Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Thinking and Writing Across Cultures - East Asia and the West
AS.001.107 (01)

In this First-Year Seminar, we will explore what it means to think and write across multiple cultures in the contemporary world. What do we gain and/or lose when we think and write crossing cultural boundaries? How do knowledge and experience of two or more cultures help us think and act critically, creatively, and ethically? What does plurality of cultures mean to universal discourses such as science and technology? How can cultural differences help or hamper our efforts to tackle global problems like climate change? These are some of the guiding questions that we will investigate together in this course by examining novels, essays, autobiographies, travelogues, philosophical writings, and films that engage with multiplicity of cultures between East Asia -- especially China, Japan, and Korea – and the West as well as within East Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Mirror Mirror: Reflections in Art from Van Eyck to Velázquez
AS.010.212 (01)

Explores the different ways Early Modern painters and printmakers incorporated mirrors and optical reflections into their works for the sake of illusion and metaphor, deception and desire, reflexivity and truth-telling. Connecting sense perception and ethical knowledge, embedded mirror images often made claims about the nature of the self, the powers of art, and the superiority of painting in particular.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Merback, Mitchell
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR, HART-RENEM, INST-GLOBAL

Art of Colonial Peru
AS.010.320 (01)

Viewed within the dynamic historical context of colonial society, we consider the pictorial, sculptural, and architectural programs that ensued in viceregal Peru (1532-1825). We examine the role of religious orders, art schools, artisan guilds and cofradía, and consider the social and political implications of art patronage.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Building an Empire: Architecture of the Ottoman Capitals, c. 1300–1600
AS.010.329 (01)

Centered on modern-day Turkey and encompassing vast territories in Asia, Africa, and Europe, the Ottoman Empire (1299 – 1923) was the longest lived and among the most powerful Islamic states in history, with an artistic tradition to match. This course explores the functional and symbolic role that architecture played during the empire’s formative centuries, when three successive capital — Bursa, Edirne, and Istanbul — served to visualize the sultans’ growing claims to universal authority. With reference to mosques, palaces, tombs, and other categories of architecture, the course will examine the buildings in their artistic, social, and political contexts. Themes to be addressed include patronage and audience, architectural practice and the building trade, ceremonial and ritual, topography and urban planning, and the relationship of Ottoman architecture to other traditions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic Empires
AS.010.338 (01)

Long characterized in the Western imagination as exotic realms of fantasy, harems in Islamic tradition served as private domestic quarters for the women of elite households. This course explores the harem—as an institution, a physical space, and a community of women—from various art-historical perspectives, considering such topics as the harem’s architecture, the agency of its inhabitants as patrons and collectors, the mediating role of eunuchs in the harem’s visual and material culture, and the ability of harem women to make their mark through public artistic commissions. Our case studies will address a range of Islamic geographical and chronological contexts, though we will focus on the empires of the early modern period and, above all, the famous harem of the Ottoman sultans at the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul. In challenging popular misconceptions, the course will also look at the wealth of exoticizing imagery that the harem inspired in Western art, which we will consider through Orientalist paintings at the Walters Art Museum and illustrated rare books at Hopkins itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South Asia
AS.010.352 (01)

This course will explore modern and contemporary art in colonial and postcolonial contexts from Bangladesh to northern Africa. How do artists negotiate demands to support their national and local identities while participating in modernism across borders? What role do secularism and spirituality have in modern art? How do anticolonial, Marxist, and feminist politics shape art in these regions? How do global economic forces and the rise of powerful collectors, private museums, and international art fairs shape art and artists working across this geographic area? We will foreground the role of women as artists, collectors, patrons, and scholars throughout.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

The Epistemology of Photography
AS.010.410 (01)

This seminar will ask how photography produces ways of knowing: how does photography’s reality-effect shape its dissemination and absorption? Is photography’s emergence during the colonial era coincidental or catalytic? How is memory (re)constituted in a photography-saturated world? What kinds of histories does photography encourage and discourage? Is a photograph an object? We will read across disciplines (literature, anthropology, history, history of art, political science, theory) to investigate the epistemology of photography and the photograph.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

The Double: Identity and Difference in Art Since 1900
AS.010.461 (01)

"Doubling" is a grammar of resemblance and difference: in works of doubling a presentation of two shapes, images or bodies, often in a symmetrical format, forces us to compare them--to perceive how they are alike and unalike. The art of doubling causes us to “see double” and to see ourselves in the act of seeing; it forces us to perceive the differences between things and bodies, catalyzing a reflection on identity. Doubling is a recurring theme of modern and contemporary art, apparent in painting, sculpture, photography, video, film, and performance. While few artists are strictly “doublers,” many practitioners have embraced tactics of repetition and reversal, staged perceptual contradictions, or explored doubled and divided selves (Doppelgängers, shadows, twins, and pairs); the course will aim to understand why. The class is organized in anticipation of an exhibition opening at the National Gallery of Art in May 2022.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Meyer, James
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Classics Research Lab: The John Addington Symonds Project
AS.040.420 (01)

Launched in January 2019, this CRL project investigates the life and work of the Victorian scholar and writer John Addington Symonds (1840–93). Symonds, trained at Oxford in Classics, was the author of one of the first major studies in English of Ancient Greek Sexuality, “A Problem in Greek Ethics,” printed in just ten copies, one of which is held by Johns Hopkins. He also introduced the word “homosexual,” first coined in German, into English print, and his influence on the emerging struggle for gay rights was immense. A major task of JASP is the reconstruction of the contents of his personal library, in part on the basis of rare archival materials and the recently published full text of his secret autobiography. More information at symondsproject.org. Under the supervision of the project’s two directors, Shane Butler (Classics) and Gabrielle Dean (MSEL), participants will learn advanced research methods, generate new knowledge, and disseminate their results. No prerequisites, but potential students should contact either director for permission to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Butler, Michael Shane, Dean, Gabrielle
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 7/9
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-ANC

Classics Research Lab: Antioch Recovery Project
AS.040.420 (02)

Launched in Spring 2020, this CRL project investigates mosaics from the ancient city of Antioch-on-the-Orontes. These mosaics are now dispersed around the world, including over thirty now in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art. Phase II will continue to digitally reunite this dispersed corpus and will focus on three chronological moments: the diverse, multilingual, crossroads city of ancient Antioch, Baltimore’s role in the international consortium excavating the site in the decade preceding World War II, and the contemporary afterlives of these mosaics connecting the selection in Baltimore with fragments around the globe. More information at antiochrecoveryproject.org. Under the supervision of the project’s director, Jennifer Stager (History of Art), participants will learn advanced research methods, travel to museum collections, generate new knowledge, and disseminate their results. No prerequisites, but potential students should contact the director for permission to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Stager, Jennifer M S
  • Room: Smokler Center Library  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and Beyond
AS.060.157 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the texts and rhetoric of the movement that abolished slavery in the Caribbean. Among other topics, we examine: how the formerly enslaved represented their experiences of slavery; how abolitionism emerged across the West Indies, Cuba, and Haiti; and the techniques artists used to imagine radical, post-slavery worlds. Authors include: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Esteban Montejo, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, and Aimé Césaire (all texts will be available in English).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Loker, Evan
  • Room: Latrobe 120  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran
AS.070.267 (01)

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
  • Room: Smokler Center 213  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

Conflict and Security in a Global World
AS.070.295 (01)

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Degani, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 50 Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Conflict and Security in a Global World
AS.070.295 (02)

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Degani, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Reverberations Of The Korean War
AS.070.332 (01)

This course will takes the reverberations of the Korean War to examine the ways in which catastrophic violence is absorbed into and corrodes social life. Particular attention is paid to the transnational nature of conflict, how boundaries around peace and war are established, and how recent scholarly and artistic work on the Korean War has critically engaged dominant frameworks of memory and trauma. Readings will draw from fiction, ethnography, historiography and will also include film. This course also draws from the public syllabus on Ending the Korean War.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Han, Clara
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Common Ground: Shared Resources, Social Economies
AS.070.342 (01)

This course explores the idea and practice of the commons through various sites and objects (money, work, natural resources, urban land, knowledge and culture, etc.). We will examine the promise and limitations of local, grassroots social and economic forms of organization that propose alternatives to the market economy. Focusing on workers, consumers and housing cooperatives; community currencies; urban gardens; self-help associations; fair trade organizations and knowledge networks; we will enquire how these social economies propose autonomous forms of living together, and sharing resources, property and labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Procupez, Valeria
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (01)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hackerman B 17 Gilman 277
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (02)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hackerman B 17 Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (03)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hackerman B 17 Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (04)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Hackerman B 17 Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (01)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (02)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (03)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Modern Latin America
AS.100.115 (04)

Latin American history since 1800 taking on big questions of world history: the emergence of republics, migration voluntary and involuntary, development and environmental change, and fights for civil rights and liberties.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM

Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation
AS.100.123 (01)

Introduction to three major themes in African history, from the precolonial era to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/38
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, MSCH-HUM

Magicians, Mystics, and Spiritualists of the 16th and 17th Centuries
AS.100.137 (01)

This course will acquaint the student with the most important magicians, mystics, and spiritualists of the early modern period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, MSCH-HUM

Reformation and Counter Reformation Europe
AS.100.216 (01)

This course explores the series of religious and political conflicts that make up what are known now as the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hinchliff, Catherine M
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Slavery in the Americas and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, 1450-1890
AS.100.224 (01)

This course explores the origins, organization and abolition of the institution of Slavery in the Americas, the Transatlantic slave trade and their impacts on the formation of the Early Modern World c. 1450-1890.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Krichtal, Alexey
  • Room: Maryland 201  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

History of Modern Germany
AS.100.233 (01)

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its role within Europe and the world from the 18th century to the ‘Refugee Crisis’, climate change and EU politics today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 50  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-GERM

Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and Exchanges
AS.100.246 (01)

This course examines Iberian-Asian relations in the early modern period. It enriches and complicates our understandings of important concepts, such as colonialism, religious conversion, and global trade.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Galasi, Francis
  • Room: Krieger 306  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA

The Qing Empire and its Global Context
AS.100.311 (01)

This is an upper level undergraduate class. It offers a case-based global history of early modern empires.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Wu, Man-Chu
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL

American Foreign Policy, 1914-2016
AS.100.337 (01)

The history of the formation of an American-led liberal international order and challenges to that order between the years of 1914 and 2016.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Delehanty, Sean T
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

Survey of the history of China from ca. 1895 to ca. 1976.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the present
AS.100.360 (01)

The Modern British World introduces some of the major events, themes, and controversies that led to Britain’s global dominance and ultimate decline as an imperial power. This course focuses on varying forms of imperial governance, the interrelationships between metropole and colony, and the formation of British and colonial national identities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katie
  • Room: Smokler Center 213  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA

John Locke
AS.100.404 (01)

Seminar style course in which John Locke’s major works will be read intensively, together with some of his contemporaries’ works, and select scholarly interpretations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city
AS.100.413 (01)

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Maryland 104  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Historiography of Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

Study of Western, Chinese, and Japanese understandings of the history of China, emphasizing their implications for cultural understanding and for policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Smokler Center 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing Backlash
AS.100.497 (01)

The sixties were a decade of unrest, failed revolutions, and fundamental change across Europe and the US. We will look at how these years changed the world through the lens of national case studies and community engagement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Politics of Science in America
AS.140.312 (01)

This course examines the relations of the scientific and technical enterprise and government in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics will include the funding of research and development, public health, national defense, etc. Case studies will include the 1918 Spanish influenza epidemic, the Depression-era Science Advisory Board, the founding of the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, the institution of the President’s Science Advisor, the failure of the Superconducting Supercollider, the Hubble Space Telescope, the covid pandemic, etc.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Gilman 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Science and Technology in Slave Regimes
AS.140.328 (01)

This course explores the questions that arise when we juxtapose slave regimes with scientific and technological change. We’ll consider very broad questions, such as, was slavery compatible with modernity? As well as study specific cases where slavery and technology intersected, such as the cotton gin or sugar cane plantations, but also the existence of “modern” scientific societies within slave regimes. We’ll explore these questions from a trans-national perspective by comparing cases in the Antebellum US, Cuba, Brazil, Haiti and other countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kargon, Robert H, Portuondo, Maria M
  • Room: Gilman 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Science & Technology in the Development of Modern Latin America
AS.140.339 (01)

This seminar will survey the development of science and technology in modern Latin America, and explore their dynamics in the context of cultural, political, and economic forces.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Alsina, Marc Joseph
  • Room: Shaffer 202  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Hackerman 320
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (07)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (09)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Ames 320
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (10)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (12)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (13)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Shaffer 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (15)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Croft Hall B32
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (16)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Shaffer 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (18)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 5:00PM - 5:50PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 40/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 40/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Economic Experience of the BRIC Countries
AS.180.214 (01)

In 2001, Jim O’Neill, the Chief Economist at Goldman Sachs, coined the acronym BRIC to identify the four large emerging economies, Brazil, Russia, India and China. These economies have since had an amazing run, and have emerged as the biggest and fastest growing emerging markets. In this course, we look at the economic experiences of the BRIC countries for the past 50 years. We discuss the reasons that have contributed to their exceptional growth rates, with particular emphasis on their transformation into market economies. We also analyze the challenges that these countries continue to face in their development process.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP

Game Theory in Social Sciences
AS.180.217 (01)

Game Theory is the study of multiple person decision problems in which the well-being of a decision maker depends not only on his own actions but also on those of others. Such problems arise frequently in economics, political science, business, military science and many other areas. In this course, we will learn how to model different social situations as games and how to use solution concepts to understand players' behavior. We will consider various examples from different fields and will play several games in class. The emphasis of the class is on the conceptual analysis and applications and we will keep the level of mathematical technicalities at the minimum -- high school algebra and one term of calculus will be sufficient. Students who took AS.180.117 are not eligible to take AS.180.217.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Ying
  • Room: Hodson 210  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

The Informal Economy: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why We Care About It.
AS.180.221 (01)

The informal economy is one of the most complex economic and political phenomena of our time. It exists in rich and poor countries alike, currently employs almost half of the world’s workers, about 1.8 billion people, and totals to economic activity of around $10 trillion. If the informal economy were an independent nation, it would be the second-largest economy in the world, after the United States and before China. In today’s globalizing environment, are informal economies a poverty trap or an engine of growth? Do they stimulate entrepreneurship and popular empowerment, or promote exploitation? How does an improved understanding of the size and organization of informal economies affect service provision, social policy or taxation? What are the implications of the informal economy for social cohesion and popular politics? The proposed course will address these (as well as other) questions related to the informal economy to offer students an understanding of such complex phenomenon from a variety of perspectives. The course will comprise three parts. Part 1 will explore the complexities of the informal economy, and the effects of informality on policies of inclusive growth. Part 2 will draw on empirical evidence and comparative case studies to examine informal economies in various regions, including Africa, East Asia, North and South America, and Europe, highlighting variations in activities, relations with the state, global integration and economic outcomes. Finally, Part 3 will discuss the ongoing economic policy shift from punitive measures to accepting informality as a virtual space through which citizens flow from job-seeker to compliant entrepreneurs.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Health and Education in South Asia
AS.180.229 (01)

Human capital is an important factor of economic growth in South Asian economies, along with physical capital and technology. Addressing health and education challenges has implications for improving a country’s human capital formation and income growth. In this course, we look at past and present health and educational outcomes in South Asian Countries. We discuss the gaps in access to education and health care services, the quality of education and health care services as well as the impacts on the productivity of the labor force. We also empirically analyze the link between economic growth and human capital development. Furthermore, we focus on some challenges and future policy options for economies in South Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 56/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Rethinking Economics After the Great Recession
AS.180.238 (01)

The financial crisis that began in the United States in 2007 threw virtually the entire world into recession. This class will look at the causes of the crisis and at how it unfolded. It will look into the conventional wisdom of economists, circa 2006, and why that wisdom proved to be so wrong. It will examine the financial innovations that contributed to the crisis, at the reasons financial regulators were blindsided, and at the reforms enacted after the crisis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Norris, Floyd
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (01)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (02)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Financial Markets and Institutions
AS.180.266 (01)

Understanding design and functioning of financial markets and institutions, connecting theoretical foundations and real-world applications and cases. Basic principles of asymmetric information problems, management of risk. Money, bond, and equity markets; investment banking, security brokers, and venture capital firms; structure, competition, and regulation of commercial banks. Importance of electronic technology on financial systems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Feinman, Joshua
  • Room: Shaffer 302  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/35
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Health
AS.180.289 (01)

Application of economic concepts and analysis to the health services system. Review of empirical studies of demand for health services, behavior of providers, and relationship of health services to population health levels. Discussion of current policy issues relating to financing and resource allocation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:30PM - 5:50PM
  • Instructor: Bishai, David M
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 40/100
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Topics in International Macroeconomics and Finance
AS.180.303 (01)

The course will review selected topics in international macroeconomics and finance. The topics for the Fall of 2019 include: financial globalization; international portfolio diversification; capital account liberalization and the choice of the exchange rate regime in emerging markets; the global financial safety net; macroeconomic adjustment in the euro area.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jeanne, Olivier
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Political Economy and Development
AS.180.338 (01)

Good governance is associated with desirable outcomes across countries and societies: higher life satisfaction, greater income per capita, lower child mortality, longer life expectancy, less disease, etc. But these statistical associations in the data are not sufficient to establish either that good governance truly causes such societal outcomes, or what types of policies produce them. This course asks: What are the determinants of good governance? Is good governance "good" beyond its intrinsic desirability? If so, how? We use a data-driven approach, focusing on quantitative empirical methods and their applications to policy. The goal is to develop skills to be savvy consumers, as well as producers, of policy-relevant evidence related to issues of governance, in rich and poor countries alike. Topics will include: democracy, corruption, conflict, culture, mass media, quotas, and foreign aid.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Campante, Filipe R
  • Room: Shaffer 304  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Race, Gender and Culture
AS.180.349 (01)

Economics is a quantitative social science studying general human behavior. This course will overview recent contributions in the economics of race, gender, and culture, and will introduce how economists study controversial issues on these topics. Students majoring in other social science disciplines are welcome to take this course. Another goal of this course is to make students become familiar with causal analysis tools popular in economics research. It is strongly recommended to take at least one econometrics course before taking this one, or at least taking it in the same semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Hwang, Yujung
  • Room: Latrobe 120  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Labor Economics
AS.180.351 (01)

The course discusses various issues in labor markets from the perspective of economic theory. We first study the major forces at work that shape labor market behavior; firms’ labor demand and workers’ labor supply. Then we discuss the equilibrium behavior of employment and wages. Using these tools, we also cover various applied topics in labor economics, such as minimum wage regulations, male-female wage differentials, human capital investment, worker mobility, and unemployment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 29/55
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Poverty/Inequality
AS.180.355 (01)

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Moffitt, Robert A
  • Room: Croft Hall B32  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/32
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL, INST-ECON

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (01)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 304
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (02)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (03)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 305
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (04)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 203
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (05)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to American Politics
AS.190.101 (06)

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Sheingate, Adam
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (01)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (02)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 306
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (03)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (04)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 202
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (05)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 304
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Contemporary International Politics
AS.190.108 (06)

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered. This course was previously AS.190.209.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 313
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (01)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 308
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (02)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Hodson 313
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (03)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 302
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of East Asia
AS.190.109 (04)

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger 306
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Ancient Political Thought
AS.190.204 (01)

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Race and Racism in International Relations
AS.190.255 (01)

This course introduces students to the foundational importance of race and racism to the construction of our contemporary global order. Topics include the Crusades, European imperialism, eugenics, Apartheid, freedom struggles, decolonization, and global development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Shilliam, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

What You Need to Know About Chinese Politics (Part 1)
AS.190.264 (01)

What you need to know about Chinese politics covers the major scandals, political events, and policy debates that every China watcher needs to know. This first module of a two-semester experience brings together two professors, Prof. Andrew Mertha (SAIS) and Prof. John Yasuda (KSAS), with very different perspectives on China's past achievements, its political and economic futures, and the global implications of China's rise. The course seeks to give ample coverage to every major political question about China that is often missed in a semester long class. In addition to lively debates between the instructors, students can also expect guest speakers from the policy world, business, and the academy for a fresh take on what's going on in China today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mertha, Andrew C, Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (01)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (02)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (03)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Virtual Online Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Introduction to Political Economy
AS.190.267 (04)

An introduction to the fundamental questions and concepts of political economy: money, commodities, profit, and capital. The course will study the nature of economic forces and relations as elements larger social and political orders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Chambers, Samuel Allen
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the US
AS.190.300 (01)

While policies were passed to ensure equal opportunity for racially subjugated Americans, the United States witnessed increasing stratification of wealth and income and deepening concentration of poverty, stagnation in closing racial gaps, and new forms of inequality posed by the striking upsurge in contact with the criminal justice system at the bottom of the skills ladder and concentration of wealth at the top. At the same time, the welfare state came under attack and faced challenges posed by an aging population, women entering the labor force, deindustrialization, and international pressures of globalization. Social spending withered in some areas while spending on citizens was increasingly likely to happen through tax expenditures and private means. This course investigates the politics around these developments and competing perspectives in debates over redistributive policies in the United States and their impact on inequality, particularly race and gender inequality. We will examine the contours of inequality and explanations for why it has expanded over the past several decades. We explore why the US is exceptional in both the level of inequality it tolerates and the generosity and types of remedies to alleviate poverty in comparison to its European counterparts and debate the role of race, unions, electoral politics and institutions. We investigate several specific cases of persistent racial inequality – concentrated poverty, segregation, and incarceration. We investigate both how policies have reinforced racial and gender divisions from a top-down perspective as well as examining under what conditions the disadvantaged contest inequality, exploring how political struggle shapes policy from the bottom-up. The last part of the course examines the consequences of inequality and social policy for representation and citizenship and how economic inequality affects political representation and responsiveness of elites to masses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical Prespective
AS.190.306 (01)

The seminar will introduce students to the political and economic trajectories of Latin America as a whole and of individual countries, including Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Special attention will be paid to the long-term trajectory of the political regime (democracy versus dictatorship) and of economic development (variations in GDP per capita). Competing theories, from economic dependence to historical institutionalism, will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of Latin America’s relative economic backwardness and low quality democracies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Smokler Center 213  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Asian American Politics
AS.190.315 (01)

This course examines issues of political identity, political incorporation, and political participation of Asian Americans. Themes include Asian American panethnicity, the struggle for immigration and citizenship, Asian American electoral politics, political activism and resistance since the 1960s, and the impact of Asian Americans on the politics of race and ethnicity in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

The Law of Democracy: The United States and Canada in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.324 (01)

The Law of Democracy refers to the statutes, court decisions, and other practices that govern the electoral processes. Although the United States and Canada have a great deal in common, they have approached many of the problems involved in institutionalizing democracy quite differently. Recognizing these differences should contribute to understanding both the strengths, and the problems, of the two approaches. Specific topic will include the right to vote, political finance, delineation of district boundaries, electoral dispute resolution, and the role of electoral management bodies and elections administrators.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

American Constitutional Law
AS.190.333 (01)

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room: Maryland 202  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Comparative Political Behavior
AS.190.338 (01)

An introduction to the study of political behavior, emphasizing electoral behavior in democratic countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Black Politics I
AS.190.340 (01)

This course is a survey of the bases and substance of politics among black Americans and the relation of black politics to the American political system up to the end of Jim Crow. The intention is both to provide a general sense of pertinent issues and relations over this period as a way of helping to make sense of the present and to develop criteria for evaluating political scientists' and others' claims regarding the status and characteristics of black American political activity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Race and the Politics of Memory
AS.190.388 (01)

This is a writing intensive, advanced undergraduate political theory seminar. The course will examine the politics of memory: how power shapes what is available to be remembered, the timing and occasions of memory, who is allowed to remember, and the spaces inside of which remembrance takes place. Specifically, the seminar will explore how segregated memory enables racial segregation and racial inequality. Toward that end, we shall investigate political and theoretical interventions potentially equipped to contest contemporary forms of racial amnesia haunting what some have labeled a “post-truth” world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism
AS.190.391 (01)

Since antiquity, global politics have been defined by the struggle between imperialism and anti-imperialism. This course examines the arguments that have accompanied this struggle, considering influential texts written to defend or to denounce empires, as well as contemporary scholarship on imperial and anti-imperial ideologies. We will focus in particular on how imperial conflicts shaped natural law, international law, liberalism, and cosmopolitanism, as well as the connections between imperialism and contemporary capitalism, development assistance, and humanitarian intervention. The fundamental questions for the course are: What is an empire? and What would it mean to decolonize our world, our international institutions, and our minds?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Shaffer 2  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 21/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, POLI-IR, INST-PT

Nonviolent Resistance in World Politics
AS.190.393 (01)

In this seminar we examine the origins, dynamics, and consequences of nonviolent struggles around the world. How do ordinary people organize for social change? What are the differences in people power campaigns in authoritarian and democratic contexts? When does nonviolent resistance succeed or fail, and what are the political consequences of these outcomes? In answering these questions, we will study the central ideas behind nonviolent action, learn about the most important scholarly discoveries in this field and analyze paradigmatic cases. Students will choose a historical or contemporary nonviolent movement to interrogate throughout the semester, as we learn new concepts, theories, and empirical patterns to make sense of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Maryland 309  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Capitalism and Ecology
AS.190.396 (01)

Capitalism and Ecology focuses on the relations between capitalism and climate during the era of the Anthropocene. How do capitalist processes of fossil extraction, consumption, production and governance contribute to the pace of climate warming, glacier flows, the ocean conveyor system, species loss and other phenomena? What are the effects and the possible modes of political response? How do the nonhuman, self-organizing processes such as glaciers, oceans and climate change on their own as they also amplify the effects of capitalist emissions? The course combines texts on capitalism and activism with those by geoscientists on how the nonhuman systems work. Books by authors in the fields of political theory, geology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and ethology will be drawn upon. Authors such as Michael Benton, Brian Fagan, Hayek, Naomi Klein, Fred Hirsch, Fred Pearce, van Dooren and Connolly are apt to be read to engage these issues. A previous course in political theory is recommended. The class is organized around student presentations on assigned readings. Two papers, 10-12 pages in length. Extensive class discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room: Hodson 316  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

The Executive Branch
AS.190.406 (01)

In the 19th Century America was noted for its courts, political parties and representative institutions. Today, America’s political parties and representative institutions have declined in importance while the institutions of the executive branch have increased in importance. This seminar will examine the nation’s key executive institutions and aspects of executive governance in the U.S. Students will alternate primary responsibility for week’s readings. Every student will prepare a 10-15 page review and critique of the books for which they are responsible in class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Krieger 180  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Issues
AS.190.408 (01)

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty by examining its historical development, current controversies, and its salience in international relations scholarship. Works in political theory and the international law literature will also inform our discussion. The course is open to advanced undergraduate students with previous coursework in political science. .

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Violence: State and Society
AS.190.421 (01)

This course will examine violence that occurs mainly within the territory of nominally sovereign states. We will focus on violence as an object of study in its own right. For the most part, we will look at violence as a dependent variable, though in some instances it will function as an independent variable, a mechanism, or an equilibrium. We will ask why violence starts, how it “works” or fails to work, why it takes place in some locations and not others, why violence take specific forms (e.g., insurgency, terrorism, civilian victimization, etc.), what explains its magnitude (the number of victims), and what explains targeting (the type or identity of victims).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/14
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Does Israel Have a Future?
AS.190.434 (01)

Israel is one of the only countries whose existence is openly challenged. This class will examine the future of Israel focusing on international and domestic threats to its continued existence as a Jewish democracy. Outside threats to be considered include nuclear attack and the growing international movement to delegitimize Israel. domestic challenges include demographic changes, the role of religion in governance, and doubts as to whether one can be a Jewish state and still be a democracy. Lessons from the destruction of the ancient Israelite kingdoms and from contemporary state deaths will be included. The course will conclude by considering efforts that Israel can undertake to meet the threats it faces.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of Outer Space
AS.190.443 (01)

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Nuclear Weapons and World Politics
AS.190.454 (01)

An intensive examination of competing theories of the role of nuclear weapons in world politics and alternative global security orders. Focus on nuclear weapons and the interstate system, deterrence, war fighting, arms control, proliferation and terrorism, with select historical and contemporary case studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

The Citizen and the Foreigner in South Asia
AS.191.306 (01)

This course will take students through the histories of belonging and non-belonging of the peoples that populate South Asia. This will involve examining the administrative as well as emotional consequences of colonial rule, the politics of legal and illegal identity documents, the continuing legacies of the partition of the Indian subcontinent, climate-change-related migration, refugee experiences and detention centers, and the dimensions of caste and tribal identities on citizenship. Towards the latter end of the course, we will examine how citizenship is an ongoing process that is intimately connected to national identity and competing ideas of who and what constitutes the nation. The course will end with considering some implications for development on citizenship. Recommended Course Background: Prior courses in Comparative Politics or South Asian Politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Dey, Nandini
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

The Politics of American Imperialism: The Founding to the Present
AS.191.308 (01)

Is there an American empire? In this course, we will investigate American imperialism over three centuries, placing at the center of our inquiry the contention that expansion has always and continues to be a crucial aspect of American politics. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of American imperialism and then move roughly chronologically from the decades before the Founding through the present, tracing the politics of each major debate about imperialism. We will pay close attention to the racial and economic processes that animate debates about American imperialism and mechanisms of imperial rule over time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Henning, Maye Lan
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Theories of Power
AS.191.316 (01)

The course introduces the most prominent theories of power in the Western political theory canon and the ways in which defining this contested concept also configures our understanding of politics and social life. Theories of power are divided into three broad sections, organized by way of the different images of politics that they project. In the first part of the course, we cover theories of power that convey a conventional image of politics as an activity (conflictual or consensual) between political actors on the municipal, national, or international stage. Here, we will read both the classical theories of power as domination (‘power over’) and those that theorize power as a capacity for social action (‘power to’). In the second part of the course, we examine the theories of power that express an expanded image of politics, as that which permeates social life: from workplaces, schools, and hospitals, to families and romantic relationships. Here, we study the ways in which our modes of being and social life are constituted by both local (micro) and structural (macro) power dynamics. In the last section, we explore naturalist theories of power that convey the most expansive image of politics as a material activity of nonhuman and human actants alike, constitutive of the world itself. Here, we dive into both the classical and contemporary accounts of power that help us come to terms with the political agency of (nonhuman) animals, viruses, electrical grids, ocean currents, and forest fires.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Vrdoljak, Tvrtko
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)
AS.191.335 (01)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Russian Foreign Policy (IR)
AS.191.345 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

International Political Economy of Emerging Markets
AS.192.260 (01)

This course examines the relationship between politics and international economics in emerging market and developing countries. Throughout the course, we apply different theories of international relations to understand foreign economic policymaking in emerging markets. Emphasis is also placed on critically evaluating these theories and developing critical-thinking skills. The course begins with an overview of theories of international political economy. The second section of the course focuses on developing countries’ embrace of economic globalization between the 1980s debt crisis and 2008 global financial crisis. We examine different political explanations for why emerging market and developing countries removed barriers to foreign trade and foreign investment in this period. The final section of the course explores how globalization has impacted emerging market economies. We consider how governments in these countries have dealt with the new challenges that have emerged in this era of economic globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Steinberg, David A
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Global Energy and Environment: A Political Economy Approach
AS.192.305 (01)

Global environmental deterioration is a major threat to human wellbeing. How do governments cooperate to address international environmental problems? Why is the global environmental regime structured as it is? Can international agreements and organizations solve global environmental problems? These are the primary questions addressed in this seminar. Among other topics, we cover research on global climate cooperation, the relationship between trade liberalization and the environment, North South negotiations on environmental agreements, environmental activism, and the problem of energy poverty in non-OECD countries. The seminar also provides students with an opportunity to conduct original research. In addition to weekly readings and discussion, the students write a final paper for the class based on empirical research on global environmental governance. Students also participate in a simulation of global climate negotiations under the 2015 Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Urpelainen, Johannes
  • Room: Krieger 205  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-IR, ENVS-MINOR, ENVS-MAJOR

Modern Warfare
AS.192.360 (01)

This course examines modern warfare from the Second World War to the present. It takes a broad historical perspective. Strategic decision-making, technological change, experiences of the soldier, different concepts of warfare, and the effect of war on societies and the effect of societies upon war will be examined. Students will be introduced to critical texts and key primary source documents. The course will start with the Second World War. It will then go on to the nuclear revolution, the Korean War, and the early Cold War. From there, the subject matter will turn to examine people’s war, focusing on Mao and the Chinese Civil War and then Vietnam. Next, the Arab-Israeli conflicts will be discussed before moving on to the strategic environment of the post-Cold War world and the long war against “terrorism” in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and elsewhere. Finally, the course will look at recent technological change, clashes, and new players. Throughout, special attention will be paid to non-Western views and experience of war. The five main questions of the class will be: • How has the nature of warfare changed between 1939 and today? What is the nature of war today? What kind of war is possible today? • How has technology changed warfare? • What are the experiences of people, both soldiers and civilians, in war? • How has warfare affected societies and culture? How have societies and culture affected war? • How has warfare affected domestic and international political change?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Malkasian, Carter A
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Never Forget: Muslims, Islamophobia, and Dissent after 9/11
AS.194.202 (01)

In partnership with the social justice organization Justice for Muslims Collective, this community-engaged course and oral history project will explore how diverse Muslim communities navigated and contested belonging and political and cultural agency amidst state-sponsored violence and national debates on race, gender, citizenship and national security after 9/11 and during the ongoing War on Terror. Through history, ethnography, first-person narratives, film, fiction, and online resources, students will learn about the impact of 9/11 on American Muslim communities. This includes cultural and political resistance to imperialism, racism, and Islamophobia as well as to intersectional inequities within Muslim communities that were intensified in the context of Islamophobia. Students will learn about community activism and organizing from JMC, and complete a participatory action research project with the organization. This project is an oral history archive that will address gaps in the documentation of movement histories when it comes to early organizing against War on Terror policies by Muslim communities and communities racialized or perceived as Muslim. Students will be trained to record stories of resistance among leaders who organized and responded at the local and national-level in the Greater Washington region, to support the building of an archive that will shape a wide variety of future organizing and advocacy efforts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (02)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, Staff
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Black Italy
AS.211.423 (01)

Over the last three decades Italy, historically a country of emigrants—many of whom suffered from discrimination in the societies they joined—became a destination for hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees from various countries, and particularly from Africa. Significant numbers of these immigrants came to Italy as a result of the country’s limited, though violent colonial history; others arrive because Italy is the closest entry-point to Europe. How have these migratory flows challenged Italian society’s sense of itself? How have they transformed the notion of Italian national identity? In recent years, growing numbers of Afro- and Afro-descendant writers, filmmakers, artists and Black activists are responding through their work to pervasive xenophobia and racism while challenging Italy’s self-representation as a ‘White’ country. How are they forcing it to broaden the idea of ‘Italianess’? How do their counternarratives compel Italy to confront its ignored colonial past? And, in what way have Black youth in Italy embraced the #Blacklivesmatter movement? This multimedia course examines representation of blackness and racialized otherness, whiteness, and national identity through literary, film, and visual archival material in an intersectional framework. Examining Italy’s internal, ‘Southern question,’ retracing Italy’s colonial history, and recognizing the experiences of Italians of immigrant origins and those of immigrants themselves, we’ll explore compelling works by writers and filmmakers such as Igiaba Scego, Gagriella Ghermandi, Maza Megniste, Dagmawi Yimer, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room: Krieger 170  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (02)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wuensch, April
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo, Ugarelli Risi, Mariangela
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo, Quattrociocchi, Christian P
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Representations of the Other(s) in Israeli Culture
AS.216.305 (01)

This course will use the concept of the Other to study the ways in which various marginal groups in Israel are represented in contemporary Israeli films, TV drama, prose-fiction, poetry and visual art. As a nation-state which was founded on the premise of a utopian vision of a just and fair society and as a promise for a safe haven for Jews escaping their status as Others, contemporary Israeli culture offers a unique case study. The course will run as a research seminar in which students will be encouraged to actively engage in analyzing the ways in which cultural productions depict the Other/s and Otherness as well as the social, political and psychological motivations and implications of these depictions. We will ask questions such as: who is considered as Other and by whom? What roles do the cultural representations play in shaping national collective identity, stereotypes and the perception of the self as Other? And how collective memory shapes Otherness?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Hodson 311  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and Culture
AS.217.427 (01)

The vast body of work produced women artists and writers in Brazil has been marginalized by canonical cultural narratives, which are now being contested by a spate of scholarly and artistic projects. This course spotlights the production of women from the early twentieth century to the present, including renowned and lesser-known works. We’ll discuss art, literature, and film alongside feminist theory, exploring radicality as it relates to aesthetics and politics. How do women’s art, literature, and thought engage with and transform Brazilian cultural production? What are their contributions to global discussions about gender and sexuality? How do these works respond to historical events? Among the topics addressed are the body, feminism, race, indigeneity, and politics. We’ll study Clarice Lispector’s acclaimed stories, the first Brazilian proletarian novel written by modernist icon Patricia Galvão, known as Pagu, the diaries of Carolina Maria de Jesus, the emblematic paintings of Tarsila do Amaral, and Lygia Clark’s artwork, as well as the booming scene of contemporary cinema and poetry. The course is taught in English, but those interested in doing the coursework in Portuguese (4 credits) should register for section 02.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina
  • Room: Gilman 50  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and Culture
AS.217.427 (02)

The vast body of work produced women artists and writers in Brazil has been marginalized by canonical cultural narratives, which are now being contested by a spate of scholarly and artistic projects. This course spotlights the production of women from the early twentieth century to the present, including renowned and lesser-known works. We’ll discuss art, literature, and film alongside feminist theory, exploring radicality as it relates to aesthetics and politics. How do women’s art, literature, and thought engage with and transform Brazilian cultural production? What are their contributions to global discussions about gender and sexuality? How do these works respond to historical events? Among the topics addressed are the body, feminism, race, indigeneity, and politics. We’ll study Clarice Lispector’s acclaimed stories, the first Brazilian proletarian novel written by modernist icon Patricia Galvão, known as Pagu, the diaries of Carolina Maria de Jesus, the emblematic paintings of Tarsila do Amaral, and Lygia Clark’s artwork, as well as the booming scene of contemporary cinema and poetry. The course is taught in English, but those interested in doing the coursework in Portuguese (4 credits) should register for section 02.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical social theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced how we study and understand society: Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and W.E.B. DuBois. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of how each theorist answered three major questions: 1) what is the origin, structure and historical dynamic of modern society?; 2) how do we gain an accurate knowledge of society?; 3) what are the conditions of possibility for freedom in modern society? In comparing, applying and critiquing their respective theories, students will advance their own theory of society.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI

Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies
AS.230.228 (01)

This course surveys the impacts of colonialism in East and Southeast Asia. Special attention will be paid to the social and economic development in British Singapore and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Korea and Taiwan. Topics include free-trade imperialism, colonial modernity, anticolonial movements, pan-Asianism, and post-war U.S. hegemony.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China
AS.230.233 (01)

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Liang, Guowei
  • Room: Hodson 305  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

War and State: A Social Science Survey
AS.230.251 (01)

This course will introduce you to the cornerstone literature of contemporary social sciences on war and nation-state. Literature in this course comes from a variety of disciplines including sociology, political science, history and archaeology. We will start with basic definitions of key concepts of “war”, “state” and “state formation”. Then we will read different theories of how evolutions in war and military gave rise to modern states as we see today. After that we will survey a stream of historical cases of war and state formation across Europe, Asia and Africa in different historical periods. Finally, we will contemplate what influences war and military continue to exert in contemporary societies and states, and the challenges that lie ahead.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Fang, Zhicao
  • Room: Latrobe 107  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Plagues, Power, and Social Control
AS.230.306 (01)

While developments in biomedicine and health care have led to the eradication, cure and management of many human health problems, disease, illness and health have also been the focus for aggressive social controls and population management. The technologies and practices of disease control and health management have been foundational to some of the most aggressive structures of oppression in recent history such as the Jewish Ghetto, the Concentration Camp, the South African Township and techniques of segregation. This course seeks to explore how epidemics and disease control are linked to larger questions of power, state craft and international dynamics. This course asks how have outbreaks of infectious disease shaped social and political action? How do societies respond to outbreaks and why? What do epidemic moments tell us about global structures of power and the dynamics of control? Drawing on historical cases including plague during the European Renaissance and before, the HIV/AIDS Pandemic and the West African Ebola Outbreak of 2013-2016, this course will introduce students to the history and practices of disease control as well as important theoretical perspectives by which to understand the sociological and historical effects of disease and the responses to them. Students will engage sociological concepts such as biopolitics, social construction of disease and illness and biosecurity and produce a final research paper examining the outcomes and responses to an epidemic event to show mastery of the topics covered in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room: Bloomberg 168  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of the Military-Industrial Complex
AS.230.326 (01)

Students will critically examine the U.S. military-industrial complex-and the social relations that constitute it-in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by drawing on works from sociology, history, political science, geography, and economics. Over the course of the semester, we will interrogate how (and by whom) war is made. In 2020, over a third of the record-breaking U.S. Department of Defense budget was earmarked for the procurement of weapons and supplies from for-profit armaments firms. Billions more flow to private companies that provide services-from security and combat to cleaning and food preparation-to the military. Over 2 million people are directly employed by the U.S. military, and countless more by its myriad private contractors. This sprawling network of private corporations, armed services, political actors, and workers constitute the military-industrial complex. By examining this network of actors that “make war,” students will explore the social, political, and economic dimensions of U.S. militarism and their changes over time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Payne, Corey Robert
  • Room: Bloomberg 278  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Latin America
AS.230.342 (01)

This course will examine the dynamics of transformative social change in Latin America and the Caribbean through analyses of resistance, rebellion, and revolution. Because revolutionary change is at once the most transformative and the most rare, this course will cover the exemplary cases of the Haitian, Mexican, and Cuban revolutions, but then also ask how theorists have understood the dynamics of both open rebellion and of everyday resistance in societies deeply structured by racial, gender, and class power, situated within an unequal world system. Attending to both local and global dynamics, this course will ask how Latin American dynamics have both conformed to and challenged universalist theories of social change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Bloomberg 176  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Climate Change and Society
AS.230.348 (01)

This course will focus on the social dimensions of climate change. Drawing on global and multi-disciplinary scholarship, we will address such issues as: the history of fossil capitalism; the relationship between social inequality and “vulnerability” to climate change (including heat waves, drought, rising seas, and extreme weather); climate migration and the political economy of “adaptation”; the merits of various mitigation strategies, including the Green New Deal, conservation offsets, and geo-engineering; the roots of climate denialism; and climate justice movements. Students will write a final research paper on a sociological aspect of climate change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America
AS.230.385 (01)

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Neoliberalism
AS.230.405 (01)

Neoliberalism, a political project that seeks to subject all aspects of social life to free market force, has ascended to orthodoxy in developed and developing countries alike over the last four decades. This course is a reading seminar focused on some of the key classic and cutting-edge original texts that critically examine and debate the origins, socio-political impacts, and crisis of the neoliberal project. It will cover such topics as the genealogy of the neoliberal idea, neoliberal state, informalization of works, neoliberal cities, rise of the one percent, and global governance. Class will be a mix of lecture and seminar-style discussions. Requirements include reading memo, class presentation, and a term paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-ECON

Lu Xun And His Times: China’s Long 20th Century And Beyond
AS.300.322 (01)

The “founding father of modern Chinese literature,” Lu Xun (1881-1936) saw himself as a contemporary of writers like Gogol, Ibsen, and Nietzsche in creating his seminal short stories and essays, and likewise, he has been seen by numerous Chinese, Sinophone, and East Asian writers as their contemporary since his lifetime until today. In this course, we will survey Lu Xun's canonical works and their legacies through a comparative approach. What echoes do Lu Xun's works have with the European and Russian texts he engaged with? Why did his works manage to mark a “new origin” of Chinese literature? How were his works repeated, adapted, and appropriated by Chinese writers from the Republican period through the Maoist era to the post-socialist present, even during the Covid-19 pandemic? How do we assess his cross-cultural reception? Are his times obsolete now that China is on the rise? Or, have his times come yet? Through our comparative survey, Lu Xun's works and their afterlives will offer us a window onto China's long twentieth century and beyond in a transnational context. All materials are provided in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Documentary Photography in a Changing China
AS.310.210 (01)

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy
AS.310.305 (01)

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ott, Marvin C
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Global Health and Human Rights: COVID-19 Case Studies from Asia
AS.310.328 (01)

Using the lens of international human rights, humanitarian law, and the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, this seminar explores a range of Covid-19 response and prevention issues and best practices focusing on case studies, including China, Japan, Taiwan, India, and South Korea, among others. We will examine the human rights-based guidance from the UN for Covid-19 response and prevention as well as the geopolitics of PPE and vaccine distribution (i.e., “mask” and vaccine diplomacy). The course will explore approaches to the balancing of rights and duties, including freedom of movement, freedoms of association and assembly, individuals’ right to health, duties to others, rights to privacy, freedom of expression, disinformation and governments’ emergency powers (and their limits) to protect public health. Inequities and discrimination exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic will also be discussed. Several health and human rights advocates and experts will visit the class to share their experiences and insights.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Worden, Andrea Joan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.107 (01)FYS: Thinking and Writing Across Cultures - East Asia and the WestF 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, SatoruGilman 208
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.212 (01)Mirror Mirror: Reflections in Art from Van Eyck to VelázquezTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMerback, MitchellGilman 177
 
HART-RENBAR, HART-RENEM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.320 (01)Art of Colonial PeruTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDeleonardis, LisaGilman 119
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.329 (01)Building an Empire: Architecture of the Ottoman Capitals, c. 1300–1600TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRustem, UnverGilman 177
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.338 (01)Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic EmpiresW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverAmes 218
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.352 (01)Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South AsiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.410 (01)The Epistemology of PhotographyM 4:30PM - 7:00PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.461 (01)The Double: Identity and Difference in Art Since 1900Th 4:30PM - 7:00PMMeyer, JamesGilman 177
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.040.420 (01)Classics Research Lab: The John Addington Symonds ProjectTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMButler, Michael Shane, Dean, GabrielleGilman 277
 
INST-GLOBAL, HART-ANC
AS.040.420 (02)Classics Research Lab: Antioch Recovery ProjectW 1:30PM - 4:00PMStager, Jennifer M SSmokler Center Library
 
HART-ANC
AS.060.157 (01)Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and BeyondTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLoker, EvanLatrobe 120
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.267 (01)Culture, Religion and Politics in IranW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHaeri, NiloofarSmokler Center 213
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.070.295 (01)Conflict and Security in a Global WorldT 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PMDegani, MichaelGilman 50
Mergenthaler 426
INST-IR
AS.070.295 (02)Conflict and Security in a Global WorldT 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PMDegani, MichaelGilman 50
Gilman 377
INST-IR
AS.070.332 (01)Reverberations Of The Korean WarW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHan, ClaraGilman 134
 
INST-CP
AS.070.342 (01)Common Ground: Shared Resources, Social EconomiesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMProcupez, Valeria 
 
INST-ECON
AS.100.102 (01)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHackerman B 17
Gilman 277
HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (02)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHackerman B 17
Gilman 77
HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (03)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHackerman B 17
Greenhouse 113
HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (04)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle MHackerman B 17
Gilman 77
HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.115 (01)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLurtz, CaseyVirtual Online
Gilman 132
HIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (02)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLurtz, CaseyVirtual Online
Gilman 55
HIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (03)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLurtz, CaseyVirtual Online
Ames 234
HIST-LATAM
AS.100.115 (04)Modern Latin AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMLurtz, CaseyVirtual Online
Maryland 202
HIST-LATAM
AS.100.123 (01)Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, InnovationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMThornberry, ElizabethGilman 132
 
HIST-AFRICA, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.137 (01)Magicians, Mystics, and Spiritualists of the 16th and 17th CenturiesMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszBloomberg 178
 
HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.216 (01)Reformation and Counter Reformation EuropeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHinchliff, Catherine MBloomberg 276
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.224 (01)Slavery in the Americas and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, 1450-1890MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKrichtal, AlexeyMaryland 201
 
HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.233 (01)History of Modern GermanyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 50
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-GERM
AS.100.246 (01)Iberia in Asia: Early Modern Encounters and ExchangesMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMGalasi, FrancisKrieger 306
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.311 (01)The Qing Empire and its Global ContextTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWu, Man-Chu 
 
HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.337 (01)American Foreign Policy, 1914-2016MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDelehanty, Sean TGilman 413
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 132
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.360 (01)The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the presentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHindmarch-Watson, KatieSmokler Center 213
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.404 (01)John LockeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 400
 
INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.413 (01)London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital cityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John WMaryland 104
 
INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography of Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William TSmokler Center 301
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.497 (01)The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing BacklashW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElizabethGilman 17
 
HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center Library
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.140.312 (01)The Politics of Science in AmericaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert HGilman 300
 
INST-AP
AS.140.328 (01)Science and Technology in Slave RegimesM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKargon, Robert H, Portuondo, Maria MGilman 300
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.339 (01)Science & Technology in the Development of Modern Latin AmericaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMAlsina, Marc JosephShaffer 202
 
INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Bloomberg 178
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Maryland 104
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Maryland 202
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Maryland 217
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (05)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Hackerman 320
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (06)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Maryland 217
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (07)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Maryland 104
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (09)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Ames 320
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (10)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Latrobe 120
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (12)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Maryland 114
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (13)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Shaffer 202
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (15)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Croft Hall B32
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (16)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Shaffer 302
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (18)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PMBarbera, RobertVirtual Online
Gilman 186
GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 5:00PM - 5:50PMStaffVirtual Online
Hodson 316
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMStaffVirtual Online
Hodson 316
AS.180.214 (01)The Economic Experience of the BRIC CountriesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDasgupta, Somasree 
 
INST-ECON, INST-CP
AS.180.217 (01)Game Theory in Social SciencesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMChen, YingHodson 210
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.221 (01)The Informal Economy: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why We Care About It.TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraGilman 75
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.229 (01)Economics of Health and Education in South AsiaTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStaff 
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.238 (01)Rethinking Economics After the Great RecessionTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNorris, FloydKrieger 308
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.261 (01)Monetary AnalysisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, Ludmila 
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.261 (02)Monetary AnalysisTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, Ludmila 
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.266 (01)Financial Markets and InstitutionsW 3:00PM - 5:30PMFeinman, JoshuaShaffer 302
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.289 (01)Economics of HealthM 3:30PM - 5:50PMBishai, David M 
 
INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.180.303 (01)Topics in International Macroeconomics and FinanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJeanne, OlivierHodson 303
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.338 (01)Political Economy and DevelopmentW 3:00PM - 5:30PMCampante, Filipe RShaffer 304
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.349 (01)Economics of Race, Gender and CultureT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHwang, YujungLatrobe 120
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.351 (01)Labor EconomicsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
 
INST-ECON
AS.180.355 (01)Economics of Poverty/InequalityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMoffitt, Robert ACroft Hall B32
 
SPOL-UL, INST-ECON
AS.190.101 (01)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Krieger 304
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (02)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Krieger 308
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (03)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Hodson 305
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (04)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Hodson 203
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (05)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Krieger 308
INST-AP
AS.190.101 (06)Introduction to American PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSheingate, AdamVirtual Online
Maryland 202
INST-AP
AS.190.108 (01)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Bloomberg 178
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (02)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Krieger 306
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (03)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Krieger 308
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (04)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Maryland 202
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (05)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Krieger 304
POLI-IR
AS.190.108 (06)Contemporary International PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PMDavid, Steven RVirtual Online
Hodson 313
POLI-IR
AS.190.109 (01)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 308
INST-CP
AS.190.109 (02)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Hodson 313
INST-CP
AS.190.109 (03)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 302
INST-CP
AS.190.109 (04)Politics of East AsiaMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMChung, ErinVirtual Online
Krieger 306
INST-CP
AS.190.204 (01)Ancient Political ThoughtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBennett, JaneGilman 313
 
INST-PT
AS.190.255 (01)Race and Racism in International RelationsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMShilliam, RobertKrieger 308
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.264 (01)What You Need to Know About Chinese Politics (Part 1)T 1:30PM - 4:00PMMertha, Andrew C, Yasuda, John KojiroAmes 234
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.267 (01)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 4:30PM - 5:20PMChambers, Samuel AllenVirtual Online
Krieger Laverty
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (02)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChambers, Samuel AllenVirtual Online
Gilman 186
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (03)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMChambers, Samuel AllenVirtual Online
Krieger Laverty
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.267 (04)Introduction to Political EconomyMW 4:30PM - 5:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMChambers, Samuel AllenVirtual Online
Gilman 377
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.190.300 (01)Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the USW 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, VeslaHodson 216
 
INST-AP
AS.190.306 (01)Latin American Politics and Society in Comparative and Historical PrespectiveTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMazzuca, Sebastian LSmokler Center 213
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.190.315 (01)Asian American PoliticsT 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, ErinHodson 313
 
INST-AP
AS.190.324 (01)The Law of Democracy: The United States and Canada in Comparative PerspectiveTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKatz, Richard StephenKrieger 302
 
INST-CP
AS.190.333 (01)American Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, EmilyMaryland 202
 
INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.338 (01)Comparative Political BehaviorTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, Richard StephenKrieger 302
 
INST-CP
AS.190.340 (01)Black Politics IM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, LesterHodson 216
 
INST-AP
AS.190.388 (01)Race and the Politics of MemoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III.Gilman 55
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.391 (01)Imperialism and Anti-ImperialismT 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaffShaffer 2
 
POLI-PT, POLI-IR, INST-PT
AS.190.393 (01)Nonviolent Resistance in World PoliticsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaffMaryland 309
 
INST-IR
AS.190.396 (01)Capitalism and EcologyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William EHodson 316
 
INST-PT, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.406 (01)The Executive BranchM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminKrieger 180
 
INST-AP
AS.190.408 (01)Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary IssuesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchmidt, Sebastian 
 
INST-IR
AS.190.421 (01)Violence: State and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew AHodson 313
 
INST-IR
AS.190.434 (01)Does Israel Have a Future?T 1:30PM - 4:00PMDavid, Steven RGilman 10
 
INST-CP
AS.190.443 (01)Politics of Outer SpaceW 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceHodson 211
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.454 (01)Nuclear Weapons and World PoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceHodson 211
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.191.306 (01)The Citizen and the Foreigner in South AsiaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDey, NandiniBloomberg 178
 
POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.191.308 (01)The Politics of American Imperialism: The Founding to the PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHenning, Maye LanShriver Hall 001
 
INST-AP
AS.191.316 (01)Theories of PowerTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMVrdoljak, TvrtkoGilman 186
 
POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.191.335 (01)Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)T 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertHodson 301
 
INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.191.345 (01)Russian Foreign Policy (IR)W 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, RobertKrieger 302
 
POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.192.260 (01)International Political Economy of Emerging MarketsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSteinberg, David AGilman 134
 
INST-ECON
AS.192.305 (01)Global Energy and Environment: A Political Economy ApproachT 1:30PM - 4:00PMUrpelainen, JohannesKrieger 205
 
INST-ECON, INST-IR, ENVS-MINOR, ENVS-MAJOR
AS.192.360 (01)Modern WarfareF 1:30PM - 4:00PMMalkasian, Carter AAmes 234
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraGilman 75
 
INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.194.202 (01)Never Forget: Muslims, Islamophobia, and Dissent after 9/11T 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, Homayra 
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMPomeranzev, PeterBloomberg 276
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaGilman 219
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.394 (02)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina, StaffGilman 219
 
INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.423 (01)Black ItalyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDi Bianco, LauraKrieger 170
 
MLL-ENGL, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.212.353 (02)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWuensch, AprilGilman 413
 
INST-CP
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo, Ugarelli Risi, MariangelaGilman 413
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo, Quattrociocchi, Christian PKrieger Laverty
 
GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.216.305 (01)Representations of the Other(s) in Israeli CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaHodson 311
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.217.427 (01)Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and CultureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMiguel Bedran, MarinaGilman 50
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.217.427 (02)Radical Women: Brazilian Literature, Art, and CultureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMiguel Bedran, MarinaGilman 50
Gilman 479
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLevien, MichaelHodson 211
 
INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.228 (01)Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested LegaciesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 413
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.233 (01)Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary ChinaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLiang, GuoweiHodson 305
 
AS.230.251 (01)War and State: A Social Science SurveyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMFang, ZhicaoLatrobe 107
 
AS.230.306 (01)Plagues, Power, and Social ControlT 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani ReinBloomberg 168
 
INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.326 (01)Sociology of the Military-Industrial ComplexWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMPayne, Corey RobertBloomberg 278
 
INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 300
 
INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.342 (01)Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Latin AmericaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMThornton, ChristyBloomberg 176
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.348 (01)Climate Change and SocietyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, MichaelAmes 218
 
ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 413
 
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithKrieger 308
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.385 (01)Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LAmes 234
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134
 
INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.405 (01)NeoliberalismT 1:30PM - 4:00PMHung, Ho-FungMergenthaler 526
 
INST-AP, INST-ECON
AS.300.322 (01)Lu Xun And His Times: China’s Long 20th Century And BeyondWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMHashimoto, SatoruGilman 208
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.210 (01)Documentary Photography in a Changing ChinaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoHodson 313
 
INST-CP
AS.310.305 (01)Southeast Asia and US Security StrategyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMOtt, Marvin C 
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.310.328 (01)Global Health and Human Rights: COVID-19 Case Studies from AsiaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWorden, Andrea JoanMergenthaler 266
 
INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer PHodson 303
 
HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL