Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Research Lab: The Dutch Americas
AS.010.400 (01)

The Dutch East India Company, or VOC, is historically and art historically well documented and firmly understood. But the Dutch also had significant holdings to the west via the Dutch West India Company, or WIC. They operated and held outposts in the present-day United States (New York/New Amsterdam), Caribbean (Surinam, Curaçao, Bonaire), Latin America (Brazil), and West Africa. Despite the abundance of materials associated with the WIC from this wide geography, these have been scarcely assessed by art historians, and a defined and comprehensive corpus has never been assembled. This class will act as a research lab in which to do so. In research teams, students will map artworks and objects created from that broad, transnational cultural ambit—categories that might include maps, landscape paintings, still life paintings featuring American flora and fauna, botanical illustrations, plantation architecture, luxury objects made from precious raw materials gathered in the Americas, the urban environment of slavery—and develop individual research questions around them. The class will run with a partner lab in the form of a course led by Professor Stephanie Porras at Tulane University. The course will feature speakers; and there is potential for funded travel to conduct research. We will start at the ground level; no previous knowledge about the field is required. Students from all disciplines are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hyman, Aaron M.
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR, INST-GLOBAL

Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran
AS.070.267 (01)

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

Slumworld: Life in informal Settlements
AS.070.380 (01)

One quarter of the planet's urban population lives today in slums, shantytowns, favelas, chawls, colonias and other forms of rudimentary settlements (according to UN Habitat). Despite their prevalence throughout the world, these places are still depicted as spaces of informality and abjection, rather than as sites of emergence of innovative -even if disadvantaged-, makeshift ways of producing the city. This course will combine ethnographic and geographical literature, as well as works of fiction and film to explore the lives of squatters and slum-dwellers in many regions of the world and examine in what way their practices, forms of dwelling, sociality, conflict and cooperation are constitutive of the urban experience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (01)

This course explores selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the wider world in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the fourteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as it reorganized itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world. Topics include: religious plurality, sovereignty and subjecthood, flourishing of learning, chivalric culture, crusading, and the plague and its effects. We will follow the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne
  • Room: Olin 305 Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (02)

This course explores selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the wider world in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the fourteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as it reorganized itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world. Topics include: religious plurality, sovereignty and subjecthood, flourishing of learning, chivalric culture, crusading, and the plague and its effects. We will follow the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne
  • Room: Olin 305 Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (03)

This course explores selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the wider world in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the fourteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as it reorganized itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world. Topics include: religious plurality, sovereignty and subjecthood, flourishing of learning, chivalric culture, crusading, and the plague and its effects. We will follow the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne
  • Room: Olin 305 Hackerman 320
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (04)

This course explores selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the wider world in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the fourteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as it reorganized itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world. Topics include: religious plurality, sovereignty and subjecthood, flourishing of learning, chivalric culture, crusading, and the plague and its effects. We will follow the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne
  • Room: Olin 305 Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (01)

A class combining Latin American history since independence and digital humanities (revised with 2021 student feedback). Students will build guided research projects while thinking about questions of republicanism, freedom and unfreedom, migration, and development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Ames 234 Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (02)

A class combining Latin American history since independence and digital humanities (revised with 2021 student feedback). Students will build guided research projects while thinking about questions of republicanism, freedom and unfreedom, migration, and development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Ames 234 Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (03)

A class combining Latin American history since independence and digital humanities (revised with 2021 student feedback). Students will build guided research projects while thinking about questions of republicanism, freedom and unfreedom, migration, and development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Ames 234 Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (04)

A class combining Latin American history since independence and digital humanities (revised with 2021 student feedback). Students will build guided research projects while thinking about questions of republicanism, freedom and unfreedom, migration, and development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Ames 234 Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880)
AS.100.122 (01)

An introduction to the African past since 1880.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Approaches to Jewish History
AS.100.128 (01)

The course will provide an introduction to the study of Jewish History.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Croft Hall G02  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 23/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

History of Modern Germany
AS.100.233 (01)

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its role within Europe and the world from the 18th century to the ‘Refugee Crisis’, climate change and EU politics today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL

West African History
AS.100.251 (01)

This course explores the rich history of West Africa and its place in the broader world. Topics include the environmental history of the Sahara desert, West African empires, and the rise of Nollywood and contemporary culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Keegan, Thomas
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Political Thought and Social Transformation in the Haitian Revolution and Early Independent Mexico, c. 1789-1850
AS.100.321 (01)

This course will examine both the Haitian Revolution and the early period of Mexican independence by engaging with the ideas of actors within these events in international contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Borocz-Johnson, Lee Michael
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Early Modern China
AS.100.347 (01)

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: BLC 5015  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city
AS.100.413 (01)

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Hackerman 320  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Society & Social Change in 18th Century China
AS.100.422 (01)

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing Backlash
AS.100.497 (01)

The sixties were a polarizing decade of unrest, revolutions, and fundamental change across Europe and the US. We will discuss 1968 through the lens of national case studies, the Cold War, and the history of Baltimore. This is a community-engaged class!

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Maryland 109  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, CSC-CE

The Hydrologic Sphere: Histories of Water in the Colonial and Postcolonial World
AS.140.317 (01)

Water supplies are becoming scarcer globally due to climate change. We use clean water—fresh and salt—in a variety of ways that provide comfort, stability, and health, making it one of the most valuable commodities on Earth. While countries in the Global North are beginning to see more frequent and lengthier droughts, those in the Latin America, Africa, and South Asia have long struggled over how to distribute and use their clean water supplies. This class will examine how colonialism and its far-reaching effects have created an environment of scarce water supplies in many areas of the world. Water access is difficult to achieve, but for much of the Global South, the colonial period helped craft the problems we see today. This class will ask what colonial and postcolonial technologies’ construction and use teach us about equitable clean water distribution, how social and cultural identities influence water supplies and use, and why water has been such an important element—and commodity—in our world, especially where Europeans settled and oppressed local populations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Brig, Kristin Victoria
  • Room: Shriver Hall Board Room  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Spinoza’s Theological Political Treatise
AS.150.428 (01)

The course is an in-depth study of Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise. Among the topics to be discussed are: Spinoza’s Bible criticism, the nature of religion, philosophy and faith, the nature of the ancient Hebrew State, Spinoza’s theory of the State, the role of religion in Spinoza’s political theory, the freedom to philosophize, the metaphysics of Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise, and finally, the reception of the TTP.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Melamed, Yitzhak Yohanan
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-MODERN

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Shaffer 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (07)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (08)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (09)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (10)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Krieger 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (11)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Krieger 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (12)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob
  • Room: Hodson 110 Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hackerman B 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hackerman B 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Economic Experience of the BRIC Countries
AS.180.214 (01)

In 2001, Jim O’Neill, the Chief Economist at Goldman Sachs, coined the acronym BRIC to identify the four large emerging economies, Brazil, Russia, India and China. These economies have since had an amazing run, and have emerged as the biggest and fastest growing emerging markets. In this course, we look at the economic experiences of the BRIC countries for the past 50 years. We discuss the reasons that have contributed to their exceptional growth rates, with particular emphasis on their transformation into market economies. We also analyze the challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Maryland 110  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP

Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa
AS.180.223 (01)

Many sub-Saharan African countries are among the least developed countries in the world. In this course, we explore the economic development experiences of African countries, with more focus on sub-Saharan Africa. The course starts with a historical perspective, delves into development strategies, and examines evidence on successes and failures of some case study countries. We conclude by analyzing the many challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process. Elements of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics are required prerequisites. There would be group presentations on assigned readings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Health and Education in South Asia
AS.180.229 (01)

Human capital is an important factor of economic growth in South Asian economies, along with physical capital and technology. Addressing health and education challenges has implications for improving a country’s human capital formation and income growth. In this course, we look at past and present health and educational outcomes in South Asian Countries. We discuss the gaps in access to education and health care services, the quality of education and health care services as well as the impacts on the productivity of the labor force. We also empirically analyze the link between economic growth and human capital development. Furthermore, we focus on some challenges and future policy options for economies in South Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Fatehin, Sohani
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Rethinking Economics After the Great Recession
AS.180.238 (01)

The financial crisis that began in the United States in 2007 threw virtually the entire world into recession. This class will look at the causes of the crisis and at how it unfolded. It will look into the conventional wisdom of economists, circa 2006, and why that wisdom proved to be so wrong. It will examine the financial innovations that contributed to the crisis, at the reasons financial regulators were blindsided, and at the reforms enacted after the crisis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Norris, Floyd
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (01)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Shaffer 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (02)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Shaffer 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Financial Markets and Institutions
AS.180.266 (01)

Understanding design and functioning of financial markets and institutions, connecting theoretical foundations and real-world applications and cases. Basic principles of asymmetric information problems, management of risk. Money, bond, and equity markets; investment banking, security brokers, and venture capital firms; structure, competition, and regulation of commercial banks. Importance of electronic technology on financial systems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Feinman, Josh
  • Room: Hodson 316  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/35
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Economics of Health
AS.180.289 (01)

Application of economic concepts and analysis to the health services system. Review of empirical studies of demand for health services, behavior of providers, and relationship of health services to population health levels. Discussion of current policy issues relating to financing and resource allocation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:30PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: de Broucker, Gatien
  • Room: Olin 305  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Topics in International Macroeconomics and Finance
AS.180.303 (01)

The course will review selected topics in international macroeconomics and finance. The topics for the Fall of 2019 include: financial globalization; international portfolio diversification; capital account liberalization and the choice of the exchange rate regime in emerging markets; the global financial safety net; macroeconomic adjustment in the euro area.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jeanne, Olivier
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Political Economy and Development
AS.180.338 (01)

Good governance is associated with desirable outcomes across countries and societies: higher life satisfaction, greater income per capita, lower child mortality, longer life expectancy, less disease, etc. But these statistical associations in the data are not sufficient to establish either that good governance truly causes such societal outcomes, or what types of policies produce them. This course asks: What are the determinants of good governance? Is good governance "good" beyond its intrinsic desirability? If so, how? We use a data-driven approach, focusing on quantitative empirical methods and their applications to policy. The goal is to develop skills to be savvy consumers, as well as producers, of policy-relevant evidence related to issues of governance, in rich and poor countries alike. Topics will include: democracy, corruption, conflict, culture, mass media, quotas, and foreign aid.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Campante, Filipe R
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Labor Economics
AS.180.351 (01)

The course discusses various issues in labor markets from the perspective of economic theory. We first study the major forces at work that shape labor market behavior; firms’ labor demand and workers’ labor supply. Then we discuss the equilibrium behavior of employment and wages. Using these tools, we also cover various applied topics in labor economics, such as minimum wage regulations, male-female wage differentials, human capital investment, worker mobility, and unemployment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Social Policy Implications of Behavioral Economics
AS.180.389 (01)

Economists increasingly incorporate insights from psychology into models of rational decision-making. Known as "behavioral economics", this line of research considers how, for example, emotions, rules-of-thumb, biased beliefs and time-inconsistent preferences influence how we make choices. Behavioral economics increasingly pervades policy discussions on topics as diverse as: obesity, the role of media, subprime mortgages and voting patterns. Behavioral models are certainly novel, but do they help us to design superior social policies? With the goal of preparing students to address this question, this course (1) provides a thorough overview of the main contributions of behavioral economics, highlighting departures from more traditional economic models and (2) emphasizes how behavioral economic models might (or might not) improve how we think about social policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Papageorge, Nick W
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Health Economics & Developing Countries
AS.180.390 (01)

Benefits of good health and its costs. Health demand and supply in poor countries. Welfare economics of Public Health. This is a writing seminar. There are some lectures on how to write a paper and on the substance of the economics of international health but the focus and only assignment is a 40-page paper by each student under the supervision of the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Gersovitz, Mark
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, POLI-CP

The University and Society
AS.190.471 (01)

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Shaffer 2  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)
AS.191.335 (01)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Queer Marxism
AS.191.346 (01)

Ever since queer theory emerged as a distinct field of critical inquiry in the early 1990s, its relationship to Marxism has been fraught. Marxian insistence on the primacy of production relations in structuring social reality has turned many queer theorists away from Marx in search of an understanding of how regimes of sexual normalcy operate to conserve a world of gender binarism organized into heterosexual domestic units. However, in the course of the last decade, the global social crisis has left many critics reexamining the relevance of Marx for grappling with issues of sexuality, reproduction and normalization, culminating in a seminal work by Kevin Floyd proposing a path Towards a Queer Marxism. If normality is not a fact of nature but a value relation that is socially produced, as queer theory has insisted from its inception, then Marx’s account of how our societies produce value might prove useful for queer theorizing. This course explores an emerging field of scholarship appearing under the banner of Queer Marxism. It examines theories, mechanisms and processes of social production and reproduction as they apply to family structures, sexual subcultures, child rearing, organization and distribution of labor, and gender embodiment, all the while having in mind the difficult questions about the possibilities for social change in a wider material world in which we are situated.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Vinketa, Darko
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

International Political Economy of Emerging Markets
AS.192.325 (01)

This course examines the relationship between politics and international economics in emerging market and developing economies. Throughout the course, we critically evaluate different political science theories of foreign economic policymaking in emerging markets. The course begins with an overview of theories of international political economy. The second section of the course focuses on developing countries’ embrace of economic globalization over the past thirty years. We examine different political explanations for why emerging market and developing countries have removed barriers to foreign trade and foreign investment since the 1980s. The final section of the course explores how globalization has impacted emerging market economies, focusing on the challenge of maintaining economic and financial stability in this era of economic globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Steinberg, David A
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora Maria Dora
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Global Health Policy
AS.192.420 (01)

The world’s countries—low, middle and high-income alike—face numerous health challenges, many shaped by processes connected to globalization. We are presently amidst one of the greatest global health challenges of the past century—the COVID-19 pandemic. But there are others that persist, including combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic, addressing non-communicable diseases, expanding health coverage and ensuring effective global governance for health. This course will examine these and other issues with an emphasis on facilitating your understanding and critical analysis of central issues in global health policy, and examining the role you can play to address health conditions—particularly those that affect disadvantaged populations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Shiffman, Jeremy
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Politics and International Relations of Iran
AS.192.425 (01)

This course provides a basis for understanding the political, economic and security dimensions of Iran’s politics and the country’s role in World politics. It will discuss the Islamic Republic of Iran's complicated political system and its international politics. A significant and geostrategically situated country, Iran is where Islamic ideology first attained power in form a major social revolution. The unfolding of that revolution has shaped the Middle East, and has posed one of the most important challenges to American foreign policy. As a revolutionary Islamic State Iran experienced a unique path to development and state-building. This course will introduce the students to the main ideological currents and political trends in Iranian politics. It will discuss the structure of its theocracy, and the working of its politics and economy. The course will also examine Iran’s foreign policy posture, with focus on U.S.-Iran relations, quest for nuclear power, and Iran's regional policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Nasr, Vali R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Democracy by the Numbers
AS.196.306 (01)

How is democracy doing around the world? This course will help students to answer this question and ask their own questions about political systems by examining a variety of quantitative measures of facets of democracy in the U.S. and internationally. We consider general indices as well as those that focus on specific normatively-appealing aspects—the absence of fraud in and broader integrity of the electoral process itself, the guarantees of fundamental human rights to all, governments’ effectiveness and accountability to the public, the equity of both representation and policy outcomes for minority groups and those historically disadvantaged or excluded, and the possibility and extent of civic engagement in non-government institutions. Wherever possible, the course will present evidence about the kinds of institutions and policies that seem to bolster democracy. Students can expect to gain hands-on experience with publicly-available subnational and national indicators of electoral and democratic quality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Corrigan, Bryce
  • Room: Wyman Park N325F  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.
AS.211.222 (01)

This course traces the history of Italian cinema from the silent era to the new millennium, highlighting its main trends and genres, and reflecting on the major transformations modern and contemporary Italian society experienced over the twentieth and twentieth-first centuries. We shall examine iconic films such as Vittorio De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves, Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura, and Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Mamma Roma, that received international recognition and influenced other national, cinematic productions. We shall also look at the work of less famous, or independent filmmakers who received less critical attention. While this class takes an historical approach, it also includes a theoretical component and introduces students to the specificity of the cinematic language, examining films in relation to the mise-en-scène, frame composition, camera movements, editing, and sound. This class is taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wegenstein, Bernadette
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (01)

This course introduces students to major figures and trends in German literature and thought from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. We will pay particular attention to the evolution of German political thought from the Protestant Reformation to the foundation of the German Federal Republic after WWII. How did the Protestant Reformation affect the understanding of the state, rights, civic institutions, and temporal authority in Germany? How did German Enlightenment thinkers conceive of ethics and politics or morality and rights? How do German writers define the nation, community, and the people or das Volk? What is the link between romanticism and nationalism? To what degree is political economy, as developed by Marx, a critical response to romanticism? How did German thinkers conceive of power and force in the wake of World Wars I and II? What are the ties that bind as well as divide a community in this tradition? We will consider these and related questions in this course through careful readings of selected works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Tobias, Rochelle
  • Room: Smokler Center 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Museums and Identity
AS.211.329 (01)

The museum boom of the last half-century has centered largely around museums dedicated to the culture and history of identity groups, including national, ethnic, religious, and minority groups. In this course we will examine such museums and consider their long history through a comparison of the theory and practice of Jewish museums with other identity museums. We will study the various museological traditions that engage identity, including the collection of art and antiquities, ethnographic exhibitions, history museums, heritage museums, art museums, and other museums of culture. Some of the questions we will ask include: what are museums for and who are they for? how do museums shape identity? and how do the various types of museums relate to one another? Our primary work will be to examine a variety of contemporary examples around the world with visits to local museums including the Jewish Museum of Maryland, the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of the American Indian.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Bloomberg 278  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

Did you know that Brazil is very similar to the United States? This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, politics, economy, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how Indigenous, Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required). No Prereq. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

Did you know that Brazil is very similar to the United States? This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, politics, economy, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how Indigenous, Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required). No Prereq. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (02)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wuensch, April
  • Room: Wyman Park N105  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern France
AS.212.413 (01)

Across the 20th century, mainstream and avant-garde French culture was deeply impacted by the presence of African American musicians and performing artists hailing from the jazz tradition. From the Josephine Baker craze of the 1920s to the second post-war which welcomed the innovations of bebop and sixties-era free improvisation, metropolitan France proved a space where expatriate and exiled Black Americans could both perpetuate the tradition and innovate by turns. At the same time, French tastemakers, critics, and musicians eager to adopt new forms and styles debated the extent to which American jazz music in its various strains could be “made French.” This course in transcultural French studies will feature readings in music criticism, history, and literature, as well as frequent close listening. It will culminate in a local concert reflecting France’s continued connection to and support of jazz and related improvised musics. Though some background in French language and in musical notation is desirable (students are encouraged to engage in original-source research), all core course readings will be provided in English. Discussion in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schilling, Derek
  • Room: Gilman 479  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Olin 305  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Colombia: Territory Against Nation
AS.215.419 (01)

The nation of Colombia amounts to a large country partly made immense and hard to govern and corruptible by its territorial nexus and porous frontier with Venezuela. Starting from such polemic claim, leaning on misgovernance vs. excessive governmentality, we will study two novels, Laura Restrepo’s Delirio/Delirium (2004) and Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s The Noise of Things Falling (2011); both winners of the prestigious Planeta Prize. To what extent can literary fictions of such scope and ambitions, invested in deeply rooted family politics, help or harm the reader’s political trust in nations as novels and fictions as nations?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical social theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced how we study and understand society: Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and W.E.B. DuBois. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of how each theorist answered three major questions: 1) what is the origin, structure and historical dynamic of modern society?; 2) how do we gain an accurate knowledge of society?; 3) what are the conditions of possibility for freedom in modern society? In comparing, applying and critiquing their respective theories, students will advance their own theory of society.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Race and Racism
AS.230.242 (01)

Race has been important in social classifications and producing inequalities. This course is designed to provide you with a global understanding of how racial categories are created and maintained, how they change over time, and how they vary from place to place. It is organized in four parts. The first part introduces the concepts and analytical tools used by social scientists to study race. Of particular concern is power and the social construction rather than “natural” categories of race, as well as the general social processes involved in the maintenance and reproduction of these boundaries. In the second part, we will study the theories and dynamics racial category formation in the United States with attention to forms and processes of racial exclusion and oppression, and evidence of socio-economic inequalities based on race. In the third part of the course, we will compare these processes in the U.S. to those occurring in other countries. The fourth and final part of the course examines how race and racism shape political struggles and resistance movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Sociology of Immigration
AS.230.317 (01)

This course surveys sociological theories and research on immigration to the U.S. Theoretical approaches include theories of international migration, economic sociology, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include the impact of U.S. immigration laws and policies on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population and the U.S. labor market and economy, and the adaptation of the first and second generations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Social Change and Development Practicum
AS.230.325 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience in the field of global social change and development. The course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Silver, BEVERLY Judith
  • Room: Shaffer 304  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Revolution and Counterrevolution
AS.230.327 (01)

In this course, students will learn about analyzing revolutionary and counterrevolutionary movements, with a focus on their strategic dimensions. Contributions from the military, counterinsurgency, sociology of revolution, historical materialist, world-system, and critical realist literature will provide different visions of strategy and tactics. The cases of Guatemala and Chile in the early 1980s and 1970s, respectively, will provide historical and empirical roots to class discussions about these different approaches and the possibilities of synthesizing them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Link Chaparro, Sebastian Eduardo
  • Room: Smokler Center 213  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Climate Change and Society
AS.230.348 (01)

This course will focus on the social dimensions of climate change. Drawing on global and multi-disciplinary scholarship, we will address such issues as: the history of fossil capitalism; the relationship between social inequality and “vulnerability” to climate change (including heat waves, drought, rising seas, and extreme weather); climate migration and the political economy of “adaptation”; the merits of various mitigation strategies, including the Green New Deal, conservation offsets, and geo-engineering; the roots of climate denialism; and climate justice movements. Students will write a final research paper on a sociological aspect of climate change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM

Power, Privilege, and Inequality
AS.230.356 (01)

Race, class and gender are among key factors in systematic patterns of inequality in the United States (and globally). In this course, we examine the manner in which social inequality comes about and is maintained through a range of social institutions and daily social interactions. This class will examine how social institutions and daily social interactions structure the decisions individuals make and, in turn, how the decisions that individuals make serve to perpetuate or challenge existing social institutions and interactions. We will explore how the intersection of different forms of inequality, for example race and class or class and gender challenge traditional conceptions of inequality and provide insight into the processes that perpetuate inequality. We will use these sociological tools to develop what sociologist C. Wright Mills calls the "sociological imagination" and apply this imagination to contemporary debates in American society. We will discuss how the sociological imagination differs from the approach other disciplines in social science might take to study inequality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Bader, Michael David
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (02)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

The Making of the Asian Races Across the Pacific in the Long 20th Century
AS.230.386 (01)

Focusing on the race-makings of the Asians across the Pacific in the long twentieth century, the course employs the reading materials that elucidate the constructions about the demographic categories of the Asian "races." We use prewar Japanese materials and Chinese nationalist thoughts to elaborate on the following themes: the internal distinction among the peoples grouped under the racial category of the Asians; the overall presentation about the generic category of the "Asian" peoplehood, as well as their alleged shared civilization and interests. The theoretical framework include concepts of capitalist reconfiguration of social boundaries through racism and the question of power behind the reproduction of racial hierarchy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Politics and Society
AS.230.396 (01)

This seminar surveys key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, sources of authority, the relationship between political and economic power, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, ideology and political contention, collective identity, social movements, and social revolutions. Fulfills Comparative Politics for International Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Racial Capitalism: A Sociological Perspective
AS.230.418 (01)

This course provides theoretical and historical approaches to examining the centrality of racism, imperialism, and colonialism to the origins and ongoing functioning of capitalism and the global political economy. We begin with the dominant theoretical frameworks used to study capitalism and carefully juxtapose these with theory and empirical analyses foregrounding capitalism’s connections to racial slavery/racialized labor exploitation, imperialism, colonialism, and gendered exploitation. Following this, we examine the unfolding of capitalism in the post-emancipation, post-independence, and neoliberal periods, paying close attention to inequalities produced within and between nations. We end by examining resistance to racial capitalism, as well as imagining alternative futures.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Sociology of Religion
AS.230.445 (01)

This seminar tackles major issues in the classical and contemporary sociology of religion. We begin with Ibn Khaldun, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Émile Durkheim, and Mary Douglas, asking basic questions: What are religion and the sacred? Why do they exist? What is the relationship between religion and social structure? And what role does religion play in morality, solidarity, boundaries, exploitation, patriarchy, and macrohistorical transformations such as the rise of capitalism? Keeping this theoretical grounding (and its flaws and biases) in mind, we continue to probe the problem of religion in modernity through more-recent writings. Topics include the secularization debate (Are modernity and religion antithetical?); “religious markets” and rational-choice theories of religion; religious revivalism, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, and proselytizing movements; feminist and queer sociologies of religion; civil religion (Is standing for the national anthem a religious act?); embodiment and prayer; Orientalism and postcolonial interrogations of the secular; religious violence and nationalism; the intersectionality of religion with race, class, and caste; and religion and neoliberalism. Although dominant sociologies of religion have focused on Christianity in Western Europe and North America, this course applies a global lens, training significant focus on non-Western and non-Christian contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/14
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL

Imagining Climate Change
AS.300.347 (01)

Climate change poses an existential threat to human civilization. Yet the attention and concern it receives in ordinary life and culture is nowhere near what science tells us is required. What are the causes of this mismatch between crisis and response? What accounts for our collective inability to imagine and grasp this new reality, and how can it be overcome? In pursuit of these questions, we will pair literary works and films with texts from politics, philosophy, literary theory, and religion, that frame climate change as a fundamental challenge to our ways of making sense of the human condition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literatures and Films of Korea and the Korean Diaspora
AS.310.110 (01)

This survey course introduces students to major events and themes addressed in Korean literature and film such as: Japanese colonialism, modernity, capitalism, the Korean War, rapid industrialization, postmodernity, immigration, transnational adoption, and more. Students will examine the role of literature and film in the development of the nation and the depiction of the Korean and Korean-diasporic subject as a complex set of intersecting social identities that contend with race, class, and gender.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura Ha Ha
  • Room: Shaffer 301  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Chinese Leaders: Institutions and Agency
AS.310.285 (01)

This course is a broad survey of what leadership looks like in China. The main through-line of the course is the how China’s leaders navigate the often challenging terrain between constraints and incentives, on the one hand, and opportunities to apply their own individual agency. We will explore the state as the arena in which all this takes place over time (to explore continuity and change) and across space (to explore adaptation and innovation). The course does not presume prior knowledge of China or Chinese language, but students new to the study of China are encouraged to pay special attention to the cumulative nature of the course and invest in the readings, particularly in the first four weeks. Although some of the themes of this course may minimally overlap with/reinforce other Chinese politics courses offered at JHU, the approach to this class will be significantly different.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C
  • Room: Krieger 304  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

China, Southeast Asia, and U.S. National Security
AS.310.305 (01)

The global political and security landscape of the 21st century will be shaped by the rivalry between two superpowers -- China and the U.S. For the foreseeable future, the geographic focus of that contest will be Southeast Asia and the surrounding maritime space, particularly the South China Sea. Southeast Asia is a complex, highly differentiated region of ten-plus nations, each with its own unique history and relationship with China. This course will introduce Southeast Asia as a key region -- geographically, economically, and strategically -- often overlooked by policymakers and scholars. It will also focus on the craft of national security strategy as the best tool for understanding the multi-sided competition, already well underway involving China, the U.S., and the Southeast Asian states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, marvin C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Eurasia's Transformation and the Global Implications
AS.310.318 (01)

Eurasia, stretching from the Western Europe across Russia, Central Asia, and China to the Pacific, is by far the largest continent on earth, with a massive share of global population, economic output, and key natural resources. It has been traditionally Balkanized. Yet since the late 1970s, due to China’s modernizations, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and a series of global geo-economic shocks, the nations of this Super Continent have become increasingly interactive, creating fluid new trans-regional political-economic patterns that remain remarkably unexplored. This course explores the critical junctures that made Eurasia the dynamic, growing colossus that it is becoming today, as well as the global implications, from a unique problem-oriented perspective. It looks first at the developmental and political challenges confronting China, Russia, and key European states as the Cold War waned, how the key nations coped, and how they might have evolved differently. It then considers the new challenges of the post-Cold War world, and how national and local leaders are responding today. Particular attention is given, in this problem—centric approach, to the challenges that growing Eurasian continental connectivity, epitomized in China’s Belt and Road Initiative, are creating for US foreign policy and for the grand strategy of American allies in NATO, Japan, and Korea. Note: Some familiarity with Eurasian history and/or politics is recommended

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Kent
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Labor Politics in China
AS.310.326 (01)

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

COVID-19 and Human Rights in Asia
AS.310.328 (01)

This seminar explores the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and government responses on a range of human rights in Asia, with a focus on the cases of China, Japan, Taiwan, India, South Korea, and Myanmar. In the first part of the course, we will investigate the fundamentals of the international human rights system, the foundational Universal Declaration of Human Rights and core human rights treaties, and the role of civil society in protecting, defending , and advancing human rights. We will then explore the United Nations’ human rights-based guidance for Covid-19 response and prevention, the right to health, and approaches to the balancing of rights and duties, including freedom of movement, freedoms of association and assembly, individuals’ right to health and duties to others, the right to education, rights to privacy, freedom of expression, right to information (and the problem of disinformation) and governments’ emergency powers (and their limits) to protect public health. Inequities and discrimination exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic will also be discussed, as will the necessity for international cooperation to effectively battle Covid-19 and vaccine inequity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Worden, Andrea Joan
  • Room: Gilman 381  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Theorizing Race and Mixed-Race in Asia and its Diasporas
AS.310.335 (01)

This class will explore the construction of race and its applications in Asia and its diasporas. Using the notion of “mixed-race” as an analytic, we will examine how the colonial origins of race and the ensuing Cold War have influenced concepts of national identity and belonging. Employing an inter-sectional approach towards race, gender, and sexuality, the course will draw on a variety of media including memoirs, archives, and videos, to contemplate the locus of race and mixed-race and their importance within the larger nexus of identity formation in Asia and its diasporas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura Ha Ha
  • Room: Shaffer 100  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Humanities Research Lab: Making Maps of Mexico
AS.360.420 (01)

Learn the basics of ArcGIS and data management as you help Prof. Lurtz publish an agricultural dataset and maps from 10 years before Mexico erupted in revolution. No experience necessary.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Greenhouse 113  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Police and Prisons
AS.362.115 (01)

This introductory course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of three parts. First, we will define key concepts in police and prison studies. Then, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Third, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Maryland 202  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-AP

Feminist and Queer Theory: Women in Western Thought an Introduction
AS.363.302 (01)

Women in Western Thought is an introduction to (the history of) Western thought from the margins of the canon. The class introduces you to some key philosophical question, focusing on some highlights of women’s thought in Western thought, most of which are commonly and unjustly neglected. The seminar will be organized around a number of paradigmatic cases, such as the mind/body question in Early Modern Europe, the declaration of the rights of (wo)men during the French revolution, the impact of slavery on philosophical thought, the MeToo debate and others. By doing so, the course will cover a range of issues, such as the nature of God, contract theory, slavery, standpoint epistemology, and queer feminist politics. Students will engage with questions about what a canon is, and who has a say in that. In this sense, Women in Western Thought introduces you to some crucial philosophical and political problems and makes you acquainted with some women in the field. The long term objective of a class on women in Western thought must be to empower, to inspire independence, and to resist the sanctioned ignorance often times masked as universal knowledge and universal history. People of all genders tend to suffer from misinformation regarding the role of women and the gender of thought more generally. By introducing you to women who took it upon themselves to resist the obstacles of their time, I am hoping to provide role models for your individual intellectual and political development. By introducing you to the historical conditions of the exclusion and oppression of women (including trans and queer women as well as black women and women of color), I hope to enable you to generate the sensitivities that are required to navigate the particular social relations of the diverse world you currently inhabit. By introducing philosophical topics in this way, I hope to enable you to have a positive, diversifying influence on you future endeavours.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: deLire, Luce Marcella
  • Room: Maryland 104  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (06)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Hodson 313
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (02)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Gilman 186
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (05)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Free Speech and the Law in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.366 (01)

This class explores the ideas and legal doctrines that define the freedom of speech. We will examine the free speech jurisprudence of the U.S. in comparison to that of other systems, particularly the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and the Supreme Court of Canada.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (01)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Gilman 377
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (03)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Krieger 306
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (04)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Gilman 377
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (01)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Shaffer 303 Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (02)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Shaffer 303 Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (03)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Shaffer 303 Gilman 119
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (04)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robbie
  • Room: Shaffer 303 Gilman 219
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (01)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (02)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (03)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (06)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

American Constitutional Law
AS.190.333 (01)

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

The American Presidency
AS.190.228 (01)

Over the past several decades, the power and importance of America’s presidency have greatly expanded . Of course, presidential history includes both ups and downs, some coinciding with the rise and fall of national party systems and others linked to specific problems, issues, and personalities. We should train our analytic eyes, however, to see beneath the surface of day-to-day and even decade-to-decade political turbulence. We should focus, instead, on the pronounced secular trend of more than two and a quarter centuries of American history. Two hundred years ago, presidents were weak and often bullied by Congress. Today, presidents are powerful and often thumb their noses at Congress and the courts. For better or worse, we have entered a presidentialist era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (04)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (05)

This course provides an analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. It offers a broad historical survey that starts with US involvement in the First World War, covers major developments of the twentieth century, and concludes with contemporary issues. Important themes include the developments underpinning the emergence of the liberal world order, strategies of containment during the Cold War, nuclear deterrence and antiproliferation efforts, the politics of international trade, alliance politics, technological and security policy, and the re-emergence of great power competition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Mudd 26 Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR

Political Violence
AS.190.350 (01)

An examination of the ways in which violence has been used to secure political ends. Topics include civil wars, targeted killings, terrorism, ethnic conflict and war itself. Students examine what makes types of political violence unique and what unites them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Nuclear Weapons and World Politics
AS.190.454 (01)

An intensive examination of competing theories of the role of nuclear weapons in world politics and alternative global security orders. Focus on nuclear weapons and the interstate system, deterrence, war fighting, arms control, proliferation and terrorism, with select historical and contemporary case studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/40
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Political Polarization
AS.190.473 (01)

The American constitutional order, which was designed to operate without political parties, now has parties as divided as any in the democratic world. This course will examine explanations of how this happened, the consequences of party polarization for public policy and governance, and what if anything should be done about it.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
  • Room: Hodson 213  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Political Thought in the Americas
AS.190.328 (01)

Reflection on political ideas and institutions in the United States is often oriented by the notion that the US is in some sense exceptional. For some commentators, the US is exceptionally democratic, exceptionally stable, exceptionally productive, and exceptionally innovative. For others, the US is exceptionally racist, exceptionally unequal, exceptionally violent, and exceptionally unhealthy. What both sides share is a common point of comparative reference in Europe. For all these commentators, Europe is the norm against which all of the exceptional qualities of the US stand out. In this course, we will ask how well notions of US exceptionalism stand up against the different comparative references found in the Americas, focusing in particular on the history of political thought in the Americas. We’ll begin by studying texts from the pre-colonial and colonial periods, noting similarities and differences between the political institutions, economies, and social and racial hierarchies of in the regions that comprised British, Spanish, Portuguese, and French America. Next, we’ll consider the US, Latin American, and Caribbean independence movements, early constitutionalism, and debates on women’s role in society, slavery, and the rights of Indigenous Americans, asking what, if anything, distinguished the US from its neighbors in its early years. Finally, we’ll examine theories of imperialism, racism, patriarchy, exploitation, and environmental destruction that have emerged from the Americas in the course of the 20th century, to see how both shared and divergent historical experiences have shaped perspectives relevant to contemporary political issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Simon, Josh David
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Philosophy of Law
AS.190.474 (01)

The philosophy of law or jurisprudence investigates the nature of law and what makes law, as it were, law. Thus, this course will examine various ways in which law has been defined and understood. It will also consider how law is distinguished from other systems of norms and values, such as morality, and how law is distinguished from other aspects of government, such as politics. In addition, the course will introduce students to discussions of legal reasoning and interpretation. Students will be required to participate in class discussion, take three exams, and write one paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Geopolitics
AS.190.451 (01)

Intensive exploration of theories of how geography, ecology, and technology shape political orders. Case studies of ancient, early modern, global, and contemporary topics, including European ascent, industrial revolution, tropics and North South divide, climate change, geo-engineering and global commons (oceans, atmosphere and orbital space

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-PT, POLI-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Russian Foreign Policy (IR)
AS.191.345 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 309  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Race, Class, and America
AS.191.352 (01)

Through an intensive and in-depth reading of theorists, thinkers, historians, and political scientists, this course will take students through the deeply interconnected story of American race relations and labor politics. We will examine primary source material, such as the essays of Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison, the speeches of A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, and Martin Luther King, Jr., the memoirs of Charles Denby and Angelo Herndon, and the pamphlets of Claudia Jones; we will read historical accounts which situate these figures in their context; and we will engage critically with the fundamental topic: in the United States, what is the relationship between race and class; racism and exploitation; civil rights and labor activism? Toward the end of the course, we will examine recent scholarship that has returned to these themes to show how deeply imbricated America—its people, its institutions, its political economy—remains to this history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Mann, Thomas Joseph
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT

States, Regimes & Contentious Politics
AS.192.150 (01)

This course, which satisfies the gateway requirement for the major in International Studies, introduces students to the study of politics and political life in the world, with a particular focus on the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Throughout the course, we will analyze the sources of order and disorder in modern states, addressing a series of questions, such as: why did nation-states form? What makes a state a nation? Why are some states democracies while others are not? How do people organize to fight oppression? Why does conflict sometimes turn violent? What are the causes of ethnic war? Drawing on a mix of classic works and contemporary scholarship, we will discuss the answers that scholars have formulated to address these and other questions, paying special attention to research design and the quality of argumentation. This course also counts as a 100-level course in comparative politics required for political science majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lawrence, Adria K
  • Room: Shaffer 303  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 51/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Use of Force and the American State
AS.191.358 (01)

This course examines the growth and development of the American state’s coercive institutions, namely, the military and police. We will explore the ways in which the American state makes war, fights crime, and polices the boundaries of citizenship. While we tend to approach these topics from the perspective of international relations, law, or political philosophy, this course focuses on American politics and institutions. How did the United States secure control over a transcontinental territory in the absence of a large standing army? Why did the federal government try to criminalize vices, and how were these statutes enforced? How did violence influence the development of the American state, and to what extent do these historical processes explain warfare and law enforcement today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Butron, Juliana
  • Room: Krieger 306  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

The Politics of Migration Control
AS.191.342 (01)

Today, immigration control is an almost ubiquitous global phenomenon. It exists in the deserts of the Sahel, shores of Morocco, airports in Korea and islands of the coast of Australia. This course will introduce students to the global phenomenon of migration control. Why does immigration control exist? What is the purpose of immigration control? What does migration control look like in different countries? Students will learn about the different forms of migration control and the actors involved; what it means to be live with migration control; the colonial histories of migration control; the racial underpinnings of it; and the way it is legitimized through certain representations of migrants.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Axster, Sabrina Diana
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.400 (01)Research Lab: The Dutch AmericasM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHyman, Aaron M.Gilman 177
 
HART-RENBAR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.267 (01)Culture, Religion and Politics in IranW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHaeri, NiloofarMergenthaler 426
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.070.380 (01)Slumworld: Life in informal SettlementsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMProcupez, ValeriaMergenthaler 426
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.100.102 (01)The Medieval WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLester, AnneOlin 305
Maryland 104
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.102 (02)The Medieval WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLester, AnneOlin 305
Gilman 308
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.102 (03)The Medieval WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLester, AnneOlin 305
Hackerman 320
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.102 (04)The Medieval WorldMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLester, AnneOlin 305
Maryland 104
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.115 (01)Modern Latin AmericaMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMLurtz, CaseyAmes 234
Maryland 202
HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.115 (02)Modern Latin AmericaMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMLurtz, CaseyAmes 234
Krieger Laverty
HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.115 (03)Modern Latin AmericaMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLurtz, CaseyAmes 234
Maryland 202
HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.115 (04)Modern Latin AmericaMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLurtz, CaseyAmes 234
Maryland 217
HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.122 (01)Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880)TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaffGilman 17
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.128 (01)Approaches to Jewish HistoryMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszCroft Hall G02
 
HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.233 (01)History of Modern GermanyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 55
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-GERM, MLL-ENGL
AS.100.251 (01)West African HistoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKeegan, ThomasKrieger 308
 
HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.321 (01)Political Thought and Social Transformation in the Haitian Revolution and Early Independent Mexico, c. 1789-1850TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBorocz-Johnson, Lee MichaelKrieger 302
 
HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.347 (01)Early Modern ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TBLC 5015
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.413 (01)London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital cityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John WHackerman 320
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.422 (01)Society & Social Change in 18th Century ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TKrieger 302
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.497 (01)1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing BacklashW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethMaryland 109
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, CSC-CE
AS.140.317 (01)The Hydrologic Sphere: Histories of Water in the Colonial and Postcolonial WorldTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBrig, Kristin VictoriaShriver Hall Board Room
 
INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.150.428 (01)Spinoza’s Theological Political TreatiseW 4:00PM - 6:30PMMelamed, Yitzhak YohananGilman 288
 
INST-PT, PHIL-MODERN
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Hodson 315
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Maryland 217
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Hodson 303
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Maryland 217
AS.180.101 (05)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Shaffer 302
AS.180.101 (06)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Croft Hall G02
AS.180.101 (07)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Gilman 119
AS.180.101 (08)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Croft Hall G02
AS.180.101 (09)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Croft Hall G02
AS.180.101 (10)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Krieger 308
AS.180.101 (11)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Krieger 308
AS.180.101 (12)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PMBarbera, BobHodson 110
Hodson 216
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHackerman B 17
 
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHackerman B 17
 
AS.180.214 (01)The Economic Experience of the BRIC CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeMaryland 110
 
INST-ECON, INST-CP
AS.180.223 (01)Economic Development in Sub-Saharan AfricaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenMaryland 114
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.229 (01)Economics of Health and Education in South AsiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMFatehin, SohaniHodson 211
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.238 (01)Rethinking Economics After the Great RecessionTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNorris, FloydMaryland 114
 
INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.261 (01)Monetary AnalysisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, LudmilaShaffer 300
 
INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.261 (02)Monetary AnalysisTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, LudmilaShaffer 300
 
INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.266 (01)Financial Markets and InstitutionsW 3:00PM - 5:30PMFeinman, JoshHodson 316
 
INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.289 (01)Economics of HealthM 3:30PM - 6:00PMde Broucker, GatienOlin 305
 
INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.180.303 (01)Topics in International Macroeconomics and FinanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJeanne, OlivierHodson 303
 
INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.338 (01)Political Economy and DevelopmentW 3:00PM - 5:30PMCampante, Filipe RHodson 216
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.351 (01)Labor EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 211
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.389 (01)Social Policy Implications of Behavioral EconomicsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPapageorge, Nick WHodson 216
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.390 (01)Health Economics & Developing CountriesT 3:00PM - 5:30PMGersovitz, Mark 
 
INST-ECON
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 132
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.471 (01)The University and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert HShaffer 2
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.191.335 (01)Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)T 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertKrieger 302
 
INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.346 (01)Queer MarxismTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMVinketa, DarkoGilman 377
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.192.325 (01)International Political Economy of Emerging MarketsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSteinberg, David AMergenthaler 266
 
INST-ECON
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora Maria DoraKrieger 300
 
INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.192.420 (01)Global Health PolicyW 4:30PM - 7:00PMShiffman, JeremyGilman 377
 
AS.192.425 (01)The Politics and International Relations of IranT 1:30PM - 4:00PMNasr, Vali RMergenthaler 252
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.196.306 (01)Democracy by the NumbersTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMCorrigan, BryceWyman Park N325F
 
INST-CP
AS.211.222 (01)Italian Cinema: The classics, the Forgotten and the Emergent.MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMWegenstein, BernadetteGilman 186
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.265 (01)Panorama of German ThoughtTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMTobias, RochelleSmokler Center 301
 
AS.211.329 (01)Museums and IdentityMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSpinner, Samuel JacobBloomberg 278
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaShriver Hall 001
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaShriver Hall 001
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.212.353 (02)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWuensch, AprilWyman Park N105
 
INST-CP
AS.212.413 (01)For the Record: Jazz Cultures of Modern FranceMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchilling, DerekGilman 479
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStaffHodson 303
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGonzalez, EduardoOlin 305
 
GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.419 (01)Colombia: Territory Against NationMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, EduardoGilman 219
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMLevien, MichaelGilman 377
 
INST-PT
AS.230.242 (01)Race and RacismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaffShriver Hall 001
 
INST-AP
AS.230.317 (01)Sociology of ImmigrationMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMHao, LingxinGilman 217
 
INST-IR
AS.230.325 (01)Global Social Change and Development PracticumTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSilver, BEVERLY JudithShaffer 304
 
AS.230.327 (01)Sociology of Revolution and CounterrevolutionMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLink Chaparro, Sebastian EduardoSmokler Center 213
 
INST-CP
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilBloomberg 178
 
INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.348 (01)Climate Change and SocietyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, MichaelGilman 400
 
ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.356 (01)Power, Privilege, and InequalityT 4:30PM - 7:00PMBader, Michael DavidGilman 75
 
INST-AP
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-YingBloomberg 276
 
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGreif, MeredithGilman 186
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.370 (02)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 186
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilBloomberg 178
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.230.386 (01)The Making of the Asian Races Across the Pacific in the Long 20th CenturyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingBloomberg 276
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.396 (01)Politics and SocietyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, JoelMergenthaler 526
 
INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.230.418 (01)Racial Capitalism: A Sociological PerspectiveT 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaffKrieger 302
 
INST-ECON
AS.230.445 (01)Sociology of ReligionW 4:30PM - 7:00PMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 526
 
INST-CP, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.347 (01)Imagining Climate ChangeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLisi, LeonardoGilman 208
 
AS.310.110 (01)Literatures and Films of Korea and the Korean DiasporaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMReizman, Laura Ha HaShaffer 301
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.285 (01)Chinese Leaders: Institutions and AgencyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMertha, Andrew CKrieger 304
 
INST-CP
AS.310.305 (01)China, Southeast Asia, and U.S. National SecurityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, marvin CMergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.318 (01)Eurasia's Transformation and the Global ImplicationsT 4:30PM - 7:00PMCalder, KentKrieger 300
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.326 (01)Labor Politics in ChinaW 4:30PM - 7:00PMHe, GaochaoGilman 119
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.310.328 (01)COVID-19 and Human Rights in AsiaF 1:30PM - 4:00PMWorden, Andrea JoanGilman 381
 
INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.310.335 (01)Theorizing Race and Mixed-Race in Asia and its DiasporasW 4:30PM - 7:00PMReizman, Laura Ha HaShaffer 100
 
INST-CP
AS.360.420 (01)Humanities Research Lab: Making Maps of MexicoMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMLurtz, CaseyGreenhouse 113
 
HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.362.115 (01)Introduction to Police and PrisonsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceMaryland 202
 
INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.363.302 (01)Feminist and Queer Theory: Women in Western Thought an IntroductionT 4:30PM - 7:00PMdeLire, Luce MarcellaMaryland 104
 
INST-PT, MSCH-HUM
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer PMaryland 114
 
HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.101 (06)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Hodson 313
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (02)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Gilman 186
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (05)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Krieger 306
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.366 (01)Free Speech and the Law in Comparative PerspectiveTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, Richard StephenGilman 186
 
INST-AP, INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.101 (01)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Gilman 377
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (03)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Krieger 306
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.101 (04)Introduction to American PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLieberman, Robert CMergenthaler 111
Gilman 377
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.111 (01)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMShilliam, RobbieShaffer 303
Krieger 308
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (02)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMShilliam, RobbieShaffer 303
Bloomberg 276
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (03)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMShilliam, RobbieShaffer 303
Gilman 119
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (04)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMShilliam, RobbieShaffer 303
Gilman 219
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (01)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 300
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (02)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 308
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (03)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 300
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (06)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 306
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.333 (01)American Constitutional LawW 4:30PM - 7:00PMStaffGilman 55
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.228 (01)The American PresidencyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminShriver Hall 104
 
POLI-AP
AS.190.227 (04)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 304
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.227 (05)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSchmidt, SebastianMudd 26
Krieger 304
INST-AP, INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.350 (01)Political ViolenceT 3:00PM - 5:30PMDavid, Steven RMaryland 114
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.454 (01)Nuclear Weapons and World PoliticsW 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 17
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.473 (01)Political PolarizationTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMTeles, Steven MichaelHodson 213
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.328 (01)Political Thought in the AmericasMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSimon, Josh DavidKrieger 300
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.474 (01)Philosophy of LawTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMCulbert, JenniferGilman 219
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.451 (01)GeopoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceGilman 17
 
INST-IR, INST-PT, POLI-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.191.345 (01)Russian Foreign Policy (IR)W 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertKrieger 309
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.352 (01)Race, Class, and AmericaTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMann, Thomas JosephKrieger 308
 
POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT
AS.192.150 (01)States, Regimes & Contentious PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLawrence, Adria KShaffer 303
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.191.358 (01)Use of Force and the American StateTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMButron, JulianaKrieger 306
 
POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.191.342 (01)The Politics of Migration ControlTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMAxster, Sabrina DianaGilman 75
 
POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP