Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic World
AS.010.330 (01)

Despite its modern-day association with a fringe extremist movement, the term “caliphate” was traditionally used to describe the Muslim world at large, the political and spiritual ruler of which bore the title of caliph. The original Islamic caliphate was established in the seventh century as a vast empire centered on the Middle East and extending deep into Africa, Asia, and Europe. It soon broke apart into a series of competing powers, until in the tenth century, three rival dynasties—the Baghdad-based Abbasids, the Spanish Umayyads, and the Fatimids of North Africa—each claimed to be the rightful caliphate. This course will examine how these fascinating political developments and conflicts played out in the realm of art and architecture between the seventh and thirteenth centuries. As well as palaces, mosques, and commemorative buildings, the course will look at media ranging from ceramics and metalwork to textiles and illustrated manuscripts, with many of the artifacts being viewed firsthand in local museum collections. These works will be considered in relation to such themes as patronage, audience, ceremony, and meaning. Particular attention will be paid to how the various caliphates—both in emulation of and competition with one another—used visual culture as a powerful tool to assert their legitimacy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-MED

Männer und Meister: Artistry and Masculinity in Sixteenth-Century Germany
AS.010.336 (01)

Since the publication of Giorgio Vasari’s Lives (1550), in which the history of art was first conceived as the successive accomplishment of a select group of great men, the discipline of Art History has had a gender problem. Today, feminist scholars continue to grapple with this troubled legacy, working to redress the masculinist biases inherent in disciplinary methods and assumptions while at the same time fighting to recover the value of traditionally overlooked subjects and genres. In the early 1990s, the history of masculinity emerged as an adjunct to traditional feminist history. Aimed at addressing misconceptions about the nature and naturalness of male identity, this subfield has helped open masculinity to critical reevaluation. Drawing on the contributions of contemporary feminist scholarship as well as those of the history of masculinity, this course explores the ways in which a reconsideration of the nature of male identity in the historical past might help us rethink key art historical issues, for example, paradigmatic notions of the Renaissance artist, the nature of copying and competition, and the concepts of creativity, invention, and genius. The course will focus on developments in the German speaking world in the late fifteenth and sixteenth-centuries; as numerous historians have noted, the German speaking lands underwent a crisis of masculinity during this period, in part precipitated by the events of the Protestant Reformation. At the same time, the region witnessed profound changes in the status of the arts and of the artist. In this course, we will explore the ways in which these phenomena were related, and how they contributed to culturally specific notions of the relationship between masculinity and artistry. We will also consider the ways in which a close examination of masculinity in the German Renaissance opens up new avenues of art historical and cultural historical investigation with relevance beyond the period itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Stolurow, Benjamin Isaac
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM

Art and Politics in Modern China
AS.010.373 (01)

Art has always been intertwined with politics; one can even say art is always political. In modern China, this statement is especially poignant. The relationship between art and politics has been at the core of art production in China in the past century, and a perennial preoccupation of those in power, including now. This course will therefore examine three major threads: the documents, dictums, and decrees by the artists and by the regimes concerning the nature, function, and practice of art and artists in the 20th century, for example, Mao’s famous Yan’an talk in 1942; artists’ response to and art’s participation in the important political events and historical moments, for example, the 1989 democracy movement; we will also examine the space of resistance, intervention, and alterity that art created in modern China, concerning topics of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, ecocriticism, privacy, and questions of historiography. The period we examine will begin at the end of the 19th century when artists struggled with a crumbling empire facing the onslaught of modernity, to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Liu, Yinxing
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, HART-MODERN

Renew, Reuse, Recycle: Afterlives of Architecture in the Ottoman Empire
AS.010.465 (01)

Designed from the outset to be inhabited and used, works of architecture are inherently susceptible to changes in purpose, appearance, and meaning over time. This was particularly so in the Ottoman Empire (c. 1299–1922), a multiethnic and multireligious transcontinental polity whose territories were already marked by long and eventful architectural histories. Through such case studies as the Parthenon in Athens, the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople/Istanbul, the Citadel of Cairo, and the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, this course investigates the ways in which buildings and sites have been appropriated, repurposed, transformed, and/or reconceptualized in response to changing sociopolitical and artistic conditions. Topics to be addressed include the conversion of places of worship, (re)decoration as a vehicle of ideology, and the phenomenon of spoliation—the recycling, whether for practical or symbolic reasons, of existing building materials. In addition to the monuments themselves, we will address the objects that filled them and the human activities they hosted. While our focus will be on the Ottoman context and its relationship to the past, the course will also consider comparable examples in other geographies as well as developments in the post-Ottoman era, including the current debate over the Parthenon marbles and the recent reconversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM

Global Victorians: Race, Empire, Re-Imagination
AS.060.213 (01)

The British nineteenth century was marked by rapid industrialization and increasing social inequality. It gave birth to some of the most well-known novelists and thinkers in the English language, while introducing technologies of communication and surveillance that continue to trouble us today. It was also a period of the British Empire’s overseas expansion and racial-economic empowerment, especially in Africa, East Asia, and the Mediterranean. This course surveys a wide range of literary, artistic, intellectual developments that took place across a wide geographical terrain in the British imperial nineteenth-century, as well as later imperial and post-imperial renditions of it.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie; Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL, ENGL-LEC, INST-GLOBAL

Global Victorians: Race, Empire, Re-Imagination
AS.060.213 (02)

The British nineteenth century was marked by rapid industrialization and increasing social inequality. It gave birth to some of the most well-known novelists and thinkers in the English language, while introducing technologies of communication and surveillance that continue to trouble us today. It was also a period of the British Empire’s overseas expansion and racial-economic empowerment, especially in Africa, East Asia, and the Mediterranean. This course surveys a wide range of literary, artistic, intellectual developments that took place across a wide geographical terrain in the British imperial nineteenth-century, as well as later imperial and post-imperial renditions of it.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie; Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL, ENGL-LEC, INST-GLOBAL

Global Victorians: Race, Empire, Re-Imagination
AS.060.213 (03)

The British nineteenth century was marked by rapid industrialization and increasing social inequality. It gave birth to some of the most well-known novelists and thinkers in the English language, while introducing technologies of communication and surveillance that continue to trouble us today. It was also a period of the British Empire’s overseas expansion and racial-economic empowerment, especially in Africa, East Asia, and the Mediterranean. This course surveys a wide range of literary, artistic, intellectual developments that took place across a wide geographical terrain in the British imperial nineteenth-century, as well as later imperial and post-imperial renditions of it.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie; Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL, ENGL-LEC, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to the Middle East
AS.100.118 (01)

This introductory course aims to introduce students who have no prior knowledge of the Middle East to the region. Emphasis will be placed on the history, geography, languages, religions, and culture of the pre-modern and modern Middle East. Students will also be exposed to different methods and approaches to the academic study of the region.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Noor, Rao Mohsin Ali
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (01)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Shaffer 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Chinese Cultural Revolution
AS.100.170 (02)

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. (Previously offered as AS.100.219 and AS.100.236. )

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Meyer-Fong, Tobie
  • Room: Shaffer 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Paris Noire: Black American Women in the City of Lights
AS.100.218 (01)

This class explores the construction and articulation of Black womanhood between the anglophone and francophone worlds in the 19th and 20th century. Through a study of secondary and primary sources, we will follow African American women across the Atlantic and analyze their experiences with France and the French language.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pilatte, Malaurie Jacqueline
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Islam East of the Middle East: The Interconnected Histories of Islam in Asia
AS.100.245 (01)

Challenging the conception that Islam is synonymous with the Middle East, this course considers Muslim populations across Asia and interrogates how Islam and these regions have shaped one another.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Halladay, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (01)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

The American Revolution in Unexpected Places
AS.100.250 (02)

This course considers the American Revolution from the perspective of locations beyond the thirteen rebelling colonies. Covering a range of global hotspots, the focus is on events from 1763 to 1788.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Pearsall, Sarah
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

History of Kabbalah
AS.100.256 (01)

This course is a survey of the history of Jewish magic, mysticism, and secret tradition from the Middle Ages till the 19th century. We shall explore the concept of the sod (mystery) and its historical variants. We shall read excerpts from the most important texts of Jewish esotericism, such as Sefer Yetzirah, the Bahir, and the Zohar. We shall also discuss “practical Kabbalah”, i.e. the preparation and use of amulets and charms, as well as demonic (and angelic) possession.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Maciejko, Pawel Tadeusz
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the medieval Middle East
AS.100.262 (01)

The course examines religious difference in the medieval Middle East, including everyday encounters and relations between members of different communities; the policies of some Islamic states towards non-Muslims; conversion to Islam and the Islamization of society and space.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: el-Leithy, Tamer
  • Room: Ames 320
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA

A History of Health, Healing, (Bio)Medicine, and Power in Africa
AS.100.265 (01)

This course explores how historical events and processes, such as colonialism and globalization, have shaped ideas of health, healing, medicine, and power in specific African societies since the 19th century. 100-level course in African History recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Mazzeo, Vincenza F
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

This class focuses on Europe from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss such topics as the Cold War, social democracy, the welfare state, the relationship to the US and the Soviet Union, decolonization, migration, 1989, European integration, neoliberalism, and the EU. We will discuss and analyze academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elisabeth
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

American Thought since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (01)

A survey of major developments in American philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory since 1865. Among other subjects, readings will explore modernism and anti-modernism, belief and uncertainty, science and tradition, uniformity and diversity, scarcity and surfeit, and individualism and concern for the social good.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-PT

American Thought since the Civil War
AS.100.295 (02)

A survey of major developments in American philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory since 1865. Among other subjects, readings will explore modernism and anti-modernism, belief and uncertainty, science and tradition, uniformity and diversity, scarcity and surfeit, and individualism and concern for the social good.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-PT

Old Regime and Revolutionary France
AS.100.303 (01)

Examines the history of France from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, focusing on early modern society, popular culture, absolutism, the Enlightenment, overseas empire, and the French and Haitian Revolutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kwass, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

History of China since ca. 1900.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

African Cities: Environment, Gender, and Economic Life
AS.100.372 (01)

This class explores the geographic, economic and cultural issues resulting from Africa’s urban growth from precolonial times to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Gondola, Didier Didier
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

The Cold War as Sports History
AS.100.386 (01)

This class reassesses the history of the Cold War through sports. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes at home and abroad. We will discuss how sports were used in domestic and foreign policy, and how Cold War sports reinforced or challenged notions of race, gender, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elisabeth
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA

Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)
AS.100.394 (01)

Place of contrasts, Brazil has a multi-ethnic cultural heritage challenged by social and racial inequalities. Its political life remains chaotic. We will examine these problems through Brazilian history and culture (literature, cinema).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hebrard, Jean Michel Louis
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-LATAM

The Gender Binary and American Empire
AS.100.396 (01)

This seminar explores how the sex and gender binary was produced through US colonialism since the nineteenth century. Topics include domestic settler colonialism, as well as Hawaii, the Caribbean, and Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Gill Peterson, Jules
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
AS.100.426 (01)

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/26
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE

Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of Rights
AS.100.445 (01)

This seminar-style course will focus on discussing British and American political thought from the "Age of Revolutions", a period also of many critiques of Empire and of many works of Antislavery. Readings include Paine's Common Sense and Rights of Man, the Declaration of Rights, the Constitution and Bill of Rights, the Federalist Papers; works by Smith, Burke, and Wollstonecraft; and antislavery works by Cugoano, Equiano, Rush, Wesley, and Wilberforce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/26
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Making Medieval History in 'Modern' America
AS.100.446 (01)

This course examines the emergence and practice of medieval history as a field of history in the US beginning in the nineteenth-century. We will address what the medieval past meant for the formation of the discipline of history in the US and how an imagined medieval past came to inform scholarly discourse, research approaches, methodologies, ideas about race and gender, legal and constitutional history, and the contours of nation states. The narrative of the medieval origins of states will also be addressed and questioned as it developed over the course of the 20th century. Students will do archival research in the JHU archives and in other published and unpublished source sets.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Anne
  • Room: BLC 4040
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/8
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

Historiography of Modern China
AS.100.482 (01)

How has the history of modern China been told by Chinese, Western, and Japanese historians and social thinkers, and how did this affect popular attitudes and government policies toward China?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/21
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

History of Hasidism
AS.130.352 (01)

Although it appears to be a relic of pre-modern Judaism, Hasidism is a phenomenon of the modern era of Jewish history. This course surveys the political and social history of the Hasidic movement over the course of the last three centuries. Students will also explore basic features of Hasidic culture and thought in their historical development. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

The Politics of Science in America
AS.140.312 (01)

This course examines the relations of the scientific and technical enterprise and government in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics will include the funding of research and development, public health, national defense, etc. Case studies will include the 1918 Spanish influenza epidemic, the Depression-era Science Advisory Board, the founding of the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, the institution of the President’s Science Advisor, the failure of the Superconducting Supercollider, the Hubble Space Telescope, the covid pandemic, etc.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin; Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Bloomberg 168
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Science, National Security, and Race: the US-East Asia Scientific Connections
AS.140.334 (01)

America’s scientific connections with China, its East Asian allies, and the rest of the world are heavily shaped by geopolitics nowadays. This course traces the historical root of these connections and invites you to explore the movement of knowledge and people, the omnipresence of the state and concerns about national security, and the career of Asian American students and scientists. It aims to equip you with a set of analytical tools to understand the complicated dynamics of the transnational scientific community between America and East Asian countries. As nationalism regains momentum globally, it is time to look back on history and think about how we should approach the increasingly tumultuous world!

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hu, Yize
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM

Islam and Medicine: Histories, Debates and Controversies
AS.140.387 (01)

This course will analyze how “Islam” and “medicine” interacted and intersected from the medieval and into the modern and contemporary world. We will look at the rise of Islamic medicine in the medieval and early modern period, the modernization of medicine in the Islamic world, and we will also investigate questions and challenges facing Muslim physicians and patients in the US, Europe and inside and outside the Muslim-majority world. We will address questions related to modernization of medical education in the Islamic world, colonization and decolonization, questions related to gender and sexuality, issues related to Islamic bioethics from organ transplantation and clinical death to abortion, artificial fertilization among other similar questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ragab, Ahmed
  • Room: Shaffer 2
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to the History of Modern Philosophy
AS.150.205 (01)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Connolly, Patrick
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (02)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Connolly, Patrick
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

Intro-Political Philosop
AS.150.240 (01)

This course begins by reviewing canonical texts in modern political philosophy beginning with Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and ends by exploring classic questions in contemporary debates in race, gender, and identity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Intro-Political Philosop
AS.150.240 (02)

This course begins by reviewing canonical texts in modern political philosophy beginning with Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and ends by exploring classic questions in contemporary debates in race, gender, and identity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Lebron, Christopher Joseph
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Rawls and His Critics
AS.150.460 (01)

John Rawls was the most important moral and political thinker of the 20th century. In this course we will look at his two main works, A Theory of Justice and Political Liberalism, along with some of the more influential criticisms of his ideas. Main topics will include the derivation of principles of justice, the role of the good in liberal political theory, and the nature of reasonable pluralism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bok, Hilary
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EU
AS.180.210 (01)

Increased mobility of people across national borders, whether by choice or by force, has become an integral part of the modern world. Using a comparative perspective and an applied economics approach, the course explores the economic and political determinants, and (likely) consequences of migration flows for East Asia, the US and the EU. Lectures, assignments and in class discussions, will be built around the following topics: i) migrants’ self-selection; ii) human capital investment decision-making; iii) remittance decisions and effects; iv) impacts on labor markets of both receiving and sending countries; and v) the economic benefits from immigration. Overall, the course will give students perspective on the why people choose or feel compelled to leave their countries, how receiving countries respond to migrants’ presence, and the key economic policy concerns that are influencing the shaping of immigration policy in East Asia, the US, and the EU.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

International Trade
AS.180.241 (01)

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

International Monetary Economics
AS.180.242 (01)

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crisis, the choice of exchange rate, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Environmental Economics
AS.180.246 (01)

This course presents a broad overview of the key issues in modern environmental economics with a focus on understanding and solving urban pollution challenges in developed and developing nations. This course explores how cities and nations can achieve the "win-win" of economic growth and reduced urban pollution. Special attention is paid to the incentives of households, firms and governments in reducing the production of pollution. The course examines a number of pollution challenges including; air, water, noise, garbage and the global challenge of climate change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Elliott, Jonathan Tyler
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Debt Crises and Financial Crises
AS.180.332 (01)

This course will provide students with the theoretical tools and historical context to understand financial crises and debt crises. We will review famous examples, such as the banking panics of the Great Depression and the Eurozone Sovereign Debt Crises, and use economic theory to understand how and why crises happen, as well as how policies can be designed to prevent them or mitigate their effects. Topics to be covered include banking crises, currency crises, sovereign debt crises, private debt crises, panics, and the relationships between them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Fourakis, Stelios Stephen
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN, INST-ECON

Economics of Poverty/Inequality
AS.180.355 (01)

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Rich Countries, Poor Countries
AS.180.361 (01)

Why are some countries rich while some other countries poor? Why does a country’s income per person generally grow over time? We try to analyze these questions using the theoretical and empirical growth literature. We will study seminal growth models, and also try to explain cross-country income differences in terms of factors like geography, institutions and global integration. Knowledge of regression analysis (including instrumental variables estimation) is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (01)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, PJ Joseph
  • Room: Shaffer 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (02)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, PJ Joseph
  • Room: Shaffer 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (03)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, PJ Joseph
  • Room: Shaffer 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Introduction to Political Theory
AS.190.180 (04)

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, adn the relationship between freedom, responsibility, and political judgement. Spanning texts ancient, modern, and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past impossible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom's opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, PJ Joseph
  • Room: Shaffer 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Ancient Political Thought
AS.190.204 (01)

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bennett, Jane
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, POLI-PT

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (01)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR, ENGY-SCIPOL

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (02)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR, ENGY-SCIPOL

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (03)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR, ENGY-SCIPOL

Global Security Politics
AS.190.220 (04)

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR, ENGY-SCIPOL

Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases
AS.190.308 (01)

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

The Global Color Line: American Segregation and Colonial Order
AS.190.310 (01)

At the end of the 19th century racial segregation was imagined as a more than a part of Jim Crow in the U.S. South: it was imagined as a model for global order. Theorists of imperial rule crisscrossed the Atlantic to study “race relations” in the United States to bolster projects of colonial rule in Africa and the Pacific. This course will unpack the theories of spatial, racial, and urban control that underwrote these visions of global order as well as the long-lasting material impact of these ideas on cities across the globe. Together, we will also uncover the role of Baltimore, as the first city in the United States to try and implement a law upholding residential segregation, in these international relations. Other case studies include Charleston, Chicago, and Johannesburg and topics include the politics of rioting, racial capitalism, race war, gender and sexuality, and public health.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kripp, Jacob S
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-AP

America at War in Korea
AS.190.316 (01)

This course takes a “war and society” approach to the Korean War. It explores the ways in which the war entangled the United States and Korea, shaping society and politics in the US and on the Korean peninsula. The course looks at the Korean War “in the round,” as involving culture, gender, and economy as well as military operations, diplomacy and strategy. We will consider the causes, course and consequences of the war locally and globally and we will look at literature and film as well as history and social science. Properly understanding a war requires an interdisciplinary approach. Students will come away from the course not only knowing about the Korean War but also how to approach understanding any war in all its dimensions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Barkawi, Tarak Karim
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, POLI-AP, POLI-CP, INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR

Future of American Democracy
AS.190.322 (01)

For the most part, observers of American politics have not considered the possibility that the American democratic regime might be at risk. But the unexpected election of Donald Trump in 2016 and the subsequent course of his presidency have occasioned a great deal of uncertainty and anxiety about whether democracy in the United States is at risk and whether American political institutions can withstand the stresses of contemporary politics. This course will use the Trump era to explore the conditions that seem to threaten the stability of the American regime. We will begin by exploring the political circumstances that led to Trump’s rise. We will then examine what we can learn from the experience of other countries about the conditions that make democracy either robust or fragile. Finally, we will consider how a set of contemporary political conditions in the United States — extreme partisan polarization, intense racial antagonism, growing economic inequality, and expanded executive power — contribute to the challenges facing American democracy today and in the future.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

America and the World
AS.190.331 (01)

This course is a survey of the unique position of the United States in world politics. We will cover the broader international relations literature on the dynamics of hegemony and empire, from work in the realist tradition to more critical approaches. The course will encompass security politics as well as the economic and monetary dimensions of American influence. Interested students must have at least completed one 100 or 200 level introductory course in international relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-IR

Constitutional Law
AS.190.334 (01)

Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: TerBeek, Calvin John
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, POLI-AP

Comparative Racial Politics
AS.190.355 (01)

This course surveys the major trends and approaches to the comparative study of race in political science and critically examines the link between race and politics. Topics include race and state formation, citizenship and national membership, immigration, racial regimes, and the political economy of race. Recommended Course Background: Courses in comparative politics, immigration, and racial politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Mergenthaler 366
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Chinese Politics
AS.190.370 (01)

This course is designed to help students better understand the politics of China. Lectures will focus on the tools of governance that China has employed to navigate its transition from plan to market, provide public goods and services to its citizens, and to maintain social control over a rapidly changing society. The course will draw heavily from texts covering a range of subjects including China's political economy, social and cultural developments, regime dynamics, and historical legacies. Students interested in authoritarian resilience, governance, post-communist transition, and domestic will find this course particularly instructive.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Nationalism and the Politics of Identity
AS.190.379 (01)

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kocher, Matthew A
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-CP, POLI-PT, POLI-CP

Politics Of Good & Evil
AS.190.398 (01)

The Politics of Good and Evil examines comparatively a series of classical myths and modern philosophies concerning the sources of evil, the nature of goodness and nobility, the relations of culture to politics, nature and the gods, the degree to which any metaphysic or theological faith is certain, and so on. It is a course in “elemental theory” in the sense that each text pursued challenges and disrupts others we read. Often the reader is disrupted existentially too, in ways that may spur new thought. A previous course in political theory or a theoretical course in the humanities is advised. A high tolerance for theory is essential. Texts on or by Sophocles, Job, Genesis ("J" version), Augustine, Voltaire, Nietzsche, James Baldwin, W. Connolly and Elizabeth Kolbert form the core of the class. Assignments: 1) One 12 page paper and a second 5-7 page paper, both anchored in the readings; 2) a class presentation on one text; 3) regular attendance and quality participation in class discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Connolly, William E
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/14
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH

Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Issues
AS.190.408 (01)

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty as the central organizing concept of international relations. Rather than taking it for granted as a framework that simply individuates state actors in international politics, we will explore the history of its emergence in colonial and imperial relations and trace its interactions with phenomena such as nationalism, globalization, territoriality, and intervention. The course is open to undergraduates with previous coursework in political science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
  • Room: Wyman Park N325F
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

Planetary Geopolitics
AS.190.423 (01)

With the tools of geopolitics, course explores political debates over globalization of machine civilization and changes in scope and pace, space and place, and role of nature in human affairs.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Krieger 307
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Afropessimism
AS.190.432 (01)

Afropessimism represents a critical body of thought that takes as its fundamental premises two ideas, the Black is the Slave, and in order to end that ontological condition the world must end. In this course, we will interrogate the key readings associated with this body of thought as well as responses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room: Mergenthaler 366
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-PT, INST-AP

Violence and Politics
AS.190.438 (01)

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them. Course is open to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, POLI-IR

White Supremacy
AS.190.469 (01)

This is a writing intensive, advanced undergraduate political theory seminar on racial formation. Specifically, the course examines white supremacy in politics and theory. We shall take a critical-historical approach to theorize the continuities and changes in whiteness over time. For instance, what power hierarchies and political goals has white identity been fashioned to advance historically? By studying whiteness as race---and not the absence thereof--we will take up questions of how to best understand and contest contemporary manifestations of white supremacy in environmental racism, imperialism, discourses of race war and replacement theory, and ongoing neo-colonial, biopolitical and death-dealing necropolitical projects. Building on this work, we will investigate the white disavowal of existential crises of climate change and pandemic threats within apocalyptic modes of whiteness---ways of thinking and acting where the end of white supremacy is imagined and lived as the real end of the world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brendese, PJ Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Empires of Capital: The British and American Empires in Global Historical Perspective
AS.191.318 (01)

What is the relationship between capitalism and empire in modern times? The history of capitalism and the history of imperialism are often treated as separate subjects. By contrast, this course begins with the hypothesis that modern empires were the progenitors of capitalist globalization, and that capitalism has been an international or geopolitical system from its earliest inceptions. The purpose of the course, then, is to engage students in a dual exploration of the political economy of modern empires and the geopolitical dimensions of modern capitalism, with a focus on Britain and the United States. We will draw our course readings from a diverse array of theoretical and historical sources on capitalism, empire and global political economy. The overarching aim of the course is to excavate how imperial histories can illuminate the nature of contemporary globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, David Kenneth
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON

American Leviathan: Conservative State-Building in the United States
AS.191.334 (01)

udging by institutional capabilities, modern conservative state-building is the most ambitious project ever undertaken by the American government, or perhaps any government in history. This seminar-style course will trace the emergence and unique features of this American Leviathan, encompassing the institutions dedicated to enforcement and national security as well as conservative visions of social policy. Across these different domains, we will look at how and why these programs and agencies manage to claim resources and attract unrivaled political support. From metaphorical wars waged against drugs or crime to a military-industrial complex unprecedented in its scale, we will look for patterns of conservative state-building in the presentation of mission, leadership style, and operation. Drawing on literatures and relying on insights from the disciplines of history and political science, this seminar will encourage and employ a broad analytical skill set in order to critique, and to better understand, the remarkable record amassed by the Leviathan of 20th century conservative state-building.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Frydl, Kathleen Jill
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Race and (Anti) Racism in Neoliberal America
AS.191.341 (01)

This course examines the concept of race in historical and theoretical perspective. “Race” is, as are all concepts, historically constituted, and racism has taken a variety of distinct forms since the earliest emergence of “racial orders.” We are especially concerned in this course with the forms of racism that have characterized the United States in the period since the late 1960s, when the dismantling of formally institutionalized white supremacy and the concomitant adoption of explicitly anti-racist values at the level of the official state policy immediately preceded institutional transformations typically captured under the label of “neoliberalism,” transformations characterized by explosions in wealth and income disparity as well as the slow dismantling of the post–World War II Keynesian/service/welfare state. Why, to put the question straightforwardly, does “race” remain one of the most effective principles of political organization despite anti-racism being the official ideological position of the United States and given the return of levels of inequality not seen since the Gilded Age? If there can be no politics in a capitalist society that is not a “class politics,” then what class politics does the current emphasis on racial disparities abet? Do anti-racist politics present a challenge to the political regime that has emerged since the 1960s, or is it part and parcel of the logic of expanding inequality, the same expanding inequality that continues to maintain racial disparities? This course will begin to address these and related questions by examining the historical development of black politics in the post–civil rights era, concluding with a consideration of contemporary debates regarding race and education, incarceration, and wealth distribution/reparations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Ben B
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/25
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP

Global Political Ecology: Colonialism, Capitalism, and Climate Change
AS.191.343 (01)

The ecological crisis currently underway calls into question political theories that emphasize concern with the ‘human’ above all else. Yet this is the hallmark of humanist political thought, encompassing notions of freedom, equality, property, knowledge, agency, time, and so on. This course rethinks ‘politics’ (theory and modes of action) from the more-than-human perspective of political ecology in conjunction with Black, Indigenous, feminist, and postcolonial thought. We will challenge political concepts that justify the domination of nature for human flourishing, and consequently question prevalent notions of what counts as ‘human’ and what as ‘nature’. We will situate anthropocentric politics within histories of capitalism and colonialism and explore the interconnections between human and non-human domination through such processes as ecological imperialism, racial capitalism, and environmental racism. Toward the end of the course, we will explore recent scholarship on modes of political action suitable for building alternate, just futures for all forms of life in a more-than-human world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Imran, Sheharyar
  • Room: Shriver Hall Board Room
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, POLI-PT, INST-PT, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Political Development in the Americas
AS.191.351 (01)

This course examines the development of political institutions in the American continent from a comparative and a historical perspective (19th and 20th century), addressing a series of questions, such as: why are some states in the Americas able to provide public goods while others are not? Why are some states democracies while others are dictatorships? The course seeks to situate national developments in a broader regional trajectory and identify long-term patterns of political development. Emphasis is placed on state structures, regimes, and social dynamics in the region and in particular countries within the region (Argentina, Chile, Mexico, United States). The course will also introduce students to research tools in comparative and American politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Casas, Julieta
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/19
  • PosTag(s): POLI-CP, POLI-AP, INST-CP

Revolution: Political Theory and Practice on the French Left 1789-1968
AS.191.360 (01)

What is revolution and how is it done? Who is up to the task of revolution: the nation, working class, the colonized? How do radicals learn from the mistakes of past revolutions and evaluate the possibility of revolution in their own time? In this course, we will follow a series of debates in political theory in France from forerunners to the French Revolution (Rousseau, Sieyes) through to the aftermath of May 1968 revolts (Kristeva, Badiou, Foucault). The goal of the course is to map these theoretical debates alongside historical events in French history to which these theories are in some way responses and interventions. Besides the two major historical events bookending the course, we will also chart a course through 19th Century and 20th Century developments in the theories of popular sovereignty, violence, decolonization, and revolution (looking to theorists like Blanqui, Sorel, Fanon, Beauvoir, Sartre, and Althusser among others). Beyond the particular French examples discussed in the course, we will also focus on broader questions about the relationship between political theory and history, and we will discuss a variety of approaches to making sense of theory and history alongside one another. No previous familiarity with political theory or French history is expected for this course. Readings in French history will be assigned alongside works of political theory to help contextualize the material.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Bean, Conor J
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT, INST-CP

Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social Sciences
AS.192.210 (01)

Are you planning to do a research project for your independent study class, or preparing for a grant application, or working on a big research project for a research intensive class or graduation thesis, or just wishing to improve your research skills? If so, this course is for you! Through weekly two hour sessions over ten weeks, you will receive systematic training on major research tools, resources and techniques useful for any research project in international studies, political science, and other social science subjects. By the end of the course, you will be able to come up with a viable research topic, and complete a research statement that includes an abstract, problem statement and literature review based on in-depth research utilizing tools and techniques covered in the course. The skills you learn through the course will prepare you for any future research projects and advanced studies.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Ye, Yunshan
  • Room: MSE Library ERC
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

India's Challenges and the Future of a Sixth of Humanity
AS.192.316 (01)

Since its independence, India has been the world’s second largest country and largest democracy, but a poor country as well. However, as India celebrates its 75th anniversary of independence, its population is projected to surpass China as the world’s most populous country during 2023, with a sixth of the world’s population. And while India is likely to emerge as the third largest economy by the end of this decade, riding on the back of nearly four decades of middling-to-strong economic growth, its democracy is increasingly stressed. But India faces many challenges. While some are chronic, others are growing. Many of these – political, economic and institutional – are internal and have been shaped by India’s multiple social cleavages, inequalities and policy choices. Others are more external, stemming from the geopolitics of its neighborhood or the long-term challenges of climate change. The devastation wrought by COVID has further exacerbated some of these challenges. The seminar will examine the principal challenges facing India—political and institutional; democracy and nationalism; economic growth; poverty and inequality; urbanization; natural resources and climate change; and geopolitical—and policy options to address them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Kapur, Devesh
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, Politics
AS.194.205 (01)

For over a thousand years, the Sufi tradition has been a dynamic force in Islamic social, political and spiritual life. The tradition offers a treasure trove of devotional literature and music, philosophical treatises, contemplative practices, and institutions of social and political organization. After unpacking the politics of the term “Sufi,” we will trace the historical development of the tradition from the early ascetics in Iraq and Syria to the age of trans-national Sufi orders, with case studies from South Asia, Turkey, and the United States. We will then move into some of the key constructs of the tradition of spiritual growth and character formation: the divine-human relationship, the stages of the spiritual path, contemplative and practical disciplines, ideas of sainthood, discipleship and ethical perfection, and the psychology of love. Throughout the class, we will explore the nature of experiential language and interrogate the tradition through the lens of gender. We will also experience Sufism through ritual and music.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: 3003 N. Charles OMA Lounge
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST

The Qur'an: Text and Context
AS.194.220 (01)

For 1400 years, the Qur’an has played a central role in Muslim intellectual, spiritual, artistic and ritual life. This course will explore the sacred scripture of Islam through its foundational ideas, history of the text and thematic development, literary style, history and methods of interpretation, and role in Muslim spiritual and ritual life. We will also explore how the Qur’an weaves through literature, music and the visual arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: 3003 N. Charles OMA Lounge
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

African-Americans and the Development of Islam in America
AS.194.230 (01)

Muslims have been a part of the American fabric since its inception. A key thread in that fabric has been the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants, some of whom were Muslims, and who not only added to the dynamism of the American environment, but eventually helped shape American culture, religion, and politics. The history of Islam in America is intertwined with the creation and evolution of African American identity. Contemporary Islam in America cannot be understood without this framing. This course will provide a historical lens for understanding Islam, not as an external faith to the country, but as an internal development of American religion. This course will explicate the history of early Islamic movements in the United States and the subsequent experiences of African-Americans who converted to Islam during the first half of the twentieth century. We will cover the spiritual growth of African American Muslims, their institutional presence, and their enduring impact on American culture writ large and African-American religion and culture more specifically.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Fanusie, Fatimah
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Civic Life
AS.196.201 (01)

What does it take for people to engage productively as informed, skilled, and effective members of democratic communities and the world? Whether we are scientists, doctors, engineers, advocates, public servants, or anything else, we are all members of pluralistic communities. This introductory course seeks to introduce students to the theory and principles of civic life and the rights and responsibilities of active citizenship. We’ll examine the history of and struggles for freedom, inclusion, and civic participation, the role of information, deliberation, and free expression in the public sphere, and the threats and opportunities for global democracy. Students will read and discuss materials by civic studies and democracy scholars, building a foundational understanding of civic life across disciplines and perspectives. Many of these scholars and practitioners will appear in class to discuss their work directly with students. The course will pay particular attention to the ways that students from all backgrounds can apply these ideas in their everyday lives, regardless of the professions they pursue. This course is also the first course for students interested in minoring in the SNF Agora Institute Minor on Civic Life, but is designed to inspire a commitment to participation in civic life for all students, including those who do not major or minor in related fields.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Han, Hahrie; Mason, Lily Hall
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Fighting the Information War: Democracy, Autocracy and the Battle of Narratives in the 20th and 21st Centuries
AS.196.310 (01)

Once, many believed the information revolution would undermine autocracies and energize democracies. Instead, we live in an era of unprecedented disinformation, propaganda and media manipulation. Can we reverse these developments? How do we fight back? This course will look at examples of propaganda and disinformation in the past, especially in the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, as well as the present: Russia, Latin America, Europe, and the US. We will analyze how our information environment has been transformed, and think about how to create alternatives that will help deliberative democracy flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Applebaum, Anne E; Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Made in Italy: Italian style in context
AS.211.224 (01)

Italy and the “Italian style” have become synonym of exquisite taste, class, and elegance thanks to the quality of Italian craftsmanship. This course will explore some of the major factors that contributed to the rise of Italian fashion and Italian industrial design as iconic all around the world. The classes will focus on the main protagonists and art movements that influenced the development of Italian style. We will analyze trends, clothing, and style not only in a historical context, but also through a critical apparatus that will include themes related to gender, culture, power, and politics. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required, but those who can read in Italian will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL, MLL-ITAL

The Meanings of Monuments: From the Tower of Babel to Robert E. Lee
AS.211.315 (01)

As is clear from current events and debates surrounding monuments to the Confederacy, monuments play an outsize role in the public negotiation of history and identity and the creation of communal forms of memory. We will study the traditions of monuments and monumentality around the world – including statues and buildings along with alternative forms of monumentality – from antiquity to the present day. We will examine the ways that monuments have been favored methods for the powerful to signal identity and authorize history. This course will also explore the phenomenon of “counter-monumentality”, whereby monuments are transformed and infused with new meaning. These kinds of monuments can be mediums of expression and commemoration for minority and diaspora communities and other groups outside the economic and political systems that endow and erect traditional public monuments. The first half of the course will examine the theoretical framework of monumentality, with a focus on ancient monuments from the ancient Near East (e.g., Solomon’s temple). More contemporary examples will be explored in the second half of the course through lectures and also field trips. We will view contemporary debates around monuments in America in light of the long history of monuments and in comparison with global examples of monuments and counter-monuments. All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Mandell, Alice H; Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH. Did you know that one of the first Latin American actresses to conquer Hollywood was Brazilian? Did you know that cinema has existed in Brazil since 1895, just six months after the first screening in Paris? This course is an introduction to both the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focus on the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production. Film aesthetics are analyzed through a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films, and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2022. Students wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. No Prereq.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH. Did you know that one of the first Latin American actresses to conquer Hollywood was Brazilian? Did you know that cinema has existed in Brazil since 1895, just six months after the first screening in Paris? This course is an introduction to both the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focus on the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production. Film aesthetics are analyzed through a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films, and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2022. Students wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. No Prereq.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/5
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (01)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jacob, Julia Marie Francoise; Wuensch, April
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Collecting and its Discontents
AS.214.307 (01)

This seminar will be concerned with resonances between collectors, artists, poets, and other hallowed figures of modernity, and their less celebrated doubles: hoarders, bibliomaniacs, ragpickers, and gleaners. We will examine the material practices and psychic mechanisms that define these identities and authorize distinctions between them, as well as the historical contexts from which they emerge. More broadly, we will grapple with the relationships between objects and narrative. We will ask how the human-object practices of collecting, hoarding, gleaning, scavenge, misuse, and fetishism change when performed in the immaterial realm of language, and what these practices look like as rhetorical and narrative strategies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Falkoff, Rebecca R; Saiber, Arielle
  • Room: Gilman 480
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (01)

What does it mean to traverse a name? What’s in a name? What if that name is Orpheus, one of antiquity’s most renowned poets? In this class we will try to answer these three questions. We will follow the myth of Orpheus from its origins in antiquity to the Italian Renaissance. Our aim will be to look at the ways a name and, in this case, a story is able to take on different forms as it travels through time and as it is being narrated. Through the texts of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio and Poliziano, we will compare their delivery of the myth against those of the Roman poets Virgil and Ovid. Via a close reading of each text, we will use elements inherent to the story such as love, loss, pain, dismemberment, identity, gender and sexuality to explore the concept of multiplicity within a single unity. Historical contextualization, literary theory, textual criticism and reception will serve as further tools to help us in our questioning. Ultimately, we will follow the journey of transformation of the myth to ask ourselves two final questions: is it the same story? Are we the same readers? No prior knowledge of any of the texts is necessary. The course will be taught in English with section 02 available in Italian for Italian Majors and Minors to fulfill their requirements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Avesani, Tatiana Ioanna
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (02)

What does it mean to traverse a name? What’s in a name? What if that name is Orpheus, one of antiquity’s most renowned poets? In this class we will try to answer these three questions. We will follow the myth of Orpheus from its origins in antiquity to the Italian Renaissance. Our aim will be to look at the ways a name and, in this case, a story is able to take on different forms as it travels through time and as it is being narrated. Through the texts of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio and Poliziano, we will compare their delivery of the myth against those of the Roman poets Virgil and Ovid. Via a close reading of each text, we will use elements inherent to the story such as love, loss, pain, dismemberment, identity, gender and sexuality to explore the concept of multiplicity within a single unity. Historical contextualization, literary theory, textual criticism and reception will serve as further tools to help us in our questioning. Ultimately, we will follow the journey of transformation of the myth to ask ourselves two final questions: is it the same story? Are we the same readers? No prior knowledge of any of the texts is necessary. The course will be taught in English with section 02 available in Italian for Italian Majors and Minors to fulfill their requirements.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Avesani, Tatiana Ioanna
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/4
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Rios Saavedra, Veronica
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Clarke, Rhiannon Taylor
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: A Cultural Perspective
AS.216.320 (01)

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is often construed as impenetrable to outsiders, yet, cultural production emerging from this crucible is often presented as a “window” into the history, politics, and psychology of the conflict. Rather than operating from the assumption that culture is a mirror that simply “reflects” an objective reality, this course investigates how authors, filmmakers, and artists situated in the midst of the conflict produce art that reaches far beyond the representation of historical events, extending into the domains of religion, memory, fantasies, nostalgia, perceptions of space and time, body image and gender and sexual identities. The material covered will include feature and documentary film, literature, memoir, dance, visual art, photography and theater. All material will be taught in English translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Maryland 309
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Latin American Ecocriticism
AS.217.425 (01)

Increased awareness of climate change has led to a shift in the way we address and intervene in environmental issues in the new millennium. Yet the interest in making sense of the environment has a long history in literature and the arts. How have Latin American writers and artists understood and depicted their environments and environmental questions? How do the form and content of texts and cultural artifacts influence our understanding of the non-human world? Can works of fiction shape ecological transformations? In this course we will discuss texts from the early colonial period to the present, including the literary works of Graciliano Ramos, Horacio Quiroga, and Clarice Lispector; political ecology; film; Ana Mendieta’s earth-body art; contemporary experiments in bio-art; postcolonial theory; and the intersection of environmental justice with such topics as nationalism and human rights. Going beyond ecocriticism’s original focus on the Anglo-American world, we will engage recent scholarship on Latin America that sheds light on the region’s cultural and geopolitical importance to the global climate, with particular attention to Brazil. This course aims to introduce students to current debates in Latin American Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene and thus contribute to an incipient but expanding field.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Bedran, Marina
  • Room: Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (02)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (03)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (04)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, MSCH-HUM

Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy Perspectives
AS.230.320 (01)

What is the function and purpose of schooling in modern society? Is education the "great equalizer" in America, or does family background mostly predict where people end up in life? What can we do to improve educational attainment? This course is designed to tackle such questions and develop the ability of students to think critically, theoretically, historically and empirically about debates in the sociology of education. The course will also cover additional topics, including: racial and economic differences in educational attainment; school segregation; the rise of for-profit education; how college matters. In addition to reading empirical studies and theoretical work, the relevance of education research for policy-making will be emphasized throughout the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course surveys the relationship between China and Chinese overseas from the mid-nineteenth century onwards. It highlights the transnational foundation of modern Chinese nationalism. It also compares the divergent formations of the Chinese question in North America and postcolonial Southeast Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Public Opinion and Democracy
AS.230.365 (01)

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and the contours of democracy in the United States, and how have these relationships changed as techniques for measuring public opinion have evolved since the early twentieth century? To consider this question, the course introduces alternative perspectives on the features of a healthy democracy, including both historical perspectives and current arguments. Interweaved with this material, the course examines how public opinion is measured and interpreted by private pollsters, survey researchers, and data journalists. Emphasis is placed on the alternative claims that opposing analysts adopt, as well as how the technologies of data collection and analysis shape the permissibility of conclusions. Students will learn to interpret public opinion patterns, which requires a brief presentation of basic concepts from survey sampling, including what to make of the polling industry’s most boring concept: margin of error.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Contemporary Social Theory
AS.230.395 (01)

What is the structure of society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced? What is the relation between social structures and our ideas about them? What are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? This course will examine how social theorists have advanced novel answers to these questions as they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20th and 21st centuries. This semester there will be a particular focus on the social theories of Antonio Gramsci, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Nancy Fraser and Stuart Hall. In addition to understanding and comparing theories, we will assess their usefulness for understanding our present conjuncture with a particular emphasis on right-wing extremism and the relationship between racism and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime Asia
AS.230.440 (01)

This seminar examines inter-regional connections and diplomacy in maritime Asia (focusing on the region around the Straits of Malacca, South and East China Seas, and the Taiwan Straits). In addition to a survey of world-system theories on Asia, the reading materials cover the maritime silk road, Chinese tribute trade system, British free-trade imperialism, American open-door policy, Japanese pan-Asianism, Cold-war diplomacy, and the Beijing-led Belt-and-Road Initiatives. The goal is to explore the prospects and limitations of examining East and Southeast Asia beyond the inter-state framework.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL

Climate Change: Science & Policy
AS.271.360 (01)

Prereq: 270.103 or permission of instructor. This course will investigate the policy and scientific debate over global warming. It will review the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change, examine the potential impacts and implications of climate change, explore our options for responding to climate change, and discuss the present political debate over global warming.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Waugh, Darryn; Zaitchik, Benjamin
  • Room: Olin 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 27/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Great Minds
AS.300.102 (01)

Introductory survey of foundational texts of modern philosophy, social and political thought, and literature. This semester will include works by Plato, René Descartes, Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Virginia Woolf, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Iris Murdoch, Cora Diamond, Judith Butler, Kwame A. Appiah, Jacques Derrida, and others. The course is taught in lectures and in seminar discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Introduction to Korean Studies
AS.310.107 (01)

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history, politics, and culture encompassing premodern, modern, and contemporary times. Through primary and secondary materials, students will learn about the formation of Korea as a complex interplay of dynastic changes, wars, colonialism, rapid modernization, migrations, and minority and diasporic politics. We will approach the study of Korea through a cultural studies perspective, paying close attention to systems of power, ideology, gender, race, and class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Reizman, Laura
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Introduction to Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies
AS.361.100 (01)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the ways of life of Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx peoples, their origins, historical legacies, and current cultural expressions. This course assumes no prior knowledge and incorporates the insights of several disciplines including anthropology, history, political science, economics, cultural studies, literary criticism, and ethnomusicology. The course seeks to comprehend the region from multiple perspectives and to provide a broad conceptual overview.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Cotler, Angelina
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Black Against Empire
AS.362.315 (01)

This course will examine the confrontation of Black social movements with imperialism in the twentieth century. How, we will ask, have key Black internationalist thinkers conceptualized and defined diaspora, capitalism, imperialism, war, and the global? What have been the effects of war and repression, as well as economic growth and globalization, on Black internationalism? Readings may include texts by W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Y. Davis, Frantz Fanon, Ashley Farmer, Claudia Jones, Robin D.G. Kelley, Claude McKay, Huey P. Newton, Walter Rodney, Malcolm X, etc. Students will complete a research paper on a topic of their own choosing related to Black internationalism in the twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP

Liberation in the African Diaspora
AS.362.318 (01)

This course explores the historical, theoretical, and political question of liberation in the African diaspora from the period of enslavement up to the current era. We will consider three major themes: enslavement, marronage, and freedom; Pan-Africanism and anti-colonialism; Black Power and national liberation. We will examine how African peoples conceptualized freedom and liberation in each period, the major organizations and intellectuals who framed them, and how popular activity developed and informed all three (ideas, organizations, and intellectuals). Some of the questions taken up include: How did enslaved Africans conceptualize freedom? Did their ideas and activities merely extend western notions of liberty and freedom, or did they develop distinct conceptions of freedom, rights, and humanity? Why, in the early Twentieth Century, did African peoples around the world pursue pan-Africanism as a political philosophy? How do class, nationality, gender, and sexuality inform such movements? Did national liberation struggles from the 1950s through the 1970s in Africa and the Caribbean bring about fundamental changes to those societies or merely replicate colonial regimes? What connections existed between national liberation movements in Africa and the Caribbean, and Civil Rights and Black Power in the United States and England?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Makalani, Minkah
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 28/35
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Unlocking Knowledge: Theorizing Prison from the Inside
AS.362.335 (01)

What can we learn about mass incarceration, and social life in the USA more broadly, when we listen to incarcerated people themselves? This course centers the voices, experiences, and expertise of the incarcerated and will combine scholarly readings on life inside prisons with a range of writings by incarcerated people. Topics of discussion may include censorship, rehabilitation, Covid-19, solitary confinement, sexuality, racism, etc. Students will learn to probe primary-source collections to amplify silenced and overlooked voices, while completing a multi-stage research project. Prior course experience on mass incarceration preferred.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Furnas, Heather; Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Making Modern Gender
AS.363.341 (01)

Gender as we know it is not timeless. Today, gender roles and the assumption that there are only two genders are contested and debated. With the binary gender system thus perhaps nearing its end, we might wonder if it had a beginning. In fact, the idea that there are two sexes and that they not only assume different roles in society but also exhibit different character traits, has emerged historically around 1800. Early German Romanticism played a seminal role in the making of modern gender and modern sexuality. For the first time, woman was considered not a lesser version of man, but a different being with a value of her own. The idea of gender complementation emerged, and this idea, in turn, imposed heterosexuality more forcefully than ever. In this course, we will trace the history of anatomy and explore the role of literature and the other arts in the making and unmaking of gender.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harmon, Brad G; Pahl, Katrin
  • Room: Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.330 (01)Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRustem, UnverGilman 177INST-GLOBAL, HART-MED
AS.010.336 (01)Männer und Meister: Artistry and Masculinity in Sixteenth-Century GermanyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMStolurow, Benjamin IsaacGilman 177INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM
AS.010.373 (01)Art and Politics in Modern ChinaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLiu, YinxingGilman 177INST-CP, HART-MODERN
AS.010.465 (01)Renew, Reuse, Recycle: Afterlives of Architecture in the Ottoman EmpireTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverLatrobe 120INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM
AS.060.213 (01)Global Victorians: Race, Empire, Re-ImaginationMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJackson, Jeanne-Marie; Rosenthal, Jesse KarlShaffer 304ENGL-GLOBAL, ENGL-LEC, INST-GLOBAL
AS.060.213 (02)Global Victorians: Race, Empire, Re-ImaginationMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJackson, Jeanne-Marie; Rosenthal, Jesse KarlShaffer 304ENGL-GLOBAL, ENGL-LEC, INST-GLOBAL
AS.060.213 (03)Global Victorians: Race, Empire, Re-ImaginationMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJackson, Jeanne-Marie; Rosenthal, Jesse KarlShaffer 304ENGL-GLOBAL, ENGL-LEC, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.118 (01)Introduction to the Middle EastTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNoor, Rao Mohsin AliHodson 316HIST-MIDEST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.170 (01)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieShaffer 202INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.170 (02)Chinese Cultural RevolutionMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMMeyer-Fong, TobieShaffer 202INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.218 (01)Paris Noire: Black American Women in the City of LightsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMPilatte, Malaurie JacquelineLatrobe 107HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.245 (01)Islam East of the Middle East: The Interconnected Histories of Islam in AsiaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHalladay, AndrewGilman 219INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST
AS.100.250 (01)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPearsall, SarahHodson 203HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.250 (02)The American Revolution in Unexpected PlacesMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMPearsall, SarahHodson 203HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.256 (01)History of KabbalahM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMaciejko, Pawel TadeuszGilman 308HIST-MIDEST, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.262 (01)Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the medieval Middle EastMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMel-Leithy, TamerAmes 320INST-GLOBAL, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.265 (01)A History of Health, Healing, (Bio)Medicine, and Power in AfricaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMMazzeo, Vincenza FAmes 218HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarms, Victoria ElisabethHodson 210HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.295 (01)American Thought since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 119HIST-US, INST-PT
AS.100.295 (02)American Thought since the Civil WarMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBurgin, AngusGilman 119HIST-US, INST-PT
AS.100.303 (01)Old Regime and Revolutionary FranceTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKwass, MichaelGilman 217INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 17INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.372 (01)African Cities: Environment, Gender, and Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMGondola, Didier DidierGilman 377HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.386 (01)The Cold War as Sports HistoryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElisabethKrieger 300HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.394 (01)Brazilian Paradoxes: Slavery, Race, and Inequality in Brazil (from a Portuguese Colony to the World’s 8th Largest Economy)TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHebrard, Jean Michel LouisGilman 277INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, HIST-LATAM
AS.100.396 (01)The Gender Binary and American EmpireTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMGill Peterson, JulesGilman 10HIST-LATAM, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.426 (01)Popular Culture in Early Modern EuropeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarshall, John WGilman 308INST-GLOBAL, HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.445 (01)Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of RightsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John WKrieger 304HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.100.446 (01)Making Medieval History in 'Modern' AmericaT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLester, AnneBLC 4040HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.482 (01)Historiography of Modern ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRowe, William THodson 313INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center 213NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.130.352 (01)History of HasidismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKatz, DavidSmokler Center 213INST-GLOBAL
AS.140.312 (01)The Politics of Science in AmericaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin; Kargon, Robert HBloomberg 168INST-AP
AS.140.334 (01)Science, National Security, and Race: the US-East Asia Scientific ConnectionsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHu, YizeShriver Hall 001INST-IR, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM
AS.140.387 (01)Islam and Medicine: Histories, Debates and ControversiesW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRagab, AhmedShaffer 2INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.205 (01)Introduction to the History of Modern PhilosophyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMConnolly, PatrickGilman 17PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.205 (02)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMConnolly, PatrickGilman 17PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.150.240 (01)Intro-Political PhilosopMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMLebron, Christopher JosephGilman 55PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.240 (02)Intro-Political PhilosopMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMLebron, Christopher JosephGilman 55PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.460 (01)Rawls and His CriticsF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBok, HilaryGilman 288INST-PT, PHIL-ETHICS
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 4:30PM - 5:20PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenOlin 305
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenOlin 305
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PMSeshie-Nasser, HellenOlin 305
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMSeshie-Nasser, HellenOlin 305
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 110
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 110
AS.180.102 (03)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, Th 4:00PM - 4:50PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 110
AS.180.102 (04)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 110
AS.180.102 (05)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 110
AS.180.210 (01)Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EUT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraHodson 216INST-ECON
AS.180.241 (01)International TradeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHodson 213INST-ECON
AS.180.242 (01)International Monetary EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, LudmilaAmes 218INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.246 (01)Environmental EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMElliott, Jonathan TylerHodson 311INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.180.332 (01)Debt Crises and Financial CrisesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMFourakis, Stelios StephenAmes 218ECON-FINMIN, INST-ECON
AS.180.355 (01)Economics of Poverty/InequalityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 216INST-ECON
AS.180.361 (01)Rich Countries, Poor CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHodson 305INST-ECON
AS.190.180 (01)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMBrendese, PJ JosephShaffer 301INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (02)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMBrendese, PJ JosephShaffer 301INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (03)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBrendese, PJ JosephShaffer 301INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.180 (04)Introduction to Political TheoryMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMBrendese, PJ JosephShaffer 301INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.204 (01)Ancient Political ThoughtTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBennett, JaneKrieger 170INST-PT, POLI-PT
AS.190.220 (01)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceHodson 110INST-IR, POLI-IR, ENGY-SCIPOL
AS.190.220 (02)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceHodson 110INST-IR, POLI-IR, ENGY-SCIPOL
AS.190.220 (03)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceHodson 110INST-IR, POLI-IR, ENGY-SCIPOL
AS.190.220 (04)Global Security PoliticsMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceHodson 110INST-IR, POLI-IR, ENGY-SCIPOL
AS.190.308 (01)Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and CasesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMazzuca, Sebastian LShaffer 300INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.310 (01)The Global Color Line: American Segregation and Colonial OrderTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKripp, Jacob SBloomberg 276POLI-AP, POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-AP
AS.190.316 (01)America at War in KoreaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBarkawi, Tarak KarimKrieger 300POLI-IR, POLI-AP, POLI-CP, INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.190.322 (01)Future of American DemocracyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLieberman, Robert CMaryland 217INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.331 (01)America and the WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSchmidt, SebastianMaryland 202INST-AP, INST-IR
AS.190.334 (01)Constitutional LawW 3:00PM - 5:30PMTerBeek, Calvin JohnMergenthaler 252INST-AP, POLI-AP
AS.190.355 (01)Comparative Racial PoliticsT 4:00PM - 6:30PMChung, ErinMergenthaler 366INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.370 (01)Chinese PoliticsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMYasuda, John KojiroGilman 219INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.379 (01)Nationalism and the Politics of IdentityTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKocher, Matthew ABloomberg 176INST-PT, INST-CP, POLI-PT, POLI-CP
AS.190.398 (01)Politics Of Good & EvilM 1:30PM - 4:00PMConnolly, William EKrieger 180POLI-PT, INST-PT, POLI-RSCH
AS.190.408 (01)Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary IssuesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchmidt, SebastianWyman Park N325FINST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.423 (01)Planetary GeopoliticsTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceKrieger 307
AS.190.432 (01)AfropessimismT 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, LesterMergenthaler 366POLI-IR, INST-PT, INST-AP
AS.190.438 (01)Violence and PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, BenjaminShriver Hall 104INST-IR, POLI-IR
AS.190.469 (01)White SupremacyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrendese, PJ Joseph POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.191.318 (01)Empires of Capital: The British and American Empires in Global Historical PerspectiveTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMJohnson, David KennethMaryland 104POLI-IR, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.191.334 (01)American Leviathan: Conservative State-Building in the United StatesW 1:30PM - 4:00PMFrydl, Kathleen JillKrieger 306INST-AP
AS.191.341 (01)Race and (Anti) Racism in Neoliberal AmericaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMTaylor, Ben BKrieger 302POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP
AS.191.343 (01)Global Political Ecology: Colonialism, Capitalism, and Climate ChangeTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMImran, SheharyarShriver Hall Board RoomPOLI-IR, POLI-PT, INST-PT, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.191.351 (01)Political Development in the AmericasM 1:30PM - 4:00PMCasas, JulietaMergenthaler 252POLI-CP, POLI-AP, INST-CP
AS.191.360 (01)Revolution: Political Theory and Practice on the French Left 1789-1968W 3:00PM - 5:30PMBean, Conor JGreenhouse 113POLI-PT, INST-PT, INST-CP
AS.192.210 (01)Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social SciencesW 4:00PM - 6:00PMYe, YunshanMSE Library ERC
AS.192.316 (01)India's Challenges and the Future of a Sixth of HumanityW 4:00PM - 6:30PMKapur, DeveshMergenthaler 266INST-CP
AS.194.205 (01)Islamic Mysticism: Traditions, Legacies, PoliticsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, Homayra3003 N. Charles OMA LoungeINST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.194.220 (01)The Qur'an: Text and ContextT 1:30PM - 4:00PMZiad, Homayra3003 N. Charles OMA LoungeISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.230 (01)African-Americans and the Development of Islam in AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMFanusie, FatimahLatrobe 107INST-GLOBAL
AS.196.201 (01)Introduction to Civic LifeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHan, Hahrie; Mason, Lily HallHodson 313INST-AP
AS.196.310 (01)Fighting the Information War: Democracy, Autocracy and the Battle of Narratives in the 20th and 21st CenturiesM 1:30PM - 4:00PMApplebaum, Anne E; Pomeranzev, PeterGilman 119INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.211.224 (01)Made in Italy: Italian style in contextMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMProietti, LeonardoKrieger 180INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL, MLL-ITAL
AS.211.315 (01)The Meanings of Monuments: From the Tower of Babel to Robert E. LeeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMandell, Alice H; Spinner, Samuel JacobGilman 479MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 305ARCH-ARCH, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 305ARCH-ARCH, INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJacob, Julia Marie Francoise; Wuensch, AprilGilman 313INST-CP
AS.214.307 (01)Collecting and its DiscontentsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFalkoff, Rebecca R; Saiber, ArielleGilman 480MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.214.362 (01)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMAvesani, Tatiana IoannaHodson 315INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.214.362 (02)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMAvesani, Tatiana IoannaHodson 315INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRios Saavedra, VeronicaSmokler Center 213INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMClarke, Rhiannon TaylorGilman 77INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.216.320 (01)The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: A Cultural PerspectiveM 3:00PM - 5:30PMStahl, NetaMaryland 309MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.217.425 (01)Latin American EcocriticismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBedran, MarinaCroft Hall G02INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (02)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (03)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (04)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 203INST-AP, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.320 (01)Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy PerspectivesT 3:00PM - 5:30PMDeluca, StefanieAbel Wolman House 100INST-AP
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKuo, Huei-YingSmokler Center 301INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.365 (01)Public Opinion and DemocracyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LGilman 313INST-AP
AS.230.395 (01)Contemporary Social TheoryM 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, MichaelShriver Hall 001INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.230.440 (01)Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingSmokler Center 301INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.271.360 (01)Climate Change: Science & PolicyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWaugh, Darryn; Zaitchik, BenjaminOlin 304INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.300.102 (01)Great MindsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 208INST-PT
AS.310.107 (01)Introduction to Korean StudiesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMReizman, LauraMergenthaler 266INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHe, GaochaoMergenthaler 266INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.361.100 (01)Introduction to Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx StudiesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMCotler, AngelinaMergenthaler 266HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.362.315 (01)Black Against EmpireMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceBloomberg 176INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.362.318 (01)Liberation in the African DiasporaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMakalani, MinkahHodson 203HIST-AFRICA, HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.362.335 (01)Unlocking Knowledge: Theorizing Prison from the InsideMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMFurnas, Heather; Schrader, Stuart LaurenceGilman 277INST-AP
AS.363.341 (01)Making Modern GenderMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarmon, Brad G; Pahl, KatrinCroft Hall G02INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM