the interests and preferences of great powers do not align with what the rest of the countries want, especially with states in the Global South. We will analyze what developing countries do to restrain the leeway of powerful countries, particularly when their interests and preferences conflict. The course is divided into four main sections: a review of theories about international order and international hierarchies, tools to restrain great powers, review of strategies from countries in Latin America, Africa, and East Asia, and areas of disagreements between the Global North and the Global South.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Rodriguez Aquino, Jose Luis
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Democracy and Political Psychology: Ideals and Realities of Democratic Citizenship
AS.191.307 (01)

This course confronts the expectations of democratic theory regarding the way citizens should think and behave with findings from political psychology with respect to how they do think and behave. Divergences of the ideals and realities of democratic citizenship often seem quite glaring and discomforting. What are the conclusions we should draw from such mismatches? Should we simply accept them or is there something to be done about them? Alternatively, should democracy be redefined or abdicated altogether? The course will center on the experience of the advanced industrial democracies – the places where one would presume democracy to work best. In addition to addressing substantive questions, the course also aims to equip students with approaches, methods, and techniques they can use in conducting their own empirical research.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Klingelhoefer, Tristan
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-CP, INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-PT

Party Politics from the Founding to the Progressives
AS.190.452 (01)

Though the torchlight parade has long since passed, American parties still stand in the shadow of the nineteenth-century Party Period. This course seeks to untangle the ideologies and practices of party politics from the Founding to the Progressive Era. Topics include the rise of mass parties, political violence, the coming of the Republican Party, the party politics of Reconstruction and westward expansion, corruption and the political machine, Populism, and movements for reform. We pay particular attention to comparisons between past and present, and to opportunities taken and foregone.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

Freshman Seminar: The Politics of Personal Life: Work, Family and Consumption
AS.191.215 (01)

This course explores various theoretical attempts to broaden the meaning of “politics” by examining three spheres of action typically equated with “personal” life: work, family, and consumption. The following questions orient our inquiry: what does the phrase “the personal is political” mean, and what sort of political solutions does it typically endorse? What can we learn about politics by studying family dynamics? Why do Americans work so much, and how does “work ethic” discourse promote punitive social policies? What is the relationship between our everyday acts of consumption and larger political phenomena such as climate change and racialization processes? What can theories of intersectionality tell us about such dynamics?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Masin-Peters, Jonathan
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

The University and Society
AS.190.471 (01)

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

The Politics of Conversation
AS.191.309 (01)

If, with Aristotle, we take the human as the political animal precisely because it is that animal possessing the gift of speech, then politics makes its entrance into our lives whenever we come to speak with one another, far before we consider politics as an activity of citizens in a state, or of states in an international order. In this course we will consider conversation as a specifically political phenomenon. We will address such questions as: What are the purposes of conversation, and how do we navigate these purposes? How do we excuse, justify, explain, forgive, or agree with one another, and what do we do when excuse, explanation, forgiveness, or agreement is no longer possible? These questions have become especially pertinent in a polarized America increasingly disenchanted with the possibility of conversations ‘across the aisle’. But the politics of conversation are relevant to the whole of our relations with other people: how we talk to our family, how we come to be friends, how we cease to be lovers. Readings include works by Plato, Jürgen Habermas, J. L. Austin, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Stanley Cavell. Recommended Course Background: One previous course in political theory or philosophy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Higgins, Christopher James
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Freshman Seminar: From Rabbis to Revolutionaries: Modern Jewish Identities
AS.211.217 (01)

Many Jews in the modern period abandoned the traditional religious way of life, but continued to identify strongly as Jews, and even those who remained committed to tradition had to adapt. Through the prism of the Yiddish language, the vernacular of Eastern European Jewry, this course will explore different ways in which Jews reacted to historical developments and embraced political and cultural movements of their time, from the founding of modern Yiddish theater in Romania, to the creation of a Jewish autonomous region in the far east of the Soviet Union, to the development of avant-garde poetry in New York. In addition to studying a wide range of texts—including fiction, poetry, memoir, song, and film—students will learn how to read the Yiddish alphabet, and will explore food culture by preparing a meal of Eastern European Jewish dishes. No prior knowledge of Yiddish is necessary for this course

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Lang, Beatrice
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Environmental Racism
AS.190.402 (01)

This is an undergraduate political theory seminar that addresses the disproportionate impact of environmental destruction on racially stigmatized populations. We shall examine the logics of power whereby the natural world is subjected to exploitation and domination, in tandem with the subordination of racial subjects historically identified as closer to nature. Likewise, we will explore political and theoretical challenges to environmental racism, such as those posed by indigenous communities, decolonial theory, and political movements contesting the intersection of racial inequalities and ecological crises.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-PT

Dictatorship, Dissidence and Democracy: Central Europe in the 20th Century
AS.191.333 (01)

Central Europe in the second half of the twentieth century was ground zero in the Cold War, as well as in the battle of ideas that accompanied it. In this course, we will first examine the theory of communism and the practice of Stalinism in the region; then seek to understand the tactics of dissent and the ideas behind it; and finally focus on the collapse of communist in 1989 and the struggle to “democratize” the region in the decade that followed. Over the course of the semester we will examine the relationship between political ideology and everyday life, seeking to understand what big concepts like ‘democracy’ and ‘dictatorship’ really meant for ordinary people from Warsaw and Tallinn to Budapest and East Berlin. We will also discuss Soviet, American and, in the latter part of the course, Russian foreign policy, with special emphasis on outsiders’ use of propaganda and violence to affect political change in the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Russian Foreign Policy (IR)
AS.191.345 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Bloomberg 278
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/35
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (01)

This course explores the rich terrain of German literature and philosophical thought, from the Enlightenment to today. At each meeting, we will investigate canonical texts of the German intellectual tradition, with an eye to establishing their well-deserved place in wider, global discourses. In this way, we will learn to think critically with these important literary and philosophical texts from German-speaking lands as a means of viewing and appreciating the full panorama of German thought. Authors discussed may include Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Hegel, Kleist, Heine, Fontane, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Heidegger, Mann and Bernhard. Readings and discussion will be in English. German is appreciated but not required. Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion (to be scheduled at a mutually agreed time) and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Dornbach, Marton
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT

Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)
AS.191.335 (01)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/35
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern France
AS.212.413 (01)

Across the 20th century, mainstream and avant-garde French culture was deeply impacted by the presence of African American musicians and performing artists hailing from the jazz tradition. From the Josephine Baker craze of the 1920s to the second post-war which welcomed the innovations of bebop and sixties-era free improvisation, metropolitan France proved a space where expatriate and exiled African Americans could both perpetuate the tradition and innovate by turns. At the same time, French taste-makers, critics, and musicians eager to adopt new forms and styles debated the extent to which American jazz music in its various strains could be made French. This course in transcultural French studies will feature readings in music criticism, history, and literature, as well as frequent close listening. It will culminate in an international symposium (to be held Nov. 15 and 16; attendance mandatory) uniting noted scholars and legendary jazz musicians. Although some background in French language and basic musical notation is desirable (students are encouraged to engage in original-source research), all core course readings will be provided in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Schilling, Derek
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL

Capitalism: Politics and Political Thought in a Market Economy
AS.191.406 (01)

The United States is a capitalist economy and we live in a capitalist world. This a fact we take for granted and therefore spend little time examining. Capitalism’ proponents attribute our society’s unprecedented wealth and technological advances to this economic system. Some go so far as to claim that modern democracy and social progress are impossible without a capitalist economy. Critics point to growing social inequality and a slew of environmental ills as proof of capitalism’s unsustainability. Some suggest that capitalism is antithetical to true democracy and human flourishing. But what exactly is capitalism? How did it evolve in the USA and how does the form capitalism takes in the United States differ from the forms it takes elsewhere? And, crucially, how is capitalism shaped by – and how does it shape – contemporary politics? And how exactly is this all related to liberalism, conservatism, neoliberalism, libertarianism, socialism, and democratic socialism? This seminar is designed to help students critically approach these questions. Rather than taking simplistic pro-contra approach, this seminar will examine capitalism along four axes: as a political-economic system, a corollary set of structures and institutions, the force behind a specific form of state organization, and the determinant of how society and individuals act and see themselves. To explore these issues, we will focus on a number of contemporary political issues, with a primary geographic focus on the United States, including the following: the debates over the welfare state and socialized healthcare; unions, lobbies, and special interests; the connection between capitalism, culture, and ideology; the effects of a capitalist organization of labor of questions of race, gender, and citizenship; the commodification of the environment and other species; and the process of critique, resistance, and social change in a capitalist system. Throughout, we will discuss the theoretical and empirical ar

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dutkiewicz, Jan
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, POLI-AP, INST-PT, INST-ECON, INST-AP

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (02)

This course explores the rich terrain of German literature and philosophical thought, from the Enlightenment to today. At each meeting, we will investigate canonical texts of the German intellectual tradition, with an eye to establishing their well-deserved place in wider, global discourses. In this way, we will learn to think critically with these important literary and philosophical texts from German-speaking lands as a means of viewing and appreciating the full panorama of German thought. Authors discussed may include Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Hegel, Kleist, Heine, Fontane, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Heidegger, Mann and Bernhard. Readings and discussion will be in English. German is appreciated but not required. Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion (to be scheduled at a mutually agreed time) and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, W 5:00PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Dornbach, Marton
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/4
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT

Made in Italy: Italian style in context
AS.211.224 (01)

Italy and the “Italian style” have become synonym of exquisite taste, class, and elegance thanks to the quality of Italian craftsmanship. This course will explore some of the major factors that contributed to the rise of Italian fashion and Italian industrial design as iconic all around the world. The classes will focus on the main protagonists and art movements that influenced the development of Italian style. We will analyze trends, clothing, and style not only in a historical context, but also through a critical apparatus that will include themes related to gender, culture, power, and politics. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required, but those who can read in Italian will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL

Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, Politics
AS.194.205 (01)

For over a thousand years, the Sufi tradition has been a dynamic force in Islamic social, political and spiritual life. The tradition offers a treasure trove of devotional literature and music, philosophical treatises, contemplative practices, and institutions of social and political organization. After unpacking the politics of the term “Sufi,” we will trace the historical development of the tradition from the early ascetics in Iraq and Syria to the age of trans-national Sufi orders, with case studies from South Asia, Turkey, and the United States. We will then move into some of the key constructs of the tradition of spiritual growth and character formation: the divine-human relationship, the stages of the spiritual path, contemplative and practical disciplines, ideas of sainthood, discipleship and ethical perfection, and the psychology of love. Throughout the class, we will explore the nature of experiential language and interrogate the tradition through the lens of gender. We will also experience Sufism through ritual and music.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (01)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff, Wuensch, April
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development
AS.230.265 (01)

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students. Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences"

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kang, Minhyoung
  • Room: Krieger 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Chinese Revolutions
AS.230.175 (01)

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/17
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Islam and its Cultural and Religious Diversity, 600-1600
AS.194.105 (01)

While media often present Islam as a fairly univocal and compact cultural and religious system, news reports about tensions, hostility and at times open conflict within the Islamic world itself are frequent. Unity and internal diversity characterize Islam nowadays and have historical roots that have deeply shaped Islam since its very inception. This course will explore the historical origins of the dynamics of unity and diversity in Islam from the predication of Muhammad and the expansion of the first caliphate, to the formation of the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires. By focusing on the historical events and the cultural production of the first millennium of Islam, this course will offer a thorough historical introduction to its cultural and religious complexity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/30
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

This course will provide an undergraduate level introduction to the study and practice, as well as the successes and failures, of international development. Students will be introduced to the various theoretical frameworks used to explain underdevelopment. Students will also explore the practice of development since the 1950s by examining specific strategies employed in Latin America, South Asia, East Asia, and Africa. Using a variety of country-specific case studies, students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical and practical frameworks learned in the class to assess the successes and failures of real-life cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Literature of the Great Recession
AS.215.417 (01)

The Great Recession—sometimes called the financial crisis or the economic crisis of 2008—brought financial markets to a halt and created significant political turmoil across the North Atlantic. But its impact on culture, and literature especially, has often been ignored. This seminar will travel across Europe, from Dublin to Madrid, from London to Reykjavík in order to examine how literature has registered this most recent economic crisis. We will focus on how crisis is narrated and the ways in which literary works have managed to provide a voice for marginalized social, economic, and political demands.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-ECON

Race and the Politics of Punishment in the US
AS.190.433 (01)

Contact with criminal justice has become a primary way that many Americans see and experience government, particularly those from race-class subjugated communities. Yet, our field has been slow to appreciate the development of the carceral state or to consider its manifold for citizenship. In this advanced undergraduate seminar, we will survey key debates around punishment, state violence, and surveillance, with a particular focus on research that takes institutional development, history and racial orders seriously. Why did the carceral state expand in "fits and starts" and with what consequence for state-building? We explore its (racialized and gendered) relationship to other key systems: foster care, social provision, labor relations and the labor market, and immigration enforcement. A core preoccupation of this course will be to understand the ways in which the criminal justice system "makes race" and how debates about crime and punishment were often debates about black inclusion and equality. How does exposure to criminal justice interventions shape political learning, democratic habits, and racial lifeworlds? In addition to policy, political discourse, and racial politics, we will employ works from a range of fields - history, sociology, law and criminology - and a range of methods (ethnography, historical analysis, quantitative and qualitative). Required books include: Khalil Muhammad's Condemnation of Blackness: race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, Elizabeth Hinton's From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime, David Oshinsky's Worse than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice, Bruce Western's Punishment and Inequality in America, and Michael Fortner's Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Freshman Seminar: By Any Means Necessary? Political Theories of Violence
AS.191.216 (01)

Questions of violence are as old as questions of politics itself. Are politics and violence essentially the same or is politics fundamentally non-violent? Is violence the only way to achieve political change? Has the state been a force for eliminating violence and securing freedom or has it only created more conflict? Who gets to define what counts as violent, and for what purposes? This course engages such questions through a theoretical lens, often focusing on political actors and activists responding on the ground to these pertinent questions. It asks students to reconsider what they normally think violence, non-violence, and politics are. We will particularly investigate this angle through the lens of race and colonialism—reading such figures as Michel Foucault, Franz Fanon, Mao Zedong, Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and Ida B. Wells—as well as focusing on histories of state formation and state violence.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Quinn A
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Ecocinema: Framing Italy's Environmental Crises
AS.211.327 (01)

Over the past decade, growing numbers of filmmakers in Italy have addressed ecological crises in their work. This class takes an eco-critical approach to contemporary Italian cinema, examining a body of compelling place-centered stories that deal with local and global issues. Defining the scope of eco-cinema and the ways we can interrogate films as ecological texts, we shall screen earth-centered films that raise consciousness about the consequences of human manipulation of the natural world; the complicity of industry, government, and organized crime in creating environmental crises; and the effects of economic and social malaise. Screenings include iconic films such as Michelangelo Antonioni’s Red Desert (1963), more recent, critically acclaimed films such as Matteo Garrone’s Gomorrah (2008), Alice Rohrwacher’s Happy as Lazzaro (2018), and many others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL

An Interdisciplinary Introduction to the Study of Latin America
AS.215.309 (01)

The course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Latin America. It brings together archeology, ethno-history, art history, literature and environmental studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Castro-Klaren, Sara
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Populism
AS.215.412 (01)

What do Hugo Chávez, Marine Le Pen, and Donald Trump have in common? According to many from across the political spectrum, they are all populists. But what is populism, exactly, and how can it describe such disparate phenomena as left-wing social movements, xenophobic anti-immigrant policies, and economic redistribution? This advanced seminar will examine the history, culture, and political theory of populism. We will pay special attention to the resurgence of populism after the Great Recession and examine a number of cases from Latin America, Europe, and the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The course is devoted to understanding how each theorist understood the origin, structure, and historical dynamics of modern societies. In addition to comparing their theories, we will use them to analyze current social issues, including those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Maryland 109
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI

Politics of Outer Space
AS.190.443 (01)

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Land, Labor and Environmental Movements in Contemporary Africa
AS.230.219 (01)

The course examines the new wave of social protest and popular uprisings in contemporary Africa through the interconnected themes of land, labor, and environmental movements. Attention will be placed on the early 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jacobs, Ricado Eduard
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Sociology of Immigration
AS.230.317 (01)

This course surveys sociological theories and research on immigration to the U.S. Theoretical approaches include theories of international migration, economic sociology, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include the impact of U.S. immigration laws and policies on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population and the U.S. labor market and economy, and the adaptation of the first and second generations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL, INST-IR

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/33
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (02)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Health and Human Rights
AS.230.393 (01)

Is access to healthcare a fundamental human right? If so, then which global actors are obligated to provide healthcare to whom, and for how long? How do meanings of health and illness vary across time and place? And finally, how are human rights principles translated into frontline practice in order to promote well-being? This course takes a critical interdisciplinary approach to these questions through a series of global case studies ranging from humanitarian aid in post-tsunami Sri Lanka to anti-FGM (female genital mutilation) campaigns in Ghana. How do international NGOs, UN bodies, and governments collaborate (or compete) to distribute healthcare in places beset by dire resource shortages? Do human rights principles carry legal weight across borders, and if so, could access to healthcare services and essential medicines be litigated in order to compel governments to provide it? And finally, what cultural assumptions do human rights discourses carry with them, and what happens if rights-based approaches are poorly received by recipient populations? Moving beyond the basic principle of healthcare as a human right, this course aims to bring this idea’s history and politics into focus by offering an in-depth exploration of its ethics and implementation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America
AS.230.385 (01)

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Geopolitics
AS.190.451 (01)

Intensive exploration of theories of how geography, ecology, and technology shape political orders. Case studies of ancient, early modern, global, and contemporary topics, including European ascent, industrial revolution, tropics and North South divide, climate change, geo-engineering and global commons (oceans, atmosphere and orbital space

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Shaffer 302
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Neoliberalism
AS.230.405 (01)

Neoliberalism, a political project that seeks to subject all aspects of social life to free market force, has ascended to orthodoxy in developed and developing countries alike over the last four decades. This course is a reading seminar focused on some of the key classic and cutting-edge original texts that critically examine and debate the origins, socio-political impacts, and crisis of the neoliberal project. It will cover such topics as the genealogy of the neoliberal idea, neoliberal state, informalization of works, neoliberal cities, rise of the one percent, and global governance. Class will be a mix of lecture and seminar-style discussions. Requirements include reading memo, class presentation, and a term paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-ECON

Southeast Asia and US Security
AS.310.305 (01)

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, Marvin C
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Contemporary Social Theory
AS.230.395 (01)

This course will examine how major social theorists of the 20th century advanced upon the “classical” social theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. As they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20th century—the Russian revolution and its degeneration into Stalinism, the failure of communist movements in the West, the rise and fall of fascism and Nazism, the consolidation of capitalist democracies and welfare states, the emergence of anti-colonial movements in the “Third World,” and the persistence of race, gender and sexuality as forms of domination—social theorists provided novel answers to classical questions of social theory: 1) what is the structure of modern society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced?; 2) what is the relation between social structures and ideas, knowledge, and subjectivity?; and 3) what are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? Theorists to be covered include Antonio Gramsci, Franz Fanon, W.E.B. Dubois, Georg Lukacs, Talcott Parsons, Herbert Marcuse, Jurgen Habermas, Louis Althusser, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Nancy Fraser, Patricia Hill Collins, Judith Butler, and Henri Lefebvre. In addition to understanding and comparing the theories, we will try to use them to understand contemporary societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Introduction to Korean History and Culture
AS.310.106 (01)

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history and culture from ancient times to the modern era. Through primary, secondary, and audio-visual sources, students will become familiar not only with the overall contours of the entirety of Korean history, but also with its cultural and religious legacy. The course combines lectures and class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Korean History Through Film and Literature
AS.310.322 (01)

In this course, students will engage with select topics in Korean history from premodern and modern times and examine how the past has been represented through various forms of film and literature. This will be combined with readings of academic articles to allow students to gauge the distance between scholarship and cultural expressions of history. Through this, students will be introduced to the highly contested and often polarizing nature of Korean history and the competition surrounding historical memory. Prior coursework in East Asian Studies strongly recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:20PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Freshman Seminar: Tolstoy's War and Peace
AS.300.237 (01)

Leo Tolstoy’s monumental novel War and Peace, which the author Henry James called “a loose baggy monster,” is a sui generis work of modern literature that offered a response and challenge to the European Realist novel and founded a Russian national myth. We will read the novel in translation, alongside its adaptations into opera, film, and Broadway musical.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Police and Prisons in Comparative Perspective
AS.362.314 (01)

This course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of two parts. First, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Second, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-AFAMER, INST-CP, INST-AP

Documentary Photography in a Changing China
AS.310.210 (01)

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Bloomberg 278
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Authoritarianism, Democracy, and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.310.401 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Philosophical Conceptions of the Infinite
AS.300.315 (01)

What is the infinite? Can we comprehend it? Can we experience it? In this course we will explore various ways in which philosophers in the western tradition have answered questions such as these. In the first half of the semester, we will examine theoretical treatments of the infinite that inform how we understand the fabric of our world, from the ordinary objects around us to more sublime concepts of God, space, time, and mathematics. In the second half, we will turn to arguments in aesthetics and ethics that reveal an interplay between infinity and finitude occurring before our very eyes. Philosophers we will cover include Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Kant, Hegel, Russell, Levinas, and Arendt. Throughout, we will ask such fundamental questions as, what is the starting point of philosophy? what is its methodology? what can it achieve in terms of knowledge? and in terms of practice?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Host, Alexander Stoltzfus
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Russian Avant-Garde Cinema
AS.300.366 (01)

Russian cinema was born out of the intense artistic experimentation of the fin-de-siècle avant-garde and developed in a climate of dramatic political and cultural change in the twenties and thirties. While subject to draconian censorship in the Soviet period, it nonetheless engaged in active dialogue with the film industries of Western Europe and America and had a lasting impact on world cinema. This course examines the extraordinary flourishing of avant-garde cinema in the Soviet Union in the 1920s and 30s including films by Eisenstein, Vertov, Pudovkin, and Dovzhenko, their theoretical writings, and their far-reaching influence on film and film theory. All readings in English, films subtitled in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Labor Politics in China
AS.310.402 (01)

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-ECON

Human Rights in China and U.S. Policy: Advocacy Opportunities and Challenges
AS.310.302 (01)

This interactive seminar will explore domestic human rights issues in China and U.S. policy toward China on human rights. In addition to learning about the broader landscape of human rights issues and related challenges in China, students will select a specific human rights issue to focus on during the course. As a practice-oriented seminar, students will develop advocacy skills that will enable them to effectively “make the case” for why the Administration and Congress should press China on the topic they’ve selected.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Worden, Andrea Joan
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.070.295 (02)Conflict and Security in a Global WorldT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMDas, VeenaAmes 234INST-IR
AS.070.336 (01)Enthnographic Perspectives on BrazilTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAngelini, AlessandroMergenthaler 426INST-CP
AS.070.295 (01)Conflict and Security in a Global WorldT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMDas, VeenaAmes 234INST-IR
AS.070.267 (01)Culture, Religion and Politics in IranTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHaeri, NiloofarMergenthaler 426INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.070.124 (01)Freshman Seminar: Climate Change - Treaties and PoliticsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMKhan, NaveedaMergenthaler 439INST-IR
AS.070.359 (01)Korean WarW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHan, ClaraKrieger 180INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.070.212 (01)Making of Minority in South AsiaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAsif, Ghazal Ghazal AsifMergenthaler 426INST-CP
AS.100.102 (01)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MOlin 305HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (02)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MOlin 305HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (03)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MOlin 305HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (04)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MOlin 305HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.104 (04)Modern Europe and the Wider WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieLevering ArellanoHIST-EUROPE
AS.100.113 (01)Making America: Race, Radicalism, and ReformMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWalters, RonaldAmes 234HIST-US
AS.070.124 (02)Freshman Seminar Religion and MediaMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMBagaria, SwayamMergenthaler 426INST-IR
AS.100.104 (03)Modern Europe and the Wider WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieLevering ArellanoHIST-EUROPE
AS.100.113 (02)Making America: Race, Radicalism, and ReformMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWalters, RonaldAmes 234HIST-US
AS.100.113 (03)Making America: Race, Radicalism, and ReformMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMWalters, RonaldAmes 234HIST-US
AS.100.113 (04)Making America: Race, Radicalism, and ReformMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMWalters, RonaldAmes 234HIST-US
AS.100.123 (01)Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, InnovationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLarson, Pier MGilman 17HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.170 (04)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 132HIST-ASIA
AS.100.273 (01)A Comparative History of Jewish and Christian MysticismMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 277HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.130 (01)Freshman Seminar: US-USSR Cold WarTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 186HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.170 (01)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 132HIST-ASIA
AS.100.104 (01)Modern Europe and the Wider WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieLevering ArellanoHIST-EUROPE
AS.100.104 (02)Modern Europe and the Wider WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieLevering ArellanoHIST-EUROPE
AS.100.233 (01)History of Modern GermanyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 55HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.170 (02)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 132HIST-ASIA
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 132INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.331 (01)Reading through Things: Early Modern Chinese Medicine, Technology, and ArtTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMJi, XiaoqianGilman 413HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.361 (01)Age of TolstoyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 377INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.374 (01)Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle AgesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMEl-leithy, TamerGilman 10INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.497 (01)The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing BacklashW 4:30PM - 7:00PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 377HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.373 (01)Crime, Punishment, Felony and Freedom: Law and Society in Pre-Modern EnglandMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLester, AnneGilman 219HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.413 (01)London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital cityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WKrieger 300INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.408 (01)Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th CenturyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethGilman 10INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.100.376 (01)The Haitian Revolution in Global PerspectiveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMGaffield, Meredith MichelleGilman 186HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.170 (03)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 132HIST-ASIA
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TGilman 77INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center LibraryINST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.100.444 (01)Migrants and Refugees in AfricaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMLarson, Pier MGilman 400HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.180.101 (07)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (05)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (09)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (06)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (11)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (08)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (16)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (13)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (24)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (15)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.217 (01)Game Theory in Social SciencesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMChen, YingAmes 218INST-ECON
AS.180.101 (23)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (21)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (22)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.228 (01)Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PMGersovitz, MarkLatrobe 107INST-ECON
AS.180.241 (01)International TradeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHodson 210INST-ECON, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.266 (01)Financial Markets and InstitutionsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWright, Jonathan HShaffer 304INST-ECON
AS.180.101 (12)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, RobertRemsen Hall 1GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.361 (01)Rich Countries, Poor CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHodson 203INST-ECON
AS.180.303 (01)Topics in International Macroeconomics and FinanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJeanne, OlivierGilman 17INST-ECON
AS.180.390 (01)Health Economics & Developing CountriesT 3:00PM - 5:30PMGersovitz, MarkShriver Hall 001INST-ECON
AS.190.101 (01)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.180.261 (01)Monetary AnalysisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, LudmilaLatrobe 107INST-ECON
AS.180.355 (01)Economics of Poverty/InequalityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMoffitt, Robert AHodson 203SPOL-UL
AS.190.101 (03)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.180.261 (02)Monetary AnalysisTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, LudmilaLatrobe 107INST-ECON
AS.190.101 (06)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.180.289 (01)Economics of HealthM 3:30PM - 6:00PMBishai, David MMaryland 110INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.190.108 (01)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (04)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (05)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (02)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (03)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.101 (05)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.108 (06)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.101 (07)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (08)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.108 (07)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.180 (04)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBennett, JaneMergenthaler 111INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.108 (10)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.245 (01)The Politics of Global DevelopmentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMShilliam, RobertHodson 316INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBennett, JaneMergenthaler 111INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.325 (01)Finding Equality in Law and SocietyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMZackin, EmilyMattin Center 160SPOL-UL
AS.190.329 (01)National Security-Nuclear AgeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDavid, Steven RBloomberg 172INST-IR
AS.190.356 (01)The Social Contract and its DiscontentsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCulbert, JenniferSmokler Center 301POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.227 (01)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMergenthaler 111POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.331 (01)America and the WorldM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchmidt, SebastianShriver Hall 001POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.227 (05)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMergenthaler 111POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.108 (08)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (09)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RMudd 26POLI-IR
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBennett, JaneMergenthaler 111INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (03)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBennett, JaneMergenthaler 111INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.227 (03)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSchmidt, SebastianMergenthaler 111POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.333 (01)American Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, EmilyMaryland 104INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.227 (04)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMergenthaler 111POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.338 (01)Comparative Political BehaviorTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKatz, Richard StephenMaryland 114INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.379 (01)Nationalism and the Politics of IdentityW 1:30PM - 3:50PMKocher, Matthew AMergenthaler 266POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-PT, INST-CP
AS.190.406 (01)The Executive BranchM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminGreenhouse 113INST-AP
AS.190.381 (01)Global Environmental PoliticsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAllan, BentleyGilman 377ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-IR
AS.190.382 (02)Democracy and Development: Theory and CasesMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian LHackerman B 17POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.191.217 (01)Freshman Seminar: International Politics from the Global SouthMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMRodriguez Aquino, Jose LuisMergenthaler 266INST-IR
AS.191.307 (01)Democracy and Political Psychology: Ideals and Realities of Democratic CitizenshipTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKlingelhoefer, TristanKrieger 306POLI-AP, POLI-CP, INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.190.452 (01)Party Politics from the Founding to the ProgressivesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, DanielGilman 277POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.191.215 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Politics of Personal Life: Work, Family and ConsumptionTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMasin-Peters, JonathanMattin Center 162INST-PT
AS.190.471 (01)The University and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert HGilman 381INST-AP
AS.191.309 (01)The Politics of ConversationTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMHiggins, Christopher JamesGilman 277INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.211.217 (01)Freshman Seminar: From Rabbis to Revolutionaries: Modern Jewish IdentitiesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMLang, BeatriceGilman 443GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.402 (01)Environmental RacismW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Greenhouse 113ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-PT
AS.191.333 (01)Dictatorship, Dissidence and Democracy: Central Europe in the 20th CenturyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMApplebaum, Anne EKrieger LavertyINST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.191.345 (01)Russian Foreign Policy (IR)W 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertBloomberg 278POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMDornbach, MartonGilman 313GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT
AS.191.335 (01)Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)M 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertGilman 55INST-IR, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.212.413 (01)For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern FranceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSchilling, DerekGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.191.406 (01)Capitalism: Politics and Political Thought in a Market EconomyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMDutkiewicz, JanGilman 381POLI-PT, POLI-AP, INST-PT, INST-ECON, INST-AP
AS.211.265 (02)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, W 5:00PM - 6:00PMDornbach, MartonGilman 313GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT
AS.211.224 (01)Made in Italy: Italian style in contextMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMProietti, LeonardoShriver Hall 104GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.205 (01)Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, PoliticsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, HomayraLatrobe 120INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff, Wuensch, AprilGilman 400INST-CP
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 313INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.265 (01)Research Tools for Global Sociology and DevelopmentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKang, MinhyoungKrieger 108
AS.230.175 (01)Chinese RevolutionsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKuo, Huei-YingShriver Hall 104INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMGonzalez, EduardoGilman 134GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.105 (01)Islam and its Cultural and Religious Diversity, 600-1600MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMFerrario, GabrieleHodson 316ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, RinaAmes 218GECS-SOCSCI
AS.215.417 (01)Literature of the Great RecessionM 3:00PM - 5:30PMSeguin, Becquer DBloomberg 176GRLL-ENGL, INST-ECON
AS.190.433 (01)Race and the Politics of Punishment in the USTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, VeslaBloomberg 276INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.191.216 (01)Freshman Seminar: By Any Means Necessary? Political Theories of ViolenceMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMLester, Quinn AMaryland 114INST-PT
AS.211.327 (01)Ecocinema: Framing Italy's Environmental CrisesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 277ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.309 (01)An Interdisciplinary Introduction to the Study of Latin AmericaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMCastro-Klaren, SaraSmokler Center 213GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.215.412 (01)PopulismT 3:00PM - 5:30PMSeguin, Becquer DGilman 186INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, EduardoGilman 134INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceMaryland 109INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.190.443 (01)Politics of Outer SpaceT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 55POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.230.219 (01)Land, Labor and Environmental Movements in Contemporary AfricaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJacobs, Ricado EduardMaryland 104INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.317 (01)Sociology of ImmigrationMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMHao, LingxinGilman 134SPOL-UL, INST-IR
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 305INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.230.335 (02)Medical HumanitarianismMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 300INST-IR
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilShriver Hall 104INST-IR
AS.230.393 (01)Global Health and Human RightsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 75INST-IR
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingSmokler Center 301INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.385 (01)Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LHodson 301INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 301INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.190.451 (01)GeopoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceShaffer 302POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.405 (01)NeoliberalismT 1:30PM - 4:00PMHung, Ho-FungMergenthaler 526INST-AP, INST-ECON
AS.310.305 (01)Southeast Asia and US SecurityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, Marvin CSmokler Center LibraryINST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.395 (01)Contemporary Social TheoryF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, RinaHodson 303INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.310.106 (01)Introduction to Korean History and CultureTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKim, NuriMaryland 217INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.310.322 (01)Korean History Through Film and LiteratureW 4:00PM - 6:20PMKim, NuriGreenhouse 113INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.237 (01)Freshman Seminar: Tolstoy's War and PeaceTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMEakin Moss, AnneGilman 208INST-GLOBAL
AS.362.314 (01)Police and Prisons in Comparative PerspectiveMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceRemsen Hall 1AFRS-AFAMER, INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.310.210 (01)Documentary Photography in a Changing ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoBloomberg 278INST-CP
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyHodson 211INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.310.401 (01)Authoritarianism, Democracy, and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarT 3:00PM - 5:30PMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraKrieger 304INST-CP
AS.300.315 (01)Philosophical Conceptions of the InfiniteM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHost, Alexander StoltzfusGilman 208INST-PT
AS.300.366 (01)Russian Avant-Garde CinemaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMEakin Moss, AnneGilman 208INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.402 (01)Labor Politics in ChinaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoKrieger 306INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-ECON
AS.310.302 (01)Human Rights in China and U.S. Policy: Advocacy Opportunities and ChallengesTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMWorden, Andrea JoanGilman 75INST-IR, INST-CP

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Freshman Seminar: Anthropology of Home
AS.070.124 (04)

In this course we will examine different conceptions and experiences of "home" through studies of domesticity, kinship and household in diverse cultural settings. Reading anthropological analysis of urban built environment and locality, we will explore the notions of home and homeland, as realms of care, intimacy and belonging yet also as sites of subjection, discrimination and gender/racial inequality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Slumworld: Life in informal Settlements
AS.070.380 (01)

One quarter of the planet's urban population lives today in slums, shantytowns, favelas, chawls, colonias and other forms of rudimentary settlements (according to UN Habitat). Despite their prevalence throughout the world, these places are still depicted as spaces of informality and abjection, rather than as sites of emergence of innovative -even if disadvantaged-, makeshift ways of producing the city. This course will combine ethnographic and geographical literature, as well as works of fiction and film to explore the lives of squatters and slum-dwellers in many regions of the world and examine in what way their practices, forms of dwelling, sociality, conflict and cooperation are constitutive of the urban experience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic Texts
AS.070.465 (01)

What is the nature of anthropological concepts and what relations do they bear to concepts internal to a society? We invite students to think with key ideas from Hindu and Islamic traditions, asking if anthropological concepts are best seen as abstractions from the particular or as intertwined with ongoing lines of inquiry, say into the nature of the real and continual efforts to test it? Topics in ritual theory, grammar, aesthetics, translation, revelation, luminosity, figuration and the mythological among those to be considered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 2:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena, Khan, Naveeda
  • Room: Mergenthaler 439
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

In this class we focus on such topics as the transatlantic alliance, the Cold War divide, the arms race, détente, migration, European integration and the EU from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources, and more.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Shaffer 100
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 4/45
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (01)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (02)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Peter to Putin: Survey
AS.100.305 (01)

Seminar on modern Russia. No midterm and no final. 6 short weekly journals, two short papers, and two small quizzes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Rise and the Fall of the Modern City: An Environmental History Perspective
AS.100.318 (01)

This course explores how environmental history analyzes the transformations of cities in the West from 1750 to the early 2000s. An emphasis will be placed on historiographical debates and concepts, but also on agency and relations of power. The course also analyze how the environment is a construct, a production of discourses, representations, and debates.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: de Font-Reaulx, Constance Marie Anne
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Soviet-American Cold War
AS.100.346 (01)

The focus will be on Soviet-American interactions, Cold-War Cultures, and the impact on both societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-Present
AS.100.283 (01)

Making and unmaking queer histories introduces students to some of the major themes and historical developments which shape contemporary understandings of past queer lives and communities in the United States and Western Europe since the nineteenth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (01)

History 100.365 will consist of two lectures a week and one discussion section. Readings focus when possible on primary sources. It will cover the social, economic, political and intellectual development of medieval society, beginning with the rise of feudal society, the development of medieval courtly culture, primarily the creation of epic and romance literature in the various courts of Europe; the creation of universities and the intellectual revival of Europe in the form of scholasticism; the re-emergence of trade and, with it, the rise of a middle class, the political development of royal authority which was tantamount to the creation of the modern national state and finally, the emergence of heresy and new forms of spirituality in the late Middle Ages to combat it, especially with the creation of the Dominican and Franciscan monastic orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (02)

History 100.365 will consist of two lectures a week and one discussion section. Readings focus when possible on primary sources. It will cover the social, economic, political and intellectual development of medieval society, beginning with the rise of feudal society, the development of medieval courtly culture, primarily the creation of epic and romance literature in the various courts of Europe; the creation of universities and the intellectual revival of Europe in the form of scholasticism; the re-emergence of trade and, with it, the rise of a middle class, the political development of royal authority which was tantamount to the creation of the modern national state and finally, the emergence of heresy and new forms of spirituality in the late Middle Ages to combat it, especially with the creation of the Dominican and Franciscan monastic orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Themes and Concepts in Jewish History
AS.100.369 (01)

The course will introduce the student to the main themes and debates in Jewish historiography from the 19th century to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST

Modernity, Catastrophe, and Power in Jewish History: 1881 to the Present
AS.100.371 (01)

Jewish history, politics, and culture across a century of enormous transformations and transformative enormities in Europe, the US, and the Middle East. Topics include: impacts on Jewish life of World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the post-imperial reordering of the Eastern Europe and the Middle East; Zionism and other modes of Jewish contestatory politics; the consolidation of American Jewry; Nazism and the Holocaust in Europe; formation and development of the State of Israel; the global reordering of Jewish life amid cross-currents of the Cold War, conflict in the Middle East, and success in the US. Substantial attention to recent and contemporary history including the dramatic changes in Israeli society and polity over the past forty years and the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

Sport is key to understanding the Cold War. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes and international competitions and how sports relate to race, gender, and class. We will discuss the ways in which sports confirm and consolidate but also challenge and change social structures and opportunities of self-fulfillment and social advancement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Images of Postwar Japan
AS.100.398 (01)

This seminar explores Japan’s changing place in the world in the decades following World War II, with an emphasis on analyzing visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, and comic books. Topics include relations with the U.S. and other countries in East Asia, particularly the two Koreas; the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and the global contexts for an expanding Japanese consumerism in the late 20th century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room: Maryland 109
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

The Holocaust in Jewish History and in Global Culture
AS.100.415 (01)

Key works on the history of Nazi Germany’s murder of European Jewry during the Second World War; Jewish responses; the recasting of Jewish and global thought in relation to this signal event; genocide and ‘ethnic cleansing’ since the Holocaust.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Multiethnic Japan
AS.100.423 (01)

An advanced undergraduate seminar on the intertwined histories of race, ethnicity, and empire in Japan and its former colonies from the early twentieth century to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Hayang
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and Films
AS.140.398 (01)

Japan is often described as “nature-loving,” and is considered to be one of world leaders in environmental protection policies. Yet current environmental successes come on the heels of numerous environmental disasters that plagued Japan in the past centuries. Juxtaposing Japanese environmental history and its reflection in popular media, the course will explore the intersection between technology, environment, and culture. Students are encouraged to enroll in AS.140.198, “Technology and Environment in Japanese Films and Anime” (1 credit) to attend movie screenings accompanying the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Frumer, Yulia
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Introduction to the History of Modern Philosophy
AS.150.205 (01)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (02)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (03)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (07)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Plato's Republic
AS.150.492 (01)

This course will be a close reading of Plato's Republic, with special attention to the parallel of city and soul, the relevance of metaphysics to politics, and the relation of aristocracy, democracy and tyranny.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (14)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (05)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (07)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (03)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements of larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (02)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (03)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases
AS.190.308 (01)

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Disposable People: Race, Immigration and Biopolitics
AS.190.311 (01)

This course will explore theories and practices of race and immigration in order to illuminate the proliferation of populations regarded as disposable in contemporary politics. We will pay special attention to the contestable criteria used to determine eligibility for membership in the human race. We shall also examine how political power influences the relays between citizenship status and those whose lives are worthy of protection, and those who should be allowed to die.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Politics of Information
AS.190.327 (01)

Considers global and comparative politics of information, information technologies, and the Internet. Examines governance of information (ownership of information, rights to information, privacy) and governance of information technologies (domain names, social media websites, etc.).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements of larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Democracy And Elections
AS.190.326 (01)

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (08)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Constitutional Law
AS.190.334 (01)

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Policy Disasters
AS.190.424 (01)

Investigates the causes of large-scale policy disasters, examining the role of ideology, psychology, organization design and political incentives. Examples may be drawn from the Iraq War, Bay of Pigs, Hurricane Katrina, the U.S. Financial crisis, Shuttle Challenger disaster. economic development policy, privatization, and the Great Society. Limited to seniors or with permission of instructor. (CP / AP)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP

Seminar In Anti-Semitism
AS.190.344 (01)

Jews exercise a good deal of power in contemporary America.. They are prominent in a number of key industries, play important roles in the political process, and hold many major national offices. For example, though Jews constitute barely two percent of America’s citizens, about one-third of the nation’s wealthiest 400 individuals are Jewish and more than ten percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress are held by Jews. One recent book declared that, “From the Vatican to the Kremlin, from the White House to Capitol Hill, the world’s movers and shakers view American Jewry as a force to be reckoned with.” Of course, Jews have risen to power in many times and places ranging from the medieval Muslim world and early modern Spain through Germany and the Soviet Union in the 20th century. In nearly every prior instance, though, Jewish power proved to be evanescent. No sooner had the Jews become “a force to be reckoned with” than they found themselves banished to the political ma rgins, forced into exile or worse. Though it may rise to a great height, the power of the Jews seems ultimately to rest on a rather insecure foundation. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Maryland 201
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Planetary Geopolitics
AS.190.423 (01)

With the tools of geopolitics, course explores political debates over globalization of machine civilization and changes in scope and pace, space and place, and role of nature in human affairs.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Mergenthaler 366
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (02)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (06)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Economics of China
AS.180.391 (01)

Discussion of the economic experience of Post-War China, primarily emphasizing topics rather than historical narrative: agriculture, industry including corporate governance and public enterprises, international trade, population, migration, education, health, public finances among other topics. This course is writing intensive and the only assignment for the course is a 40 page paper on some aspect of the Chinese economy to be done under the close supervision of the instructor. The course is not primarily a lecture course, although there will be some lectures on how to do a paper and on the substance of the Chinese economic experience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Gersovitz, Mark
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (04)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Labor Economics
AS.180.351 (01)

The course discusses various issues in labor markets from the perspective of economic theory. We first study the major forces at work that shape labor market behavior; firms’ labor demand and workers’ labor supply. Then we discuss the equilibrium behavior of employment and wages. Using these tools, we also cover various applied topics in labor economics, such as minimum wage regulations, male-female wage differentials, human capital investment, worker mobility, and unemployment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, SPOL-UL

European Politics in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.440 (01)

Europe has been in a sense the first testing ground for theories of comparative politics, but many outsiders now see Europe as a pacified and somewhat boring place. This course will question conventional wisdom through an examination of European politics in historical and cross-national perspective. We will apply the comparative method to the study of European politics today, and conversely we will ask what Europe tells us more generally about politics. We will see that Europe is still a locus of intense conflict as well as remarkably diverse experimentation. Topics will include: political, legal, and economic governance; the evolution of democracy and fundamental rights, the welfare state, class stratification, immigration and race, the role of religion; European integration and globalization. Recommended background: Introduction to Comparative Politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP, POLI-RSCH

Politics Of Good & Evil
AS.190.398 (01)

The Politics of Good and Evil places a set of classic myths into conversation with recent philosophical and political work on existential questions. The myths include the Book of Job, Genesis (J version), two dramas by Sophocles, a selection from Augustine, and Voltaire’s Candide. Texts by Nietzsche (Thus Spoke Zarathustra), William James, (A Pluralistic Universe) and Connolly are then placed into conversation with both each other and these classic stories. Kohlberg’s The Sixth Extinction closes the class, encouraging us to think again about the relations between mythic orientations to responsibility, tragic possibility, nature/culture imbrications and the shape of contemporary life during the Anthropocene. Previous work in political theory is recommended. The course is devoted to “elemental theory”, in which diverse existential stories jostle each other and periodically disturb us, challenging us to explore new thoughts in a new world. One class presentation, two 10-12 page papers, and extensive class discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH

International Monetary Economics
AS.180.242 (01)

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crisis, the choice of exchange rate, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal Justice
AS.191.303 (01)

In this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of critical race theory, including its genesis in legal theory. The course will examine its relationship and importance to social movements, including through key concepts like intersectionality. The course will also use critical race theory to grapple with law, racial segregation, and the criminal justice system in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (04)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

The Political Bases of the Market Economy
AS.190.429 (01)

Although “the market” is conventionally understood as separate from “politics”, the modern market economy did not arise in a political vacuum. In fact, the very separation between the economy and politics is itself the product of a politically potent set of ideas. This course is an upper-division reading seminar on the origins and evolution of the modern market economy. Readings will include Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Becker, and Foucault. Recommended course background: Introduction to comparative politics OR any college-level course in social or political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, POLI-CP, POLI-RSCH

Economics of Transition and Institutional Change
AS.180.233 (01)

This course will introduce students to the comparative analysis of institutions of existing capitalist systems and to the historical evolution of those institutions. By comparing the economic systems of different nations, we will try to reveal the institutional setups that either contribute or hinder economic performance. We will also examine the process of countries transforming their economies and investigate the factors that determine the differences in reforms’ outcomes between countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (10)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EU
AS.180.210 (01)

Increased mobility of people across national borders, whether by choice or by force, has become an integral part of the modern world. Using a comparative perspective and an applied economics approach, the course explores the economic and political determinants, and (likely) consequences of migration flows for East Asia, the US and the EU. Lectures, assignments and in class discussions, will be built around the following topics: i) migrants’ self-selection; ii) human capital investment decision-making; iii) remittance decisions and effects; iv) impacts on labor markets of both receiving and sending countries; and v) the economic benefits from immigration. Overall, the course will give students perspective on the why people choose or feel compelled to leave their countries, how receiving countries respond to migrants’ presence, and the key economic policy concerns that are influencing the shaping of immigration policy in East Asia, the US, and the EU.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Social Policy Implications of Behavioral Economics
AS.180.389 (01)

Economists increasingly incorporate insights from psychology into models of rational decision-making. Known as "behavioral economics", this line of research considers how, for example, emotions, rules-of-thumb, biased beliefs and time-inconsistent preferences influence how we make choices. Behavioral economics increasingly pervades policy discussions on topics as diverse as: obesity, the role of media, subprime mortgages and voting patterns. Behavioral models are certainly novel, but do they help us to design superior social policies? With the goal of preparing students to address this question, this course (1) provides a thorough overview of the main contributions of behavioral economics, highlighting departures from more traditional economic models and (2) emphasizes how behavioral economic models might (or might not) improve how we think about social policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Papageorge, Nick W
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, SPOL-UL, GECS-SOCSCI, BEHB-SOCSCI

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (13)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (18)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 3/23
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (17)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/23
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (11)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Congress and Foreign Policy
AS.191.354 (01)

This course is an introduction to the Congressional role in foreign policy. The Constitution grants the President the authority to conduct foreign policy. Yet it also gives Congress a substantial role in the shaping of foreign policy. The distinct roles are not always clear, creating an inherent tension between these two branches of government and efforts on each side to increase their power. This class will address the “rules of the road” in conducting American foreign policy and how they change. The class will go beyond theory to include case studies that show the tension between Congress and the Administration – including the Iran Agreement, Climate Change, the use of sanctions and American policy towards Cuba. The course will include guest lecturers who work in Congress on the various aspects of foreign policy – including appropriations, intelligence, oversight and investigations. We will address the Congressional role in ratification of treaties and in declaring war. The class will consider the different ways that each branch of government approaches human rights, arms sales and sanctions. The class will also address the domestic political aspects of foreign policy – including the role of advocacy groups and special interests and the political use of Congressional investigations. Most of these classes will be in Washington, DC to facilitate guest speakers. Several classes will meet at the US Congress.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Frifield, Julia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (09)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (12)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/22
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Arendt/Foucault
AS.190.403 (01)

This upper-level undergraduate writing intensive course brings together the work of Hannah Arendt and Michel Foucault to focus on their critiques of modernity and their discussions of political change/revolution. Although Arendt and Foucault are often understood as coming from and supporting different political theoretical traditions, the course will also explore ways in which their shared debt to the work of Friedrich Nietzsche illuminates sometimes surprising commonalities and complementary positions. There is no final exam in this course but in addition to reading assignments, students will be required to write three papers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval World
AS.194.201 (01)

The three most widespread monotheisms have much more in common than is generally portrayed: a common founding figure, a partly shared succession of prophets, closely comparable ethical concerns and religious practices, a history of coexistence and of cultural, religious, social and economic interaction. This course will focus on a number of key texts and historical events that have shaped the relationships between Jews, Muslims, and Christians during the Middle Ages and contributed to their reciprocal construction of the image of the “other.” The geographical center of the course will be the Mediterranean and the Near and Middle East, a true cradle of civilizations, religions, and exchange.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Ferrario, Gabriele
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/30
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

Imagining Borders
AS.190.335 (01)

What is a border and why do borders matter in global politics. What do borders mean under conditions of globalization? An examination of the politics of borders, transborder flows, and networks within and across borders. The readings which come from political science and other disciplines, will include theoretical and case-specific works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kripp, Jacob S, Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/35
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (01)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (04)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements of larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict Responses
AS.191.317 (01)

The slogan "No Justice, No Peace" has been uttered both as a call to arms for social unrest and as a warning that a lack of perceived justice in a society will mean lack of peace. While the demand is made in a variety of contexts ranging from urban protests in response to racial injustices to states in the aftermath of protracted civil strife or state sponsored violence, a discussion of the kind of justice that is demanded with the slogan or the kind of peace that is foreseen is often missing from the public invocations of ‘no justice, no peace.’This course aims to examine invocations of “no justice, no peace” and mechanisms employed to respond to its demands. As such, the course readings will explore conceptions of justice and peace envisioned in a variety of post-conflict contexts. Students will be encouraged to evaluate and question the conceptions of justice and peace and the shifts in their meanings overtime through an examination of primary sources such as U.N. resolutions, Security Council Meeting Notes, UNCHR reports, international NGO reports, international tribunal reports in addition to seminal texts on the concepts of justice, peace and reconciliation. Students will be encouraged to articulate the ways in which response mechanisms delivered or failed to deliver the promises of justice, peace and fugitive reconciliation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kirmizidag, Nur
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (04)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (01)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

The Economic Experience of the BRIC Countries
AS.180.214 (01)

In 2001, Jim O’Neill, the Chief Economist at Goldman Sachs, coined the acronym BRIC to identify the four large emerging economies, Brazil, Russia, India and China. These economies have since had an amazing run, and have emerged as the biggest and fastest growing emerging markets. In this course, we look at the economic experiences of the BRIC countries for the past 50 years. We discuss the reasons that have contributed to their exceptional growth rates, with particular emphasis on their transformation into market economies. We also analyze the challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP

Political Economy and Development
AS.180.338 (01)

Good governance is associated with desirable outcomes across countries and societies: higher life satisfaction, greater income per capita, lower child mortality, longer life expectancy, less disease, etc. But these statistical associations in the data are not sufficient to establish either that good governance truly causes such societal outcomes, or what types of policies produce them. This course asks: What are the determinants of good governance? Is good governance "good" beyond its intrinsic desirability? If so, how? We use a data-driven approach, focusing on quantitative empirical methods and their applications to policy. The goal is to develop skills to be savvy consumers, as well as producers, of policy-relevant evidence related to issues of governance, in rich and poor countries alike. Topics will include: democracy, corruption, conflict, culture, mass media, quotas, and foreign aid.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Campante, Filipe R
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, SPOL-UL

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (08)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social Sciences
AS.192.210 (01)

Are you planning to do a research project for your independent study class, or preparing for a grant application, or working on a big research project for a research intensive class or graduation thesis, or just wishing to improve your research skills? If so, this course is for you! Through weekly two hour sessions over ten weeks, you will receive systematic training on major research tools, resources and techniques useful for any research project in international studies, political science, and other social science subjects. By the end of the course, you will be able to come up with a viable research topic, and complete a research statement that includes an abstract, problem statement and literature review based on in-depth research utilizing tools and techniques covered in the course. The skills you learn through the course will prepare you for any future research projects and advanced studies.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 6:00PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Ye, Yunshan
  • Room: MSE Library ERC
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (16)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 3/23
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Kissinger Seminar on American Grand Strategy
AS.192.410 (01)

Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructors and space in the course is limited. To apply, email a one-page resume, one-page personal statement on why you want to take the class including how it contributes to your professional interests, and a writing sample of less than ten pages to KissingerCenter@jhu.edu. Applications are due by Monday, October 21, 2019. This course is an initiative of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS, meant to link SAIS with the undergraduate International Studies major at Homewood. It will expose exceptional undergraduate students to the study of grand strategy and the history of U.S. foreign policy. The bulk of the course will explore critical moments, themes, and people in the history of American grand strategy, from Washington’s Farewell Address to the statecraft of Donald Trump. The seminar will be rooted in applied history—the study of the past as a way of better understanding the challenges and opportunities of the present and future. It will also be interdisciplinary, drawing on international relations theory and contemporary policy studies. The seminar will equip students to evaluate and contribute to intense debates about the future of American grand strategy. In addition to regular classroom meetings, the course will feature events at the SAIS campus in Washington, DC, including meetings with current and former policymakers. These sessions will take place on February 10th, March 2th, April 6th, April 27th. Transportation between Homewood campus and SAIS will be provided. These sessions will be followed by a dinner hosted by the Kissinger Center.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Brands, Henry S, Gavin, Francis J
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/21
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

China Under Revolution and Reform
AS.192.280 (01)

China is an emerging world power with a long history, a rich culture, and complex political struc-tures and processes. As a modern state, the People's Republic of China (PRC) continues to amaze and confound observers both inside and outside its borders. More than three decades after opening its doors to the outside world, China remains as important as it is misunderstood. This course is de-signed to provide you with a road map to help understand the fascinating world of Chinese politics and the contemporary Chinese state. The course presumes no prior knowledge of China.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Economic Growth and Development in East Asia
AS.192.225 (01)

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

North Korea, Identity, and International Politics
AS.191.359 (01)

This upper-level course examines some of the major debates and political issues relating to North Korea. This course will examine some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of North Korea. We will analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in Political Science in the context of North Korea: identity and foreign policymaking. A central aim of this course is to help students understand and debate the role of US policy in North Korea’s history and today through interactive activities that put the classroom knowledge—based on academic literature, journalistic sources, lectures, and discussion—into practical use through in-class activities and intensive policy writing assignments. The course will introduce students to the various schools of thought within International Relations as well as to the central foreign policy debates concerning North Korea, putting it in the context of the development of North Korea’s political institutions and interactions with its neighbors.It is recommended that students have taken a survey course on International Relations (e.g., Global Security Politics, Contemporary International Politics). Some knowledge of Comparative Politics or Asian history may also be helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Draudt, Darcie Anne
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

States, Regimes & Contentious Politics
AS.192.150 (01)

This course introduces students to the study of politics and political life in the world, with a particular focus on the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Throughout the course, we will analyze the sources of order and disorder in modern states, addressing a series of questions, such as: why did nation-states form? What makes a state a nation? Why are some states democracies while others are not? How do people organize to fight oppression? Why does conflict sometimes turn violent? What are the causes of ethnic war? Drawing on a mix of classic works and contemporary scholarship, we will discuss the answers that scholars have formulated to address these and other questions, paying special attention to research design and the quality of argumentation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 7/32
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

The American Welfare State
AS.190.380 (01)

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Trump. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (03)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements of larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

The Idea of Power
AS.150.404 (01)

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

Violence and Politics
AS.190.438 (01)

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (15)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hamilton, Bruce W
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/23
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore Area
AS.190.410 (01)

This course uses a community based learning approach to inquire into the presence of the Rastafari community in the Baltimore area. Most people will have heard of Rastafari through the music of Bob Marley. People might not know, however, that Rastafari emerges out of and has been part of a global history of liberation struggles. This course is co-taught with a local Rastafari organization. You will be intellectually and practically equipped to take part in a project of original research on the Rastafari presence in the Baltimore region, starting with the demonization of the movement in the 1980s “war on drugs” and including the movement’s response.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, CSC-CE

The Battle of Ideas for the World Economy
AS.192.415 (01)

This seminar is intended as a capstone intellectual experience for seniors and advanced juniors majoring in international studies. The course presumes solid background knowledge in economics, comparative politics, and international relations. This course is designed to stretch you, and will hone your analytical and writing skills by exposing you to complex and theoretically advanced forms of political economy argument in a “proposition-opposition” format. The seminar will heavily rely upon your input and you will be required to read a book every week. The seminar is organized around a series of ‘antimonies,’ set up as thematic pairs, covering such political economy themes like free trade vs. protectionism, free market capitalism vs. socialism, democratic erosion vs. autocratic strength, hegemonic stability vs. US abdication of power, or whether the current populist wave has mainly economic or mostly cultural roots. Each two-week segment will deal with a specific topic area. The first week will give the case ‘for’ a specific notion while the following week will give the case ‘against.’ Our discussions will be in-depth interrogations of the arguments of these ‘pro-con’ authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:45PM - 7:15PM
  • Instructor: Matthijs, Matthias
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 12/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/22
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Islamic Finance
AS.230.367 (01)

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $2 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on riba in the Quran and hadith, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/2
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and Culture
AS.211.361 (02)

In this course we will study and analyze the notion of dissent in Israeli society and culture on its various literary and artistic forms. We will examine the emergence and the formation of various political and social protest movements, such as the Israeli Black Panthers, Israeli feminism and the 2011 Social Justice protest. We will discuss at length the history and the nature of dissent in the military and in relation to Israeli wars and will track changes in these relation. Significant portion of the course will be dedicated to the literary, cinematic and artistic aspects of Israeli protest and their influence on Israeli discourse. We will explore the nature and role of specific genres and media such as the Israeli satire, Israeli television, newspaper op-ed and the recent emergence of social media. Students wishing to work in English exclusively for 3 credits should enroll in section one. Students who are fluent in Hebrew and are wishing to attend an additional hour-long Hebrew discussion session per week with Professor Cohen (time TBD in consultation with enrolled students) for 4 credits should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.
AS.211.222 (01)

This course traces the history of Italian cinema from the silent era to the new millennium, highlighting its main trends and genres, and reflecting on the major transformations modern and contemporary Italian society experienced over the twentieth and twentieth-first centuries. We shall examine iconic films such as Vittorio De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves, Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura, and Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Mamma Roma, that received international recognition and influenced other national, cinematic productions. We shall also look at the work of less famous, or independent filmmakers who received less critical attention. While this class takes an historical approach, it also includes a theoretical component and introduces students to the specificity of the cinematic language, examining films in relation to the mise-en-scène, frame composition, camera movements, editing, and sound. This class is taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wegenstein, Bernadette
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Plagues, Power, and Social Control
AS.230.306 (01)

While developments in biomedicine and health care have led to the eradication, cure and management of many human health problems, disease, illness and health have also been the focus for aggressive social controls and population management. The technologies and practices of disease control and health management have been foundational to some of the most aggressive structures of oppression in recent history such as the Jewish Ghetto, the Concentration Camp, the South African Township and techniques of segregation. This course seeks to explore how epidemics and disease control are linked to larger questions of power, state craft and international dynamics. This course asks how have outbreaks of infectious disease shaped social and political action? How do societies respond to outbreaks and why? What do epidemic moments tell us about global structures of power and the dynamics of control? Drawing on historical cases including plague during the European Renaissance and before, the HIV/AIDS Pandemic and the West African Ebola Outbreak of 2013-2016, this course will introduce students to the history and practices of disease control as well as important theoretical perspectives by which to understand the sociological and historical effects of disease and the responses to them. Students will engage sociological concepts such as biopolitics, social construction of disease and illness and biosecurity and produce a final research paper examining the outcomes and responses to an epidemic event to show mastery of the topics covered in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime Asia
AS.230.440 (01)

The goal of the seminar is to examine the prospects and limits of understanding the incorporation of Asia in the capitalist world-system from the prism of oceanic connections. The theoretical thrust of this course is to develop but also to adapt Janet Abu-Lughod emphasis on the connections across port cities and littoral in the Afro-Eurasian continents before the long sixteenth century in her Before European Hegemony. But instead of looking at a port city as its adjacent hinterland polity’s gateway to global trade in the premodern era, the course examines the multifarious coast-hinterland relationships. The readings are organized by a chronological order, which begins with the historical maritime silk road between the third and thirteenth centuries, and will be followed by Asian port cities in the European age of empire and postwar American-led Cold War Structure, as well as the present-day Chinese New Silk Road Diplomacy. Students are expected to select an issue of regional tensions and to analyze its historical root.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Global Health and Human Rights
AS.230.393 (01)

Is access to healthcare a fundamental human right? If so, then which global actors are obligated to provide healthcare to whom, and for how long? How do meanings of health and illness vary across time and place? And finally, how are human rights principles translated into frontline practice in order to promote well-being? This course takes a critical interdisciplinary approach to these questions through a series of global case studies ranging from humanitarian aid in post-tsunami Sri Lanka to anti-FGM (female genital mutilation) campaigns in Ghana. How do international NGOs, UN bodies, and governments collaborate (or compete) to distribute healthcare in places beset by dire resource shortages? Do human rights principles carry legal weight across borders, and if so, could access to healthcare services and essential medicines be litigated in order to compel governments to provide it? And finally, what cultural assumptions do human rights discourses carry with them, and what happens if rights-based approaches are poorly received by recipient populations? Moving beyond the basic principle of healthcare as a human right, this course aims to bring this idea’s history and politics into focus by offering an in-depth exploration of its ethics and implementation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

French in Switzerland
AS.212.345 (01)

Nearly 30% of the Swiss are native French speakers. But what do we really know about them, what distinguishes them from French speakers in neighboring France? While the language both speak is identical, their social and cultural practices set them worlds apart: the way they interact socially, engage politically, think imaginatively, engage with nature, cook and even love. This highly interactive course explores the social and cultural practices of the French Swiss and how they came to play a key role in national and international critical and political thought; we will analyze how, in a nation composed of four different language groups and an immigrant population of nearly 20%, the French Swiss contribute to maintaining the country’s highest standard of democratic practices; likewise, from an international perspective, we will study how French Switzerland developed a historic role in providing and enabling peaceful forums for international dialogue and peace talks (UN, WHO, UIT, etc.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Cook-Gailloud, Kristin
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (01)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wuensch, April
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

The Qur'an: Text and Context
AS.194.220 (01)

For 1400 years, the Qur’an has played a central role in Muslim intellectual, spiritual, artistic and ritual life. This course will explore the sacred scripture of Islam through its foundational ideas, history of the text and thematic development, literary style, history and methods of interpretation, and role in Muslim spiritual and ritual life. We will also explore how the Qur’an weaves through literature, music and the visual arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in America
AS.194.210 (01)

This course explores how American Muslims navigate and contest complex notions of belonging in the context of national conversations on race, gender, citizenship, and national security. With a focus on specific case studies that range from Black Muslim movements of the early twentieth century to the ongoing War on Terror, the course adds complexity to the public conversation on what it means to be Muslim - and what it means to be American. We will draw on history, ethnography, first-person narratives, films, blogs, documentaries and fiction. As a Community Engaged course, the class will include site visits and learning with and from Muslim communities in Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP, CSC-CE

Beyond the Wall: The Political Economy of the US and Mexico
AS.230.238 (01)

Examining the exchange of culture, people, and commodities between the United States and Mexico since the 19th century, this course asks not just how US practices and policies have shaped Mexican society, but how, in turn, Mexico has shaped the United States. We will examine the social, political, and economic forces that have long pulled these two societies together – and pushed them apart.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Global Crises: Past and Present
AS.230.337 (01)

This course will compare the current global crisis with previous major crises of historical capitalism through a combination of theoretical and historical readings. Throughout, we will ask: What can a study of past crises tell us about the nature and future trajectory of the current global crisis? Special emphasis will be placed on (1) “the late-nineteenth century great depression”, (2) the Great Depression of the 1930s, and (3) the period of crisis and stagflation in the 1970s. We will be particularly concerned to understand the differential social and geopolitical impact of the crises. Which social classes bore the brunt of the disruptions in economic activity in each crisis? Which geographical areas or geopolitical groupings lost out (or benefited) from the crisis? How have environmental and ecological challenges resurfaced in each crisis including today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (02)

A journey through early modern Italy, from the cultural centers (Florence, Venice, Rome, etc.) to the peripheries, this course will trace the development of the Italian literary identity from a civic and cultural perspective. How do we live our best lives? How do we create a good and just society? These enduring quandaries were fundamental points of consideration for the humanist scholars of early modern Italy. Drawing from the wisdom of their ancient Roman legacy – along with their own striking innovations – they forged a new and glorious cultural tradition. Using literary, philosophical and historiographical sources from antiquity through the early modern period (Cicero, Aristotle, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso) we will explore the cultural and civic history of Italy, paying particular attention to themes of community, identity and the ethics of citizenship. The course is taught in English with section 02 available in Italian for Italian Majors and Minors to fulfill their requirements.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (01)

A journey through early modern Italy, from the cultural centers (Florence, Venice, Rome, etc.) to the peripheries, this course will trace the development of the Italian literary identity from a civic and cultural perspective. How do we live our best lives? How do we create a good and just society? These enduring quandaries were fundamental points of consideration for the humanist scholars of early modern Italy. Drawing from the wisdom of their ancient Roman legacy – along with their own striking innovations – they forged a new and glorious cultural tradition. Using literary, philosophical and historiographical sources from antiquity through the early modern period (Cicero, Aristotle, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso) we will explore the cultural and civic history of Italy, paying particular attention to themes of community, identity and the ethics of citizenship. The course is taught in English with section 02 available in Italian for Italian Majors and Minors to fulfill their requirements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/7
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Great Minds
AS.300.102 (01)

Introductory survey of foundational texts of modern Western literature and thought. This semester will include works by René Descartes, Max Weber, W. E. B. Du Bois, Virginia Woolf, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, Theodor Adorno, Michel Foucault, Cora Diamond, and Stanley Cavell. The course is taught in lectures and seminar discussions led by the course faculty.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Black Against Empire
AS.362.315 (01)

This course will examine the confrontation of Black social movements with imperialism in the twentieth century. How, we will ask, have key Black internationalist thinkers conceptualized and defined diaspora, capitalism, imperialism, war, and the global? What have been the effects of war and repression, as well as economic growth and globalization, on Black internationalism? Readings may include texts by W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Y. Davis, Frantz Fanon, Ashley Farmer, Claudia Jones, Robin D.G. Kelley, Claude McKay, Huey P. Newton, Walter Rodney, Malcolm X, etc. Students will complete a research paper on a topic of their own choosing related to Black internationalism in the twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP

The History and Culture of North Korea
AS.310.323 (01)

This is a seminar that investigates the history and culture of North Korea. Course materials include scholarly articles, political tracts, biographies, movies, as well as works of fiction. For the final project, students will write an extended research paper on a topic of their choice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and Culture
AS.211.361 (01)

In this course we will study and analyze the notion of dissent in Israeli society and culture on its various literary and artistic forms. We will examine the emergence and the formation of various political and social protest movements, such as the Israeli Black Panthers, Israeli feminism and the 2011 Social Justice protest. We will discuss at length the history and the nature of dissent in the military and in relation to Israeli wars and will track changes in these relation. Significant portion of the course will be dedicated to the literary, cinematic and artistic aspects of Israeli protest and their influence on Israeli discourse. We will explore the nature and role of specific genres and media such as the Israeli satire, Israeli television, newspaper op-ed and the recent emergence of social media. Students wishing to work in English exclusively for 3 credits should enroll in section one. Students who are fluent in Hebrew and are wishing to attend an additional hour-long Hebrew discussion session per week with Professor Cohen (time TBD in consultation with enrolled students) for 4 credits should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Chinese Politics and Society
AS.310.230 (01)

This introductory course will familiarize students with the major dynamics of political and social change in contemporary China since 1949. The course will be divided chronologically into four main topics: 1. The contested processes of nation-state making in modern China before 1949; 2. The making of the socialist system during the Mao Years and its dismantling since 1978; 3. The Reform Era transformation to a market economy with Chinese characteristics; 4. The dynamic relationships among the state, market and society since the new millennium. Students will explore how scholars have explained major political and social changes with reference to individual and collective rationalities, specific organizational and institutional arrangements, and specific strategic and cultural mechanisms of Chinese political and social habits.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

China in Imagination
AS.300.410 (01)

What is China? This question has gained new relevance amid the nation’s recent rise as a global power. We survey how China was imagined, represented, and conceptualized in literature, film, and philosophical writings from mainland China, overseas Chinese communities, East Asia, and the West from the late nineteenth century to the present. Through exploring this complex history, we aim to understand China and the contemporary world in a diversified, historically self-reflective way. Topics of discussion include, but not limited to, representation, identity, form, allegory, exile, diaspora, modernism, translation, world history, and universality. All readings are in English; all films subtitled in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

The Religions of Korea
AS.310.222 (01)

This course offers an overview of the religions of Korea, both indigenous and foreign, old and new. Attention will be paid to the history of these religions, their impact on society, as well as their teachings and objectives. Students will engage with various forms of secondary as well as primary sources including scriptures, sermons, and religious tracts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room: Mattin Center 160
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Cinema of the 1930s: Communist and Capitalist Fantasies
AS.300.324 (01)

Comedy and musical comedy film flourished in the USA during the Great Depression as well as in the USSR during the Stalinist Great Terror. This course will compare films of the era in a variety of genres (musical, epic, Western, drama), examining the intersections between politics and aesthetics as well as the lasting implications of the films themselves in light of theoretical works on film as a medium, ethics and gender.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis
AS.271.403 (01)

This course provides students with a broad introduction to US environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA, RCRA, and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of this course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the proper perspective. This course is taught in conjunction with an identical graduate course. All students will be expected to perform at a graduate level.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 6:00PM - 8:45PM
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room: Olin 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/21
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, ENVS-MINOR

Environmental Ethics
AS.271.401 (01)

Environmental Ethics is a philosophical discipline that examines the moral relationship between humans and the natural environment. For individuals and societies, it can help structure our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Beginning with a comprehensive analysis of their own values, students will explore complex ethical questions, philosophical paradigms and real-life case studies through readings, films and seminar discussions. Traditional ethical theories, including consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics will be examined and applied. Environmental moral worldviews, ranging from anthropocentric to ecocentric perspectives, will be critically evaluated. Organized debates will help students strengthen their ability to deconstruct and assess ethical arguments and to communicate viewpoints rooted in ethical principles. Students will apply ethical reasoning skills to an examination of contemporary environmental issues including, among others, biodiversity conservation, environmental justice, climate change, and overpopulation. Students will also develop, defend and apply their own personal environmental ethical framework. A basic understanding of modern environmental history and contemporary environmental issues is required. Prior experience with philosophy and ethics is not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room: Olin 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, INST-PT, ENVS-MINOR

Imagining Climate Change
AS.300.342 (01)

Climate change poses an existential threat to human civilization. Yet the attention and concern it receives in ordinary life and culture is nowhere near what science tells us is required. What are the causes of this mismatch between crisis and response? What accounts for our collective inability to imagine and grasp this new reality, and how can it be overcome? In pursuit of these questions, we will look at texts from politics, philosophy, literary theory, and religion that frame climate change as a fundamental challenge not only to humanity but to the humanities: the disciplines and modes of thought that we rely on to make sense of the human condition. The second part of the course will examine works of literature and film for examples of how contemporary artists attempt to make the climate crisis visible and intelligible to us.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.070.124 (04)Freshman Seminar: Anthropology of HomeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMProcupez, ValeriaMergenthaler 426
AS.070.380 (01)Slumworld: Life in informal SettlementsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMProcupez, ValeriaMaryland 217INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.070.465 (01)Concepts: How to Read Hindu and Islamic TextsF 2:00PM - 4:30PMDas, Veena, Khan, NaveedaMergenthaler 439INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethShaffer 100HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.282 (01)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.282 (02)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.305 (01)Peter to Putin: SurveyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 413HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.318 (01)The Rise and the Fall of the Modern City: An Environmental History PerspectiveTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMde Font-Reaulx, Constance Marie AnneBloomberg 276HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.100.346 (01)Soviet-American Cold WarT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey PGilman 413HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.283 (01)Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-PresentTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHindmarch-Watson, KatieShriver Hall 001HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TKrieger 170HIST-ASIA, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (01)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (02)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.369 (01)Themes and Concepts in Jewish HistoryMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 134INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.371 (01)Modernity, Catastrophe, and Power in Jewish History: 1881 to the PresentM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethGilman 308INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethShriver Hall 001HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisSmokler Center LibraryHIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.100.398 (01)Images of Postwar JapanTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, HayangMaryland 109INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.415 (01)The Holocaust in Jewish History and in Global CultureT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, KennethMaryland 114HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TGilman 308INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.423 (01)Multiethnic JapanW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, HayangHodson 213INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 75INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center LibraryNEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.140.398 (01)Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and FilmsM 3:00PM - 5:30PMFrumer, YuliaHodson 301INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.150.205 (01)Introduction to the History of Modern PhilosophyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWilliams, MichaelLevering ArellanoPHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (02)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWilliams, MichaelLevering ArellanoPHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (03)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWilliams, MichaelLevering ArellanoPHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (03)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (04)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (05)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (06)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (07)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.150.492 (01)Plato's RepublicT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoyar, DeanRemsen Hall 1INST-PT
AS.180.102 (14)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.190.102 (05)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, NicolasRemsen Hall 101INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (07)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, NicolasRemsen Hall 101INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.180 (03)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMChambers, Samuel AllenHodson 210INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.220 (02)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.190.220 (03)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.190.308 (01)Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and CasesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 377INST-CP
AS.190.311 (01)Disposable People: Race, Immigration and BiopoliticsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Mattin Center 162INST-PT
AS.190.327 (01)Politics of InformationT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMarlin-Bennett, ReneeKrieger 304INST-IR
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMChambers, Samuel AllenHodson 210INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.326 (01)Democracy And ElectionsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKatz, Richard StephenKrieger 302INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (08)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, NicolasRemsen Hall 101INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.334 (01)Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, EmilyKrieger 300INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.424 (01)Policy DisastersTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMTeles, Steven MichaelShriver Hall 001INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.190.344 (01)Seminar In Anti-SemitismW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminMaryland 201INST-AP
AS.190.423 (01)Planetary GeopoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceMergenthaler 366INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.102 (02)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJabko, NicolasRemsen Hall 101INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (06)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, NicolasRemsen Hall 101INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.180.391 (01)Economics of ChinaM 3:00PM - 5:30PMGersovitz, MarkGilman 77INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.102 (04)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, NicolasRemsen Hall 101INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.180.351 (01)Labor EconomicsT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirGilman 55INST-ECON, SPOL-UL
AS.190.440 (01)European Politics in Comparative PerspectiveT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 303INST-CP, POLI-CP, POLI-RSCH
AS.190.398 (01)Politics Of Good & EvilM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William EHodson 311POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH
AS.180.242 (01)International Monetary EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDasgupta, SomasreeHodson 311INST-ECON
AS.191.303 (01)Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal JusticeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger LavertyPOLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL
AS.150.205 (04)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWilliams, MichaelLevering ArellanoPHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.190.429 (01)The Political Bases of the Market EconomyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, NicolasGreenhouse 113INST-ECON, POLI-CP, POLI-RSCH
AS.180.233 (01)Economics of Transition and Institutional ChangeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, LudmilaShriver Hall 001INST-ECON
AS.180.102 (10)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.210 (01)Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EUTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraMaryland 104INST-ECON
AS.180.389 (01)Social Policy Implications of Behavioral EconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMPapageorge, Nick WMaryland 217INST-ECON, SPOL-UL, GECS-SOCSCI, BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.180.102 (13)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (18)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (17)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (11)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.191.354 (01)Congress and Foreign PolicyTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMFrifield, Julia POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.180.102 (09)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.180.102 (12)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.190.403 (01)Arendt/FoucaultTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCulbert, JenniferHodson 313INST-PT
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMazzuca, Sebastian LHodson 213INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.194.201 (01)Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval WorldMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMFerrario, GabrieleHodson 216ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.335 (01)Imagining BordersTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKripp, Jacob S, Marlin-Bennett, ReneeAmes 218INST-IR
AS.190.220 (01)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.190.180 (04)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMChambers, Samuel AllenHodson 210INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.191.317 (01)No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict ResponsesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKirmizidag, NurGilman 381INST-IR
AS.190.220 (04)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 50INST-IR
AS.190.102 (01)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, NicolasRemsen Hall 101INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.180.214 (01)The Economic Experience of the BRIC CountriesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDasgupta, SomasreeMergenthaler 111INST-ECON, INST-CP
AS.180.338 (01)Political Economy and DevelopmentW 3:00PM - 5:30PMCampante, Filipe RHodson 216INST-ECON, SPOL-UL
AS.180.102 (08)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.192.210 (01)Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social SciencesW 6:00PM - 8:00PMYe, YunshanMSE Library ERC
AS.180.102 (16)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.192.410 (01)Kissinger Seminar on American Grand StrategyM 3:00PM - 5:30PMBrands, Henry S, Gavin, Francis JMergenthaler 266INST-GLOBAL
AS.192.280 (01)China Under Revolution and ReformTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMMertha, Andrew CGilman 55INST-CP
AS.192.225 (01)Economic Growth and Development in East AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraCroft Hall G02INST-ECON
AS.191.359 (01)North Korea, Identity, and International PoliticsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDraudt, Darcie AnneKrieger LavertyINST-CP
AS.192.150 (01)States, Regimes & Contentious PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLawrence, Adria KKrieger 302INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.190.380 (01)The American Welfare StateTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, DanielAbel Wolman House 100POLI-AP, POLI-RSCH, INST-AP
AS.190.102 (03)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJabko, NicolasRemsen Hall 101INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMChambers, Samuel AllenHodson 210INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.150.404 (01)The Idea of PowerTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLebron, Christopher JosephMaryland 202INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.190.438 (01)Violence and PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminCroft Hall G02INST-IR
AS.180.102 (15)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHamilton, Bruce WHodson 110
AS.190.410 (01)Beyond Bob Marley: Exploring the Rastafari Movement in the Greater Baltimore AreaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMShilliam, RobertKrieger 300POLI-IR, CSC-CE
AS.192.415 (01)The Battle of Ideas for the World EconomyW 4:45PM - 7:15PMMatthijs, MatthiasMergenthaler 266INST-ECON
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.367 (01)Islamic FinanceM 3:00PM - 5:30PMCalder, RyanGilman 400INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 377INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaBloomberg 272GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, RinaHodson 303
AS.211.361 (02)Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaKrieger 302INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.211.222 (01)Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMWegenstein, BernadetteGilman 479INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.306 (01)Plagues, Power, and Social ControlT 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani ReinShaffer 304INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.440 (01)Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime AsiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKuo, Huei-YingShriver Hall 104INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 300INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.393 (01)Global Health and Human RightsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 377INST-IR
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingBloomberg 178INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.212.345 (01)French in SwitzerlandMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMCook-Gailloud, KristinGilman 134INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWuensch, AprilGilman 381INST-CP
AS.194.220 (01)The Qur'an: Text and ContextTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMZiad, HomayraGilman 377ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 4:30PM - 5:20PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.194.210 (01)Race, Gender, Citizenship: Being Muslim in AmericaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, HomayraKrieger 302ISLM-ISLMST, INST-AP, CSC-CE
AS.230.238 (01)Beyond the Wall: The Political Economy of the US and MexicoMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.337 (01)Global Crises: Past and PresentTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, Beverly JudithShaffer 300INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, EduardoBloomberg 172INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 413INST-AP
AS.214.362 (02)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMStephens, Walter EGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, EduardoGilman 186INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.214.362 (01)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMStephens, Walter EGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 134INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.300.102 (01)Great MindsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 208INST-PT
AS.362.315 (01)Black Against EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger LavertyINST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.310.323 (01)The History and Culture of North KoreaT 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, NuriGreenhouse 113INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.361 (01)Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaKrieger 302INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.310.230 (01)Chinese Politics and SocietyTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMHe, GaochaoGilman 313INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.300.410 (01)China in ImaginationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHashimoto, SatoruBloomberg 178INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.222 (01)The Religions of KoreaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKim, NuriMattin Center 160INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHe, GaochaoKrieger 180INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.300.324 (01)Cinema of the 1930s: Communist and Capitalist FantasiesMW 10:30AM - 11:45AMEakin Moss, AnneGilman 208INST-GLOBAL
AS.271.403 (01)Environmental Policymaking and Policy AnalysisW 6:00PM - 8:45PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304INST-AP, INST-CP, ENVS-MINOR
AS.271.401 (01)Environmental EthicsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304GECS-SOCSCI, INST-PT, ENVS-MINOR
AS.300.342 (01)Imagining Climate ChangeTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLisi, LeonardoGilman 186GRLL-ENGL, INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR