Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Projecting Power: Monarchs, Movies, and the Masses
AS.010.342 (01)

Faced with the apparent intractability of British rule during much of the colonial period, Indians were often forced to look outside institutional politics in order to imagine the Indian nation and their place within it. Many turned to bazaar art, films, photographs, maps, and other media that allowed them to gesture toward ideas not permitted in state-sanctioned discourse and to circumvent hurdles of multilingualism and illiteracy. We will consider, among other topics, how and why images of precolonial Indian monarchs became standardized during this time, the ability of mass-produced religious and devotional art to link households and communities, the rise and marketability of Indian maps, the role cinema hall in building and projecting national and communal bonds, and the power of iconography featuring Indians executed by the colonial state. In prioritizing the visual realm as a space wherein the Indian nation was imagined and disseminated, this course subverts classic theories of the modern nation-state that attribute its rise to literacy and language. It also seeks, as a corollary, to move the study of Indian nationalism away from the writings of the Indian elite and toward the contributions of everyday Indians whose projects were often unwritten but were no less influential.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Halladay, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Law after Mass Violence in Latin America
AS.070.305 (01)

This course invites students to examine an idea central to theories of transitional justice: that holding perpetrators of mass violence legally accountable enables transitions from war to peace and authoritarianism to democracy. We will examine this idea by focusing on Latin America, where social movements for legal accountability and human rights prosecutions have flourished since the 1980s, influencing law and transitional justice mechanisms globally. By engaging ethnographies of transition, we will critically examine concepts such as justice, accountability, catastrophic violence, transition, and the rule of law, comparing how anthropologists and lawyers reason, formulate questions, and engage evidence.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Wherry, Anna Elisabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Anthropology of the Archive: The Cold War Politics of Knowledge Production in Asia
AS.070.358 (01)

This course will invite students to inquire into knowledge production in the context of the Cold War in Asia by exploring how our knowledge of wartime is selected, regenerated, and repressed by archives. The course will examine the dual nature of archives in documenting conflicts and serving as evidence of state violence. We will also consider how the archive may extend beyond documents to incorporate oral narratives and material artifacts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Yuna
  • Room: Mergenthaler 426
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Early Modern Europe & the Wider World
AS.100.103 (01)

This survey course examines the history of Europe from the early sixteenth to the late eighteenth centuries. Topics to be examined include the Reformations and religious wars, curiosity, contact and conquest of non-European lands, the rise of modern bureaucratic states, the emergence of popular sovereignty as a political criterion, the new science, as well as expanding literacy and consumption.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Loiselle, Ken
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/26
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Introduction to Native North America
AS.100.117 (01)

This course provides an overview of Native American History in North America. We will investigate the diverse Indigenous cultures and political systems that have called the continent home from large and historically well-documented polities such as Cherokee nation and the Haudenosaunee to the crucial yet often-overlooked role of smaller polities such as those of the Abenakis and the Petites Nations of the Gulf Coast. Along the way we will ask: how have geography (and displacement) shaped culture and politics? how have Indigenous histories shaped the history of the United States (as well as Mexico and Canada)? what are the unique challenges of studying and writing Native American History today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Grindon, Blake
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Native North America
AS.100.117 (02)

This course provides an overview of Native American History in North America. We will investigate the diverse Indigenous cultures and political systems that have called the continent home from large and historically well-documented polities such as Cherokee nation and the Haudenosaunee to the crucial yet often-overlooked role of smaller polities such as those of the Abenakis and the Petites Nations of the Gulf Coast. Along the way we will ask: how have geography (and displacement) shaped culture and politics? how have Indigenous histories shaped the history of the United States (as well as Mexico and Canada)? what are the unique challenges of studying and writing Native American History today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Grindon, Blake
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Africans and France, 1900-2024
AS.100.257 (01)

By 1900, France had conquered large parts of the African continent - mainly through violence - and gained a reputation as the least racist Western state. In 2023, the French government works to hold onto the power it still holds in multiple sub-Saharan countries while, at home and abroad, the perniciousness and persistence of French anti-African racisms spark debate and activism. This course examines the interactions between African and Afro-descendent people and France/the French, in Africa (with particular attention to North and West Africa), France, and beyond. We will focus on colonialism, decolonization, and neocolonialism - notably “Françafrique” - as well as how Africans and Afro-descendent people in France navigated the challenges and possibilities they encountered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Shepard, Todd
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Europe since 1945
AS.100.270 (01)

This class focuses on Europe from the end of World War II until today. We will discuss topics such as Germany’s division during the Cold War, the European welfare state, the relationship to the US and the Soviet Union, decolonization, the revolutions of 1989, racism, neoliberalism, and the EU. Expect academic literature, movies, documentary films, textual and visual primary sources, and plenty of group work. A special treat: we will team up with students at the University of Regensburg to research current challenges to and in the transatlantic alliance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elisabeth
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US

Conspiracy in American Politics
AS.100.274 (01)

Conspiratorial thinking is nothing new in American politics. Since the founding of the nation, Americans have been riveted—and riven—by conspiracy theories. This course introduces students to key methods and questions in U.S. history by exploring conspiratorial episodes from the American Revolution through the present. We’ll pick apart allegations and denials of conspiracies to discover what they tell us about American politics and culture. We’ll also consider historians’ analyses of conspiratorial claims, and think about the relationship between conspiracy and historical causality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Luff, Jennifer D
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, POLI-AP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP

Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-Present
AS.100.283 (01)

This course investigates sexual cultures through the lens of modern Queer History in the United States and Western Europe, with forays into global and transnational histories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hindmarch-Watson, Katherine Anne
  • Room: Krieger 307
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

The French Revolution
AS.100.310 (01)

The political, social and cultural history of events that marked a turning-point to the modern era by inaugurating and then destroying a more popular democracy than Europeans had yet known.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Mason, Laura
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

The Enlightenment
AS.100.314 (01)

Examines the Enlightenment, an intellectual movement that swept Europe in the eighteenth century to shape the modern world. Students will not only read canonical works of the period (Voltaire, Hume, Rousseau, etc.) but also consider the broader social and cultural contexts in which ideas evolved. Thus, the class will explore the rise of the book trade and popular reading practices; new understandings of gender and sexuality; and the development of anti-Black racism and slavery in the Atlantic world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kwass, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/14
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL

20th-Century China
AS.100.348 (01)

Survey of the history of China from ca. 1895 to ca. 1976.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rowe, William T
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA

Africa and the Atlantic World
AS.100.378 (01)

This upper-division course is designed to help students examine and probe the significant role Africa has played in shaping the Atlantic world and its place within its economic, social, religious, cultural, and political configurations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Gondola, Didier Didier
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-AFRICA, AFRS-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL

Sports History of the Cold War
AS.100.386 (01)

This class reassesses the history of the Cold War through sports. We will investigate how the Cold War has shaped sports, the Olympic movement, the role of athletes at home and abroad. We will discuss how sports intersected with domestic and foreign policy, and how sports reinforced or challenged notions of race, gender, and class. We will also interview eyewitnesses, former athletes in the 1960s and 1970s.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Harms, Victoria Elisabeth
  • Room: Krieger 307
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, MSCH-HUM

History of Global Development
AS.100.395 (01)

This course explores development as an ideology and a practice. From colonialism to the Cold War to contemporary NGOs, we will interrogate the history of our attempts to improve the world. This iteration of the course will have a particular focus on the intersections between development and the environment. Graduate students welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey Marina
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL

The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to present
AS.100.442 (01)

Since 1900 global markets have undergone a dramatic transformation. This course will grapple with the writings of economists and social theorists who sought to understand the implications of these changes, and in some cases helped to inspire them. Questions they addressed include: does freedom result from the absence of coercion, or does it require the provision of capacities? Do markets reward desirable behaviors, or do they produce social and environmental pathologies? Does competition occur spontaneously, or does it require careful regulation and reinforcement? And what is the relationship between innovation and inequality? Readings include selections from Max Weber, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W.E.B. DuBois, John Maynard Keynes, Friedrich Hayek, Karl Polanyi, Joseph Schumpeter, Theodor Adorno, Milton Friedman, Donna Haraway, Wendy Brown, and Thomas Piketty. Class meetings will focus on the close reading of these texts, and discussion of how and why perceptions of the market economy have changed over time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Burgin, Angus
  • Room: Gilman 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of Rights
AS.100.445 (01)

This seminar-style course will focus on discussing British and American political thought from the "Age of Revolutions", a period also of many critiques of Empire and of many works of Antislavery. Readings include Paine's Common Sense and Rights of Man, the Declaration of Rights, the Constitution and Bill of Rights, the Federalist Papers; works by Smith, Burke, and Wollstonecraft; and antislavery works by Cugoano, Equiano, Rush, Wesley, and Wilberforce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marshall, John W
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT

History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Politics of Science in America
AS.140.312 (01)

This course examines the relations of the scientific and technical enterprise and government in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics will include the funding of research and development, public health, national defense, etc. Case studies will include the 1918 Spanish influenza epidemic, the Depression-era Science Advisory Board, the founding of the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, the institution of the President’s Science Advisor, the failure of the Superconducting Supercollider, the Hubble Space Telescope, the covid pandemic, etc.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ginsberg, Benjamin; Kargon, Robert H
  • Room: Gilman 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, MSCH-HUM

Health and Healing in Early-Modern England
AS.140.382 (01)

This course explores health and society in England, 1500 to 1800 including healing practices at all levels of society, concepts of health and illness, patient experiences, and patterns of disease. Recommended Course Background: At least one course in History or History of Science, Medicine, and Technology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Fissell, Mary E
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Islamic Philosophy
AS.150.202 (01)

In the Islamic Golden Age (800-1400 CE), philosophers such as al-Farabi, Avicenna, al-Ghazali, and Averroes made enormous contributions to every aspect of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and philosophical theology. But philosophy in the Islamic world did not end with Averroes. It continued to flourish in Muslim Eastern countries, in particular Persia and India, with the works of such philosophers as Suhrawardi and Mula Sadra. In the contemporary era, drawing on their rich tradition, Muslim philosophers such as Muhammad lqbal, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, and Amina Wadud continue to tackle social, philosophical, and theological issues in the Islamic world. In this course, we will discuss the works of Muslim philosophers from the Golden Age to the present day.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Morvarid, Hashem
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Introduction to the History of Modern Philosophy
AS.150.205 (01)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Dong, Hao
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT, COGS-PHLMND

Intro Hist of Mod Philos
AS.150.205 (02)

An overview of philosophical thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. We shall focus on fundamental questions in epistemology (knowledge, how we acquire it, its scope and limits), metaphysics (the ultimate nature of reality, the relation of mind and body, free will), and theology (the existence and nature of God, God’s relation to the world, whether knowledge of such things is possible): all questions that arose in dramatic ways as a result of the rise of modern science. The principal philosophers to be discussed are Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant, though we shall also make the acquaintance of Spinoza, Leibniz and Berkeley.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Dong, Hao
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT, COGS-PHLMND

Introduction to Modern Political Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition
AS.150.240 (01)

This course begins by reviewing canonical texts in modern political philosophy beginning with Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and ends by exploring classic questions in contemporary debates in race, gender, and identity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Chaput, Emmanuel
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Introduction to Modern Political Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition
AS.150.240 (02)

This course begins by reviewing canonical texts in modern political philosophy beginning with Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and ends by exploring classic questions in contemporary debates in race, gender, and identity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Chaput, Emmanuel
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Immanuel Kant's Political Philosophy
AS.150.469 (01)

Immanuel Kant's political philosophy is primarily presented in two works very late in his corpus: Perpetual Peace and the Metaphysics of Morals. In these Kant presents an account of justice as based on the innate right of individuals to freedom, which situates his account in the history of the liberal tradition of political philosophy. But what really follows from the starting point of individual freedom? In this course we will both pay careful attention to Kant's texts, and also think about the implications of the position for contemporary concerns, as well as for how liberalism should be understood.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Allais, Lucy
  • Room: Gilman 288
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/21
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MODERN, PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT

Women Philosophers in the German tradition
AS.150.472 (01)

This course examines the works, influence, and legacy of often underappreciated and overlooked women philosophers of the German tradition in the 19th and 20th centuries. Although they were largely deprived of formal education and academic positions and excluded from academic discourse, women thinkers developed their own ways of philosophizing, of engaging in dialogue with their contemporaries, and of shaping the philosophical movements of their time. The course will focus on Lou Andreas-Salomé (1861-1937) and her engagement with the philosophy of life movement and psychoanalysis, Edith Stein (1891-1942) and her impact on the phenomenological tradition, and Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) and her lasting contribution to existential questions of human intellectual, social, and political life. The underlying theme of the course that connects these three thinkers is the life of the mind: what can we learn from each thinker about the conditions of human life, the dynamics of personal development, and the potential for emancipation?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kraus, Katharina
  • Room: Greenhouse 110
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-MIND, PHIL-MODERN, INST-PT

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (04)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (05)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Macroeconomics
AS.180.101 (06)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Barbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, Hellen
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (01)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (02)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elements of Microeconomics
AS.180.102 (03)

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EU
AS.180.210 (01)

Increased mobility of people across national borders, whether by choice or by force, has become an integral part of the modern world. Using a comparative perspective and an applied economics approach, the course explores the economic and political determinants, and (likely) consequences of migration flows for East Asia, the US and the EU. Lectures, assignments and in class discussions, will be built around the following topics: i) migrants’ self-selection; ii) human capital investment decision-making; iii) remittance decisions and effects; iv) impacts on labor markets of both receiving and sending countries; and v) the economic benefits from immigration. Overall, the course will give students perspective on the why people choose or feel compelled to leave their countries, how receiving countries respond to migrants’ presence, and the key economic policy concerns that are influencing the shaping of immigration policy in East Asia, the US, and the EU.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Economics of Transition and Institutional Change
AS.180.233 (01)

This course will introduce students to the comparative analysis of institutions of existing capitalist systems and to the historical evolution of those institutions. By comparing the economic systems of different nations, we will try to reveal the institutional setups that either contribute or hinder economic performance. We will also examine the process of countries transforming their economies and investigate the factors that determine the differences in reforms’ outcomes between countries.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

International Trade
AS.180.241 (01)

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/60
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

International Monetary Economics
AS.180.242 (01)

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crisis, the choice of exchange rate, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Poliakova, Ludmila
  • Room: Maryland 109
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN

Environmental Economics
AS.180.246 (01)

In this course we will study the role of the government in the regulation of the environment. In the first half of the course we will take a broad overview of environmental economics. We will focus on evaluating the effectiveness and trade-offs associated with various tools used to regulate the environment, covering topics related to market failures, pollution regulation, and regulation under uncertainty. In the second half of the course, we take a more applied approach and consider topics related to particular environmental issues including climate change, study the functioning of particular industries such as energy and electricity, and consider challenges to regulation such as enforcement, international borders, and unknown control costs.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Elliott, Jonathan Tyler
  • Room: Shaffer 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Debt Crises and Financial Crises
AS.180.332 (01)

This course will provide students with the theoretical tools and historical context to understand financial crises and debt crises. We will review famous examples, such as the banking panics of the Great Depression and the Eurozone Sovereign Debt Crises, and use economic theory to understand how and why crises happen, as well as how policies can be designed to prevent them or mitigate their effects. Topics to be covered include banking crises, currency crises, sovereign debt crises, private debt crises, panics, and the relationships between them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Fourakis, Stelios Stephen
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): ECON-FINMIN, INST-ECON

Economics of Poverty/Inequality
AS.180.355 (01)

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Husain, Muhammad Mudabbir
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Rich Countries, Poor Countries
AS.180.361 (01)

Why are some countries rich while some other countries poor? Why does a country’s income per person generally grow over time? We try to analyze these questions using the theoretical and empirical growth literature. We will study seminal growth models, and also try to explain cross-country income differences in terms of factors like geography, institutions and global integration. Knowledge of regression analysis (including instrumental variables estimation) is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dasgupta, Somasree
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Social Policy Implications of Behavioral Economics
AS.180.389 (01)

Economists increasingly incorporate insights from psychology into models of rational decision-making. Known as "behavioral economics", this line of research considers how, for example, emotions, rules-of-thumb, biased beliefs and time-inconsistent preferences influence how we make choices. Behavioral economics increasingly pervades policy discussions on topics as diverse as: obesity, the role of media, subprime mortgages and voting patterns. Behavioral models are certainly novel, but do they help us to design superior social policies? With the goal of preparing students to address this question, this course (1) provides a thorough overview of the main contributions of behavioral economics, highlighting departures from more traditional economic models and (2) emphasizes how behavioral economic models might (or might not) improve how we think about social policy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Papageorge, Nick W
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, BEHB-SOCSCI

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (01)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (02)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (03)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (04)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (05)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (06)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (07)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP

Introduction To Comparative Politics
AS.190.102 (08)

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Shaffer 3
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP

Power and Global Politics
AS.190.239 (01)

Global politics involves power: hard and soft power; power over, power with, and power to; resources as power; and relations and processes of power. This course will explore aspects of power as they play out in case studies of diplomacy and war, global markets, and communications networks (cyber and other information technologies). The course will also examine the nature of actors and the powers they have to act across state borders. Readings will include classic texts on power, as well as more recent works of International Relations scholarship, and class assignments will focus on using insights from these works to draw one’s own positions on foreign policy issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Marlin-Bennett, Renee E
  • Room: Krieger 307
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Labor and American Politics
AS.190.251 (01)

This course will explore working people’s political strategies from the Civil War through the present. We'll examine the shifting alliances among trade unions and political parties, and investigate mobilizations by freed people, women, immigrants, and LGBTQ workers. And we’ll pay special attention to the ways that workers’ action shaped the development of the modern American state.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Luff, Jennifer D
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, INST-AP

Liberalism, Republicanism, and Democracy in American Political Theory
AS.190.286 (01)

For 250 years, American politics and society have reflected tensions between two foundational ideals. On the one hand, the notion of republican citizenship in the Declaration of Independence has inspired notions of the common good and institutions from majoritarian democracy to jury duty and state militias. Meanwhile, the tradition of liberal protections eventually enshrined in the Bill of Rights has grown to guarantee equal treatment and more rights for more people. At times, these two principles have gone hand in hand – at others, they have pointed in two very different directions. In this class, we will explore the philosophical origins of liberalism and republicanism and trace them through historical events and cultural landmarks, from the Revolutionary War until today. In the process, we will study, interpret, and discuss the contentious history of democracy in America.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schmitz, Volker
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases
AS.190.308 (01)

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, POLI-CP

Does Israel Have a Future?
AS.190.318 (01)

The future of Israel has never been more uncertain. Although external threats from Arab countries have abated, the danger posed by a nuclear attack from Iran grows with each passing day. Equally alarming is the growing domestic threat to Israel’s existence as a Jewish democracy. Efforts by Israel’s ruling coalition to weaken the High Court call into question whether the liberal democratic character of Israel can persist. The possibility of civil war, once thought impossible, cannot be discounted. In assessing how Israel can cope with these existential threats, lessons from the destruction of the ancient Israelite kingdoms will be examined.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: David, Steven R
  • Room: Mergenthaler 366
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Business, Finance, and Government in E. Asia
AS.190.348 (01)

Business, Finance, and Government in East Asia explores the dynamics of East Asia's economic growth (and crises) over the last fifty years. We will examine Japan's post-war development strategy, the Asian tiger economies, and China's dramatic rise. Centered on case studies of major corporations, this course examines the interplay between politics and economics in East Asia, and considers the following questions: How have businesses navigated East Asia’s complex market environment? In what ways can the state foster economic development? How has the financial system been organized to facilitate investment? What are the long-term prospects for growth in the region?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Theories of Global Violence
AS.190.373 (01)

In this course, we will explore a constellation of theories loosely tied together under the rubric ‘violence’. Where and to whom does violence occur? What qualifies as violent, and why? The focus of our attention be both above and below state-to-state wars and international relations. Although war will never be far from our focus, our emphasis will be on those forms of violence that are not reducible to the traditional notion of international conflict. Political theory will help us better understand violence; violence will help us better understand political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Phillips, Chas.
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): POLI-PT, INST-PT

Urban Politics and Policy
AS.190.385 (01)

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross listed with Africana Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spence, Lester
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
AS.190.394 (01)

This course examines the domestic, regional, and transnational politics of the Middle East and North Africa. The class is organized into three units. The first examines major armed conflicts— anti-colonial, intra-state, and inter-state—from 1948 through the 1990s. It uses these historical moments as windows onto key issues in Middle Eastern and North African political issues such as external intervention/occupation, human rights, sectarianism, social movements, and memory politics. Unit Two focuses on policy relevant issues such as democratization, minority populations, religion and politics, and gender. In Unit Three, students will explore the politics of the Arab Uprisings through critical reading and discussion of new (post-2011) scholarship on MENA states, organizations, and populations. Enrollment limited to Political Science and International Studies majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Parkinson, Sarah
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

The New Deal and American Politics
AS.190.425 (01)

This seminar explores how the New Deal, the fundamental moment in the post-Civil War United States, has structured politics and government across a variety of domains ever since. Topics include presidential leadership, executive power, political parties, labor, race, and the welfare state.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Political Economy of Japan and Korea
AS.190.427 (01)

This upper-level seminar examines some of the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese and South Korean political economy. Topics include nationalism, gender politics, civil society, immigration, and US-Japan-South Korea trilateral relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Chung, Erin
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Politics of the Market Economy
AS.190.429 (01)

Although “the market” is conventionally understood as separate from “politics”, the modern market economy did not arise in a political vacuum. In fact, the very separation between the economy and politics is itself the product of a politically potent set of ideas. This course is an upper-division reading seminar on the origins and evolution of the modern market economy. Readings will include Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Becker, and Foucault. Recommended course background: Introduction to comparative politics OR any college-level course in social or political theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jabko, Nicolas
  • Room: Mergenthaler 431
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

The American State from Above and Below
AS.190.439 (01)

Despite its well-known idiosyncrasies, the American state has consistently wielded substantial power, and many Americans have long experienced the state’s power as potent, omnipresent, and structuring their lives in important ways. This research-based course will examine theories of the state and political authority both from “above” - considering the political sources of both the American state’s power and its limitations - and from “below,” using people’s own narratives and political formations to explore how Americans develop knowledge about the state, confront and resist the state’s power, and expand or shift its distribution of ‘public’ goods. How do people understand the state, theorize its operations and possibilities, deploy it, and sometimes build parallel structures of provision and governance? We explore several cases of when people marginalized by race, class, gender, or precarious legal standing organized deep challenges to state power and transformed state authority. Considering the state as both formal structure and frame for everyday experience can offer a fresh perspective on contemporary democratic challenges and political struggles. Students will conduct original research using archives and sources like the American Prison Writing Archive, oral history archives like the Ralph Bunche collection and HistoryMakers collection, and archival sources in the History Vault such as the Kerner Commission interviews. The course is appropriate for advanced undergraduates (juniors and seniors), preferably having taken courses in political science or related coursework, and graduate students in political science, history, and sociology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C; Weaver, Vesla Mae
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-AP

States and Democracy
AS.190.470 (01)

The focus of the seminar is on the formation and transformation sates and regimes. The perspective is both historical and comparative, covering Western Europe, Latin America, Africa and the US as a “non exceptional” case. This is fundamentally a Comparative Politics course, but APD students will almost certainly benefit from it.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 9:30AM - 11:30AM
  • Instructor: Mazzuca, Sebastian L
  • Room: Mergenthaler 366
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Philosophy of Law
AS.190.474 (01)

The philosophy of law or jurisprudence investigates the nature of law and what makes law, as it were, law. This course will examine some of the ways in which law has been defined and understood. It will also consider how law is distinguished from other systems of norms and values, such as morality, and how law is distinguished from other aspects of government, such as politics. In addition, the course will introduce students to discussions of legal reasoning and interpretation. To complete the course, students will be required to participate in class discussion, take two exams, and write a paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Culbert, Jennifer
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Marxisms: Ecological, Feminist, Racial, and Latin American Approaches to Historical Materialism
AS.190.489 (01)

This seminar explores the intellectual origins and ongoing intellectual productivity of the historical materialist account of political economy inaugurated with Karl Marx. It considers, in particular, how fatal couplings between power and difference are leveraged by capitalism as a tool of accumulation. Women’s labor and social reproduction, nature’s availability for mastery and the destructive exploitation of land and natural resources, racial inferiority and exploitative conditions of labor, and Global South peoples conscription into hyper-exploitative labor. The seminar will explore and interrogate the political dimensions of these transformations: how are relationships of political rule entangled with capitalist priorities of accumulation and which peoples/political subjects get to do the ruling and why? How did patriarchal and racial arrangements came to be, how do they relate to the production of value, and how are they sustained politically today? How do historical political transformations (including formal decolonization, democratic transitions, and the onset of free trade and structural adjustment, among others) inaugurate new forms of accumulation and how do these forms and their politics take different shape in the North and the Global South? A sample of the readings include Karl Marx, Rosa Luxemburg, W. E. B. Du Bois, Silvia Federici, Andreas Malm, Ruy Mauro Marini, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 9:00AM - 11:30AM
  • Instructor: Valdez, Inés
  • Room: Macaulay 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-ECON

Planetary Geo-Technics, Utopian-Dystopian Futurism & Materialist World Order Theories
AS.190.494 (01)

There is a widespread recognition that the prospects for contemporary civilization and humanity are shadowed by a range of catastrophic and existential threats, a major subset of which are anthropogenic and technogenic in character. (In the simplest terms these threats arise from the collision between scientific-technological modernity and the geography of the planet Earth.) At the same time, the two most powerful institutional complexes on the planet (market capitalism and the war state system) are committed to further rapidly advancing technology for power and plenty, and anticipate further great elevations of the human estate. Over the last long century, a great debate has emerged, across many disciplines, on the ‘terrapolitan question’(TQ): given the new and prospective material contexts for human agency, what world orders are needed to assure human survival, prosperity and freedom? Practical agency responsive to the new horizon of threat and benefit depends upon getting an adequate answer to this question. Any theory capable of illuminating these realities and choices, and answering the TQ, must be significantly materialist in character. Explicitly materialist theories are very old, and very diverse, and material factors appear in virtually every body of thought, yet are still significantly underdeveloped in contemporary international and world order theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Deudney, Daniel Horace
  • Room: Mergenthaler 366
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/5
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Decolonizing Nuclear Politics
AS.191.319 (01)

This course explores the imbrication of nuclear weapons and colonialism in global politics. Each stage of nuclear weapons production mobilizes existing colonial relations or creates new sites of coloniality: uranium mining in African colonies, nuclear fuel industries that polluted native lands, and nuclear testing in occupied Pacific Islands. A critical understanding of nuclear politics thus requires a decolonial lens to examine the role of colonial relations, the impact of nuclear industries on marginalized communities, and instances of resistance that envision a nuclear-free and anticolonial future. Towards this goal, the course addresses a series of questions, including: How are nuclear weapons produced, by and for whom? Are nuclear weapons only instruments at the hands of world leaders, or are they already part of everyday realities for historically and currently colonized communities? Can ‘national security’ and ‘strategic calculations’ justify nuclear use and the legacies of nuclear violence? What are instances of resistance that tie together anti-colonial and antinuclear determinations?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Li, Ruoyu
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): POLI-IR, INST-IR

Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social Sciences
AS.192.210 (01)

Are you planning to do a research project for your independent study class, or preparing for a grant application, or working on a big research project for a research intensive class or graduation thesis, or just wishing to improve your research skills? If so, this course is for you! Through weekly two hour sessions over ten weeks, you will receive systematic training on major research tools, resources and techniques useful for any research project in international studies, political science, and other social science subjects. By the end of the course, you will be able to come up with a viable research topic, and complete a research statement that includes an abstract, problem statement and literature review based on in-depth research utilizing tools and techniques covered in the course. The skills you learn through the course will prepare you for any future research projects and advanced studies.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Ye, Yunshan
  • Room: MSE Library ERC
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Autocracy, Democracy and Development: Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar
AS.192.404 (01)

East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. Over the last 30 years, only eight East Asian countries have become democratic out of more than 60 countries worldwide, and they continue to struggle with the challenges of democratic consolidation, weak political governance, and limited citizens’ political engagement. This course explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth. The choice of Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar as the case studies for this course results from their authoritarian past as well as their more recent institutional and political trajectories towards democracy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dore, Giovanna Maria Dora
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

The Qur'an: Text and Context
AS.194.220 (01)

For 1400 years, the Qur’an has played a central role in Muslim intellectual, spiritual, artistic and ritual life. This course will explore the sacred scripture of Islam through its foundational ideas, history of the text and thematic development, literary style, history and methods of interpretation, and role in Muslim spiritual and ritual life. We will also explore how the Qur’an weaves through literature, music and the visual arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: 3003 N. Charles OMA Lounge
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

Museums, Communities, and the Sacred
AS.194.256 (01)

This community-engaged course is co-created by a scholar and curator with expertise in religion, art, and material culture, and taught in partnership with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA), and centers how museums engage with the sacred. Recognizing that museums have traditionally been under-equipped to respond to the social concerns that animate their local communities, the BMA is rethinking how a twenty-first century civic museum engages the city in which it is located. Understanding the museum as a public space in which contemporary civic and social issues can be engaged, we will explore such questions as: how can a museum represent devotional objects while honoring a diversity of religious and spiritual perspectives and avoiding homogenous narratives about belief? How can a museum create relationships with religious communities to understand and interpret the objects in its collection, and navigate differences in faith-based communities with ethical care? How can a museum engage local communities in the process of writing labels for objects and in other acts of interpretation in a way that is not extractive and is genuinely value-aligned? In short, how can a museum truly become public? As a community-engaged course, students will build practically on their learning about museums, religion and public pedagogy to create and facilitate community listening circles at the BMA. The course will include visits to the BMA and other sites, guest visits on focused topics from museum professionals in other institutions, and training in listening and facilitation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Ziad, Homayra
  • Room: 3003 N. Charles OMA Lounge
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE, ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (01)

Course is taught in ENGLISH. Did you know that one of the first Latin American actresses to conquer Hollywood was Brazilian? Did you know that cinema has existed in Brazil since 1895, just six months after the first screening in Paris? This course is an introduction to both the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focus on the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production. Film aesthetics are analyzed through a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films, and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2022. Students wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. No Prereq.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian Society
AS.211.316 (02)

Course is taught in ENGLISH. Did you know that one of the first Latin American actresses to conquer Hollywood was Brazilian? Did you know that cinema has existed in Brazil since 1895, just six months after the first screening in Paris? This course is an introduction to both the academic study of cinema as a communicative art and to Brazilian film. The films selected focus on the late 1950s to the present and highlight import episodes and challenges in the advancement of Brazilian society as well as its cinematic production. Film aesthetics are analyzed through a number of critical perspectives, including class, race, gender as well as ethnicity, nationalism or national identity, colonialism, social changes, and the politics of representation. In this sense, the films, and documentaries that we will be watching and studying encompass the period from the rise of New Cinema (Cinema Novo) up to films exploring the most recent trends, including movies launched up to 2022. Students wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. No Prereq.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: De Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia Christina
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/3
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

German Cinema: The Divided Screen
AS.211.372 (01)

This course is an approach to Twentieth century German history and culture via film and related readings in English translation. We will emphasize the national division thematically, and explore the audio and visual aspects of cinema by focusing on representative films embedded in larger narratives. Some prior familiarity with German culture is recommended but not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Rhee, Sharlyn
  • Room: MSE Library LRG AV
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Theories of Peace from Kant to MLK
AS.211.387 (01)

That the nations of the world could ever work together seems utopian, but also unavoidable: migration, war, and not least climate change make some form of global coordination increasingly necessary. This course will give historical and philosophical depth to the idea of a cosmopolitan order and world peace by tracing it from its ancient sources through early modernity to today. At the center of the course will be the text that has been credited with founding the tradition of a world federation of nations, Immanuel Kant’s "Toward Perpetual Peace" (1795). Confronting recent and current political discourse, literature, and philosophy with Kant’s famous treatise, we will work to gain a new perspective on the idea of a world order. In addition to Kant, readings include Homer, Erasmus, Pico della Mirandola, Rousseau, Jeremy Bentham, Emily Dickinson, Tolstoy, Whitman, Rosa Luxemburg, Gandhi, Hannah Arendt, John Lennon, and Martin Luther King as well as lesser-known authors such as the Abbé de Saint-Pierre, Ellen Key, Odette Thibault, Simone Weil, and Claude Lefort. Taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Frey, Christiane; Seguin, Becquer D
  • Room: Gilman 381
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Climate Change Narratives: Human and Non-Human Transformative Storytelling
AS.211.424 (01)

In The Great Derangement Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh writes that “the climate crisis is also a crisis of culture, and thus of imagination.” Worldwide, climate and environmental change is stirring the imaginary of novelists, filmmakers, and artists who are finding ways to frame, emplot, or even perform, an unmanageable phenomenon like climate change. How is climate change shaping new modes of storytelling and aesthetics? How do film, literature, and environmentally conscious art transform our perception of the world we inhabit and its unpredictable changes? Can climate change narratives help us to imagine futures of possibilities, maybe dystopian, uncertain, or even happy, but futures nonetheless? This multimedia course explores, through a transnational perspective, a variety of contemporary novels, films, and other media that attempt answer these questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, MSCH-HUM

La France Contemporaine
AS.212.353 (01)

Students will explore contemporary French society and culture through a wide variety of media: fiction and non-fiction readings (graphic novels, news periodicals, popular magazines), films, music, art, websites, and podcasts. A diverse range of hands-on activities in addition to guided readings will help students develop cultural awareness as we discuss topics such as education, politics, humor, sports, cuisine, immigration, slang, and national identity, as well as the historical factors that have influenced these facets of French and francophone culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.301 or AS.210.302 or permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wuensch, April
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (01)

The supernatural is often described as the disruption of universal coherence. It becomes an aggression that challenges the stability of a world in which the natural laws were, until then, intact. The Impossible suddenly happens in a world in which it was banished.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Cipriani, Giulia M.
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early Modern
AS.214.362 (02)

The supernatural is often described as the disruption of universal coherence. It becomes an aggression that challenges the stability of a world in which the natural laws were, until then, intact. The Impossible suddenly happens in a world in which it was banished.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Avesani, Tatiana Ioanna; Cipriani, Giulia M.
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/4
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL

Modern Latin American Culture
AS.215.380 (01)

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Rios Saavedra, Veronica
  • Room: Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/22
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Modern Spanish Culture
AS.215.390 (01)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Spanish culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. The course will offer a general survey of the history of Spain and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. This course will be of particular interest for students planning on spending a semester abroad in Spain—specially for those students going to the JHU Fall Semester in Madrid, at Carlos III University. Taught in Spanish. Recommended Course Background: AS.210.311 or appropriate Webcape score. AS.215.390 was formerly numbered AS.211.390

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Pinar Diaz, Alicia
  • Room: Gilman 77
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Edwards, Zophia
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (02)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Edwards, Zophia
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (03)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Edwards, Zophia
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (04)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Edwards, Zophia
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical social theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced how we study and understand society: Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and W.E.B. DuBois. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of how each theorist answered three major questions: 1) what is the origin, structure and historical dynamic of modern society?; 2) how do we gain an accurate knowledge of society?; 3) what are the conditions of possibility for freedom in modern society? In comparing, applying and critiquing their respective theories, students will advance their own theory of society.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/27
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies
AS.230.228 (01)

This course surveys the impacts of colonialism in East and Southeast Asia. Special attention will be paid to the social and economic development in British Singapore and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Korea and Taiwan. Topics include free-trade imperialism, colonial modernity, anticolonial movements, pan-Asianism, and post-war U.S. hegemony.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Race and Racism
AS.230.242 (01)

Race has been important in social classifications and producing inequalities. This course is designed to provide you with a global understanding of how racial categories are created and maintained, how they change over time, and how they vary from place to place. It is organized in four parts. The first part introduces the concepts and analytical tools used by social scientists to study race. Of particular concern is power and the social construction rather than “natural” categories of race, as well as the general social processes involved in the maintenance and reproduction of these boundaries. In the second part, we will study the theories and dynamics racial category formation in the United States with attention to forms and processes of racial exclusion and oppression, and evidence of socio-economic inequalities based on race. In the third part of the course, we will compare these processes in the U.S. to those occurring in other countries. The fourth and final part of the course examines how race and racism shape political struggles and resistance movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Edwards, Zophia
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/17
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, MSCH-HUM

Knowledge, Evidence, and Democracy
AS.230.250 (01)

Fake news. Alternative facts. Follow the science. Misinformation. Disinformation. How can we understand the role of information, evidence, and scientific inquiry in politics? Where does information come from? How is it used? How can evidence, argument, and listening improve public conversations? This seminar will examine the connections between information, knowledge, evidence, and democracy, focusing mostly on the United States but with global examples as well.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR, AGRI-ELECT

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Crises: Past and Present
AS.230.337 (01)

This course will compare the current global crisis with previous major crises of historical capitalism through a combination of theoretical and historical readings. Throughout, we will ask: What can a study of past crises tell us about the nature and future trajectory of the current global crisis? We will be particularly concerned to understand the ways in which social, economic and geopolitical crises intertwined, as well as the differential social and geopolitical impact of the crises. Which social classes bore the brunt of the disruptions in economic activity in each crisis? Which geographical areas or geopolitical groupings lost out (or benefited) from the crisis? What kinds of movements of protest emerged and how did they affect the trajectory of the crises? How have environmental and ecological challenges resurfaced in each crisis including today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Silver, BEVERLY Judith
  • Room: 3505 N. Charles 102
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON, INST-IR

Public Opinion and Democracy
AS.230.365 (01)

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and the contours of democracy in the United States, and how have these relationships changed as techniques for measuring public opinion have evolved since the early twentieth century? To consider this question, the course introduces alternative perspectives on the features of a healthy democracy, including both historical perspectives and current arguments. Interweaved with this material, the course examines how public opinion is measured and interpreted by private pollsters, survey researchers, and data journalists. Emphasis is placed on the alternative claims that opposing analysts adopt, as well as how the technologies of data collection and analysis shape the permissibility of conclusions. Students will learn to interpret public opinion patterns, which requires a brief presentation of basic concepts from survey sampling, including what to make of the polling industry’s most boring concept: margin of error.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Mergenthaler 252
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, AGRI-ELECT

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Great Minds
AS.300.102 (01)

This course offers an introductory survey of foundational authors of modern philosophy and moral and political thought whose ideas continue to influence contemporary problems and debates. The course is taught in lectures and seminar discussions. Authors studied include Plato, René Descartes, Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Virginia Woolf, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Iris Murdoch, James Baldwin, Cora Diamond, Judith Butler, Kwame A. Appiah and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Lu Xun And His Times: China’s Long 20th Century And Beyond
AS.300.322 (01)

The “founding father of modern Chinese literature,” Lu Xun (1881-1936) saw himself as a contemporary of writers like Gogol, Ibsen, and Nietzsche in creating his seminal short stories and essays, and likewise, he has been seen by numerous Chinese and Sinophone writers as their contemporary since his lifetime until today. In this course, we will survey Lu Xun's canonical works and their legacies through a comparative approach. What echoes do Lu Xun's works have with the European and Russian texts he engaged with? Why did his works manage to mark a “new origin” of Chinese literature? How were his works repeated, adapted, and appropriated by Chinese and Sinophone writers from the Republican period through the Maoist era to the post-socialist present, even during the Covid-19 pandemic? Are his times obsolete now that China is on the rise? Or, have his times come yet? We will raise these questions to guide our comparative investigation into Lu Xun’s works and their legacies in China’s long twentieth century and beyond.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Cities and Urban Life in Chinese Film
AS.310.207 (01)

This seminar introduces students to the phenomenon of migration in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan from theoretical, empirical, and comparative perspectives. The objectives of the course are to understand the 1) historical context behind present-day migrations in East Asia; 2) different patterns of migration flows and their consequences on receiving countries; 3) various theoretical frameworks for migration. The course is divided into three parts. In the first part, the course will examine theoretical approaches to migration, structured around the question of whether East Asia as a region represents a distinct model of migration. In the second, students will explore the empirical cases in greater detail by comparing and contrasting the different types of migrations. The third part addresses the responses to migration by host governments and societies and the implications of migration on citizenship and identity. Recommended Course Background: any class related to the history or politics of Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and/or China.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Jiang, Jin
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Women, Patriarchy, and Feminism in China, South Korea, and Japan
AS.310.329 (01)

We will try to get a quick overview of the recent history of patriarchy in China, South Korea, and Japan from the mid-twentieth century to our present and then compare the initiatives of feminists to transform the lives of women throughout these three societies. We will also debate whether or how it makes sense to adapt the Western notions of patriarchy and sexism as well as the Western political program of feminism to the non-Western context of East Asia by reading books by historians, anthropologists, and sociologists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Henning, Stefan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Islam in Asia
AS.310.331 (01)

You will learn about the efforts of ordinary, non-elite Muslims to shape the relation between their communities and the state as well as to (where applicable) the non-Muslim majority through collective organizing over the last forty years. We will read and discuss books by anthropologists, historians, and sociologists studying Iran, Pakistan, India, China, Malaysia, and Indonesia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Henning, Stefan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, INST-CP

Humanities Research Lab: Making Maps of Mexico
AS.360.420 (01)

Learn the basics of ArcGIS, data management, and the history of maps and censuses as you help Prof. Lurtz build a digital historical atlas of Mexico. No experience necessary, graduate students welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lurtz, Casey Marina
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies
AS.361.100 (01)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the ways of life of Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx peoples, their origins, historical legacies, and current cultural expressions. This course assumes no prior knowledge and incorporates the insights of several disciplines including anthropology, history, political science, economics, cultural studies, literary criticism, and ethnomusicology. The course seeks to comprehend the region from multiple perspectives and to provide a broad conceptual overview.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Cotler, Angelina
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Popular Music in Latin America: Dissent, Resistance, Tranformation
AS.361.200 (01)

Popular music is central to Latin American cultural practices. From Carmen Miranda to Bad Bunny, from Carlos Gardel to Karol G, this course examines the works of numerous performers and songwriters who have defined the Latin American songbook, elevating it to one of the most sophisticated art forms in the Americas. We will explore a vast range of musical genres that constitute the diverse soundscape of Latin American popular music, from Argentine Tango and Brazilian Samba to Colombian Salsa, Dominican Dembow, and Son Cubano. Our exploration will encompass its Afro-diasporic, Indigenous, and European origins, the impact of the cultural industry, and its intersections with the region’s social and political history. We will delve into the stories behind the songs, reflecting on their instrumental roles in shaping identity, citizenship, sensibility, political dissent, and resistance. Through listening sessions, critical and theoretical texts, and open discussions, participants will enhance their understanding of the musical and artistic forces that have shaped Latin American history and culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Noah, Marcelo
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Humanities Research Lab: The Military-Industrial Complex in Maryland, D.C., and Virginia
AS.362.325 (01)

Washington, DC, is the capital of the United States but also the capital of its post–World War II national security state and military-industrial complex. This course will investigate the local effects of this status on the Washington-Baltimore corridor, in terms of immigration and urban development. The course will be divided into three major sections. First, we will analyze the growth and development of the military-industrial complex. Second, we will look at its place in the city and region’s development, including the construction of the Pentagon, Central Intelligence Agency, National Security Agency, and other institutions. Third, we will analyze how these institutions have driven changes in the region’s population, as immigrants from war-torn parts of the globe have found new homes in and near Washington, DC. This course requires at least four Friday group trips to 555 Penn in Washington, which will take most of the day (transportation provided).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 12:30PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Gender and Sexuality beyond the Global West: The Politics of Sexual Violence Gender Nation Empire
AS.363.331 (01)

This course aims to expand and enrich students coordinates for understanding the problem of sexual violence, exploring how sexual violence appears in the weave of everyday life, as foundational to the politics of the nation state, and across the apparatus of the law. We will take a connective and comparative approach in which sexual violence is studied vis-à-vis the feminist postcolonial and transnational critique of gendered belonging to the nation state. In so doing, gender, sexuality, race, and coloniality become analytics that unsettle and complicate the contemporary distinctions of West/East & Global North/South. We will ask questions such as: why are sex and death constitutive to the modern nation state? How is everyday life remade in the shadows of catastrophic violence? How can repair be imagined outside of a medical or juridical vocabulary?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, Talia S
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.342 (01)Projecting Power: Monarchs, Movies, and the MassesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMHalladay, AndrewGilman 217HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.070.305 (01)Law after Mass Violence in Latin AmericaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWherry, Anna ElisabethMergenthaler 426INST-CP
AS.070.358 (01)Anthropology of the Archive: The Cold War Politics of Knowledge Production in AsiaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, YunaMergenthaler 426INST-CP
AS.100.103 (01)Early Modern Europe & the Wider WorldMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMLoiselle, KenKrieger 304HIST-EUROPE
AS.100.117 (01)Introduction to Native North AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMGrindon, BlakeAmes 218HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.117 (02)Introduction to Native North AmericaMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMGrindon, BlakeAmes 218HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.257 (01)Africans and France, 1900-2024T 1:30PM - 4:00PMShepard, ToddGilman 119HIST-EUROPE, HIST-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.270 (01)Europe since 1945TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarms, Victoria ElisabethAmes 218HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US
AS.100.274 (01)Conspiracy in American PoliticsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLuff, Jennifer DGilman 219HIST-US, POLI-AP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP
AS.100.283 (01)Making and Unmaking Queer Histories, 1800-PresentTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHindmarch-Watson, Katherine AnneKrieger 307HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.310 (01)The French RevolutionTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMMason, LauraGilman 381HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.314 (01)The EnlightenmentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKwass, MichaelGilman 217HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.348 (01)20th-Century ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRowe, William TGilman 55INST-GLOBAL, HIST-ASIA
AS.100.378 (01)Africa and the Atlantic WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMGondola, Didier DidierGilman 186HIST-AFRICA, AFRS-AFRICA, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.386 (01)Sports History of the Cold WarW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHarms, Victoria ElisabethKrieger 307HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, HIST-US, HIST-ASIA, MSCH-HUM
AS.100.395 (01)History of Global DevelopmentT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLurtz, Casey MarinaKrieger 304HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.442 (01)The Intellectual History of Capitalism, 1900 to presentW 1:30PM - 4:00PMBurgin, AngusGilman 308HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.100.445 (01)Revolution, Anti-Slavery, and Empire 1773-1792: British and American Political Thought from Paine, Smith, and the Declaration of Independence to Cugoano, Wollstonecraft, and the Bill of RightsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarshall, John WGilman 17HIST-EUROPE, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center LibraryNEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.140.312 (01)The Politics of Science in AmericaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGinsberg, Benjamin; Kargon, Robert HGilman 300INST-AP, MSCH-HUM
AS.140.382 (01)Health and Healing in Early-Modern EnglandF 1:30PM - 4:00PMFissell, Mary EHodson 303INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.150.202 (01)Introduction to Islamic PhilosophyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMMorvarid, HashemAmes 218INST-PT
AS.150.205 (01)Introduction to the History of Modern PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMDong, HaoAmes 218PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.205 (02)Intro Hist of Mod PhilosMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMDong, HaoAmes 218PHIL-MODERN, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-PT, COGS-PHLMND
AS.150.240 (01)Introduction to Modern Political Philosophy: The Social Contract TraditionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMChaput, EmmanuelKrieger 302PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.240 (02)Introduction to Modern Political Philosophy: The Social Contract TraditionMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMChaput, EmmanuelKrieger 302PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.469 (01)Immanuel Kant's Political PhilosophyW 4:00PM - 6:30PMAllais, LucyGilman 288PHIL-MODERN, PHIL-ETHICS, INST-PT
AS.150.472 (01)Women Philosophers in the German traditionTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMKraus, KatharinaGreenhouse 110PHIL-MIND, PHIL-MODERN, INST-PT
AS.180.101 (01)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenGilman 50
AS.180.101 (02)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenGilman 50
AS.180.101 (03)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, T 9:00AM - 9:50AMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenGilman 50
AS.180.101 (04)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenGilman 50
AS.180.101 (05)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 3:00PM - 3:50PMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenGilman 50
AS.180.101 (06)Elements of MacroeconomicsWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, M 4:30PM - 5:20PMBarbera, Bob; Seshie-Nasser, HellenGilman 50
AS.180.102 (01)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirRemsen Hall 1
AS.180.102 (02)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirRemsen Hall 1
AS.180.102 (03)Elements of MicroeconomicsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirRemsen Hall 1
AS.180.210 (01)Migrating to Opportunity? Economic Evidence from East Asia, the U.S. and the EUT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraHodson 303INST-ECON
AS.180.233 (01)Economics of Transition and Institutional ChangeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPoliakova, LudmilaMaryland 217INST-ECON
AS.180.241 (01)International TradeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeHodson 213INST-ECON
AS.180.242 (01)International Monetary EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPoliakova, LudmilaMaryland 109INST-ECON, ECON-FINMIN
AS.180.246 (01)Environmental EconomicsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMElliott, Jonathan TylerShaffer 302INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.180.332 (01)Debt Crises and Financial CrisesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMFourakis, Stelios StephenKrieger 180ECON-FINMIN, INST-ECON
AS.180.355 (01)Economics of Poverty/InequalityMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMHusain, Muhammad MudabbirHodson 216INST-ECON
AS.180.361 (01)Rich Countries, Poor CountriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDasgupta, SomasreeGilman 119INST-ECON
AS.180.389 (01)Social Policy Implications of Behavioral EconomicsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMPapageorge, Nick WHodson 303INST-ECON, BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.190.102 (01)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (02)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (03)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (04)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (05)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (06)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (07)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP
AS.190.102 (08)Introduction To Comparative PoliticsMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMJabko, NicolasShaffer 3INST-CP, AGRI-ELECT, POLI-CP
AS.190.239 (01)Power and Global PoliticsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMarlin-Bennett, Renee EKrieger 307POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.190.251 (01)Labor and American PoliticsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMLuff, Jennifer DMaryland 114POLI-AP, INST-AP
AS.190.286 (01)Liberalism, Republicanism, and Democracy in American Political TheoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchmitz, VolkerMergenthaler 252POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.308 (01)Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and CasesMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMMazzuca, Sebastian LGilman 77INST-CP, POLI-CP
AS.190.318 (01)Does Israel Have a Future?W 1:30PM - 4:00PMDavid, Steven RMergenthaler 366INST-CP
AS.190.348 (01)Business, Finance, and Government in E. AsiaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMYasuda, John KojiroAmes 234INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.190.373 (01)Theories of Global ViolenceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPhillips, Chas.Krieger 300POLI-PT, INST-PT
AS.190.385 (01)Urban Politics and PolicyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpence, LesterHodson 203INST-AP
AS.190.394 (01)Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North AfricaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMParkinson, SarahKrieger 300ISLM-ISLMST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.190.425 (01)The New Deal and American PoliticsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchlozman, DanielLatrobe 120INST-AP
AS.190.427 (01)Political Economy of Japan and KoreaT 3:00PM - 5:30PMChung, ErinShaffer 303INST-CP
AS.190.429 (01)Politics of the Market EconomyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJabko, NicolasMergenthaler 431INST-ECON
AS.190.439 (01)The American State from Above and BelowTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLieberman, Robert C; Weaver, Vesla MaeShriver Hall 104POLI-IR, INST-AP
AS.190.470 (01)States and DemocracyTh 9:30AM - 11:30AMMazzuca, Sebastian LMergenthaler 366INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.190.474 (01)Philosophy of LawTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMCulbert, JenniferBloomberg 276INST-PT
AS.190.489 (01)Marxisms: Ecological, Feminist, Racial, and Latin American Approaches to Historical MaterialismT 9:00AM - 11:30AMValdez, InésMacaulay 101INST-PT, INST-ECON
AS.190.494 (01)Planetary Geo-Technics, Utopian-Dystopian Futurism & Materialist World Order TheoriesW 4:30PM - 7:00PMDeudney, Daniel HoraceMergenthaler 366POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.191.319 (01)Decolonizing Nuclear PoliticsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLi, RuoyuGilman 377POLI-IR, INST-IR
AS.192.210 (01)Library Research Seminar for International Studies and Social SciencesW 4:00PM - 6:00PMYe, YunshanMSE Library ERC
AS.192.404 (01)Autocracy, Democracy and Development: Korea, Indonesia and MyanmarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMDore, Giovanna Maria DoraMergenthaler 266INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.194.220 (01)The Qur'an: Text and ContextTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMZiad, Homayra3003 N. Charles OMA LoungeISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.194.256 (01)Museums, Communities, and the SacredTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMZiad, Homayra3003 N. Charles OMA LoungeCSC-CE, ISLM-ISLMST, INST-GLOBAL
AS.211.316 (01)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 216INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.211.316 (02)Brazilian Cinema and Topics in Contemporary Brazilian SocietyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMDe Azeredo Cerqueira, Flavia ChristinaHodson 216INST-NWHIST, INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.211.372 (01)German Cinema: The Divided ScreenMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMRhee, SharlynMSE Library LRG AVINST-GLOBAL
AS.211.387 (01)Theories of Peace from Kant to MLKW 1:30PM - 4:00PMFrey, Christiane; Seguin, Becquer DGilman 381INST-PT
AS.211.424 (01)Climate Change Narratives: Human and Non-Human Transformative StorytellingT 3:00PM - 5:30PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 75INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, MSCH-HUM
AS.212.353 (01)La France ContemporaineTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWuensch, AprilGilman 479INST-CP
AS.214.362 (01)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMCipriani, Giulia M.Gilman 313INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.214.362 (02)Italian Journeys: Medieval and Early ModernTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM, F 2:00PM - 2:50PMAvesani, Tatiana Ioanna; Cipriani, Giulia M.Gilman 313INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL
AS.215.380 (01)Modern Latin American CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRios Saavedra, VeronicaGilman 186INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.215.390 (01)Modern Spanish CultureTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMPinar Diaz, AliciaGilman 77INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMEdwards, ZophiaOlin 305INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (02)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMEdwards, ZophiaOlin 305INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (03)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMEdwards, ZophiaOlin 305INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (04)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMEdwards, ZophiaOlin 305INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWhite, Alexandre Ilani ReinHodson 303INST-PT
AS.230.228 (01)Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested LegaciesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-YingShriver Hall 001INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.242 (01)Race and RacismMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMEdwards, ZophiaGilman 313INST-AP, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.250 (01)Knowledge, Evidence, and DemocracyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMPerrin, Andrew JonathanAbel Wolman House 100INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR, AGRI-ELECT
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilSmokler Center 301INST-IR
AS.230.337 (01)Global Crises: Past and PresentTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSilver, BEVERLY Judith3505 N. Charles 102INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON, INST-IR
AS.230.365 (01)Public Opinion and DemocracyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LMergenthaler 252INST-AP, AGRI-ELECT
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingShriver Hall 001INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGreif, MeredithKrieger 302INST-AP
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilSmokler Center 301INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyAmes 218INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.300.102 (01)Great MindsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 208INST-PT
AS.300.322 (01)Lu Xun And His Times: China’s Long 20th Century And BeyondWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMHashimoto, SatoruGilman 208INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.207 (01)Cities and Urban Life in Chinese FilmW 3:00PM - 5:30PMJiang, JinMergenthaler 266INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.310.329 (01)Women, Patriarchy, and Feminism in China, South Korea, and JapanTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMHenning, StefanMergenthaler 266INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.310.331 (01)Islam in AsiaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHenning, StefanMergenthaler 266ISLM-ISLMST, INST-CP
AS.360.420 (01)Humanities Research Lab: Making Maps of MexicoTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLurtz, Casey MarinaHodson 315INST-GLOBAL
AS.361.100 (01)Introduction to Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx StudiesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMCotler, AngelinaGilman 219HIST-LATAM, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.361.200 (01)Popular Music in Latin America: Dissent, Resistance, TranformationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNoah, MarceloKrieger 300INST-GLOBAL
AS.362.325 (01)Humanities Research Lab: The Military-Industrial Complex in Maryland, D.C., and VirginiaF 10:00AM - 12:30PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceMergenthaler 266INST-AP
AS.363.331 (01)Gender and Sexuality beyond the Global West: The Politics of Sexual Violence Gender Nation EmpireTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, Talia SMaryland 202INST-CP