Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Public Opinion and Democracy
AS.001.127 (01)

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and the contours of democracy in the United States, and how have these relationships changed as techniques for measuring public opinion have evolved since the early twentieth century? To consider this question, the course introduces alternative perspectives on the features of a healthy democracy, including both historical perspectives and current arguments. Interweaved with this material, the course examines how public opinion is measured and interpreted by private pollsters, survey researchers, and data journalists. Emphasis is placed on the alternative claims that opposing analysts adopt, as well as how the technologies of data collection and analysis shape the permissibility of conclusions. Students will learn to interpret public opinion patterns, which requires a brief presentation of basic concepts from survey sampling, including what to make of the polling industry’s most boring concept: margin of error.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L (Steve)
  • Room: Gilman 381  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Science and Technology in Africa
AS.070.367 (01)

This course explores the role of science and technology in the making of African histories and politics. We will examine precolonial iron-working, healing, and weaving; the ways guns and railroads functioned as tools of empire; the role of hydroelectric dams in postcolonial nation building; and the rise of digital communication and payment systems in the present. Throughout, we will challenge commonsense distinctions between the material and the spiritual, designers and users, wealth and people.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Degani, Michael
  • Room: Croft Hall G02  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Readings of Foucault
AS.070.473 (01)

We will do a close reading of selected texts of Foucault to track the concepts of power, subjectivity, government, and care of the self.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena (Veena)
  • Room: Mergenthaler 439  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

China: Neolithic to Song
AS.100.243 (01)

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song Dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE) and will include discussion of art, material culture, and literature as well as politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will help students gain firsthand perspective on the materials covered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Gilman 17 Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

China: Neolithic to Song
AS.100.243 (02)

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song Dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE) and will include discussion of art, material culture, and literature as well as politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will help students gain firsthand perspective on the materials covered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Gilman 17 Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (01)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 203 Krieger 306
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (02)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 203 Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

This class focuses on Europe from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss such topics as the Cold War, social democracy, the welfare state, the relationship to the US and the Soviet Union, decolonization, migration, 1989, European integration, neoliberalism, and the EU. We will discuss and analyze academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (01)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Bloomberg 176 Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

Race & Power in Modern South Africa
AS.100.282 (02)

Overview of modern South African history, with a focus on the origins of the racial state and the development of black liberation movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Bloomberg 176 Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA

The French Revolution
AS.100.310 (01)

Political, social and cultural history of a turning-point in European history that witnessed the birth and death of democracy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Mason, Laura
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

The Enlightenment
AS.100.314 (01)

Examines the Enlightenment, an intellectual movement that swept Europe in the eighteenth century to shape the modern world. Topics include science and religion; print culture; gender and sociability; political economy; and race, slavery, and colonialism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kwass, Michael
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Annales School
AS.100.343 (01)

This is not a typical history course but one on historical theory and modern historiographical thought. How did historians in the past generations attempt to analyze the past? To what extent is history connected to other disciplines? What was the French contribution to contemporary historiography? What is "new history"? In this seminar, we are going to examine the scholarship of the French Annales, arguably the most influential and revolutionary “school” of historiography in the twentieth century. Students will read selected works of the Annales historians and discuss concepts such as economic history, serial history, longue durée, conjuncture, total history, mentalité, historical psychology, and historical anthropology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Zheng, Xinhe (Vaclav)
  • Room: Gilman 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (01)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Gilman 55 Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages
AS.100.365 (02)

This course will cover the period commonly known as the High Middle Ages, that is, the civilization of Western Europe in the period roughly from 1050 to 1350. . It is a period of exceptional creativity in the history of Western Europe and in medieval history specifically, a time when many of the most characteristic institutions of Europe came into being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Brazil History and Cultures: A Glance from Baltimore
AS.100.379 (01)

Using textual and visual documents (including books from Peabody Library), we will examine the contrasts of Brazilian history and culture, and its connections with 19th and 20th century Baltimore.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis (Jean)
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

Sport is key to understanding the Cold War. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes at home and abroad, how sports were used in domestic and foreign policy, and how Cold War sports reinforce or challenge notions of race, gender, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Krieger 180  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA

Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle East
AS.100.387 (01)

Explores the daily lives of non-elites in the medieval Middle East—food; housing; clothes; marriage and divorce; urban festivals—through primary documents (e.g. letters, court records) and artifacts (e.g. clothing). Pre-requisite for enrollment: Students must have taken one history course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST

The Gender Binary and American Empire
AS.100.396 (01)

This discussion-based seminar will explore some of the ways that the sex and gender binary was produced out of American statecraft in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Particular attention will be paid to US imperialism, both domestically in its settler form, as well as in Hawaii, the Caribbean, and the Pacific. What happens to the study of the modern gender binary if it is treated as a transnational artefact of US imperialism’s encounter with a multitude of cultures and nations?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Gill Peterson, Julian (Jules)
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 308  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of Rights
AS.100.445 (01)

This seminar-style course will focus on discussing British and American political thought from the "Age of Revolutions", a period also of many critiques of Empire and of many works of Antislavery. Readings include Paine's Common Sense and Rights of Man, the Declaration of Rights, the Constitution and Bill of Rights, the Federalist Papers; works by Smith, Burke, and Wollstonecraft; and antislavery works by Cugoano, Equiano, Rush, Wesley, and Wilberforce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

History Research Lab: Virtue Politics - from Athens to America
AS.100.450 (05)

What matters most for good government: the quality of its institutions or of its rulers? Since the 16th c., western thought has focused on ‘structural’ concerns like the separation of powers. In his book Virtue Politics, James Hankins suggests that Renaissance humanism offered an alternative. Agnostic about institutions, ‘virtue politics’ cared about the souls of individuals in power. It said that the key to good politics lay in good education of the State’s leaders. This course traces ‘virtue politics’ from roots in Antiquity to ramifications for 1/6/2021 and the Poor People’s Campaign. Readings range widely across the western tradition, focusing especially on Liberal and Radical thought. They end with an evaluation of 20th- and 21st-c. American politics: from pragmatism to Civil Rights, critical pedagogy to Black feminism, fundamentalist evangelism to queer liberation. Participants collaboratively develop a “public engaging project” in lieu of a final exam.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: van den Arend, Alan R (Alan)
  • Room: Shaffer 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE

History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Epidemic!: Diseases that Shaped our World
AS.140.228 (01)

In this course, we will look at a number of key epidemic diseases in the pre-modern and modern world, from Black Death to COVID-19, and investigate how it affected medical thought and practice, as well as political, social and economic lives. We will pay special attention to how these diseases spread and how they affected and were influenced by questions of race, gender, sexuality and colonialism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Health & Society in Latin America & the Caribbean
AS.140.231 (01)

Medical practice is complex in Latin America and the Caribbean. Most countries in the region have universal healthcare; yet, the quality of clinical services varies widely, and is influenced by degrees of incorporation into—or marginalization from—social power structures. Many people take their health into their own hands by supplementing biomedicine with plant based remedies as well as religious and spiritual services. This course will interrogate the history and contemporary relevance of healthcare in Latin America and the Caribbean, with particular interest in how medicine intersects with colonialism, slavery, capitalism, neo-colonialism, grassroots revolutionary movements, the Cold War, and neoliberalism. Drawing on films, visual and performance art, and music, students will consider the ways in which race, gender, indigeneity, ability, class, and nation have affected people’s experiences with medical practice. Informed by postcolonial and decolonial scholarship, we will also examine why Latin America and the Caribbean have become “laboratories” for the production of medical knowledge, and importantly, how that knowledge was created by indigenous, enslaved, and migrant people as well as professionals. Finally, we seek to understand individual health problems in relation to the social and political determinants of health. As such, the course prompts students to reflect on why healthcare professionals—in the United States and abroad—would benefit from historically-informed communication with patients and their communities. This is a discussion-based seminar that requires active participation. There are no exams. The course does not assume any previous knowledge of the history of medicine or Latin American history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: O'brien, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Biology and Society in Asia
AS.140.245 (01)

What major knowledge traditions about life’s generation and function have taken shape in Asia that continue to shape our contemporary world? How have they fared in encounters with Western knowledge traditions? How have modern biology, biotechnology and biomedicine developed in Asia in recent years within distinct geopolitical contexts? This course addresses these questions with selected historical cases from China, India, Japan, Koreas and selected Southeast Asian countries. It first introduces concepts and frameworks of major non-Western knowledge systems about life such as yin-yang and five phases and examine how religions, politics, and cross-cultural encounters impacted these systems, their evolutions or replacements. Then the class will examine the political, material, cultural and institutional contexts of more recent development in the life sciences in Asia. Class activities include lectures, discussions, research seminars, a final research project, and possible conversations with visiting professors and field trips.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Jiang, Lijing
  • Room: Gilman 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and Films
AS.140.398 (01)

Japan is often described as “nature-loving,” and is considered to be one of world leaders in environmental protection policies. Yet current environmental successes come on the heels of numerous environmental disasters that plagued Japan in the past centuries. Juxtaposing Japanese environmental history and its reflection in popular media, the course will explore the intersection between technology, environment, and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Frumer, Yulia
  • Room: Krieger 306  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Introduction to the History of Modern Philosophy
AS.150.205 (01)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 55
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (02)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (03)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (04)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Williams, Michael
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro-Political Philosop
AS.150.240 (01)

This course begins by reviewing canonical texts in modern political philosophy beginning with Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and ends by exploring classic questions in contemporary debates in race, gender, and identity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Gilman 55 Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Intro-Political Philosop
AS.150.240 (02)

This course begins by reviewing canonical texts in modern political philosophy beginning with Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and ends by exploring classic questions in contemporary debates in race, gender, and identity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Gilman 55 Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 114
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 274
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 316
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 316
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 316
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EU
AS.180.210 (01)

Increased mobility of people across national borders, whether by choice or by force, has become an integral part of the modern world. Using a comparative perspective and an applied economics approach, the course explores the economic and political determinants, and (likely) consequences of migration flows for East Asia, the US and the EU. Lectures, assignments and in class discussions, will be built around the following topics: i) migrants’ self-selection; ii) human capital investment decision-making; iii) remittance decisions and effects; iv) impacts on labor markets of both receiving and sending countries; and v) the economic benefits from immigration. Overall, the course will give students perspective on the why people choose or feel compelled to leave their countries, how receiving countries respond to migrants’ presence, and the key economic policy concerns that are influencing the shaping of immigration policy in East Asia, the US, and the EU.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora (Giovanna Maria Dora)
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Transition and Institutional Change
AS.180.233 (01)

This course will introduce students to the comparative analysis of institutions of existing capitalist systems and to the historical evolution of those institutions. By comparing the economic systems of different nations, we will try to reveal the institutional setups that either contribute or hinder economic performance. We will also examine the process of countries transforming their economies and investigate the factors that determine the differences in reforms’ outcomes between countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

International Trade
AS.180.241 (01)

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

International Monetary Economics
AS.180.242 (01)

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crisis, the choice of exchange rate, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Latrobe 120  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Rich Countries, Poor Countries
AS.180.361 (01)

Why are some countries rich while some other countries poor? Why does a country’s income per person generally grow over time? We try to analyze these questions using the theoretical and empirical growth literature. We will study seminal growth models, and also try to explain cross-country income differences in terms of factors like geography, institutions and global integration. Knowledge of regression analysis (including instrumental variables estimation) is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Social Policy Implications of Behavioral Economics
AS.180.389 (01)

Economists increasingly incorporate insights from psychology into models of rational decision-making. Known as "behavioral economics", this line of research considers how, for example, emotions, rules-of-thumb, biased beliefs and time-inconsistent preferences influence how we make choices. Behavioral economics increasingly pervades policy discussions on topics as diverse as: obesity, the role of media, subprime mortgages and voting patterns. Behavioral models are certainly novel, but do they help us to design superior social policies? With the goal of preparing students to address this question, this course (1) provides a thorough overview of the main contributions of behavioral economics, highlighting departures from more traditional economic models and (2) emphasizes how behavioral economic models might (or might not) improve how we think about social policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Papageorge, Nicholas W (Nick)
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, SPOL-UL, BEHB-SOCSCI

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (01)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (02)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (05)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (07)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Hodson 316 Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Hodson 316 Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (01)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (02)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 186
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (03)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)
  • Room: Virtual Online Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (04)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

What you need to know about Chinese Politics, Part 2
AS.190.269 (01)

This serves as a two-semester survey of Chinese politics from 1911-Present. This second module explores the politics of the reform and post-reform eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C (Andrew), Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Human Security
AS.190.283 (01)

While traditional studies on security have focused largely on border protection, sovereign authority of the state, and interstate alliances, the threats posed to everyday people were not a central focus of security analyses until the end of the Cold War. The human security approach has evolved as a challenge to conventional thinking on security. This course will introduce the notion of human security, trace its emergence and evolution in the global political discourse, explore the theoretical scholarship from which it developed, and evaluate its effectiveness as a framework for addressing the most egregious threats human beings face today. From refugee flows, gender inequality, ethnic conflict, mass atrocities, poverty, to climate change, human security scholarship and policy has sought to examine the various threats to the lives of people that transcend national borders and allow us to break out of narrow thinking to develop innovative and globally-minded solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Barqueiro, Carla Robertson (Carla)
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases
AS.190.308 (01)

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Future of American Democracy
AS.190.322 (01)

For the most part, observers of American politics have not considered the possibility that the American democratic regime might be at risk. But the unexpected election of Donald Trump in 2016 and the subsequent course of his presidency have occasioned a great deal of uncertainty and anxiety about whether democracy in the United States is at risk and whether American political institutions can withstand the stresses of contemporary politics. This course will use the Trump era to explore the conditions that seem to threaten the stability of the American regime. We will begin by exploring the political circumstances that led to Trump’s rise. We will then examine what we can learn from the experience of other countries about the conditions that make democracy either robust or fragile. Finally, we will consider how a set of contemporary political conditions in the United States — extreme partisan polarization, intense racial antagonism, growing economic inequality, and expanded executive power — contribute to the challenges facing American democracy today and in the future.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Smokler Center 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Democracy And Elections
AS.190.326 (01)

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Politics of Information
AS.190.327 (01)

Considers global and comparative politics of information, information technologies, and the Internet. Examines governance of information (ownership of information, rights to information, privacy) and governance of information technologies (domain names, social media websites, etc.).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room: Shaffer 303  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Constitutional Law
AS.190.334 (01)

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily (Emily)
  • Room: Krieger 304  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Imagining Borders
AS.190.335 (01)

What is a border and why do borders matter in global politics. What do borders mean under conditions of globalization? An examination of the politics of borders, transborder flows, and networks within and across borders. The readings which come from political science and other disciplines, will include theoretical and case-specific works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room: Hodson 203  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/35
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Politics of the Korean Diaspora
AS.190.337 (01)

This seminar explores some of the core questions in the study of citizenship, migration, and racial and ethnic politics through the lens of Korean diasporic populations in the United States, Japan, China, and the former Soviet Union. We will examine how immigration, citizenship, and minority policies have structured and constrained the relationship of Korean communities to both the receiving and sending states. As a diasporic group, is there a collective self-identification among members of Korean communities that transcends territorial, hemispheric, linguistic, and cultural differences? Or is the Korean ethnic identity more a reflection of racial and ethnic politics in the receiving society? What factors determine the assimilability of a particular group at a given historical moment?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Krieger 180  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

American Racial Politics
AS.190.339 (01)

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.214

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Black Politics II
AS.190.342 (01)

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.340.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Seminar In Anti-Semitism
AS.190.344 (01)

Jews exercise a good deal of power in contemporary America.. They are prominent in a number of key industries, play important roles in the political process, and hold many major national offices. For example, though Jews constitute barely two percent of America’s citizens, about one-third of the nation’s wealthiest 400 individuals are Jewish and more than ten percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress are held by Jews. One recent book declared that, “From the Vatican to the Kremlin, from the White House to Capitol Hill, the world’s movers and shakers view American Jewry as a force to be reckoned with.” Of course, Jews have risen to power in many times and places ranging from the medieval Muslim world and early modern Spain through Germany and the Soviet Union in the 20th century. In nearly every prior instance, though, Jewish power proved to be evanescent. No sooner had the Jews become “a force to be reckoned with” than they found themselves banished to the political ma rgins, forced into exile or worse. Though it may rise to a great height, the power of the Jews seems ultimately to rest on a rather insecure foundation. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Foundations of International Relations Theory
AS.190.346 (01)

This course is a broad conceptual introduction to international relations theory in a format that stresses close reading and critical discussion. We will explore mainstream theoretical perspectives and critiques of those perspectives, as well as more recent developments in the field. By the end of the course, students will have a firm grasp of the core issues and debates in the field. The course is conceptually demanding; interested students should have at least completed an introductory course in political science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-PT, POLI-IR, POLI-PT

A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st Century
AS.190.347 (01)

“Can the United States and China avoid a new Cold War? One might think not given disputes over the South China Sea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, human rights, trade, ideology and so much more. Moreover, competition for influence in the developing world and American concerns as to whether China will replace it as the preeminent world power suggest a new Cold War is in the offing. Nevertheless, their extensive economic ties and need to work together to solve common problems such as climate change, nuclear proliferation, and pandemics argues against a continuing confrontation. This course will examine whether cooperation or conflict will define Sino-American relations, and whether a new Cold War—or even a shooting war—lies in the future.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Shaffer 304  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

The State of Nature
AS.190.357 (01)

Though it is possible to imagine ways of addressing the multiple crises the world will face as the atmosphere warms, seas rise, and pollutants seep into the surface of the planet, any serious proposal will require a degree of coordination amongst nation-states that has proven impossible to achieve in the past. In this course, we will consider this difficult situation by treating it as an instance of an old problem in political theory: how to escape the infamous “state of nature,” where individuals struggle to obtain the resources they need to survive at others’ expense, rather than cooperating to satisfy their needs and address the threats they face in common. First, we will study some influential reflections on the state of nature by Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Freud, and Pateman, as well as efforts to apply the logic of the state of nature to problems in international politics by Kant, Wendt, Waltz, Enloe, and others. Then we will read contemporary work on the international politics of climate change and ask what it would take to start building the better world that is possible today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Simon, Joshua David (Josh)
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, POLI-CP, INST-PT, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Political Violence
AS.190.374 (01)

This undergraduate seminar is designed to introduce students to the comparative study of political violence and intra-state conflict. We will examine social science theories and empirical studies on a wide range of forms of political violence, including civil war, coups, state repression, communal violence, riots, terrorism, genocide, and criminal-political violence. We will study these phenomena at the micro, meso and macro levels, and focus on understanding their causes, dynamics, outcomes, and aftermath. The class will also equip students with an ability to analyze political violence by using social scientific tools.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Amat Matus, Consuelo
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-IR

Nationalism and the Politics of Identity
AS.190.379 (01)

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room: Krieger 306  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-CP, POLI-PT, POLI-CP

Race and American Democracy
AS.190.390 (01)

While the United States has long been a democracy for white men, it has mostly been anything but democratic when seen through the eyes of Black Americans. But progress toward the expansion of democracy has occurred at a few times in American history. What made American democratization possible, and how might the United States again move toward more complete and inclusive democracy?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Maryland 309  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (01)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 32/40
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Introduction to Economic Development
AS.190.392 (02)

Most wealthy countries are democracies, but not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples. This course explores three fundamental questions: 1) What political institutions promote economic prosperity? 2) Under what conditions does democracy promote prosperity? 3) What are the mechanisms connecting political institutions and economic performance?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
AS.190.394 (01)

This course examines the domestic, regional, and transnational politics of the Middle East and North Africa. The class is organized into three units. The first examines major armed conflicts— anti-colonial, intra-state, and inter-state—from 1948 through the 1990s. It uses these historical moments as windows onto key issues in Middle Eastern and North African political issues such as external intervention/occupation, human rights, sectarianism, social movements, and memory politics. Unit Two focuses on policy relevant issues such as democratization, minority populations, religion and politics, and gender. In Unit Three, students will explore the politics of the Arab Uprisings through critical reading and discussion of new (post-2011) scholarship on MENA states, organizations, and populations. Enrollment limited to Political Science and International Studies majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
  • Room: Krieger 304  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST, POLI-CP

Politics Of Good & Evil
AS.190.398 (01)

The Politics of Good and Evil examines comparatively a series of classical myths and modern philosophies concerning the sources of evil, the nature of goodness and nobility, the relations of culture to politics, nature and the gods, the degree to which any metaphysic or theological faith is certain, and so on. It is a course in “elemental theory” in the sense that each text pursued challenges and disrupts others we read. Often the reader is disrupted existentially too, in ways that may spur new thought. A previous course in political theory or a theoretical course in the humanities is advised. A high tolerance for theory is essential. Texts on or by Sophocles, Job, Genesis ("J" version), Augustine, Voltaire, Nietzsche, James Baldwin, W. Connolly and Elizabeth Kolbert form the core of the class. Assignments: 1) One 12 page paper and a second 5-7 page paper, both anchored in the readings; 2) a class presentation on one text; 3) regular attendance and quality participation in class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room: Bloomberg 168  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH

The Political Bases of the Market Economy
AS.190.429 (01)

Although “the market” is conventionally understood as separate from “politics”, the modern market economy did not arise in a political vacuum. In fact, the very separation between the economy and politics is itself the product of a politically potent set of ideas. This course is an upper-division reading seminar on the origins and evolution of the modern market economy. Readings will include Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Becker, and Foucault. Recommended course background: Introduction to comparative politics OR any college-level course in social or political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, POLI-CP

Violence and Politics
AS.190.438 (01)

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

European Politics in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.440 (01)

Europe has been in a sense the first testing ground for theories of comparative politics, but many outsiders now see Europe as a pacified and somewhat boring place. This course will question conventional wisdom through an examination of European politics in historical and cross-national perspective. We will apply the comparative method to the study of European politics today, and conversely we will ask what Europe tells us more generally about politics. We will see that Europe is still a locus of intense conflict as well as remarkably diverse experimentation. Topics will include: political, legal, and economic governance; the evolution of democracy and fundamental rights, the welfare state, class stratification, immigration and race, the role of religion; European integration and globalization. Recommended background: Introduction to Comparative Politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

The Death Penalty
AS.190.472 (01)

Political power has been defined as “a right of making laws with penalty of death, and consequently all less penalties…and of employing the force of the community in the execution of such laws….only for the public good” (John Locke). This course will explore political power as it is identified with this right. To this end, we will consider a broad range of topics, among them how death is understood (or not) when it is identified as the most severe punishment that can be imposed by a state. We will also consider how the state (particularly the United States) exercises the right to make laws with the penalty of death, as well as how the state executes these laws. In addition, we will consider how the penalty of death is imposed by the state without specific legislation. Readings for the course will include, among others, texts by Camus, Girard, Foucault, Sarat, Berlant, Butler, and Schmitt, as well as U.S. Supreme Court cases and a novel. Students will be required to participate in class discussion and draft and write two papers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room: Gilman 77  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, INST-AP

Racial Capitalism in a Global Perspective
AS.191.331 (01)

We live in a world of brutal racial violence and massive economic inequality. How did the world get this way? Can these global conditions be changed? This course tackles these questions through the lens of global racial capitalism. We will draw the global political theories of Karl Marx, W.E.B. Du Bois, C.L.R James, Cedric Robinson, Angela Davis and Saidiya Hartman to think about how people are brought into violent contact through imperialism, colonialism, warfare, trade, and cultural exchange. Topics include: slavery, logistics, global policing, war, class, profit, primitive accumulation, decolonization, resistance, and freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kripp, Jacob S
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, INST-ECON

Congress and Foreign Policy
AS.191.354 (01)

This course is an introduction to the Congressional role in foreign policy. The Constitution grants the President the authority to conduct foreign policy. Yet it also gives Congress a substantial role in the shaping of foreign policy. The roles are not always clear, creating an inherent tension between these two branches of government and efforts on each side to increase their power. This class will address the “rules of the road” in conducting American foreign policy and how they change. The class will go beyond theory to include case studies that show the tension between Congress and the Administration – including the Iran Agreement, Climate Change, the use of sanctions and American policy towards Cuba. The course will include guest lecturers who work in Congress on the various aspects of foreign policy – including appropriations, intelligence, oversight and investigations. We will address the Congressional role in ratification of treaties and in declaring war. The class will consider the different ways that each branch of government approaches human rights and sanctions. The class will also address the domestic political aspects of foreign policy – including the role of advocacy groups and special interests and the political use of Congressional investigations. One class might be held in Washington D.C. at the U.S. Senate, so would require additional time for travel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Frifield, Julia Ellen
  • Room: Hodson 316  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social Sciences
AS.192.210 (01)

Are you planning to do a research project for your independent study class, or preparing for a grant application, or working on a big research project for a research intensive class or graduation thesis, or just wishing to improve your research skills? If so, this course is for you! Through weekly two hour sessions over ten weeks, you will receive systematic training on major research tools, resources and techniques useful for any research project in international studies, political science, and other social science subjects. By the end of the course, you will be able to come up with a viable research topic, and complete a research statement that includes an abstract, problem statement and literature review based on in-depth research utilizing tools and techniques covered in the course. The skills you learn through the course will prepare you for any future research projects and advanced studies.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 6:00PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Ye, Yunshan
  • Room: MSE Library ERC  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Economic Growth and Development in East Asia
AS.192.225 (01)

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives. It is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while cultivating a broad grasp of the challenges of “East Asia's fast-paced economic growth.” Part I considers the origins of East Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the 1997-1998 East Asian financial crisis, its lessons and the economic renaissance that followed. Part II focuses on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to East Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, trade integration, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora (Giovanna Maria Dora)
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Introduction to Contemporary African Politics
AS.192.265 (01)

This class provides an introduction to contemporary African politics. Africa is diverse, and its political landscape is rapidly changing. Dramatic events that have occurred in just over half a century in Africa, including but not limited to decolonization, the end of the Cold War, rapid democratization, urbanization, the youth bulge, conflicts, and most recently, the COVID-19 pandemic, etc. has significantly shaped the nature of state and society with implications for political outcomes in present-day Africa. This course unfolds in four parts. In part one, we examine Africa's recent political history focusing on how pre-colonial politics, slave trade, colonialism, and decolonization politics impact modern African states. Part two then examines the social forces that shape contemporary politics across the continent. These include ethnic groups, religion, gender, and civil society. With an understanding of these social forces, we then move on to part three, which will explore dynamics and structures that mediates these social forces, including democracy, development, social movements, and international relations. The final part examines Africa's critical issues and opportunities, including conflict, the youth bulge, regionalism/AfCFTA, climate change, gender (in)equality and women's empowerment, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Nwankwor, Chiedo O
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Kissinger Seminar on American Grand Strategy
AS.192.410 (01)

Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructor and space in the course is limited. To apply, email a one-page resume, one-page personal statement on why you want to take the class including how it contributes to your professional interests, and a writing sample of less than ten pages to KissingerCenter@jhu.edu by the end of the day on Sunday, October 24, 2021. This course is an initiative of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS. It will expose exceptional undergraduate students to the study of grand strategy and the history of U.S. foreign policy. The course will explore critical moments, themes, and people in the history of American grand strategy, from Washington’s Farewell Address to the statecraft of Donald Trump. The seminar will also consider key issues in U.S. grand strategy today, from climate change to the challenge of an assertive China. Students will also have the opportunity to meet with current and former policymakers who have worked on these issues in real time. The course will meet 9 times at Homewood and 4 times at the SAIS campus in Washington, D.C.; transportation between Homewood campus and SAIS will be provided.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Brands, Henry S (Hal)
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Politics of Inequality
AS.192.412 (01)

At the heart of the study of politics is a question about who gets what and when. Consequently, inequality features as a central theme in the discipline. Scholars have studied how inequality shapes democratization, redistribution, voting behavior, and how the institutions of welfare and taxation in turn shape inequality. More recently, scholars have started to pay attention to how inequality across and within ethnicities, races, and gender may matter to political outcomes. The centrality of inequality is reflected in the significant increase in quantity and quality of research on this subject over the past two decades. This seminar is designed to provide you with a critical overview of the field, both theoretically and empirically. We will briefly review the normative foundations and conceptual complexities involved in the study of inequality. Measures of inequality vary in their analytical properties, and it is important to choose the right one. We will review the main issues when measuring inequality. We will then proceed thematically. We will examine the political, and institutional foundations of income inequality and also its effects on institutional development, political participation and voting choice. Next, we examine the individual-level determinants of economic and political preferences, and how inequality intersects with race and gender. We end with a discussion of the social effects of inequality and what constraints exist to addressing inequality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Suryanarayan, Pavithra
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Global Health Policy
AS.192.420 (01)

The world’s countries—low, middle and high-income alike—face numerous health challenges, many shaped by processes connected to globalization. We are presently amidst one of the greatest global health challenges of the past century—the COVID-19 pandemic. But there are others that persist, including combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic, addressing non-communicable diseases, expanding health coverage and ensuring effective global governance for health. This course will examine these and other issues with an emphasis on facilitating your understanding and critical analysis of central issues in global health policy, and examining the role you can play to address health conditions—particularly those that affect disadvantaged populations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Shiffman, Jeremy (Jeremy)
  • Room: Bloomberg 176  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, Politics
AS.194.205 (01)

For over a thousand years, the Sufi tradition has been a dynamic force in Islamic social, political and spiritual life. The tradition offers a treasure trove of devotional literature and music, philosophical treatises, contemplative practices, and institutions of social and political organization. After unpacking the politics of the term “Sufi,” we will trace the historical development of the tradition from the early ascetics in Iraq and Syria to the age of trans-national Sufi orders, with case studies from South Asia, Turkey, and the United States. We will then move into some of the key constructs of the tradition of spiritual growth and character formation: the divine-human relationship, the stages of the spiritual path, contemplative and practical disciplines, ideas of sainthood, discipleship and ethical perfection, and the psychology of love. Throughout the class, we will explore the nature of experiential language and interrogate the tradition through the lens of gender. We will also experience Sufism through ritual and music.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra (Homayra)
  • Room: Hodson 315  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST

The Qur'an: Text and Context
AS.194.220 (01)

For 1400 years, the Qur’an has played a central role in Muslim intellectual, spiritual, artistic and ritual life. This course will explore the sacred scripture of Islam through its foundational ideas, history of the text and thematic development, literary style, history and methods of interpretation, and role in Muslim spiritual and ritual life. We will also explore how the Qur’an weaves through literature, music and the visual arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra (Homayra)
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

African-Americans and the Development of Islam in America
AS.194.230 (01)

Muslims have been a part of the American fabric since its inception. A key thread in that fabric has been the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants, some of whom were Muslims, and who not only added to the dynamism of the American environment, but eventually helped shape American culture, religion, and politics. The history of Islam in America is intertwined with the creation and evolution of African American identity. Contemporary Islam in America cannot be understood without this framing. This course will provide a historical lens for understanding Islam, not as an external faith to the country, but as an internal development of American religion. This course will explicate the history of early Islamic movements in the United States and the subsequent experiences of African-Americans who converted to Islam during the first half of the twentieth century. We will cover the spiritual growth of African American Muslims, their institutional presence, and their enduring impact on American culture writ large and African-American religion and culture more specifically.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Fanusie, Fatimah
  • Room: Greenhouse 113  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Democratic Challenges
AS.196.304 (01)

Modern democracies like the U.S. are undergoing severe challenges from within and elsewhere. Internally, many of their citizens are newly skeptical of democracy, believing for example that elections are rigged. Outside, they face new competition from authoritarian systems such as China’s government, which show no signs of converging towards democracy, and offer a possible alternative system of rule. Finally, democracies also have to engage with new policy challenges, such as racial justice and climate change. In this course, we will draw upon the collective wisdom of faculty at Johns Hopkins’ new SNF Agora Institute, to understand better the political challenges that democracy faces, and the policy challenges that it has to respond to. We will put modern democratic challenges in their appropriate historical context. Has America really been a democracy in the past? We will ask about the social and political conditions under which democracy does well, and under which it fails. Finally, we will look at the new agenda of questions that democracy faces, and the means that it can draw on to confront them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Farrell, Henry (Henry)
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Democracy by the Numbers
AS.196.306 (01)

How is democracy doing around the world? This course will help students to answer this question and ask their own questions about political systems by examining a variety of quantitative measures of facets of democracy in the U.S. and internationally. We consider general indices as well as those that focus on specific normatively-appealing aspects—the absence of fraud in and broader integrity of the electoral process itself, the guarantees of fundamental human rights to all, governments’ effectiveness and accountability to the public, the equity of both representation and policy outcomes for minority groups and those historically disadvantaged or excluded, and the possibility and extent of civic engagement in non-government institutions. Wherever possible, the course will present evidence about the kinds of institutions and policies that seem to bolster democracy. Students can expect to gain hands-on experience with publicly-available subnational and national indicators of electoral and democratic quality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Corrigan, Bryce
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Democracy
AS.196.311 (01)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha
  • Room: Hodson 315 Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Democracy
AS.196.311 (02)

Democracies around the world are under threat. This course introduces students to the philosophical foundations of democracy as well as the history of democratic revolutions, institutions, and principles. How can we defeat the most important contemporary challenges to democracy, including populism, authoritarianism and disinformation? And how can we revive the “democratic spirit” - in America and around the world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, Yascha
  • Room: Hodson 315 Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Smokler Center 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Planet Amazonia: Culture, History, and the Environment
AS.211.231 (01)

Without Amazonia, global warming could reach levels that threaten life on the planet. Yet, in an era of deforestation and climate change, Amazonia itself might be on the verge of disappearance, with disastrous consequences for the world. This course proposes interdisciplinary perspectives on Amazonia through a range of works drawn from history, anthropology, archeology, environmental studies, literature, and the arts. We’ll look at texts by European travelers and missionaries who contributed to the paradoxical image of Amazonia as a “virgin paradise” or a “green hell”; scientific studies and artists’ depictions of the region’s flora and fauna; the often-overlooked history of human occupation of the region; and projects to colonize, develop, or conserve the world’s largest tropical forest. What importance does Amazonia hold for Latin American and global geopolitics? How do art and literature, including indigenous writings, create, reinforce, or deconstruct clichés about the region? What alternative futures for our planet can Amazonia help us to imagine?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, MLL-ENGL

Niccolò Machiavelli's "The Prince": Understanding the Meaning and Legacy of a Masterpiece
AS.211.300 (01)

Who was Niccolò Machiavelli? We often hear the term “Machiavellian” in reference to actors in business or politics, but what does it really mean? What does Machiavelli teach us about the nature and the dynamics of political power? Can Machiavelli’s thought offer insights into today’s politics and fast-changing world? The course aims to answer these questions by addressing three topics. First, we will study Machiavelli’s life and times, particularly the events connected to his production and the context in which he wrote his main writings. We will see how the fifteenth-century Florentine humanism and the massive political changes affecting early modern Europe shaped Machiavelli’s mindset. Second, we will familiarize ourselves with Machiavelli’s thought by reading The Prince and excerpts from Discourses on Livy. Third, we will get acquainted with some of the main trends in the reception of Machiavelli in the 20th and 21st centuries. Special attention will be paid to interpretations of Machiavelli by Antonio Gramsci, Leo Strauss, Isaiah Berlin, John Greville Agard Pocock, Quentin Skinner, and John P. McCormick. We will also pay attention to modern television programs and films that show the width and depth of Machiavelli's legacy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Panichi, Alessio
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ITAL, INST-PT

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2019. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)
  • Room: Hodson 315  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH - This course is an introduction to the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focuses on films from the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of the Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production with a special view to the film aesthetics through analysis from a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2016. Students wishing to do the course work in English, for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. THERE IS NO FINAL EXAM. May not be taken on a Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)
  • Room: Hodson 315  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL

Climate Change Narratives: Human and Non-Human Transformative Storytelling
AS.211.424 (01)

In The Great Derangement Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh writes that “the climate crisis is also a crisis of culture, and thus of imagination.” Worldwide, climate and environmental change is stirring the imaginary of novelists, filmmakers, and artists who are finding ways to frame, emplot, or even perform, an unmanageable phenomenon like climate change. How is climate change shaping new modes of storytelling and aesthetics? How do film, literature, and environmentally conscious art transform our perception of the world we inhabit and its unpredictable changes? Can climate change narratives help us to imagine futures of possibilities, maybe dystopian, uncertain, or even happy, but futures nonetheless? This multimedia course explores, through a transnational perspective, a variety of contemporary novels, films, and other media that attempt answer these questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura (Laura)
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (01)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wuensch, April
  • Room: Gilman 479  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Utopias and Dystopias in Renaissance Culture
AS.214.466 (01)

We will trace the dream of designing an ideal society and the danger of creating its opposite in the sixteenth and seventeenth century Italian and European thought.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, David
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Quattrociocchi, Christian P
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Mexican Empire: the Problem of Territory from Aztec Philosophy to Trump's Wall
AS.215.416 (01)

This course with seminar option is devoted to Mexico, its past and present paths into a remote inside-out pre-imperial epoch inalienable from North-against-South histories across the American Narcoland from Honduras to Alaska. Our nonfictional materials combine detailed summaries and readings of Stuart Elden's The Birth of Territory and James Maffie's Aztec Philosophy: Understanding a World in Motion. The fictional matter concerns Roberto Bolaño's 1998 novel, Los detectives salvajes (The Savage Detectives), Corman McCarthy's apocalypse Western, 1985 Blood Meridian, and Carlos Reygadas' films, Post Tenebras lux (2012) and Nuestro tiempo (2018).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo)
  • Room: Hodson 203  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/35
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

The Holocaust in Israeli Society and Culture
AS.216.342 (01)

This course examines the role of the Holocaust in Israeli society and culture. We will study the emergence of the discourse on the Holocaust in Israel and its development throughout the years. Through focusing on scholarly, literary, artistic, and cinematic responses to the Holocaust, we will analyze the impact of its memory on the nation, its society, politics, and collective self. The course is divided to three general categories: Historical and Sociological Perspective, Literary Perspective, and Cinematic Perspective. However, we will study the crossroad between these three categories, and will explore them in relation to one another.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta (Neta)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-CP

Chinese Revolutions
AS.230.175 (01)

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying)
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China
AS.230.233 (01)

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Liang, Guowei
  • Room: Maryland 109  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith (Meredith)
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Knowledge, Evidence, and Democracy
AS.230.250 (01)

Fake news. Alternative facts. Follow the science. Misinformation. Disinformation. How can we understand the role of information, evidence, and scientific inquiry in politics? Where does information come from? How is it used? How can evidence, argument, and listening improve public conversations? This seminar will examine the connections between information, knowledge, evidence, and democracy, focusing mostly on the United States but with global examples as well.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Maryland 201  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR

The Political Economy of Modern India
AS.230.318 (01)

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina (Rina)
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Global Crises: Past and Present
AS.230.337 (01)

This course will compare the current global crisis with previous major crises of historical capitalism through a combination of theoretical and historical readings. Throughout, we will ask: What can a study of past crises tell us about the nature and future trajectory of the current global crisis? Special emphasis will be placed on (1) “the late-nineteenth century great depression”, (2) the Great Depression of the 1930s, and (3) the period of crisis and stagflation in the 1970s. We will be particularly concerned to understand the differential social and geopolitical impact of the crises. Which social classes bore the brunt of the disruptions in economic activity in each crisis? Which geographical areas or geopolitical groupings lost out (or benefited) from the crisis? How have environmental and ecological challenges resurfaced in each crisis including today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith (BEVERLY)
  • Room: Hodson 213  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON, INST-IR

Class, Race, and Political Struggle in Capitalist Societies
AS.230.349 (01)

Does capitalism promote democracy and stability, or repression, racial conflict, and social unrest? Following the 2008 financial crisis, countries around the world have experienced severe economic and political crises, giving rise to explosive movements that have challenged the viability of capitalism and democracy as durable systems. By considering these developments, this course examines the core political dimensions of capitalist societies. We will define and discuss key terms, like capitalism, racial capitalism, the capitalist state, democracy, social movements, and more. We will pay special attention to the ways in which the economic, political, and ideological structures of capitalist societies shape and are shaped by social movements and political parties. The course is global in perspective, drawing on developments in many countries, with a special focus on the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Awatramani, Rishi
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying)
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Value of Life: Racism, Capitalism and Health
AS.230.389 (01)

We are generally told that you can't put a price on life or a price on our health but lives are quantified, valued and priced every day. In this class we will explore the ways in which life is valued in the modern world, its effects and the outcomes from it. We will also examine how forms of quantification and valuation have been employed to dehumanize and subjugate peoples, especially those racialized as different. Beginning with an exploration of human pricing during the trans-Atlantic Slave trade and continuing through to contemporary health care and health insurance practices, this course will examine how we value (monetarily) human existence in modernity. This course will introduce students to ideas emerging out of the Black Marxist Tradition, postcolonial thought, and critical feminist approaches to historical research. From the examination of insurance under slavery to the use of race corrections in medical algorithms, this class will confront students with the question- "how can we put a price on life?" and most importantly "Should we?".

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Social Problems in Contemporary China
AS.230.415 (01)

In this course we will examine contemporary Chinese society, looking at economic development, rural transformation, urbanization and migration, labor relations, changes in class structure and family organization, health care, environmental problems, governance, and popular protest. The course is designed for both graduate and undergraduate students. Undergraduates must have already completed a course about China at Hopkins. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room: Shaffer 303  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Labor in the World System
AS.230.465 (01)

This is an intensive reading seminar on working class formation from a comparative, historical and global perspective, including theoretical and empirical (case study) readings on changes over time in labor process, labor markets, and labor movements. We will build on a range of local case studies to establish spatial and temporal patterns, and discuss the connections between these global patterns and the dynamics of historical capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith (BEVERLY)
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Environmental Ethics
AS.271.401 (01)

Environmental Ethics is a philosophical discipline that examines the moral relationship between humans and the natural environment. For individuals and societies, it can help structure our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Beginning with a comprehensive analysis of their own values, students will explore complex ethical questions, philosophical paradigms and real-life case studies through readings, films and seminar discussions. Traditional ethical theories, including consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics will be examined and applied. Environmental moral worldviews, ranging from anthropocentric to ecocentric perspectives, will be critically evaluated. Organized debates will help students strengthen their ability to deconstruct and assess ethical arguments and to communicate viewpoints rooted in ethical principles. Students will apply ethical reasoning skills to an examination of contemporary environmental issues including, among others, biodiversity conservation, environmental justice, climate change, and overpopulation. Students will also develop, defend and apply their own personal environmental ethical framework. A basic understanding of modern environmental history and contemporary environmental issues is required. Prior experience with philosophy and ethics is not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room: Olin 304  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, ENVS-MINOR

Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis
AS.271.403 (01)

This course provides students with a broad introduction to US environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA, RCRA, and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of this course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the proper perspective. This course is taught in conjunction with an identical graduate course. All students will be expected to perform at a graduate level.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 6:00PM - 8:45PM
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room: Olin 304  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/21
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, ENVS-MINOR

Great Minds
AS.300.102 (01)

Introductory survey of foundational texts of modern philosophy, social and political thought, and literature. This semester will include works by Plato, René Descartes, Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Virginia Woolf, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Iris Murdoch, Cora Diamond, Judith Butler, Kwame A. Appiah, Jacques Derrida, and others. The course is taught in lectures and in seminar discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Women and Work in the US
AS.300.301 (01)

This course offers an introduction to the political forces, cultural values, and social factors which have shaped the history of women’s labor in the US. This course will ask question such as: Why do we place a higher value on work which takes place in the public sphere than work in the home? How do representations of work in literature and popular movies reinforce or subvert gender roles? How have women negotiated gendered and racial boundaries through political action or writing? Focusing on racialized labor, domestic labor, sex work, and factory work, the course will provide an interdisciplinary cultural study of women’s work relevant to our current historical moment. Authors discussed include Saidiya Hartman, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emma Goldman, and Kathi Weeks.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Wells, Madeline (Maddie)
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Transwar Japanese and Japanophone Literatures
AS.300.341 (01)

A survey of Japanese and Japanese- language literatures produced in Japan and its (former)colonies during the “transwar” period, or the several years before and after the end of WWII. This periodization enables us to take into account the shifting boundaries, sovereignties, and identities amid the intensification of Japanese imperialism and in the aftermath of its eventual demise. We aim to pay particular attention to voices marginalized in this political watershed, such as those of Japanese-language writers from colonial Korea and Taiwan, intra-imperial migrants, and radical critics of Japan’s “postwar” regime. Underlying our investigation is the question of whether literature can be an agent of justice when politics fails to deliver it. We will introduce secondary readings by Adorno, Arendt, Levinas, Derrida, and Scarry, among others, to help us interrogate this question. All readings are in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Korean Studies
AS.310.107 (01)

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history, politics, and culture encompassing premodern, modern, and contemporary times. Through primary and secondary materials, students will learn about the formation of Korea as a complex interplay of dynastic changes, wars, colonialism, rapid modernization, migrations, and minority and diasporic politics. We will approach the study of Korea through a cultural studies perspective, paying close attention to systems of power, ideology, gender, race, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura (Laura Ha)
  • Room: Maryland 201  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Sociology of Urban China
AS.310.320 (01)

Urban China has gone through two major social transformations since 1949: the embrace of a central planning socialist system between early 1950s and late 70s, and the embrace of neo-liberal market economy in the so-call “socialism with Chinese characteristics” since 1980. While the political regime remains the same over time, many profound changes have occurred in economic life, social life, cultural life, spiritual life and civil life. What really happened in the social transformation of urban China? What would explain those changes? How did people in different walk of life deal with those huge and deep social transformation? To address these concerns, we will exam a list of issues. Topics includes changes in population and demographic characteristics, employment structure and job market, workplace and residential communities, income and wealth distributions, segregation impacts of urban household registration systems, urban consumption patterns, courting cultures and dressing codes, spiritual practices, and social mobility and social stratifications. In the realm of public policies, we will pay special attentions to the issues of transportation, housing, medical service, public education, social insurance, and environmental protection. We will also study the characteristics of contentious politics and how social conflicts of power, interest, justice, cultural and belief were processed in urban China.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao (Gaochao)
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Ecofeminist Debates: Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West
AS.363.330 (01)

This course develops an interdisciplinary and comparative approach to introduce students to ecofeminism through a special focus on its inflections in non-western contexts. Through class discussions and sustained writing engagement, we will develop an understanding of the history of ecofeminism, including theoretical debates linking gender perspectives with political mobilization, as well as ecofeminism's enduring influence on new intellectual and political movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Abiral, Burge
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Cultural Heritage in Crisis
AS.389.260 (01)

We explore the possible futures of cultural heritage and museums in times of accelerating climate change, pandemics, armed conflict and political and social turmoil by examining past and contemporary events.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Balachandran, Sanchita
  • Room: Gilman 150A  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-INTRO, INST-GLOBAL, ARCH-ARCH

Islamic Finance
AS.230.367 (01)

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $3 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on usury in Islam and other religious and philosophical traditions, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/14
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST

Sociology of Religion
AS.230.445 (01)

This seminar tackles major issues in the classical and contemporary sociology of religion. We begin with Ibn Khaldun, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Émile Durkheim, and Mary Douglas, asking basic questions: What are religion and the sacred? Why do they exist? What is the relationship between religion and social structure? And what role does religion play in morality, solidarity, boundaries, exploitation, patriarchy, and macrohistorical transformations such as the rise of capitalism? Keeping this theoretical grounding (and its flaws and biases) in mind, we continue to probe the problem of religion in modernity through more-recent writings. Topics include the secularization debate (Are modernity and religion antithetical?); “religious markets” and rational-choice theories of religion; religious revivalism, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, and proselytizing movements; feminist and queer sociologies of religion; civil religion (Is standing for the national anthem a religious act?); embodiment and prayer; Orientalism and postcolonial interrogations of the secular; religious violence and nationalism; the intersectionality of religion with race, class, and caste; and religion and neoliberalism. Although dominant sociologies of religion have focused on Christianity in Western Europe and North America, this course applies a global lens, training significant focus on non-Western and non-Christian contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.127 (01)FYS: Public Opinion and DemocracyMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen L (Steve)Gilman 381
 
INST-AP
AS.070.367 (01)Science and Technology in AfricaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDegani, MichaelCroft Hall G02
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.473 (01)Readings of FoucaultF 1:30PM - 4:00PMDas, Veena (Veena)Mergenthaler 439
 
INST-PT
AS.100.243 (01)China: Neolithic to SongMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 17
Gilman 186
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.243 (02)China: Neolithic to SongMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMeyer-Fong, TobieGilman 17
Gilman 186
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.250 (01)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPearsall, SarahHodson 203
Krieger 306
HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.250 (02)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMPearsall, SarahHodson 203
Gilman 75
HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 55
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.282 (01)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornberry, ElizabethBloomberg 176
Maryland 104
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.282 (02)Race & Power in Modern South AfricaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornberry, ElizabethBloomberg 176
Gilman 308
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.310 (01)The French RevolutionMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMason, LauraBloomberg 276
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.314 (01)The EnlightenmentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKwass, MichaelHodson 303
 
MSCH-HUM, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.343 (01)The Annales SchoolTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMZheng, Xinhe (Vaclav)Gilman 308
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (01)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 55
Gilman 119
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.365 (02)Culture & Society in the High Middle AgesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 55
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.379 (01)Brazil History and Cultures: A Glance from BaltimoreTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel Louis (Jean)Maryland 114
 
HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethKrieger 180
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.387 (01)Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle EastT 3:00PM - 5:30PMEl-leithy, TamerBloomberg 178
 
HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.100.396 (01)The Gender Binary and American EmpireTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGill Peterson, Julian (Jules)Krieger Laverty
 
HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 308
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.445 (01)Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of RightsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John WKrieger Laverty
 
HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.100.450 (05)History Research Lab: Virtue Politics - from Athens to AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMvan den Arend, Alan R (Alan)Shaffer 300
 
HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center Library
 
NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.140.228 (01)Epidemic!: Diseases that Shaped our WorldT 3:00PM - 5:30PMRagab, AhmedGilman 132
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.231 (01)Health & Society in Latin America & the CaribbeanTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMO'brien, ElizabethGilman 400
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.245 (01)Biology and Society in AsiaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMJiang, LijingGilman 300
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.398 (01)Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and FilmsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMFrumer, YuliaKrieger 306
 
INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.150.205 (01)Introduction to the History of Modern PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWilliams, MichaelVirtual Online
Gilman 55
PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (02)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWilliams, MichaelVirtual Online
Gilman 17
PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (03)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMWilliams, MichaelVirtual Online
Gilman 186
PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (04)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMWilliams, MichaelVirtual Online
Maryland 217
PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.240 (01)Intro-Political PhilosopMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLebron, Christopher JosephGilman 55
Bloomberg 178
PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.240 (02)Intro-Political PhilosopMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMLebron, Christopher JosephGilman 55
Gilman 75
PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMSeshie-nasser, HellenVirtual Online
Bloomberg 178
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-nasser, HellenVirtual Online
Maryland 114
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMSeshie-nasser, HellenVirtual Online
Bloomberg 178
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-nasser, HellenVirtual Online
Bloomberg 172
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirVirtual Online
Krieger 180
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirVirtual Online
Bloomberg 274
AS.180.102 (03)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 12:00PM - 12:50PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirVirtual Online
Hodson 316
AS.180.102 (04)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirVirtual Online
Hodson 316
AS.180.102 (05)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirVirtual Online
Hodson 316
AS.180.102 (06)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirVirtual Online
Hodson 316
AS.180.210 (01)Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EUTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora (Giovanna Maria Dora)Hodson 303
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.233 (01)Economics of Transition and Institutional ChangeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, LudmilaMaryland 114
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.241 (01)International TradeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeMergenthaler 111
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.242 (01)International Monetary EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, LudmilaLatrobe 120
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.361 (01)Rich Countries, Poor CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeMaryland 114
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.389 (01)Social Policy Implications of Behavioral EconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMPapageorge, Nicholas W (Nick)Ames 218
 
INST-ECON, SPOL-UL, BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.190.102 (01)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)Virtual Online
Bloomberg 178
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (02)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)Virtual Online
Krieger 300
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (05)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)Virtual Online
Krieger 300
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (07)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)Virtual Online
Bloomberg 172
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBennett, JaneHodson 316
Krieger Laverty
INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBennett, JaneHodson 316
Krieger Laverty
INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.220 (01)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)Virtual Online
Bloomberg 178
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.220 (02)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)Virtual Online
Gilman 186
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.220 (03)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)Virtual Online
Smokler Center Library
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.220 (04)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel Horace (Daniel)Virtual Online
Krieger 304
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.269 (01)What you need to know about Chinese Politics, Part 2T 1:30PM - 4:00PMMertha, Andrew C (Andrew), Yasuda, John KojiroAmes 218
 
POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.283 (01)Human SecurityTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBarqueiro, Carla Robertson (Carla)Krieger 302
 
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.308 (01)Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and CasesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMazzuca, Sebastian LKrieger Laverty
 
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.322 (01)Future of American DemocracyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLieberman, Robert CSmokler Center 301
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.326 (01)Democracy And ElectionsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, Richard StephenHodson 313
 
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.327 (01)Politics of InformationT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMarlin-Bennett, ReneeShaffer 303
 
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.334 (01)Constitutional LawTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMZackin, Emily (Emily)Krieger 304
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.335 (01)Imagining BordersTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarlin-Bennett, ReneeHodson 203
 
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.337 (01)Politics of the Korean DiasporaT 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, ErinKrieger 180
 
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.339 (01)American Racial PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, LesterShriver Hall 001
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.342 (01)Black Politics IIT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, Lester 
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.344 (01)Seminar In Anti-SemitismF 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminGilman 55
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.346 (01)Foundations of International Relations TheoryMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMSchmidt, SebastianKrieger 300
 
INST-IR, INST-PT, POLI-IR, POLI-PT
AS.190.347 (01)A New Cold War? Sino-American Relations in the 21st CenturyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDavid, Steven RShaffer 304
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.357 (01)The State of NatureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSimon, Joshua David (Josh)Krieger 300
 
POLI-PT, POLI-CP, INST-PT, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.374 (01)Political ViolenceTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAmat Matus, ConsueloHodson 216
 
POLI-CP, POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.379 (01)Nationalism and the Politics of IdentityF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew AKrieger 306
 
INST-PT, INST-CP, POLI-PT, POLI-CP
AS.190.390 (01)Race and American DemocracyTTh 3:00PM - 4:45PMLieberman, Robert CMaryland 309
 
POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.190.392 (01)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 4:30PM - 5:20PMMazzuca, Sebastian LVirtual Online
Gilman 17
POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.392 (02)Introduction to Economic DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian LVirtual Online
Gilman 377
POLI-CP, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.394 (01)Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North AfricaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMParkinson, SarahKrieger 304
 
INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST, POLI-CP
AS.190.398 (01)Politics Of Good & EvilM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William EBloomberg 168
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH
AS.190.429 (01)The Political Bases of the Market EconomyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)Shriver Hall 001
 
INST-ECON, POLI-CP
AS.190.438 (01)Violence and PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminMergenthaler 266
 
INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.440 (01)European Politics in Comparative PerspectiveW 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, Nicolas (Nicolas)Gilman 413
 
INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.472 (01)The Death PenaltyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCulbert, JenniferGilman 77
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT, INST-AP
AS.191.331 (01)Racial Capitalism in a Global PerspectiveTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKripp, Jacob SKrieger Laverty
 
POLI-IR, POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, INST-ECON
AS.191.354 (01)Congress and Foreign PolicyTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMFrifield, Julia EllenHodson 316
 
AS.192.210 (01)Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social SciencesW 6:00PM - 8:00PMYe, YunshanMSE Library ERC
 
AS.192.225 (01)Economic Growth and Development in East AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora (Giovanna Maria Dora)Gilman 377
 
INST-ECON
AS.192.265 (01)Introduction to Contemporary African PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMNwankwor, Chiedo OHodson 313
 
INST-CP
AS.192.410 (01)Kissinger Seminar on American Grand StrategyM 4:30PM - 7:00PMBrands, Henry S (Hal)Gilman 400
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.192.412 (01)Politics of InequalityT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSuryanarayan, PavithraMergenthaler 252
 
INST-ECON
AS.192.420 (01)Global Health PolicyTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMShiffman, Jeremy (Jeremy)Bloomberg 176
 
INST-IR
AS.194.205 (01)Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, PoliticsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZiad, Homayra (Homayra)Hodson 315
 
INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.194.220 (01)The Qur'an: Text and ContextTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMZiad, Homayra (Homayra)Krieger Laverty
 
ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.230 (01)African-Americans and the Development of Islam in AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMFanusie, FatimahGreenhouse 113
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.196.304 (01)Democratic ChallengesW 1:30PM - 4:00PMFarrell, Henry (Henry)Gilman 17
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.196.306 (01)Democracy by the NumbersTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMCorrigan, Bryce 
 
INST-CP
AS.196.311 (01)DemocracyTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMApplebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, YaschaHodson 315
Greenhouse 113
INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.196.311 (02)DemocracyTTh 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMApplebaum, Anne E (Anne), Mounk, YaschaHodson 315
Greenhouse 113
INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMPomeranzev, PeterSmokler Center 301
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.211.231 (01)Planet Amazonia: Culture, History, and the EnvironmentW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMiguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)Shriver Hall 001
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, MLL-ENGL
AS.211.300 (01)Niccolò Machiavelli's "The Prince": Understanding the Meaning and Legacy of a MasterpieceMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMPanichi, AlessioBloomberg 178
 
MLL-ITAL, INST-PT
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)Hodson 315
 
GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina (Flavia)Hodson 315
 
GRLL-ENGL, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.424 (01)Climate Change Narratives: Human and Non-Human Transformative StorytellingW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDi Bianco, Laura (Laura)Gilman 55
 
MLL-ENGL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWuensch, AprilGilman 479
 
INST-CP
AS.214.466 (01)Utopias and Dystopias in Renaissance CultureMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMStephens, Walter EGilman 119
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo), Patterson, DavidGilman 400
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMQuattrociocchi, Christian PGilman 413
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.215.416 (01)Mexican Empire: the Problem of Territory from Aztec Philosophy to Trump's WallTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGonzalez, Eduardo (Eduardo)Hodson 203
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.216.342 (01)The Holocaust in Israeli Society and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, Neta (Neta) 
 
MLL-ENGL, INST-CP
AS.230.175 (01)Chinese RevolutionsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying)Bloomberg 178
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.233 (01)Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLiang, GuoweiMaryland 109
 
INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, Meredith (Meredith)Bloomberg 276
 
INST-AP
AS.230.250 (01)Knowledge, Evidence, and DemocracyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMPerrin, Andrew JMaryland 201
 
INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.318 (01)The Political Economy of Modern IndiaT 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, Rina (Rina)Abel Wolman House 100
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil 
 
INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.337 (01)Global Crises: Past and PresentTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, Beverly Judith (BEVERLY)Hodson 213
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON, INST-IR
AS.230.349 (01)Class, Race, and Political Struggle in Capitalist SocietiesM 4:30PM - 7:00PMAwatramani, RishiGilman 413
 
INST-ECON
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying)Bloomberg 178
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil 
 
INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.389 (01)The Value of Life: Racism, Capitalism and HealthW 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani ReinAmes 234
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.415 (01)Social Problems in Contemporary ChinaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, JoelShaffer 303
 
INST-CP
AS.230.465 (01)Labor in the World SystemW 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, Beverly Judith (BEVERLY)Mergenthaler 526
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.271.401 (01)Environmental EthicsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304
 
INST-PT, ENVS-MINOR
AS.271.403 (01)Environmental Policymaking and Policy AnalysisM 6:00PM - 8:45PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304
 
INST-AP, INST-CP, ENVS-MINOR
AS.300.102 (01)Great MindsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 208
 
INST-PT
AS.300.301 (01)Women and Work in the USTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMWells, Madeline (Maddie)Gilman 217
 
INST-AP
AS.300.341 (01)Transwar Japanese and Japanophone LiteraturesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, SatoruGilman 208
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.107 (01)Introduction to Korean StudiesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMReizman, Laura (Laura Ha)Maryland 201
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.320 (01)Sociology of Urban ChinaT 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, Gaochao (Gaochao)Mergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP
AS.363.330 (01)Ecofeminist Debates: Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global WestF 1:30PM - 4:00PMAbiral, BurgeBloomberg 276
 
INST-PT
AS.389.260 (01)Cultural Heritage in CrisisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBalachandran, SanchitaGilman 150A
 
PMUS-INTRO, INST-GLOBAL, ARCH-ARCH
AS.230.367 (01)Islamic FinanceM 1:30PM - 4:00PMCalder, RyanGilman 377
 
INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.230.445 (01)Sociology of ReligionTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST