Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Reading Marx
AS.070.413 (01)

This seminar offers a close reading of selected works of Karl Marx, along with supplemental secondary literature. We will explore how the central pillars of Marx’s thought--including dialectical materialism, critical political economy, and utopian socialist thought—shape his critical method in interrogating the logic of capital.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Angelini, Alessandro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/9
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Minorites in South Asia
AS.070.212 (01)

This course will introduce first-year students to the anthropology of modern South Asia from the lens of its varied minorities. We will interrogate ideas of nation, community, tradition, and belonging across the region to understand contemporary dilemmas of diversity, heterogeneity, and cultural citizenship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Asif, Ghazal Ghazal Asif
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Conflict and Security in a Global World
AS.070.295 (01)

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Conflict and Security in a Global World
AS.070.295 (03)

Students will be introduced to problems of global governance in the context of transnational conflicts, changing nature of war, new epidemics and pandemics, and the threats of planetary extinction. What are the ways security is imagined and what kinds of political passions are mobilized for security of people versus security of states.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Precarity in South Korea through TV and Film:Aesthetics and everyday life
AS.070.389 (01)

This seminar explores how precarity in South Korea gains expression in the medium of TV and film. In particular, this seminar will focus on how the moving image brings the viewer into the texture of everyday life. We will focus on the TV show Misaeng and include films such as Parasite and Burning. TV and film will be paired with readings on the transformations of intimate life in contemporary South Korea and comparative work on precarity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Han, Clara
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Anthropology of Epidemics
AS.070.425 (01)

In this course we will examine how forms of governance, politics, expert knowledge, and citizen actions are implicated in the emergence and management of epidemics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Das, Veena
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

African Cities
AS.070.241 (01)

Over the past two decades, African cities have absorbed rapid population increase without accompanying economic growth. Students will review the major challenges of this mode of urbanization and explore the vibrant ways residents have sought to meet them. Following anthropology’s commitment to lived experience, we will track these issues through the twists and turns of everyday life, and consider what they may say about urbanity more broadly in the 21st century. Topics include livelihood, the built environment, conflict and membership, and popular culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Degani, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Culture, Religion and Politics in Iran
AS.070.267 (01)

This is an introductory course for those interseted in gaining basic knowledge about contemporary Iran. The focus will be on culture and religion and the ways they in which they become interwoven into different kinds of political stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Haeri, Niloofar
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (02)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (03)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (01)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

The Medieval World
AS.100.102 (04)

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation
AS.100.123 (01)

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Thornberry, Elizabeth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/38
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA

Introduction to Modern Jewish History
AS.100.129 (01)

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US

Introduction to Modern Jewish History
AS.100.129 (02)

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US

Reformation and Counter Reformation Europe
AS.100.216 (01)

This course explores the series of religious and political conflicts that make up what are known now as the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in Europe.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hinchliff, Catherine M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

History of Modern Germany
AS.100.233 (01)

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its role within Europe from the 18th century to the ‘Refugee Crisis’ and immigration today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

American Revolution
AS.100.241 (01)

This course provides an intensive introduction to the causes, character, and consequences of the American Revolution, the colonial rebellion that produced the first republic in the Americas, and set in motion an age of democratic revolutions in the Atlantic world. A remarkable epoch in world history, the revolutionary era was of momentous significance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Philip
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

American Revolution
AS.100.241 (02)

This course provides an intensive introduction to the causes, character, and consequences of the American Revolution, the colonial rebellion that produced the first republic in the Americas, and set in motion an age of democratic revolutions in the Atlantic world. A remarkable epoch in world history, the revolutionary era was of momentous significance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Philip
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

A survey of the history of China from the late Qing era to the early People’s Republic.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Age of Tolstoy
AS.100.361 (01)

Tolstoy and his era, 1820s to 1910s. Topics include state and politics, empire, the Russian identity, and forms of cultural expression. Students consider "War and Peace" and other masterworks.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brooks, Jeffrey P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-EUROPE

Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle East
AS.100.387 (01)

Explores the daily lives of non-elites in the medieval Middle East—food; housing; clothes; marriage and divorce; urban festivals—through primary documents (e.g. letters, court records) and artifacts (e.g. clothing). Pre-requisite for enrollment: Students must have taken one history course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/24
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST, HIST-MIDEST

Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th Century
AS.100.408 (01)

We will read and analyze key works of social and critical theory produced in relation to 20th and 21st century problems of state and society, nationalism, empire, totalitarianism, genocide, capitalism, political order, gender, race, sexuality, secularism, religion, environmental catastrophe. Possible readings include Weber, Du Bois, Adorno, Arendt, Foucault, Balibar, Beck among others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moss, Kenneth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city
AS.100.413 (01)

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Women & Modern Chinese History
AS.100.424 (01)

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 7:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Old Regime and Revolutionary France
AS.100.303 (01)

Examines the history of France from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, focusing on early modern society, popular culture, absolutism, the Enlightenment, overseas empire, and the French and Haitian Revolutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Kwass, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (01)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (02)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (03)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, Th 7:30PM - 8:20PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Race, Racism and Medicine
AS.140.227 (01)

How can we think about the interconnections between racism, theories of race and the practice of medicine? Living at a moment when racial disparities in health outcomes in the United States are still very stark, this course will provide a historically grounded approach to thinking about the roles that race and racism have played in healthcare, the production of health disparities as well as the role of medicine in the development of racist thought. While much of this course will focus geographically within the United States, this class will also explore global histories of medicine, encountering questions of race and medicine in Africa, the South Pacific and Asia. In addition to the analysis of primary source documents and historical texts, students will also be introduced to theoretical approaches to the study of race and racism from W.E.B. Dubois, Sylvia Wynter, Frantz Fanon and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Science and Science Fiction in Global Perspective
AS.140.423 (01)

What can we learn from science fiction about the history of science and technology? What ideas about science do Sci-Fi novels manifest? Is the relationship between science and science fiction always the same, across different time periods and geographical areas? This course will explore these questions by taking a comparative perspective. Each meeting we will read a Sci-Fi novel from Europe, America, South and East Asia, and discuss it in conjunction with historical writing about relevant scientific developments. Reading Sci-Fi novels from 17th-century Germany, 19th-century England and India, and 20th-century Japan, China, Korea and the US, the students will explore how actual scientific developments were reflected in fiction, and what fictional depictions say about the aspirations and anxieties provoked by new technologies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Frumer, Yulia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (08)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 10:00AM - 10:50AM, WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (13)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (18)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (19)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

International Trade
AS.180.241 (01)

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/80
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, GECS-SOCSCI

Environmental Economics
AS.180.246 (01)

This course presents a broad overview of the key issues in modern environmental economics with a focus on understanding and solving urban pollution challenges in developed and developing nations. This course explores how cities and nations can achieve the "win-win" of economic growth and reduced urban pollution. Special attention is paid to the incentives of households, firms and governments in reducing the production of pollution. The course examines a number of pollution challenges including; air, water, noise, garbage and the global challenge of climate change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kahn, Matthew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/75
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Economics of Health
AS.180.289 (01)

Application of economic concepts and analysis to the health services system. Review of empirical studies of demand for health services, behavior of providers, and relationship of health services to population health levels. Discussion of current policy issues relating to financing and resource allocation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:30PM - 5:50PM
  • Instructor: Bishai, David M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/100
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Ancient Political Thought
AS.190.204 (01)

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (02)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (03)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

Politics of the Korean Diaspora
AS.190.337 (01)

This seminar explores some of the core questions in the study of citizenship, migration, and racial and ethnic politics through the lens of Korean diasporic populations in the United States, Japan, China, and the former Soviet Union. We will examine how immigration, citizenship, and minority policies have structured and constrained the relationship of Korean communities to both the receiving and sending states. As a diasporic group, is there a collective self-identification among members of Korean communities that transcends territorial, hemispheric, linguistic, and cultural differences? Or is the Korean ethnic identity more a reflection of racial and ethnic politics in the receiving society? What factors determine the assimilability of a particular group at a given historical moment?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Philosophy of Law
AS.150.355 (01)

In this course we will examine major issues in the philosophy of law, including the nature of law, the role of the Constitution in legal decisions, and the justification of punishment. No previous knowledge of law or philosophy is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Moyar, Dean
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (14)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Race, Politics and Literature
AS.190.307 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

American Constitutional Law
AS.190.333 (01)

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Zackin, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Historiography of Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

A survey of assumptions and approaches in the study of modern Chinese history, as written by Chinese, Japanese, and Western historians.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA

Race and Debt: Living on Borrowed Time
AS.190.404 (01)

This is an advanced undergraduate seminar that explores how racial stigma functions as a marker of being always already in debt. In view of the legacies of settler-colonialism, imperialism and chattel slavery, how is it that those from whom so much has been taken are nevertheless regarded as perpetually in debt? We shall examine the moral, economic and racialized logics of power through which a range of political subjects come to be regarded as ungrateful “takers” as opposed to “makers,” and owing a debt to society. In so doing, we will investigate how temporality functions as a tool of power by considering how the indebted are made vulnerable to precarity, discipline, and disposability—in effect, forced to live life on borrowed time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, Philip Joseph, III.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Free Speech and the Law in Comparative Perspective
AS.190.366 (01)

This class explores the ideas and legal doctrines that define the freedom of speech. We will examine the free speech jurisprudence of the U.S. in comparison to that of other systems, particularly the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and the Supreme Court of Canada.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Katz, Richard Stephen, Zackin, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP

Urban Politics & Policy
AS.190.384 (02)

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross-listed with Africana Studies

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/27
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing Backlash
AS.100.497 (01)

The sixties were a decade of unrest, failed revolutions, and fundamental change across Europe and the US. We will look at how these years changed the world through the lens of national case studies and community engagement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elizabeth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Health & Society in Latin America & the Caribbean
AS.140.231 (01)

Healthcare is complex in Latin America and the Caribbean, where many people supplement biomedicine with plant and diet-based remedies, as well as religious and shamanic services. This course will cover the history of health and society in Latin America and the Caribbean from 1750 to the present, covering such topics as: medicine and the Spanish inquisition; disease control and tropical medicine; the medical knowledge of enslaved and indigenous peoples; reproduction and nation-state formation; and healthcare during the Cold War and its aftermath. Throughout, we will also consider the ways in which ideas about race, gender, indigeneity, class, and disability have affected people’s access to healthcare. By the end of the course we will understand why leading scholars have referred to Latin America and the Caribbean as a “laboratory” for the production of medical knowledge. We will discover how that knowledge has been influenced by common people as well as professionals, and how it has influenced medical practice around the world. This is a discussion-based seminar course. It does not assume any previous knowledge of the history of medicine or Latin American and Caribbean history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: O'brien, Elizabeth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

National Security-Nuclear Age
AS.190.329 (01)

This course examines the impact of weapons of mass destruction on international politics with an emphasis on security issues. The first half of the course focuses on the history of nuclear weapons development during the Cold War and theories of deterrence. The second half of the class considers contemporary issues including terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missile defense and proliferation. Requirements include a midterm, final and a ten page paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Business, Finance, and Government in E. Asia
AS.190.348 (01)

Business, Finance, and Government in East Asia explores the dynamics of East Asia's economic growth (and crises) over the last fifty years. We will examine Japan's post-war development strategy, the Asian tiger economies, and China's dramatic rise. Centered on case studies of major corporations, this course examines the interplay between politics and economics in East Asia, and considers the following questions: How have businesses navigated East Asia’s complex market environment? In what ways can the state foster economic development? How has the financial system been organized to facilitate investment? What are the long-term prospects for growth in the region?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

The City Victorious: Medieval Cairo
AS.100.438 (01)

What was medieval Cairo like? Students explore urban life in this imperial capital (969-1517), including food and market habits; relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims; patronage; plague, drought, and famine. Pre-requisite for enrollment: Students must have taken two history courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Science & Technology in the Development of Modern Latin America
AS.140.339 (01)

This seminar will survey the development of science and technology in modern Latin America, and explore their dynamics in the context of cultural, political, and economic forces.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Alsina, Marc Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Economics of Poverty/Inequality
AS.180.355 (01)

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Moffitt, Robert A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/32
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL, INST-ECON

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (10)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (03)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (17)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (11)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Rich Countries, Poor Countries
AS.180.361 (01)

Why are some countries rich while some other countries poor? Why does a country’s income per person generally grow over time? We try to analyze these questions using the theoretical and empirical growth literature. We will study seminal growth models, and also try to explain cross-country income differences in terms of factors like geography, institutions and global integration. Knowledge of regression analysis (including instrumental variables estimation) is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (01)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (15)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (04)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (01)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Monetary Analysis
AS.180.261 (02)

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Parties and Elections in America
AS.190.387 (01)

Considers how parties and elections structure political conflict, and facilitate (or not) democratic control of government. Topics include campaigns, voting behavior, election administration, money in politics, presidential nomination, and party coalitions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Political Economy and Development
AS.180.338 (01)

Good governance is associated with desirable outcomes across countries and societies: higher life satisfaction, greater income per capita, lower child mortality, longer life expectancy, less disease, etc. But these statistical associations in the data are not sufficient to establish either that good governance truly causes such societal outcomes, or what types of policies produce them. This course asks: What are the determinants of good governance? Is good governance "good" beyond its intrinsic desirability? If so, how? We use a data-driven approach, focusing on quantitative empirical methods and their applications to policy. The goal is to develop skills to be savvy consumers, as well as producers, of policy-relevant evidence related to issues of governance, in rich and poor countries alike. Topics will include: democracy, corruption, conflict, culture, mass media, quotas, and foreign aid.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Campante, Filipe R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (05)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (02)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to present
AS.100.442 (01)

This course examines shifting understandings of the philosophical foundations, political implications, and social effects of the market economy since the early twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Capitalism and Ecology
AS.190.396 (01)

Capitalism and Ecology focuses on the relations between capitalism and climate during the era of the Anthropocene. How do capitalist processes of fossil extraction, consumption, production and governance contribute to the pace of climate warming, glacier flows, the ocean conveyor system, species loss and other phenomena? What are the effects and the possible modes of political response? How do the nonhuman, self-organizing processes such as glaciers, oceans and climate change on their own as they also amplify the effects of capitalist emissions? The course combines texts on capitalism and activism with those by geoscientists on how the nonhuman systems work. Books by authors in the fields of political theory, geology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and ethology will be drawn upon. Authors such as Michael Benton, Brian Fagan, Hayek, Naomi Klein, Fred Hirsch, Fred Pearce, van Dooren and Connolly are apt to be read to engage these issues. A previous course in political theory is recommended. The class is organized around student presentations on assigned readings. Two papers, 10-12 pages in length. Extensive class discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (01)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (07)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

The Informal Economy: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why We Care About It.
AS.180.221 (01)

The informal economy is one of the most complex economic and political phenomena of our time. It exists in rich and poor countries alike, currently employs almost half of the world’s workers, about 1.8 billion people, and totals to economic activity of around $10 trillion. If the informal economy were an independent nation, it would be the second-largest economy in the world, after the United States and before China. In today’s globalizing environment, are informal economies a poverty trap or an engine of growth? Do they stimulate entrepreneurship and popular empowerment, or promote exploitation? How does an improved understanding of the size and organization of informal economies affect service provision, social policy or taxation? What are the implications of the informal economy for social cohesion and popular politics? The proposed course will address these (as well as other) questions related to the informal economy to offer students an understanding of such complex phenomenon from a variety of perspectives. The course will comprise three parts. Part 1 will explore the complexities of the informal economy, and the effects of informality on policies of inclusive growth. Part 2 will draw on empirical evidence and comparative case studies to examine informal economies in various regions, including Africa, East Asia, North and South America, and Europe, highlighting variations in activities, relations with the state, global integration and economic outcomes. Finally, Part 3 will discuss the ongoing economic policy shift from punitive measures to accepting informality as a virtual space through which citizens flow from job-seeker to compliant entrepreneurs.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (06)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (09)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Topics in International Macroeconomics and Finance
AS.180.303 (01)

The course will review selected topics in international macroeconomics and finance. The topics for the Fall of 2019 include: financial globalization; international portfolio diversification; capital account liberalization and the choice of the exchange rate regime in emerging markets; the global financial safety net; macroeconomic adjustment in the euro area.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jeanne, Olivier
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Introduction to Global Studies
AS.190.111 (04)

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, Th 8:30PM - 9:20PM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (03)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (05)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (06)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (04)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Financial Markets and Institutions
AS.180.266 (01)

Understanding design and functioning of financial markets and institutions, connecting theoretical foundations and real-world applications and cases. Basic principles of asymmetric information problems, management of risk. Money, bond, and equity markets; investment banking, security brokers, and venture capital firms; structure, competition, and regulation of commercial banks. Importance of electronic technology on financial systems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wright, Jonathan H
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/38
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

U.S. Foreign Policy
AS.190.227 (04)

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR

Theory of Conversation
AS.191.309 (01)

What are the purposes of conversation, and how do we navigate these purposes? How do we excuse, justify, and explain ourselves to one another; how do we forgive each other; how do we come to agree with one another? When do we reach the conclusion that we have nothing more to say, and why? In this course, we will approach these and similar questions through the tradition of ordinary language philosophy as represented by Wittgenstein, Austin, and Cavell. We will then apply the method of ordinary language philosophy to conversations found in the plays of Beckett and Shakespeare, as well as the films of Hawks and McCarey. Students will be expected to write a short paper each week.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Higgins, Christopher James
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Violence: State and Society
AS.190.421 (01)

This course will examine violence that occurs mainly within the territory of nominally sovereign states. We will focus on violence as an object of study in its own right. For the most part, we will look at violence as a dependent variable, though in some instances it will function as an independent variable, a mechanism, or an equilibrium. We will ask why violence starts, how it “works” or fails to work, why it takes place in some locations and not others, why violence take specific forms (e.g., insurgency, terrorism, civilian victimization, etc.), what explains its magnitude (the number of victims), and what explains targeting (the type or identity of victims).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Political Violence
AS.190.412 (01)

An examination of the ways in which violence has been used to secure political ends. Topics include terrorism, assassination, genocide, coups, rebellions and war itself. Students examine what makes types of political violence unique and what unites them. (Formerly AS.190.372)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

The Cinema of Revolution
AS.300.343 (01)

This course examines global political revolutions through cinema and the ways in which cinema helped to make political revolutions. Early cinema was intimately intertwined with the Russian revolution, and Russian revolutionary cinema had a profound impact on the ways in which media was used for revolutionary purposes through the 20th century and around the world. Students will be introduced to films from a number of different countries, and the history and context of their production and reception. They will also learn methods of film analysis and produce their own video essay.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Franco-American relations
AS.211.360 (01)

Historical allies, yet rivals in trade; partners in intellectual exchange, yet baffled by each other’s culture: in this course we will examine core elements of the relationship between France & the US through the lens of diplomacy, commerce, language, food, cinema, the arts, friendship, feminism, parenting, ethnicity, health, climate change, and social justice. Students will develop and exercise critical thinking habits while working toward the learning outcome of a deeper cross-cultural understanding of France and the US. In the bigger picture, interactions between the two countries will be considered as a significant model of international relations. Course is taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wuensch, April
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-CP

Game Theory in Social Sciences
AS.180.217 (01)

Game Theory is the study of multiple person decision problems in which the well-being of a decision maker depends not only on his own actions but also on those of others. Such problems arise frequently in economics, political science, business, military science and many other areas. In this course, we will learn how to model different social situations as games and how to use solution concepts to understand players' behavior. We will consider various examples from different fields and will play several games in class. The emphasis of the class is on the conceptual analysis and applications and we will keep the level of mathematical technicalities at the minimum -- high school algebra and one term of calculus will be sufficient. Students who took AS.180.117 are not eligible to take AS.180.217.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Geopolitics
AS.190.451 (01)

Intensive exploration of theories of how geography, ecology, and technology shape political orders. Case studies of ancient, early modern, global, and contemporary topics, including European ascent, industrial revolution, tropics and North South divide, climate change, geo-engineering and global commons (oceans, atmosphere and orbital space

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

The University and Society
AS.190.471 (01)

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Korean History Through Film and Literature
AS.310.322 (01)

In this course, students will engage with select topics in Korean history from premodern and modern times and examine how the past has been represented through various forms of film and literature. This will be combined with readings of academic articles to allow students to gauge the distance between scholarship and cultural expressions of history. Through this, students will be introduced to the highly contested and often polarizing nature of Korean history and the competition surrounding historical memory. Prior coursework in East Asian Studies strongly recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 7:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern Warfare
AS.192.360 (01)

This course examines modern warfare from the Second World War to the present. It takes a broad historical perspective. Strategic decision-making, the effect of war on societies, technological change, experiences of the soldier, and different concepts of warfare will be examined. Students will be introduced to critical texts and key primary source documents. The course will start with the Second World War. It will then go on to the nuclear revolution, the Korean War, and the early Cold War. From there, the subject matter will turn to examine people’s war, focusing on Mao and the Chinese Civil War and then Vietnam. Next, the Arab-Israeli conflicts will be discussed before moving on to the new strategic environment of the post-Cold War world and the long war against “terrorism” in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and elsewhere. Finally, the course will look at recent technological change, clashes, and new players. Throughout, special attention will be paid to the non-Western view and experience of war.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Malkasian, Carter A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. The course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The course is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the economic and political development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I. Finally, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s economic and political developmental trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Representing the Holocaust
AS.211.333 (01)

How has the Holocaust been represented in literature and film? Are there special challenges posed by genocide to the traditions of visual and literary representation? Where does the Holocaust fit in to the array of concerns that the visual arts and literature express? And where do art and literature fit in to the commemoration of communal tragedy and the working through of individual trauma entailed by thinking about and representing the Holocaust? These questions will guide our consideration of a range of texts — nonfiction, novels, poetry — in Yiddish, German, English, French and other languages (including works by Primo Levi and Isaac Bashevis Singer), as well as films from French documentaries to Hollywood blockbusters (including films by Alain Resnais, Claude Lanzmann, and Steven Spielberg). All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Eduardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Made in Italy: Italian style in context
AS.211.224 (01)

Italy and the “Italian style” have become synonym of exquisite taste, class, and elegance thanks to the quality of Italian craftsmanship. This course will explore some of the major factors that contributed to the rise of Italian fashion and Italian industrial design as iconic all around the world. The classes will focus on the main protagonists and art movements that influenced the development of Italian style. We will analyze trends, clothing, and style not only in a historical context, but also through a critical apparatus that will include themes related to gender, culture, power, and politics. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required, but those who can read in Italian will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Intellectual History
AS.300.311 (01)

This course offers a conceptual and historical introduction to Intellectual History. What makes the “history of ideas” different from the history of other objects? What, if anything, distinguishes the history of ideas from the history of philosophy? What is it exactly that we call “ideas”? In what sense do they have a history? These are examples of the kind of questions addressed in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Transwar Japanese and Japanophone Literatures
AS.300.341 (01)

A survey of Japanese and Japanese- language literatures produced in Japan and its (former)colonies during the “transwar” period, or the several years before and after the end of WWII. This periodization enables us to take into account the shifting boundaries, sovereignties, and identities amid the intensification of Japanese imperialism and in the aftermath of its eventual demise. We aim to pay particular attention to voices marginalized in this political watershed, such as those of Japanese-language writers from colonial Korea and Taiwan, intra-imperial migrants, and radical critics of Japan’s “postwar” regime. Underlying our investigation is the question of whether literature can be an agent of justice when politics fails to deliver it. We will introduce secondary readings by Adorno, Arendt, Levinas, Derrida, and Scarry, among others, to help us interrogate this question. All readings are in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

The Executive Branch
AS.190.406 (01)

In the 19th Century America was noted for its courts, political parties and representative institutions. Today, America’s political parties and representative institutions have declined in importance while the institutions of the executive branch have increased in importance. This seminar will examine the nation’s key executive institutions and aspects of executive governance in the U.S. Students will alternate primary responsibility for week’s readings. Every student will prepare a 10-15 page review and critique of the books for which they are responsible in class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Politics and Society
AS.230.396 (01)

This seminar surveys key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, sources of authority, the relationship between political and economic power, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, ideology and political contention, collective identity, social movements, and social revolutions. Fulfills Comparative Politics for International Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-CP

Introduction to Police and Prisons
AS.362.115 (01)

This introductory course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of three parts. First, we will define key concepts in police and prison studies. Then, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Third, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-AP

Introduction to Korean History and Culture
AS.310.106 (01)

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history and culture from ancient times to the modern era. Through primary, secondary, and audio-visual sources, students will become familiar not only with the overall contours of the entirety of Korean history, but also with its cultural and religious legacy. The course combines lectures and class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kim, Nuri
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict Responses
AS.191.317 (01)

The slogan "No Justice, No Peace" has been uttered both as a call to arms for social unrest and as a warning that a lack of perceived justice in a society will mean lack of peace. While the demand is made in a variety of contexts ranging from urban protests in response to racial injustices to states in the aftermath of protracted civil strife or state sponsored violence, a discussion of the kind of justice that is demanded with the slogan or the kind of peace that is foreseen is often missing from the public invocations of ‘no justice, no peace.’This course aims to examine invocations of “no justice, no peace” and mechanisms employed to respond to its demands. As such, the course readings will explore conceptions of justice and peace envisioned in a variety of post-conflict contexts. Students will be encouraged to evaluate and question the conceptions of justice and peace and the shifts in their meanings overtime through an examination of primary sources such as U.N. resolutions, Security Council Meeting Notes, UNCHR reports, international NGO reports, international tribunal reports in addition to seminal texts on the concepts of justice, peace and reconciliation. Students will be encouraged to articulate the ways in which response mechanisms delivered or failed to deliver the promises of justice, peace and fugitive reconciliation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Kirmizidag, Nur
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Society in the Anthropocene
AS.230.348 (01)

If the progressive domination of nature has been the overriding ideology of modern societies, extreme weather events and now the Covid-19 pandemic have underscored the tenuousness of that domination. The pandemic has quickly put extreme stress on a variety of social institutions, realizing dystopian scenarios previously imagined by science fiction writers and apocalyptic climate change thinkers. While addressing the unfolding Covid-19 crisis, this course will place it within a broader set of concerns around climate change and what some call the Anthropocene—the era in which human activity has become the dominant influence on the Earth’s climate and environment. We will survey a range of social scientific literature—combined with journalistic and popular sources—on the social origins of ‘natural’ disasters; the ways in which social phenomenon—institutions, ideologies, poverty, inequality, racism, nationalism, anomie and politics—affect and are affected by such disasters; and the different ways in which various social factors—states, investors, social movements and sub-cultures—prepare for the coming crises of the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Russian Foreign Policy (IR)
AS.191.345 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

International Migration, Diasporas and Development
AS.192.270 (01)

International migration has emerged as one of most politically salient and contentious issues in the politics of advanced democracies. However, while the economic, political, and social impact of large immigrant inflows has prompted much debate and analysis in developed countries, the effects of emigration and diasporas on the source country are poorly understood. This seminar examines the economic and political challenges and opportunities of international migration and diasporas on countries of origin and policy options to address them. The seminar will examine a range of issues. Is the phenomenon of greater import in the current (and future) context than it has historically been and if so, why? How do selection characteristics of international migrants and reasons for leaving affect the country of origin? Why do diasporas differ in the forms of engagement with the country of origin? What explains the massive increases in financial remittances sent by immigrants to their countries of origin and what are their effects? The seminar will also examine non-pecuniary or “social” remittances, which reshape individual preferences and social norms and thereby influence economic, political, and social change. What are the human capital effects of international migration, ranging from the “brain-drain” of limited human capital to “brain-gain” effects arising from diasporic networks? How does the “long-distance” nationalism of diasporas that support more polarizing political parties and groups engaged in conflict affect international security? Finally, we will examine policies in both receiving and sending countries and how they affect outcomes in their countries as well as of migrants themselves. Are international agreements on migration feasible or will rising nationalism ensure that unilateral policies and bilateral arrangements prevail?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Kapur, Devesh
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON

The Domestic Politics of Israel
AS.191.315 (01)

Israel’s politics and history are complex, involving multiple military conflicts, domestic struggles and dynamic international relationships. This course will focus on Israel’s domestic politics by tracing the story of the development of its party system and the parties composing it. A parliamentary democracy with a proportional representation electoral system, Israel’s party system includes multiple parties who represent the various segments of Israeli society. What are the origins of this party system and the parties within it? What changes have they experienced and what are the factors that influence those changes? Who are the important actors and what might be motivating them? How have these parties influenced the development of Israel’s domestic politics? Using both historical and statistical materials, these questions and others will serve as our guide on a journey to a better understanding of Israel’s domestic politics, from its inception to the present day.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Dolinsky, Alona Olga
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, INST-CP

Capitalism, Development, and Resistance in South Korea
AS.230.229 (01)

This course examines the origins, processes, and consequences of economic development in South Korea. Attention will be paid to the rise of big business, strong state, and contentious society in the post-1945 period. The first part of the course focuses on the academic debates on Korea's economic miracle and introduces theories of late development and state formation. The second part of the course explores labor unrest and social conflicts that have emerged in response to capitalist development in twentieth and twenty-first century Korea.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kang, Minhyoung
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Demons of Democracy
AS.191.348 (01)

This course examines how a political discourse of deviancy, which produces a suspicion and a demonization of the Other, has legitimized the subsequent marginalization of specific groups from the democratic sphere. How has democracy, which promises a universal inclusivity of all its citizens, justified the historical and ongoing exclusion of certain marginalized groups from participating in political life? In this course, we will gain deeper insight into the logics of “demon-making” by turning to Black, feminist and queer critiques of democracy’s core tenets, particularly the values of inclusion, representation, and diversity. We will pay special attention to these scholars’ critiques of the Rational Man, conceived by Enlightenment thinkers to be the ideal subject of political life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Najjar, Stephanie Hanna
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Queer Theory, Western Philosophy and Identity Politics
AS.191.321 (01)

The course focuses on sympathetic links between Western philosophers and queer theory in order to illuminate contemporary understandings of (gender or sexual) identity. The course identifies three strands of queer theory each with its specific understanding of identity and, consequently, each with its specific political solution to issues of persisting structures of patriarchy, homophobia, racism and capitalist exploitation. We begin in Ancient Greece with Plato’s seminal dialogue on Eros - the Symposium, which we will use to explore ancient Greek sexuality as a set of norms, practices, and identities that differ quite significantly from their modern counterparts. Thereafter, the course proceeds in three parts, each analyzing a specific strand of queer theory inspired by different thinkers from the Western philosophical canon: 1. Queer theory inspired by psychoanalytic thought of Freud and Lacan 2. Theories of performativity inspired by Foucault and Derrida 3. Affect and assemblage theory inspired by Deleuze and Guattari.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Skerjanec, Blaz
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Race and Ethnic Politics in the United States
AS.190.437 (01)

Race has been and continues to be centrally important to American political life and development. In this course, we will engage with the major debates around racial politics in the United States, with a substantial focus on how policies and practices of citizenship, immigration law, social provision, and criminal justice policy shaped and continue to shape racial formation, group-based identities, and group position; debates around the content and meaning of political representation and the responsiveness of the political system to American minority groups; debates about how racial prejudice has shifted and its importance in understanding American political behavior; the prospects for contestation or coalitions among groups; the “struggle with difference” within groups as they deal with the interplay of race and class, citizenship status, and issues that disproportionately affect a subset of their members; and debates about how new groups and issues are reshaping the meaning and practice of race in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)
AS.191.335 (01)

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Freedman, Robert
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Politics of Outer Space
AS.190.443 (01)

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

North Korea, Identity, and International Politics
AS.191.359 (01)

This course analyzes the role of identity and foreign policy in contemporary North Korea. We begin with an overview of North Korea's political economic development and the role of national identity in state formation. We will then use those concepts to explore North Korea's relations with South Korea, China, and the United States through topics such as regime security, nuclear weapons, human rights, and social change. The course ties together academic literature, journalistic sources, and policy research with in-class activities and writing assignments. It is recommended that students have taken a survey course on International Relations (e.g., Global Security Politics, Contemporary International Politics).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Draudt, Darcie Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Panorama of German Thought
AS.211.265 (02)

This course introduces students to major figures and trends in German literature and thought from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. We will pay particular attention to the evolution of German political thought from the Protestant Reformation to the foundation of the German Federal Republic after WWII. How did the Protestant Reformation affect the understanding of the state, rights, civic institutions, and temporal authority in Germany? How did German Enlightenment thinkers conceive of ethics and politics or morality and rights? How do German writers define the nation, community, and the people or das Volk? What is the link between romanticism and nationalism? To what degree is political economy, as developed by Marx, a critical response to romanticism? How did German thinkers conceive of power and force in the wake of World Wars I and II? What are the ties that bind and rend a community in this tradition? We will consider these and related questions in this course through careful readings of selected works.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Tobias, Rochelle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/3
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Culture & Civilization
AS.211.394 (01)

The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. Section 01: 3 credits in ENGLISH Section 02: 4 credits in Portuguese (instructor’s permission required)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/32
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Gender and International Development
AS.230.324 (01)

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine the gendered impact of international development experiences and policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of how the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work political participation and social movements. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Global Social Change and Development Practicum
AS.230.325 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience in the field of global social change and development. The course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Chinese Revolutions
AS.230.175 (01)

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (02)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Urban China
AS.310.320 (01)

Urban China has gone through two major social transformations since 1949: the embrace of a central planning socialist system between early 1950s and late 70s, and the embrace of neo-liberal market economy in the so-call “socialism with Chinese characteristics” since 1980. While the political regime remains the same over time, many profound changes have occurred in economic life, social life, cultural life, spiritual life and civil life. What really happened in the social transformation of urban China? What would explain those changes? How did people in different walk of life deal with those huge and deep social transformation? To address these concerns, we will exam a list of issues. Topics includes changes in population and demographic characteristics, employment structure and job market, workplace and residential communities, income and wealth distributions, segregation impacts of urban household registration systems, urban consumption patterns, courting cultures and dressing codes, spiritual practices, and social mobility and social stratifications. In the realm of public policies, we will pay special attentions to the issues of transportation, housing, medical service, public education, social insurance, and environmental protection. We will also study the characteristics of contentious politics and how social conflicts of power, interest, justice, cultural and belief were processed in urban China.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (02)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/60
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR

Politics of India
AS.192.315 (01)

India is the world’s largest democracy and its second most populous country. This course introduces core issues in the study of modern Indian politics. The class is organized around the following topics: we trace India's journey to Independence; the consolidation of democracy in the early decades; the relationship between the state and the economy; the state’s institutional architecture; how political parties and electoral campaigns operate; the threats posed by corruption, criminality and dynastic politics; the role of caste and religion in shaping politics; the political and economic consequences of economic liberalization; elections; and the recent rise of right-wing hindutva in the country. The focus is on building knowledge and understanding of the Indian case. But we will also consider to what extent India’s experience is reflective of more general theories of politics, and how they might change because of what India can teach us. Class sessions will be interactive, with plenty of opportunity for group discussion. The reading list is diverse and draws from political science, sociology, history, and anthropology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Suryanarayan, Pavithra
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

The Russian Novel
AS.300.317 (01)

This course introduces students to the nineteenth century Russian novel and considers its lasting impact on world culture. We will read classic masterpieces of the psychological and philosophical novel, and their experimental forerunners. Short lectures on historical and cultural context and on methods of literary analysis will be combined with intensive group discussion. Novels include Anna Karenina, Crime and Punishment, Eugene Onegin, Dead Souls, and Hero of our Time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

(Making Space For) Black Thought
AS.230.304 (01)

How do we think about the power relations at work in the scholarship we read and in the important texts we consider essential to our educational experience? This course will critically investigate the role that concepts of race and racism have played in formulating dominant perceptions of who can be the producers of knowledge and what constitutes authoritative knowledge itself. We will consider how and why thinkers and scholarship produced outside of Europe and North America are too often ignored for their scholarly contributions and the dynamics that lead to this situation. We will also explore how and why new and important perspectives emerge from engaging and centering voices from beyond traditional canonical works. With a particular focus on the forms of knowledge arising from European Enlightenment approaches to concepts of thought reason and objective knowledge, this course will critically engage students with a wide range of thinkers such asGWF Hegel, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Davis, Ralph Trouillot, Sadiya Hartman, Walter Rodney, Derek Walcott, Sylvia Wynter and Frantz Fanon. This course will focus largely on thinkers engaging within the Black Atlantic and black diaspora traditions to question how we might consider voices and thought from beyond Eurocentric positions in our own scholarly practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (01)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Guillemard, Claude H
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

China, Human Rights, and U.S. Policy Responses
AS.310.302 (01)

This seminar explores select human rights issues in China (e.g., human rights impacts of the management of COVID-19, the Hong Kong protests, mass detentions/forced labor in Xinjiang province) and the extraterritorial reach of China’s human rights challenges. As a practice and policy-oriented course, we will also investigate different responses and actions taken by the U.S. government and Congress, including hearings, legislation, reports, statements, etc. Class assignments include advocacy for Chinese prisoners of conscience (each student will “adopt” one currently detained PoC), and written work that mirrors real-world writing. We’ll also have several human rights advocates and experts visit the class to share their experiences and insights. This seminar explores select human rights issues in China (e.g., human rights impacts of the management of COVID-19, the Hong Kong protests, mass detentions/forced labor in Xinjiang province) and the extraterritorial reach of China’s human rights challenges. As a practice and policy-oriented course, we will also investigate different responses and actions taken by the U.S. government and Congress, including hearings, legislation, reports, statements, etc. Class assignments include advocacy for Chinese prisoners of conscience (each student will “adopt” one currently detained PoC), and written work that mirrors real-world writing. We’ll also have several human rights advocates and experts visit the class to share their experiences and insights.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Worden, Andrea Joan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of political thought. Political thought critically considers what we think we mean when we talk about ‘the political’, reflections that often lead political theorists to examine not only various kinds of political regimes, institutions, and practices, but also to explore matters of ethics, morality, anthropology, history, and biology. This particular course will focus on classical debates about freedom, equality, authority, and justice that have been revisited and revised by feminist political theorists such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Catharine MacKinnon, bell hooks, Iris Marion Young, and Wendy Brown.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, Politics
AS.194.205 (01)

For over a thousand years, the Sufi tradition has been a dynamic force in Islamic social, political and spiritual life. The tradition offers a treasure trove of devotional literature and music, philosophical treatises, contemplative practices, and institutions of social and political organization. After unpacking the politics of the term “Sufi,” we will trace the historical development of the tradition from the early ascetics in Iraq and Syria to the age of trans-national Sufi orders, with case studies from South Asia, Turkey, and the United States. We will then move into some of the key constructs of the tradition of spiritual growth and character formation: the divine-human relationship, the stages of the spiritual path, contemplative and practical disciplines, ideas of sainthood, discipleship and ethical perfection, and the psychology of love. Throughout the class, we will explore the nature of experiential language and interrogate the tradition through the lens of gender. We will also experience Sufism through ritual and music.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST

Getting to Truth: How to Navigate Today's Media Jungle
AS.196.300 (01)

Our democratic system depends on an informed public, but media today are polarized along ideological lines, undercut by economic and technological change and sometimes polluted with bogus stories written for profit or spin. In this course, taught by a veteran journalist, we will discuss the evolution of news, examine the current challenges and assess what citizens can do to get a fair understanding of what's going on. We’ll use many concrete examples and students will have multiple writing assignments.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Shane, Scott
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Freshman seminar: Planet Amazonia: Culture, History, and the Environment
AS.211.231 (01)

Without Amazonia, global warming could reach levels that threaten life on the planet. Yet, in an era of deforestation and climate change, Amazonia itself might be on the verge of disappearance, with disastrous consequences for the world. This course proposes interdisciplinary perspectives on Amazonia through a range of works drawn from history, anthropology, archeology, environmental studies, literature, and the arts. We’ll look at texts by European travelers and missionaries who contributed to the paradoxical image of Amazonia as a “virgin paradise” or a “green hell”; scientific studies and artists’ depictions of the region’s flora and fauna; the often-overlooked history of human occupation of the region; and projects to colonize, develop, or conserve the world’s largest tropical forest. What importance does Amazonia hold for Latin American and global geopolitics? How do art and literature, including indigenous writings, create, reinforce, or deconstruct clichés about the region? What alternative futures for our planet can Amazonia help us to imagine? Minors in Latin American Studies may count the class toward the Portuguese Language and Brazilian Culture concentration.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

State and Society in Modern India
AS.230.318 (01)

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The course is devoted to understanding how each theorist understood the origin, structure, and historical dynamics of modern societies. In addition to comparing their theories, we will use them to analyze current social issues, including those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL

The Political Economy of Climate Change
AS.191.347 (01)

Scientists tell us that continued reliance on fossil fuels to drive our economies causes global warming, which in turn poses an existential threat to humanity as we know it. But the major tools of societies to steer a clean energy transition—climate and energy policies—often fail, lack ambition, and vary widely from country to country. This is puzzling: Why is it so difficult to pass meaningful policies even though the stakes are so high? How to explain the varying responses to the same problem? In this course, students study the struggle over energy and climate policies through case studies of large industrialized countries. Besides other things, we will ask why the US failed to install any kind of meaningful climate policy, if and how the problems of the EU’s carbon market can be solved, why China cancelled over 100 coal-fired power plants in 2017, and why cloudy Germany became a solar energy powerhouse.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Kupzok, Nils
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-CP, INST-ECON, INST-IR

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.070.413 (01)Reading MarxTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAngelini, Alessandro INST-PT
AS.070.212 (01)Minorites in South AsiaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAsif, Ghazal Ghazal Asif INST-CP
AS.070.295 (01)Conflict and Security in a Global WorldT 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PMDas, Veena INST-IR
AS.070.295 (03)Conflict and Security in a Global WorldT 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 12:00PM - 1:15PMDas, Veena INST-IR
AS.070.389 (01)Precarity in South Korea through TV and Film:Aesthetics and everyday lifeW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHan, Clara INST-CP
AS.070.425 (01)Anthropology of EpidemicsF 1:30PM - 4:00PMDas, Veena INST-IR
AS.070.241 (01)African CitiesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDegani, Michael INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.267 (01)Culture, Religion and Politics in IranW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHaeri, Niloofar INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.100.102 (02)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle M HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (03)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle M HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (01)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle M HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.102 (04)The Medieval WorldMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpiegel, Gabrielle M HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.123 (01)Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, InnovationTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMThornberry, Elizabeth HIST-AFRICA
AS.100.129 (01)Introduction to Modern Jewish HistoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMoss, Kenneth HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US
AS.100.129 (02)Introduction to Modern Jewish HistoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMoss, Kenneth HIST-EUROPE, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US
AS.100.216 (01)Reformation and Counter Reformation EuropeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHinchliff, Catherine M HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.233 (01)History of Modern GermanyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria Elizabeth HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.241 (01)American RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMorgan, Philip INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.241 (02)American RevolutionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMorgan, Philip INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William T INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.361 (01)Age of TolstoyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrooks, Jeffrey P INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.387 (01)Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle EastMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMEl-leithy, Tamer INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.408 (01)Theorizing the Age of Enormity: Social Theory and the History of the 20th CenturyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoss, Kenneth INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.100.413 (01)London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital cityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John W INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.424 (01)Women & Modern Chinese HistoryW 7:00PM - 9:30PMMeyer-Fong, Tobie INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.303 (01)Old Regime and Revolutionary FranceTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMKwass, Michael HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.111 (01)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (02)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR
AS.190.111 (03)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, Th 7:30PM - 8:20PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR
AS.140.227 (01)Race, Racism and MedicineTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWhite, Alexandre Ilani Rein INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.423 (01)Science and Science Fiction in Global PerspectiveT 3:00PM - 5:20PMFrumer, Yulia INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (08)Elements of MacroeconomicsM 10:00AM - 10:50AM, WF 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (13)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (18)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (19)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 1:30PM - 2:20PMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.241 (01)International TradeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDasgupta, Somasree INST-ECON, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.246 (01)Environmental EconomicsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKahn, Matthew INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.180.289 (01)Economics of HealthM 3:30PM - 5:50PMBishai, David M INST-ECON, PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.190.204 (01)Ancient Political ThoughtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBennett, Jane INST-PT
AS.190.227 (02)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSchmidt, Sebastian POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.227 (03)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMSchmidt, Sebastian POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.337 (01)Politics of the Korean DiasporaM 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, Erin INST-CP
AS.150.355 (01)Philosophy of LawM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMoyar, Dean INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.180.101 (14)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.190.307 (01)Race, Politics and LiteratureW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT
AS.190.333 (01)American Constitutional LawTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZackin, Emily INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography of Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William T INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-ASIA
AS.190.404 (01)Race and Debt: Living on Borrowed TimeT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, Philip Joseph, III. INST-PT
AS.190.366 (01)Free Speech and the Law in Comparative PerspectiveTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKatz, Richard Stephen, Zackin, Emily INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.190.384 (02)Urban Politics & PolicyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, Lester INST-AP
AS.100.497 (01)The Year 1968: Rebels, Revolutions & the Right-Wing BacklashW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria Elizabeth HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.140.231 (01)Health & Society in Latin America & the CaribbeanTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMO'brien, Elizabeth INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.329 (01)National Security-Nuclear AgeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDavid, Steven R INST-IR
AS.190.348 (01)Business, Finance, and Government in E. AsiaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMYasuda, John Kojiro INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.100.438 (01)The City Victorious: Medieval CairoT 3:00PM - 5:30PMEl-leithy, Tamer HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, David INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.140.339 (01)Science & Technology in the Development of Modern Latin AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMAlsina, Marc Joseph INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (05)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.355 (01)Economics of Poverty/InequalityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMoffitt, Robert A SPOL-UL, INST-ECON
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (10)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.190.102 (03)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.180.101 (17)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.101 (11)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.361 (01)Rich Countries, Poor CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, Somasree INST-ECON
AS.190.227 (01)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, Sebastian POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.180.101 (15)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 10:30AM - 11:20AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.190.102 (04)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.180.261 (01)Monetary AnalysisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, Ludmila INST-ECON
AS.180.261 (02)Monetary AnalysisTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, Ludmila INST-ECON
AS.190.387 (01)Parties and Elections in AmericaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchlozman, Daniel INST-AP
AS.180.338 (01)Political Economy and DevelopmentW 3:00PM - 5:30PMCampante, Filipe R INST-ECON
AS.190.102 (05)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (02)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.100.442 (01)The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to presentF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBurgin, Angus HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.190.396 (01)Capitalism and EcologyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William E INST-PT, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.102 (01)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.180.101 (07)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 10:00AM - 10:50AMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.221 (01)The Informal Economy: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why We Care About It.TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora INST-ECON
AS.190.102 (06)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, Nicolas INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.180.101 (09)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarbera, Robert GECS-SOCSCI
AS.180.303 (01)Topics in International Macroeconomics and FinanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJeanne, Olivier INST-ECON
AS.190.111 (04)Introduction to Global StudiesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, Th 8:30PM - 9:20PMMarlin-Bennett, Renee POLI-IR
AS.190.180 (03)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (05)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (06)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (04)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.180.266 (01)Financial Markets and InstitutionsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWright, Jonathan H INST-ECON
AS.190.227 (04)U.S. Foreign PolicyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMSchmidt, Sebastian POLI-IR, INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.191.309 (01)Theory of ConversationTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMHiggins, Christopher James INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.421 (01)Violence: State and SocietyF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew A INST-IR
AS.190.412 (01)Political ViolenceW 3:00PM - 5:30PMDavid, Steven R INST-IR
AS.300.343 (01)The Cinema of RevolutionT 3:00PM - 5:30PMEakin Moss, Anne INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.360 (01)Franco-American relationsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWuensch, April GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-FREN, INST-CP
AS.180.217 (01)Game Theory in Social SciencesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMChen, Ying INST-ECON
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo GRLL-SPAN, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.451 (01)GeopoliticsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel Horace POLI-PT, INST-IR, INST-PT, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.190.471 (01)The University and SocietyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin, Kargon, Robert H INST-AP
AS.310.322 (01)Korean History Through Film and LiteratureW 7:00PM - 9:30PMKim, Nuri INST-GLOBAL
AS.192.360 (01)Modern WarfareF 1:30PM - 4:00PMMalkasian, Carter A INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.192.404 (01)Democracy, Autocracy and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and MyanmarTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDore, Giovanna Maria Dora INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.211.333 (01)Representing the HolocaustW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpinner, Samuel Jacob INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGonzalez, Eduardo INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.211.224 (01)Made in Italy: Italian style in contextMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMProietti, Leonardo GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.311 (01)Introduction to Intellectual HistoryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, Paola INST-PT
AS.300.341 (01)Transwar Japanese and Japanophone LiteraturesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, Satoru INST-GLOBAL
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMPomeranzev, Peter INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.190.406 (01)The Executive BranchM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin INST-AP
AS.230.396 (01)Politics and SocietyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, Joel INST-PT, INST-CP
AS.362.115 (01)Introduction to Police and PrisonsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart Laurence INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.310.106 (01)Introduction to Korean History and CultureTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKim, Nuri INST-GLOBAL
AS.191.317 (01)No Justice, No Peace: Perspectives from Post-conflict ResponsesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMKirmizidag, Nur INST-IR
AS.230.348 (01)Society in the AnthropoceneW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, Michael ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.191.345 (01)Russian Foreign Policy (IR)W 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, Robert POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.192.270 (01)International Migration, Diasporas and DevelopmentM 4:00PM - 6:30PMKapur, Devesh INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.191.315 (01)The Domestic Politics of IsraelM 4:00PM - 6:30PMDolinsky, Alona Olga POLI-CP, INST-CP
AS.230.229 (01)Capitalism, Development, and Resistance in South KoreaTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKang, Minhyoung INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.191.348 (01)Demons of DemocracyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNajjar, Stephanie Hanna POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.191.321 (01)Queer Theory, Western Philosophy and Identity PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSkerjanec, Blaz POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.437 (01)Race and Ethnic Politics in the United StatesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, Vesla INST-AP
AS.191.335 (01)Arab-Israeli Conflict (IR)T 4:00PM - 6:30PMFreedman, Robert INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.190.443 (01)Politics of Outer SpaceT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeudney, Daniel Horace POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.191.359 (01)North Korea, Identity, and International PoliticsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDraudt, Darcie Anne INST-CP
AS.211.265 (02)Panorama of German ThoughtWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMTobias, Rochelle GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.394 (01)Brazilian Culture & CivilizationMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.230.324 (01)Gender and International DevelopmentF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, Rina INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.325 (01)Global Social Change and Development PracticumT 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, Beverly Judith 
AS.230.175 (01)Chinese RevolutionsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, Meredith INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.335 (02)Medical HumanitarianismMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.310.320 (01)Sociology of Urban ChinaM 3:00PM - 5:30PMHe, Gaochao INST-CP
AS.230.150 (02)Issues in International DevelopmentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLevien, Michael GECS-SOCSCI, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR
AS.192.315 (01)Politics of IndiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSuryanarayan, Pavithra INST-CP
AS.300.317 (01)The Russian NovelW 1:30PM - 4:00PMEakin Moss, Anne INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.304 (01)(Making Space For) Black ThoughtW 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani Rein INST-PT
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGuillemard, Claude H INST-CP
AS.310.302 (01)China, Human Rights, and U.S. Policy ResponsesTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMWorden, Andrea Joan INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCulbert, Jennifer INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.194.205 (01)Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, PoliticsM 3:00PM - 5:30PMZiad, Homayra INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.196.300 (01)Getting to Truth: How to Navigate Today's Media JungleTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMShane, Scott INST-AP
AS.211.231 (01)Freshman seminar: Planet Amazonia: Culture, History, and the EnvironmentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMiguel Bedran, Marina INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.318 (01)State and Society in Modern IndiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, Rina INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart Laurence INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer P HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.191.347 (01)The Political Economy of Climate ChangeTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMKupzok, Nils ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-CP, INST-ECON, INST-IR
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, Meredith INST-AP, SPOL-UL